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April 20, 2018 - 3:00pm


For more information on 8041 E. Main Road, Le Roy, please click here.
For more information on 147 Pearl St., Batavia, please click here.

April 20, 2018 - 2:29pm

Press release:

The cofounder of The Essential Oil Center in Batavia is conducting a shoe drive fundraiser now through June 10 to raise money for a Uganda Mission Trip in September.

Michelle Gillard will earn funds based on the total weight of the pairs of gently worn, used and new shoes collected, as Funds2Orgs will issue a check for the collected shoes. Those dollars will benefit the Uganda Mission Trip that Gillard will be serving on this fall.

Anyone can help by donating gently worn, used and new shoes on Sunday, June 10, at the Artisan Vendor Carnival at Batavia Downs Gaming from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., or by contacting Gillard at 297-0779 for pickup at any time.

If you or your organization feel you can collect 25 pairs of shoes, contact Gillard and she can provide you with the materials to collect them.

All donated shoes will then be redistributed throughout the Funds2Orgs network of micro-enterprise (small business) partners. Funds2Orgs works with micro-entrepreneurs in helping them create, maintain and grow small businesses in developing countries where economic opportunity and jobs are limited.

Proceeds from the sales of the shoes collected in shoe drive fundraisers are used to feed, clothe and house their families.

"We are so excited about this shoe drive," Gillard said. "We know that most people have extra shoes in their closets they would like to donate to us.

"By doing so, we raise money for this great cause, and we have the chance to help families in developing nations who need economic opportunities. It's a win-win for everyone. We have already reached 25 percent of our goal.”

By donating gently worn, used and new shoes to the Uganda Mission Trip the shoes will be given a second chance and make a difference in people’s lives around the world.

Requirements for Shoes:

Shoes must be new or gently used. They should be clean, no rips, no tears and soles must be attached. If possible each pair should be tied or rubber-banded together. Kids and adults shoes are accepted. Sneakers, shoes (even heels), boots and sandals are all acceptable.

About Uganda Mission Trip:

Gillard became involved with the organization Sole Hope a couple years ago. What started as an individual fundraiser to help Sole Hope has turned into a heartfelt passion to help others on multiple levels. Join us in supporting great causes, Funds2Orgs and Sole Hope and the people of Uganda.

Gillard's planned trip to Uganda in September will be the first of what she hopes are many mission trips to serve in that nation's slums and orphanages.

April 20, 2018 - 2:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in news, batavia, accident.

A two-car motor vehicle accident with injuries is reported in the parking lot of Batavia Downs on Park Road.

Town of Batavia fire and Mercy EMS responding.

UPDATE 2:22 p.m.: No need for fire, Town of Batavia back in service. Injuries are not due to the accident. It is a medical condition that caused the accident.

April 20, 2018 - 2:01pm
posted by Genesee Chamber... in batavia, downtown, business, tourism, chamber of commerce, restaurants, Vegan.

This Earth Day, the very first 100-percent vegan restaurant in Genesee County is opening up to share a different kind of delicious food with locals and visitors alike. Yep, you read that right! One-hundred-percent vegan food will be served up at Eden Café & Bakeshop!

Located inside Eli Fish Brewing Company, at 109 Main St., Batavia, there is a glimpse of the garden, with generous plant-based meals, fresh juices, and even treats to satisfy your sweet tooth. Join Eden Café & Bakeshop for their grand opening THIS SUNDAY, April 22nd, starting at 12 p.m.

There will be lots going on including a Cutco knife giveaway, raffles, and branded tumblers will be available for purchase. Be one of the first to experience a new kind of cuisine after the ribbon-cutting ceremony at 2 p.m. 

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What began as a thought of opening a zero-waste store, slowly turned into Eden Café & Bakeshop. Owner, Judy Hysek, is bringing some seriously tasty and animal-free food choices to all in and around Genesee County!

Hysek has been vegan for three years, which just so happens to be enough time to experiment with plant-based foods and create some delicious concoctions to share with you!

“I’m hoping to open the community up to a new way of eating," she said. "I want to make it easier for people who don’t know how to eat without meat and dairy… I would have gone vegan a lot sooner if there was more support, education, and availability... I’m just trying to add to the awareness and make it more accessible."

Now, let’s get down to business. Let’s talk about the food!

Carrot Dogs: You may have heard of these soon-to-be-famous “dogs” already, especially if you follow Eden Café & Bakeshop’s Facebook Page.

