Online News. Community Views.

>> Download <<
The Batavian Mobile
Droid | iPhone

Recent comments

Community Sponsors

business

November 1, 2015 - 11:40am
posted by Billie Owens in business, Milestones, michael ranzenhofer, robert friedman.

Today, the law firm of Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC (WNY-Lawyers.com) announced it is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2015.

Founded in 1955, the general practice law firm has grown from one office in Akron to seven Western New York offices. Their other offices are located in Williamsville/Clarence, West Seneca, Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Batavia and Rochester. Michael H. Ranzenhofer and Robert Friedman are the firm’s partners.

October 30, 2015 - 1:58pm
posted by Billie Owens in ARC, Le Roy, business, Milestones.

(Submitted photo of NYS ARC President Laura Kennedy presenting an Employer of the Year Award to Jeremy Smowton, of Bessey Tools in Le Roy.)

Press release:

NYS ARC President Laura Kennedy presented an Employer of the Year Award to Jeremy Smowton of Bessey Tools, last week during NYS ARC’s Fall meeting in Albany.  Bessey Tools was nominated for the award by Genesee ARC to recognize its longtime partnership with the business whose United States headquarters is in Le Roy.

Smowton, vice president of Finance at Bessey Tools, reflected on the company’s association with Genesee ARC.

“We truly appreciate the hard work and effort the team from our local ARC provides for Bessey Tools," Smowton said. "They are a conscientious group that cares about the work they do, which we feel they do very well. At Bessey Tools, we are proud to have the privilege to serve our community through Genesee ARC. We look forward to a long standing future relationship.”

Genesee ARC has had a business relationship with Bessey Tools for the past 15 years and has had an onsite enclave at their factory since January 2013, employing 6 to 10 people daily.

Scott Jones, Genesee ARC director of Employment Services, said individuals work at ten different stations, assembling clamps, operating drill and hydraulic presses, packing and barcoding products.

“When Bessey Tools decided to move an assembly operation from Long Island to Le Roy, they asked Genesee ARC to handle the production because of our quality work and 15-year track record of excellence,” Jones said.

The Award presentation coincided with October’s 70th annual observance of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a time to celebrate the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities.

Genesee ARC is one of 54 Chapters of NYS ARC, the largest provider of services to people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities in the nation, offering supports encompassing all aspects of a person’s life from birth through end-of-life care.

October 30, 2015 - 1:43pm
posted by Billie Owens in tourism, genesee county, darien lake, Milestones, business.

(Submitted photo of Kelly Rapone, with the Genesee County Chamber of Commerce, and Amber Ciesiulka, with Darien Lake Theme Park Resort, with their respective awards.)

Press release:

The Genesee County Chamber of Commerce and Darien Lake Amusement Park Resort both received awards recently for Excellence in Tourism Marketing from the New York State Tourism Industry Association.

The New York State Tourism Industry Association (NYSTIA) has recognized leaders in New York State’s tourism industry who have achieved a high level of excellence and accomplishment at the 2015 Tourism Excellence Awards. The winning individuals or organizations were selected on the basis of demonstrated commitment, leadership, and accomplishment in travel and tourism.

Genesee County Chamber of Commerce earned the “Excellence in Tourism Marketing -- Statewide” for its Haunted History Trail of New York State program. Created by Genesee County Chamber of Commerce in 2013, it is the only statewide haunted tourism trail in the country. The program includes partnership with 30 tourism promotion agencies and promotes over 60 haunted inns, hotels, museums and more across New York State and was developed to draw tourists who have an interest in ghosts.

Darien Lake Amusement Park was recognized for “Excellence in Tourism Marketing -- Private Sector ” for their 2015 overall marketing program which focused on delivering an exceptional value and experience to season pass holders, daily visitors and overnight guests. Darien Lake Amusement Park Resort is New York State’s largest amusement park resort featuring over 50 rides and attractions including a 10-acre waterpark and a variety of overnight options including a hotel, cabins and a campground.

The organizations received their awards at the NYSTIA Tourism Excellence Awards Dinner on Thursday, Oct. 22, at The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown. Kelly Rapone and Taylor White, Genesee County Chamber of Commerce, and Amber Ciesiulka, Darien Lake Theme Park Resort, accepted the awards at the event.

October 30, 2015 - 11:08am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Wilmot Cancer Institute Batavia, batavia, health, business.

wilmot-1.jpg

Photos provided by our news partner, WBTA.

Press release from UR Medicine:

Patients in Genesee and surrounding counties can now access a full range of cancer treatment services in one location at Wilmot Cancer Institute Batavia.

The office at 262 Bank St. is the former Batavia Radiation Oncology, which joined UR Medicine’s Wilmot Cancer Institute in 2014. With renovated and expanded space, the office features larger clinical examination rooms, and it has added medical oncology, hematology, and an infusion center.

Kevin J. Mudd, M.D., who has been Batavia’s radiation oncologist for more than 14 years, continues to see patients at Wilmot Cancer Institute Batavia. He is joined by Nayana Kamath, M.D., of Interlakes Oncology and Hematology, who provides the medical oncology and hematology services at the office.

“It’s exciting to continue providing high-quality, comprehensive cancer care here in this community and to see our services growing with our integration with URMC and Wilmot Cancer Institute,” Mudd said.

Services for patients who need medical oncology, hematology and chemotherapy/infusion began in July. The office’s new infusion center was designed with patient comfort in mind.

“Our new infusion center is bright and open,” Kamath said. “While that might not sound significant, it can make a real difference for patients who need to be here for three or four hours at a time. ”

As part of Wilmot Cancer Institute, the Batavia office provides access to clinical trials, which are available for a variety of cancers at different stages and help lead to the next generation of therapies, and to advanced diagnostic testing for certain cancers, which helps physicians to tailor treatments more precisely to a patient’s needs.

“Cancer care is more complex than it has ever been before, and it requires a coordinated team with expertise in many disciplines to identify the best course of treatment for each individual patient,” said Jonathan W. Friedberg, M.D., M.M.Sc., director of Wilmot Cancer Institute. “Our office here in Batavia brings Wilmot Cancer Institute’s precision medicine approach closer to home for patients and families who might otherwise have to travel an hour or more for care.” 

wilmot-4.jpg

October 30, 2015 - 10:59am
posted by Howard B. Owens in GCEDC, GGLDC, business.

Press release:

The Board of Directors of the Genesee Gateway Local Development Corporation (GGLDC) passed a budget for Fiscal Year 2016 at its board meeting today with anticipated cash outflows of $2.4 million. Funding will be realized primarily through grant revenue (restricted to the project for which the funding was awarded), rents and loan repayments. 

Major sources of revenue includes a $750,000 grant from the New York State Department of Homes and Community Renewal program for the p.w. minor project and the remaining balance of a $200,000 grant from New York State Empire State Development. The balance of the ESD grant will be used for the development of the Western New York Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (WNY STAMP). 

Rent revenue of $672,000 will be generated from the MedTech Centre facility and common area maintenance fees from the Buffalo East Tech Park and Genesee Valley Agri-Business Park (Ag-Park). In addition, $672,200 in revenue will be received through the Empire Pipeline PILOT Increment Financing (PIF) and grant revenue from the United States Economic Development Administration that is restricted to support development at the Ag-Park.  

Additional revenues include $14,000 in grants from National Grid and $498,600 in principal and interest payments from several different companies for loans made in previous years.

Anticipated 2016 expenditures include the distribution of the state grant to support the p.w. minor project and building maintenance, an economic development program support grant, professional services and site/corporate park maintenance.

In 2015 the GGLDC made progress on a number of projects including: the widening of Route 63 to support commerce in the Ag-Park; assisting Bergen and Le Roy in securing an America’s Best Communities grant to create an economic development revitalization plan; and, completed enhancements to Buffalo East Tech Park, including roadway installation and improvements to the Route 5 entrance. The improvements at the Buffalo East Tech Park enabled the construction of Yancey’s Fancy new $20.6 million facility. 