Imagine a carrot, in the shape of a traditional hot dog, which has been infused with deliciousness and then topped with more deliciousness of your choice. You’ll have to try it for yourself the next time you're in Eli Fish.

Word on the street is that even omnivores can't tell the difference between a carrot dog and a traditional hot dog. We dare you to give it a try and test your taste buds to see if you can tell the difference. Try your first carrot dog on a roll or wrapped in a pretzel and baked until golden brown! 

Cauliflower Wings: Where have these been all our lives? Since Western New York is the home of Buffalo Wings, it only makes sense to have “wings” on the menu at Eden.

You can have your wings tossed in Buffalo sauce or topped with the sweet mustard sauce. You can’t go wrong with either sauce -- so good! The breaded and baked florets are served with carrots and celery sticks with a house-made dip. The cauliflower wings can also be made gluten free and they're just as tasty!

Loaded Nachos: What goes better with a cold brew from Eli Fish than a pile of nachos? What about a pile of nachos smothered in a vegan beer cheese? There is nothing more satisfying!

Speaking of cheese…

Eden will have a variety of house made vegan, artisan cheeses including almond feta and cashew mozzarella, which will come on the poutine. (Poutine is a dish originating from the Canadian province of Quebec consisting of French fries and cheese curds topped with a brown gravy.) Where else can you get poutine in Batavia, let alone a vegan poutine?!

Other menu items include desserts like cashew cheesecake, cookies, brownies and more. Desserts will rotate to give everyone the opportunity to try something new and yummy!

Last but definitely not least -- fresh juices, smoothies, lemonades and kombucha! This week I was lucky enough to try a fresh juice made of apples, strawberries and raspberries. (Please make this a rotating juice, it was so good!)

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Did you know?

Veganism is on a climb throughout the world. In the United States, a recent report by Top Trends in Prepared Foods in 2017, says “6 percent of U.S. consumers now claim to be vegan, up from just 1 percent in 2014.”

Eden is here to satisfy some taste buds and open some minds to the benefits of eating healthy, saving animals, and the planet. Everyone should rejoice and get involved in the efforts to sustain our planet and you can start right at home, or at Eden.

Oh, and by the way -- Eden is donating all gratuities to a nonprofit right here in Genesee County. Mockingbird Farm Sanctuary in Byron provides a home and lifetime care to animals regardless of their condition or past. Their goal is to improve the mental, physical and emotional well-being of the animals who live on the farm. Eden is already showing love to others trying to make a difference right here at home!

For more information on Eden Cafe and other hotspots in Genesee County, visit: https://visitgeneseeny.com/

April 20, 2018 - 1:59pm
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, news, Announcements, business, ferrellgas.

Ferrellgas in Batavia is hosting its annual Customer Appreciation Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 12. It is located at 655 Ellicott St.

Grill tank fills -- unlimited quantity -- will be $5.

All attendees will be eligible for drawings. No purchase necessary to enter the drawing.

"On-site raffles will be huge this year," says management.

They include Omaha steaks, a TV, propane prizes for new and existing customers, and lots of basket raffles for kids and adults alike.

All proceeds will benefit the Michael Napoleone Foundation for Childhood Cancer Research.

Pre-sale raffle tickets are available at the Ellicott Street store.

First-place prize is a dual fuel grill and patio heater; Second-place prize is a stainless steel grill and accessories; Third-place prize is a propane firepit and accessories.

Call 1-800-437-4856 for more information.

April 20, 2018 - 1:47pm

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Batavia Middle School was rockin' this morning with a visit from the rock band class at Batavia High School to help kickoff STEAM Day at the school.

The band's visit was intended to also give middle school students of another idea for a class they might take when they get to high school.

The band played The Ramones, Tom Petty, The Kinks (twice depending on how you count "You Really Got Me" with the Van Halen intro of "Eruption"), and Cream, among others.

During a Bryan Adams song, the students broke out their mobile phone flashlights and waved them in the air just like any other rock concert.

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April 20, 2018 - 1:15pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Batavia CTE, BOCES, news, schools, education.

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Press release:

Earlier this month, hundreds of high school students from across New York state attended the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) State Leadership Conference, which was held in Binghamton.

Students from the Mount Morris and Batavia Career and Technical Education (CTE) centers attended this competition and earned the highest awards in their events. These students proved to be the top student technology experts in the state. As a result of earning these awards, four students have qualified to attend the National FBLA Leadership in Baltimore in late June.

“FBLA is a great learning opportunity for our students, they gain confidence in their abilities and develop valuable networking skills to aid them in their future,” said Maggie Poray, Batavia CTE Center Programming and Interactive Media instructor.

Angel Felix and Spencer Herring are Computer Information Systems students who attend the Mount Morris CTE Center. Both are students from Geneseo Central Schools. This team won first place in the Computer Game and Simulation Competition.

This is the second year that Angel has competed in this competition. Last year, he also earned first place in the Computer Game and Simulation Competition. This year’s game has a theme, “A Day in the Life of a FBLA student.”

“It is a two-dimensional game that is played on a computer. The characters have different activities such as competing in FBLA events and even fundraising. In our game, the characters are also developing a game. We spent six months working on this project which includes two main and 10 other characters,” Angel said.

Spencer said, “This was my first year entering the FBLA Competition, Angel and I are a great team. It’s an open-world game, which means the player can roam a virtual world and approach objectives freely.

"Angel and I thought about some of the things we do as FBLA students and we put that into the game. We had some programming glitches to work through but we worked together to fix these issues.”

“Angel and Spencer put a lot of hard work and dedication into their Computer Game and Simulation competition. They were able to build on the experience from last year to develop their skills in programming, design and problem solving to develop an amazing computer game to present to the judges this year,” Poray said.

Larry Harvey, Mount Morris CTE Center Computer Information Systems instructor said, “We are incredibly proud of our students for competing and producing results that will enrich their lives for years to come.

"The Genesee Valley Educational Partnership along with the Future Business Leaders of America organization, believe that the most important skills that we teach are the ones that the students will use far beyond school and into everyday life.”

Taylor Tyczka is a Batavia CTE Center Programming and Interactive Media student from Attica CS. She is a junior and was elected as NY FBLA District 10 State Vice President. This is the first time that a student from the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership has been elected as a state FBLA officer.

“I am very excited to be elected for this position," Taylor said. "I worked very hard on my campaign. I will attend state FBLA meetings and serve as a liaison between the schools and chapters in District 10 and the state FBLA.

"I’m very thankful to my advisors and my teacher, Ms. Poray, for providing me with this opportunity to attend this state conference. This is an honor for me to serve.”

Donovan Kelley is a Batavia CTE Center Programming and Interactive Media student from Caledonia-Mumford. He earned fifth place in the Computer Applications Competition.

April 20, 2018 - 11:33am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Larry Piegza, NY-27, news.

Press release:

The Erie County Reform Party is proud to announce the endorsement of Larry Piegza who looks to unseat Chris Collins in New York’s Congressional District 27. Piegza, a Western New York native and entrepreneur, originally announced that he was running as a Republican candidate last November.

“I originally hoped to inspire the Republican Party to change direction and focus on balancing our budget, streamlining our government and promoting ethical leadership.” Piegza said. “But the party is no longer interested in these goals.

"The Republican Leadership is not holding Chris Collins to account for his insider trading scandal and the fact that he keeps voting to balloon our deficit. My campaign is to give conservatives a chance to revolutionize our government. If we want to drain the swamp, a good place to start is with Chris Collins.”

The Reform Party has long believed in reforming the political and electoral process, eliminating corruption and special interest control of policy-making government in order to return more power to the people. It advocates for term limits for congressman and judges, instant runoff voting, and mechanisms for more direct democracy.

“The fighting in Congress this year has disgusted many people; people want a balanced budget, not a circus show," said Charlie Flynn, head of the selection committee. "When we decided to endorse Larry, I knew that the Republican Party is truly splitting.

"I wouldn’t be surprised if half of the Party votes for our candidate this year. We have the more ethical conservative candidate."

The fact that Piezga is an underdog in this race doesn’t seem to bother him.

“I am truly honored by the Reform Party’s decision to endorse my candidacy,” Piegza said. “Our nation is going to need strong third-party candidates if we are going to hold Congress accountable to their districts.”

To learn more about Piegza and his campaign for New York Congressional District 27, visit FixItLarry.org. Additionally, consider supporting the campaign by donating $5, $10, or $27.