“Thanks to the County’s assistance and our funding partners, the GGLDC has been successful in completing many projects,” said Thomas H. Felton, chairman of the GGLDC Board of Directors. “We continue to see significant attention from new businesses interested in locating in our County, and we are excited to work with our partners to bring new jobs and investment here.”

October 30, 2015 - 9:42am
posted by Howard B. Owens in downtown, batavia, business, City Slickers.

cityslickersawningoct302015.jpg

After a couple of years of considering his options, City Slickers owner Ken Mistler has settled on a design for an awning over the patio of his Downtown restaurant. The steel beams for the awning are being installed today and the awning should be completed in about a week. While the patio will be open, it will be heated, Mistler said.

October 26, 2015 - 4:05pm
posted by Billie Owens in steve hawley, business, agriculture.

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) today announced that $1 million is now available to aid aspiring farmers to enter the agriculture industry.

The New York State New Farmers Grant Fund will provide up to 50 percent of the cost for new farmers to start projects, purchase farm machinery and equipment and construct and improve farm buildings. The submission deadline for applications for the grant program is Jan. 22.

“As the owner of our family-owned farm for many years, I know firsthand how difficult life in the agriculture industry can be,” Hawley said. “Profits from produce and livestock sales fluctuate and the possibility of drought and flooding is always real. I can imagine the trepidation many young men and women feel as they begin their career in farming and agriculture, and this funding is a tremendous opportunity for aspiring farmers to get on their feet.

"Up to $50,000 in matching grant funds are available for everything from tractor and plow purchases to construction of barns and silos. I am proud of the work we have done to bolster the agriculture industry in New York State and I pledge my continued support going forward.”

October 26, 2015 - 3:13pm
posted by Billie Owens in business, Announcements, education, Nursing.

Press release:

The University of Rochester School of Nursing is offering 50-percent tuition support in scholarships for its Care Manager Education, RN-to-BS completion and Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner programs to meet the educational needs of health care employees in the Finger Lakes region.

Infusing the region with graduates from the three programs will directly fill gaps in care to help patients achieve better health outcomes.

Currently, there’s a rising demand for nurses resulting from a transformation of the region’s Medicaid health care delivery system, through the New York State Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) program, regionally organized by the Finger Lakes Performing Provider System (FLPPS).  New York State is using the DSRIP reform model to improve clinical outcomes and reduce avoidable ED use and hospitalizations by 25 percent over five years.

FLPPS — a not-for-profit organization representing a network of 28 hospitals, 3,000 health care providers and more than 600 health care and community-based organizations in a 13 county region — aims to address current shortfalls in the health care system, including the role of behavioral health in primary care and skilled nursing facilities, patient care transitions, chronic disease management, and integrating health care services across multiple care settings. The FLPPS region covers Allegany, Cayuga, Chemung, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Seneca, Steuben, Wayne, Wyoming and Yates counties.
 
For more information, visit the School of Nursing’s Web site at SON.Rochester.edu

October 23, 2015 - 6:17pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business.

tuftsoct232015-2.jpg

Dave and Robyn Tufts held an open house today in the former WBTA building on East Main Street that they are renovating into apartments and office space.  The restoration preserves and enhances the mid-century modern architecture and when completed will contain four apartments and office space. The exterior and one apartment are completed and a second apartment will be done soon. The downstairs office space is build-to-suit ready for a tenant.

Previously: Local developer announces plans to restore and preserve Mid-century building in city's central corridor

tuftsoct232015.jpg

tuftsoct232015ex.jpg

October 23, 2015 - 12:43pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Empire Tractor, batavia, business.

empireskidloaderoct232015.jpg

Pete Colantonio, of Empire Tractor, goes over some of the controls of a New Holland Skid Loader with Pete Kingston, of Geneseo, during Empire Tractor's Skid Loader Rodeo.

The most skilled entrants can win prizes.

The rodeo involves driving the skid loader through a timed obstacle course.

Empire Tractor, on East Main Street Road, Batavia, is hosting the event through this afternoon and then again tomorrow starting at 9 a.m.