April 20, 2018 - 11:24am
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia, news, notify, Le Roy, Oakfield.
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    Jason Anderson

Jason R. Anderson, 36, of South Main Street, Batavia, is charged with grand larceny, 4th, driving while under the influence of drug and alcohol, criminal mischief, 4th, and possession of a hypodermic instrument. Anderson is accused of driving his vehicle into Kibbe Park where it became stuck in the mud. Anderson then allegedly stole another vehicle and attempted to push his vehicle out of the mud. That vehicle also became stuck in the mud. The stuck vehicles were reported at 1:27 a.m. Tuesday. Upon investigation by officers Mitchell Cowen and Arick Perkins, Anderson was allegedly found to be under the influence of drugs and alcohol and in possession of needles. He was arraigned and jailed without bail.

Kiara M. McCoy, 28, of Woodward Street, Rochester, was arrested on a warrant for alleged failure to answer a traffic summons. McCoy was located by Rochester PD and turned over to Batavia PD. McCoy posted bail and was released.

George E. Norway, 65, of North Pearl Street, Oakfield, is charged with aggravated harassment. Norway allegedly left a threatening message for an employee at the Department of Motor Vehicles. Norway was arraigned and released under the supervision of Genesee Justice.

Sarah D. Peterson, 26, of Le Roy, is charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. Peterson was arrested by State Police at an apartment in Le Roy at 12:15 p.m. Wednesday.

Samuel R. Oddo, 34, of Batavia, is charged with grand larceny, 4th. Oddo is accused of stealing property at Target with a value of more than $1,000. He was arrested by State Police at 2:34 p.m. Monday.

Jessica M. Pfenninger, 35, of Batavia, and Robin L. Walsh, 51, of Batavia, are charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance, 7th. Pfenninger and Walsh were arrested by State Police at 2:38 p.m. Wednesday. No further details released.

April 20, 2018 - 10:09am
posted by Howard B. Owens in accident, news, Alabama, Basom.

A motor-vehicle accident with unknown injuries is reported in the area of 986 Bloomingdale Road, Basom, in front of the Rez Smokeshop.

Alabama fire and Mercy EMS responding.

UPDATE 10:09 a.m.: Indian Falls fire requested mutual aid.

UPDATE 10:10 a.m.: One person shook up. Mercy EMS can respond non-emergency. Indian Falls is canceled. 

UPDATE 11:10 a.m.: Alabama fire back in service. About 20 minutes ago, the ambulance was called back to the scene because an injury victim decided he did want to be evaluated at a hospital. The patient was transported to an Erie County hospital.

April 19, 2018 - 8:08pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in GCC, GCEDC, batavia, business, news.

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Students at Genesee Community College competed today in a business idea pitch competition. with a couple of hundred dollars in prize money at stake from StartUp Genesee Committee of the Genesee County Economic Development Center.

In all, 17 individuals and teams competed, including Gino Vos, above, who pitched his idea of a tourism-related T-shirt company in his home of Kurasoleno, in South America. He won second place in the "Most Likely to Succeed" category.

The winner in that category was Glenn Holmes, with Livestock Haulage Company. Holmes is also an international student from Ireland.

The "Most Creative" prize went to Josh Berranco, Nathan Maniscalko, and Richard Estes, with the TV Show, "Spooky Kooky Investigation Inc." (see video below)

Second in "Most Creative," Paige Biggins, hockey for children with special needs.

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Casey Smalls, a GCC fashion student, pitched a new natural eyelashes product.

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Zoe Falsone, Paul Elliott, and Dave Inzinna, a TV show, "Music Then, Now, Forever."

April 19, 2018 - 7:27pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Johnson Controls, genesee county, energy savings, news, notify.

The Genesee County Legislature is having a hard time coming to terms with borrowing $4 million to potentially save $4 million or more on future energy bills.

Not every member of the Legislature believes the cost savings are real, or that the county should borrow that much money on an expectation of saving money years from now.

Legislators Gary Maha and Andrew Young are the most skeptical.

"I appreciate the effort," Young said. "I try to look at everything just as I would for my business. Would I do it? I would not borrow $4 million and hope I got it back over the next 20 years. I don’t know too many business people who would."

He called the idea, from a business perspective, "irrational."

Clattenburg said she looked at it a little differently.

"The rationale is like any homeowner," Clattenburg said. "You buy an energy-efficient furnace and your costs are cut in half and you take saving from the energy cost and use it to pay for your furnace. You talk about (as) if, I was a business. I talk about it as if I were a housewife and I was buying a furnace. That is how I would look at it."

In summary, the proposal involves the county signing an agreement with Johnson Controls that would entail the county borrowing $4 million. Johnson Controls would then act as a contractor for a series of projects intended to reduce energy consumption at county buildings.