Lunch is being served both days.

empireskidloaderoct232015-2.jpg

empireskidloaderoct232015-3.jpg

empireskidloaderoct232015-4.jpg

October 22, 2015 - 4:21pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Brach Machine Inc., batavia, business.

brachmachineoct_222015.jpg

Bill and Nancy Brach clearly love their business, Brach Machine, Inc., which is now in its 30th year in Batavia. Yesterday, the Brachs showed a visitor around their shop with verve and eagerness to share the details of what they do, how they do it and why it's important. 

Going through the stockroom of completed parts, Nancy stops and remarks, "These are parts that most people wouldn't have a clue as to what they are."

"I have no idea," the visitor admits.

"Right, exactly," said Nancy, "but there's someone for whom these are a vital part of their business."

Making vital parts for business is what Bill Brach set out to do when he started his business in 1985. Brach machine makes the tools that make it possible for other manufacturers all over the world to make the parts that make our daily lives a little bit easier.

The ignition on your car, die cast. Your refrigerator handle, probably die cast. The sprinkler head on your hose, die cast.

"You've had your hands on hundreds of die castings," Bill said.

When asked to describe his business, Bill has a ready answer that he enunciates clearly in a voice of good cheer that tells you it's a well-rehearsed line intended to precisely describe the business he's in, as precisely as the tools his employees make.

"We manufacture consumable tooling for the high-pressure die-casting industry."

That's it. That's what Brach Machine does. In a nutshell.

High-pressure die casting involves injecting metal in liquid form -- zinc, aluminum, magnesium, copper, lead, and tin -- into molds to make parts, tools and pieces. Brach Machine makes the parts that make the injection possible.

It's no wonder Bill chooses his words carefully. What he does isn't easy and mistakes are measured in fractions of a millimeter. After showing a visitor a tool that can measure a gap that is a quarter of the width of a human hair, Nancy explains such exacting specifications are necessary for their customers to achieve the quality their customers expect.

A tool that comes out of Brach Machine, cut and crafted from a piece of iron with no do-overs, might be worth $4,500 or more. It needs to be cut and shaved and polished to exact specifications. 

That means the people Bill and Nancy hire need to be able to do quality work and have some level of experience suitable to the task. Such employees are hard to find, especially in a tight job market with the unemployment rate hovering near 4 percent.

Brach Machine is advertising for employees more than they ever have and is hosting a pair of open houses to celebrate both 30 years in business and to commemorate Manufacturing Day.

The open houses are Tuesday Oct. 27 and Thursday Nov. 5 with three times available for tours each date: 8 a.m., 11:30 a.m., or 2:30 p.m. Spots are limited, so the open house will be on a first-come-first-serve basis. RSVP to: Tim Gleba, production supervisor, via e-mail [email protected] or phone 343-9134.

Prospective employees are welcome as well as anybody interested in one of Batavia's world-class businesses and manufacturing sites in general.

"The thing we want to share with people is this is a place where you can get a job, and it's a good job and it's a stable job and it's a fair-paying job," Nancy said. "It has benefits and we'll keep you here as long as you will stay."

brachmachineoct_222015-2.jpg

Brian Doktor

brachmachineoct_222015-3.jpg

Dave Beedham

brachmachineoct_222015-4.jpg

Al Bailey

brachmachineoct_222015-5.jpg

brachmachineoct_222015-6.jpg

brachmachineoct_222015-7.jpg

brachmachineoct_222015-8.jpg

October 22, 2015 - 1:02pm
posted by Billie Owens in business, Announcements, Brach Machine.

Press release:

Brach Machine is welcoming the community to support Manufacturing Day! First held in 2012, Manufacturing Day highlights the importance of manufacturing to the economy and draws attention to the many high-skill jobs available in manufacturing fields.

For more than 30 years, Brach Machine, Inc., has been a leading worldwide supplier, providing innovative shot-end components for all makes and models of zinc and aluminum high-pressure die-casting machines. With a greater demand from our customers and new products in development, finding machinists with the skills we need to join the Brach Machine team has become even more important.

Brach Machine is pleased to announce they will be hosting two open houses this year to observe Manufacturing Day. Guided tours of the facility will take place, showcasing modern manufacturing technology and careers.