Many of the projects are already part of the county's capital investment plans. Over the 20 years, the county would pay $200,000 a year on the loan but save an estimated $200,000 a year in energy costs. Johnson Controls guarantees a certain amount of costs savings realized in each of the first three years of the contract. The county could buy a sort of extended warranty for additional years to guarantee savings, though that isn't really being considered.

County Highway Superintendent Tim Hens first brought the idea to the Legislature in February and the Legislature gave him the green light to put together a resolution to approve a contract with Johnson Controls.

He's been to two committee meetings this week, Public Service on Monday and Ways and Means on Wednesday, to discuss the proposal with legislators. Neither committee has yet to approve the resolutions.

Yesterday, Ways and Means tabled the resolution pending more information on other financing options, such as using $2 million the county has available and borrowing only $2 million, perhaps from another source.

“I don’t just see it as a loser," Hens said during a 30-minute robust discussion of the proposal Wednesday. "I think it’s a good deal for the county. I wouldn’t be here for my third committee meeting pushing it so heavily if I didn’t think it was a great idea for the county.”

The benefits as laid out by Hens, County Treasurer Scott German, and the legislators who support it -- Shelly Stein, Marianne Clattenburg, John Deleo, and John Hilchey -- include:

  • Front-loading paying for several capital-improvement projects that the county will have to pay for eventually anyway;
  • If the contract is signed by May 30, an interest rate of 3.5 percent is locked in (the Federal Reserve is planning three interest rate hikes this year);
  • Getting the work done before inflation drives up the costs;
  • Shifting some of the operational expense of energy from an expense against property taxes into an expense against sales taxes, which frees up space for other expenses under the tax cap;
  • Saving maintenance and repair costs on old and failing equipment;
  • Ensuring employees are working in safe and comfortable buildings that currently need significant repairs

Maha said he isn't against the idea of getting the work done, but he isn't comfortable on taking on a $4 million loan with a 20-year payoff, especially when the county is looking at a potential expense of $45 million or more for a new jail.

"The timing of it bothers me," Maha said. "I understand the benefits of the energy efficiency at the county buildings but I look at my home, you know, I haven’t put any energy into my home until I have the money. I don’t think my constituents want me to say 'yeah, go ahead and borrow $4 million' when we’ve got other projects out there that will cost the county millions of dollars.”

Not every project in this proposal will, by themselves, lead to cost savings. Putting a new roof on the highway garage, for example, won't reduce energy costs but it must be done and it can be included in the contract. Making it part of the Johnson Controls contract takes it out of the list of other capital projects the county must pay for using the existing capital budget.

Most of the cost savings actually come from some of the smaller projects, such as switching lighting in county buildings to more energy-efficient systems.

Some projects, such as replacing the eight air handlers on the roof of County Building #2, will both reduce energy costs and save maintenance costs.

"Right now we spend a ton of time repairing broken air handlers in Building #2," Hens said on Wednesday. "We don’t have great job-costing software to be able to track exactly what we spend, but I can tell you, Terry and the other guys have a lot of overtime going in after hours to fix air handlers or going to the jail to repair the boiler."

Deleo admitted to some skepticism of the proposal but near the end of the discussion Wednesday, he said he had warmed to it.

"So you’re saying right now cash is cheap, so let’s lock it in at the low rate and keep that over the 20 years because it’s cheap now, and then we’ll keep our cash in reserves and if things go off, we always have the cash, and cash is king, as they say," Deleo said. "I’m not as negative against this anymore as I hear it more and more."

Young said he doesn't think the savings is sufficient enough to justify taking on $4 million in debt. Using a calculation provided by Johnson Controls called Net Present Value, Young said there are essentially no savings.

The initial NPV calculation showed only $1,357 in savings on the value of the money, but Hens said with a lower financing rate, the new calculation is $38,519.

"I’m not 100-percent confident, there’s no guarantee it’s going to pay for itself in 20 years," Young said.

Net Present Value is a term economists use to try and determine the value of money today against the value of money at some point in the future. The calculations can get complicated. A straight calculation of $4 million today versus the value of that money in 20 years would, at a steady rate of 2-percent annual inflation, be $2.7 million.

Such straight-line calculations through having little predictive value. We don't know what the rate of inflation will be in each year, what interest rates might be in future years (if money isn't borrowed now and is instead borrowed on a project-by-project basis in coming years); and in this case, how the cost of energy will change over 20 years.