Tuesday, Oct. 27 -- three times available:  8 a.m., or 11:30 a.m., or 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 5 -- three times available: 8 a.m., or 11:30 am, or 2:30 p.m.

Spots are limited, so the open house will be on a first-come-first-serve basis.

RSVP to:
Tim Gleba
Production Supervisor
Brach Machine Inc.
www.brachmachine.com
4814 Ellicott Street Road
Batavia, NY 14020
[email protected]
585-343-9134

 

October 21, 2015 - 4:32pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in business, jobs, employment.

The slight bump in Genesee County's unemployment rate for September over August can be attributed to people leaving the workforce, said Scott Gage, director of the Job Bureau.

The local labor market remains tight, with an unemployment rate of 4.4 percent.

The local trend holds statewide, Gage said.

"The labor force went down by 81,000 people (statewide)," Gage told WBTA. "Some 55,000 people retired, the other 21,500 either are going back to school or left just because their summer job ended."

There were 700 people in Genesee County who chose to leave the workforce at the end of the summer.

The 4.4 percent rate is still three-tenths of a percentage point than a year ago and much improved over the 5.9 percent rate in 2013 or the 7.1 percent rate in September 2012.

Employers continue to report they're finding it difficult to fill open positions and help wanted signs dot the landscape locally.

The NYS Labor Department reports 23,100 non-farm jobs in Genesee County, down for the 23,800 in August and down from the 23,400 in September 2014. Government jobs have dropped by 300 year-over-year while goods-producing jobs and private-sector service jobs have held steady at 4,100 and 13,500, respectively.

"We're seeing job openings across all sectors," Gage said. "Manufacturing, retail, service jobs, health care. There are job openings."

October 21, 2015 - 4:08pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in STAMP, GCEDC, Alabama, business.

From Steve Hyde, president and CEO of Genesee County Economic Development Center:

As we take a collective breath from this month’s exhilarating announcement about 1366 Technologies becoming the first tenant at the Science Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Park (STAMP) in the Town of Alabama, we can look back as a community and realize what a magnificent accomplishment this is for Genesee County.

Governor Cuomo’s announcement created a buzz unlike anything we have experienced in recent times; and why not – the first tenant at STAMP is the largest economic development project in the County’s history. It triggers the first phase of what we believe will be a transformative economic development game changer for the Western New York and Finger Lakes regions for generations to come.

The public and private sector support throughout the 10 years to bring STAMP from a concept to this first development has been building steadily. This support gained steam and momentum especially over the last 24 months when it became a crescendo after a coalition of local and state government officials, organized labor, regional business and economic development agencies, higher education and others helped secure $33 million in the state budget as part of the Fiscal 2014-2015 budget deliberations last year.

Like any effort of this magnitude, you need a solid foundation of support, or else the effort crumbles. The foundation for STAMP was built at the local level and in particular the annual funding provided to the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) by Genesee County. This foundation was further enhanced and enabled through the longtime support of the Town of Alabama.

Last week the Governor and other state leaders as well as local and regional elected officials, regional economic development partners and others from the Buffalo and Rochester metropolitan regions came to Batavia to celebrate this monumental achievement. I wanted to take this opportunity on behalf of the GCEDC Board and staff to thank the Town of Alabama for its steadfast support of our efforts to make STAMP a reality. 

From the town’s representatives in the state legislature, Senator Ranzenhofer and Assemblyman Hawley, to Genesee County Legislative Chairman Ray Cianfrini to the members of the town board: Supervisor Dan Mangino, Deputy Supervisor Janet Sage, Council members Bill Cleveland, Pam LaGrou, Kevin Fisher and Planning Board Chair Ron Gilbert – thank you! The work of the town was further enhanced through the participation of town officials Sage, Fisher and Gilbert on their STAMP Committee.

It also should be noted that elected officials represent the interests of the constituents in the communities they represent. In this regard, the town has been extremely forthcoming in sharing information about STAMP to residents. These meetings also have provided town residents a forum to provide their feedback and comments. It is a process that we look forward to continue to work with the town on now and in the future as we move to implement our first project on the STAMP campus.

There is an old saying that local government is where the rubber meets the road. In this instance, local government in the Town of Alabama is where the silicon meets the solar wafer.

October 19, 2015 - 4:44pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Neptune's Gardens, batavia, business.

neptunesoct192015.jpg

Start a business and make it well into your second year and you're doing better than nearly 20 percent of the other people who tried doing the same thing. Make it to five years and you've lasted longer than nearly half of your compatriots. How about 30 years? Well, the Small Business Administration doesn't publish those stats, but does tell us 75 percent of new businesses are closed by year 16.

And in the age of speedy delivery from computer to doorstep, it gets even tougher on retail businesses.

That makes 30 years of owning Neptunes Gardens for Nick and Cathy LaFarnara quite an accomplishment.

Nick said customer service and an ongoing effort to diversify what they offer has helped them survive, especially against growing Internet competition.

Just this past Thursday, as an example of going above and beyond for a customer, Nick said he drove nearly 150 miles to retrieve a saltwater aquarium filter and deliver it to an elderly customer after she tried unsuccessfuly to purchase it at Petco.

"It's stuff like that, you kind of bend over backwards to try to make ends meet," Nick said.

A big part of their business now is live bait, and they do well in the summer with goldfish for fairs and carnivals, and stocking fish for residential and commercial ponds.

Nick's father opened Neptune's Gardens at 33 Liberty St., behind the Pok-A-Dot, in 1967.

Nick and Cathy's daughter, Jamie, works in the store now and will likely run it someday, but Cathy thinks a fourth generation is already eager to take over.

"Our grandkids are already involved," Cathy said. "One time we had a customer looking for a fish and I was, 'I don't think we have it,' and Victor, I think he was 6  years old, said, 'Grandma, we have it.' He took the lady right to it."

Now 9, Victor has a way with reptiles in the store and he thinks nothing of walking around with a snake wrapped around his waist.

"He probably sells more reptiles and snakes than I do," Nick said.

October 19, 2015 - 3:46pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Batavia Downs, ADK Hospitality, business, GCEDC.

downshotelgroundoct192015.jpg

Dignitaries, politicians and business leaders gathered at Batavia Downs today for an official groundbreaking ceremony for a new $5.4 million hotel being developed by ADK Hospitality, a company from Buffalo that reached an agreement earlier this year to build the hotel on land formerly owned by Western OTB.

The project turns the land from tax-free acreage to tax-generating acreage and is expected to create 25 full-time equivalent jobs in the 82-room facility. To help finance the project, Genesee County Economic Development Center has granted more than $600,000 in tax relief. Once open, hotel guests with balconies will be able to watch harness racing from their rooms.

downshotelgroundoct192015-2.jpg

downshotelgroundoct192015-3.jpg

Western OTB VP Mike Nolan, left, and CEO Michael Kane.

downshotelgroundoct192015-4.jpg

 ADK Hospitality CEO Anthony Baynes.

downshotelgroundoct192015-5.jpg

October 17, 2015 - 3:47pm
posted by Billie Owens in Notre Dame, batavia, business, Milestones.

Press release:

The Business Teachers Association of New York State awards the Julian A. Milkes Award for Outstanding New Business Educator each school year. Notre Dame High School is proud to announce that its Business Teacher, Lindsay Warner, is the recipient of the 2015 award.

The Julian A. Milkes Award recognizes exemplary efforts of new business educators early in their careers. Individuals must have made significant contributions to Business Education through some combination of program development, professional association activities, professional contributions (through presentations/publications), and civic and community involvement. They will have been involved in innovative, unique and novel programs and have shown extraordinary professional commitment early in their careers.

Retired principal Joseph Scanlan, Ph.D., said “Mrs. Warner has brought Business Education into the new millennium at Notre Dame High School.”

Lindsay’s hard work and diligence have resulted in Notre Dame obtaining college course accreditation for three high school business courses she currently teaches in conjunction with Genesee Community College.

“She is a mover and shaker who teaches business courses using real life business applications," Scanlan said. "Course requests for the courses she teaches are off the charts as the word has traveled quickly that her classes are indeed the real deal."