Maha is concerned about placing bets on the prediction of the future, he said. Who knows what technology changes will come in 20 years? He suggested in 20 years, whoever is still around in county government will have no real knowledge of why the loan exists and what purpose it served.

"I want to reiterate that my concern is, I don't care if it's $1 million or $4 million, I don't like the 20 years," Maha said. "Who knows what is going to happen 20 years down the road. Who is going to look back in 20 years and remember why we did this?"

Clattenburg countered, “We might look back in 20 years and say look at all the money we saved over the 20 years.”

Both Hens and German made the point a couple of times during the discussion that the estimated saving presented by Johnson Controls should be considered "conservative" estimates that the actual cost savings should be higher. Johnson Controls, Hens noted, with the first-three-year guarantee on its estimates, doesn't want to overestimate and wind up owing the county money, so their estimates are cautious.

Clattenburg, who chairs Ways and Means, was perhaps the staunchest proponent of the Johnson Controls proposal.

“If we don’t do this and we go the other route (paying for each project individually), don’t come to me to override the tax cap at any point," Clattenburg said. "I hope you are willing to do that if we don’t go this way because that’s what’s going to happen."

Neither legislators Bob Bausch nor Gregg Torrey expressed an overt opinion on whether they will support the proposed contract. But Bausch suggested that maybe the county could use current capital project funds along with some reserves, up to about $2 million, to reduce the amount of money borrowed. That would both reduce the total amount of interest paid and reduce the length of the loan, perhaps to as little as six years.

Hens said that would mean going to another firm for financing and losing the guaranteed 3.5 percent rate. German said he would have to gather estimates but the rate wouldn't be guaranteed until the county was actually ready to take out the loan, which could be two months.

The committee agreed to table the resolution until German is able to report back on that option.

CLARIFICATIONS: We should have pointed out in the body of the story that the estimated cost savings on utility bills alone if the loan is taken out is $117,250. Hens says that's a conservative estimate based on an inflation rate of 3 percent over 20 years. He said the actual rate since 1998 has been 3.9 percent and going back to 1958, the averaged annual rate of inflation for energy costs has been 4.32 percent. If either of those figures hold true, he said, the county will save substantially more.

April 19, 2018 - 5:34pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in NY-27, kathy hochul, Nate McMurray, news.

Press release:

Today, Governor Cuomo told a gathered crowd that Kathy Hochul would give Democrats the best chance to take away the 27th Congressional District from Chris Collins. He referenced Nancy Pelosi, implying that she expressed a similar sentiment.

Democratic Congressional Candidate Nate McMurray is disappointed by the statement.

“Clearly I'm not part of the Washington/Albany insider game. But you know what? I want no part of that mess. This is a new era. It’s an era where the people again decide what’s best, not a group of political elites."

McMurray continued, "The Governor is not out there with me in the 27th District. He does not see the energy and enthusiasm we see, not from big donors but from regular people.”

“I respect the Governor," McMurray said. "I think he has done a lot of important things. If the Governor is reelected, I look forward to working with him.

"And if Kathy Hochul wins her reelection bid for Lieutenant Governor, I especially look forward to working with her. I’m proud of her representation of our region. I wish the Governor would join me on a trip to Batavia or Warsaw or Lockport and see the support we're feeling in those rooms.

“Sooner or later Albany and D.C. will realize, ‘Don’t underestimate Nate.’ I’m no pawn on a board. No one owns me. No one owns the people of NY 27.”

April 19, 2018 - 5:13pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in steve hawley, news.

Press release:

“The governor is so desperate to appeal to the radical left as his election approaches that he has now granted conditional pardons to roughly 35,000 convicts on parole, a shameful move that flies in the face of every law-abiding citizen who has done the right thing and followed the law.

“Despite the governor’s radical interpretation, paying your debt to society and earning back the ability to exercise our most cherished right, voting, should not be granted until a felon is completely off parole and has been rehabilitated.

“It is obvious Gov. Cuomo will go to great lengths to win an election but I never thought it would involve pandering to rapists, murderers and arsonists. This governor seems to be fonder of helping inmates and convicted felons instead of hardworking, law-abiding citizens.”

April 19, 2018 - 5:09pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Five Star Urgent Care, batavia, news, business.

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Five Star Urgent Care held a ribbon cutting yesterday for its new location on Veterans Memorial Drive, next to Home Depot, in Batavia.

Cutting the ribbon is Denae McPherson, the regional practice director for Five Star.

The location is the 18th for the company.

April 19, 2018 - 2:26pm

The Genesee Valley Wind Ensemble will perform its 2018 Spring Concert in the auditorium of Oakfield-Alabama Central School beginning at 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 29. The school is located at 7001 Lewiston Road, Oakfield.

Conductors are: Mark Flynn, guest conductor, high school band director at Akron Central School; Dan Klinczar, member conductor, elementary band director at Alexander Central School; and Philip J. Briatico, conductor and founder of the GVWE, Warsaw Central School.

Admission cost: Adults -- $10; Seniors (55+) & Veterans -- $8; Students (with ID) -- $5; Children age 5 and under -- FREE; Family Deal -- $25 -- for immediate family and children -- mother and/or father and up to four children.

These works will be featured:

  • "Classical Gas" -- Mason Williams
  • "Flourish for Glorious John" -- Ralf Vaughan Williams
  • "Joy Revisited" -- Frank Tichelli
  • "The Chimes of Liberty" -- Edwin Franko Goldman
  • Highlights from "My Fair Lady" -- Lerner & Loewe
  • "Cherish" -- The Association
  • "Prelude, Siciliano & Rondo" -- Malcolm Arnold

This program is made possible in part by the Reach Grant program administered by GO ART!

The purpose of the GVWE is to serve and to provide the Greater Genesee Valley audience with new and familiar music, to serve its membership with the opportunity to perform challenging wind ensemble literature and to creat the opportunity for the conductor and musicians to grow their collective musical talents.

Contact: [email protected]

April 19, 2018 - 1:00pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in GCC, poetry, news, arts, entertainment.

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Press release:

"Time" magazine recently quoted Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith as she talked about the value of poetry in our world today.

She said, "Poetry requires us to be humble and beholden to something other than our own opinion. That's important. There's too much in our 21st century lives that is telling us we're the most important thing, that our initial gut reaction is incredibly valuable and not vulnerable, and that our opinions as consumers are more important than just about anything else about us.

"A poem says 'No, no. You have feelings. You have fears. You have questions. Let's get back to the voice and the vocabulary of being human.' "

The annual student poetry contest at Genesee Community College is designed to do just that -- to encourage and reward students for their abilities to express their feelings, fears, questions and voices through poetry.

For the 17th year, the poetry contest illuminated the unique and impressive talents of GCC's students. On Tuesday, April 17, the six winning students were honored at an awards and recognition ceremony in the Alfred C. O'Connell Library where they each received a certificate, gift card, and a journal to encourage them to continue their writing.

The 2018 Student Poetry Contest winners, awarded by a panel of six judges, included:

Body of Work: Committee's Choice -- Catherine McCabe-Strong, of Rochester

McCabe-Strong is in her final year of Paralegal Studies at GCC. She is a repeat winner of the Student Poetry Contest.

Body of Work: Director's Choice -- Cameron Kowalczewski, of East Aurora

Kowalczewski began at GCC in 2016 as an Accelerated College Enrollment (ACE) student and has since graduated high school and is now pursuing an associate degree in the Social Sciences with a concentration in English at GCC.

1st Place -- Nicole Favata, of Dunkirk

Favata is a Fashion Design student at GCC. Favata submitted a poem in spoken word format and the transcript is available on the Poetry Contest Web page.

2nd Place -- Raxel Piper, of Oakfield

Her second-place winning poem is entitled "The Perfect Woman."

3rd Place -- Mackayla Poorman, of Farmersville Station

Poorman is pursuing an Associate Degree in Liberal Arts at GCC's Arcade Campus Center and plans to transfer to a four-year college for writing and to minor in Theater. Her creative poem format was inspired by several of her favorite authors; Maggie Stiefvater, Jennifer Niven and Jonathan Safran Foer.

Honorable Mention honors -- Gabrielle Rozanski, of Avon, for her piece, "Tomorrow."

The entire works of these students can be found onGCC's Alfred C. O'Connell Library Poetry Contest Web page.

"Our students have many responsibilities between their studies, clubs, sports, jobs and families that demand their time and attention," Assistant Professor and Reference Services Librarian Cynthia Hagelberger said.

"We are thrilled to see so many of them putting in the extra effort it takes to enter the poetry contest each year. The library is proud and honored to offer a program that provides students with a public forum to celebrate their writing skills and creativity."

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