Warner also masterminded her senior-level marketing class’s participation in the Virtual Business Competition held at GCC in March. The Notre Dame “Cupcakery” team captured four first-place awards and one for second in the competition with 12 other regional schools. She planted the seed, encouraged them to do their best and oversaw their efforts.

Warner has also started a quality shadowing experience program, which is placing interested juniors and seniors in real-life career opportunities during the school year and summer vacation.

A Notre Dame High School graduate, she received her master's in Education from Nazareth College in 2009. She holds a NYS Professional Certification in Business and Marketing Education. She lives in Le Roy with her husband, Jeremy, and two young sons. Congratulations to Lindsay on this prestigious award!

October 15, 2015 - 6:53pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in mark fanara, batavia, business, High Voltage Tattoo & Piercing.

markbenefithighvolt2015.jpg

Four years ago Mark Fanara, whose Batavia tattoo business High Voltage had become very successful, thought he should do something to give back to the community that had nourished him his entire life, so he decided to hold a charity tattoo event and donate the proceeds to local community groups. The event was so popular and raised so much money for local charity that he decided to do it again the next year, and the next, and the next.

This year, Mark needs the community's help. Hospitalized with lymphomatoid granulomatosis, a rare cancer, the father of little two boys has only limited means to deal with his illness.

To help him out, two of his employees, Andrew London and Jeremy Fridman, are holding their own three-day event of tattoos and piercing to benefit Mark. The event is from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 23 through Oct. 25. Customers can select from a specific set of designs for a small tattoo for $30. Piercings are $15. Proceeds benefit Mark Fanara.

High Voltage is located at 110 W. Main St., Batavia.

There will also be a spaghetti dinner at 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 1, at the Alexander Fire Hall. Live music with Nix Vega starts at 6 p.m.

October 15, 2015 - 10:31am
posted by Howard B. Owens in agriculture, business.

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) today announced the availability of $1.4 million in grant funding through the New York State Environmental Protection Fund to support a pilot program aimed at helping farms implement projects that mitigate adverse environmental impact and protect against dramatic weather conditions.

Funding will be available to farmers who best develop projects which reduce greenhouse gas and carbon emissions as well as aid farms in their constant struggles with drought and flooding.

“As the owner of a family farm for many years, I understand the daily struggles of Western New York farmers as they try to protect their crops from harmful New York weather conditions,” Hawley said. “As large agricultural producers, we must also be mindful of our environmental footprint, and this funding will help our state’s farms develop procedures which reduce detrimental environmental impact without damaging the farms’ ability to grow produce and livestock. This is a victory for our environment, as well as farmers who could use increased funding to protect their livelihoods from flooding and drought.”

County Soil and Water Conservation districts will apply for competitive grants on behalf of farmers and must be submitted for one of the following categories: soil health systems, on-farm riparian, floodplain and upland water management systems, or agricultural waste storage cover and flare systems.

Applications must be received by Dec. 14 and can be submitted at https://www.grantsgateway.ny.gov

October 14, 2015 - 9:13am
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, GCEDC, business, brownfield opportunity area.

stevehyde_oct142015.jpg

A vibrant and prosperous urban core in Batavia is vital to all of the economic development projects the Genesee County Economic Development Center is working to bring to fruition, said CEO Steve Hyde, during a presentation Monday night during Batavia's City Council meeting.

Hyde joined the discussion Monday about a projected called Batavia Path to Prosperity, or BP2. The project is being set up to take some of the fees paid by developers in future projects in the city that receive PILOTS (Payments in Lieu of Taxes) from the GCEDC and allocate half of those funds to a pool of money that can help spur development of blighted properties, properties that are part of the city's Brownfield Opportunity Area.

"My passion all along has been about growth in our community," Hyde said. "How can we build economic growth outside so it will flow back into the inside. This is an opportunity to shine a bright light on troubled areas in our community so that we have a multifaceted redevelopment strategy so that we have a path of growth for our kids."

City Manager Jason Molino kicked off the discussion by saying the program can help address poverty in the city's most economically distressed neighborhoods, increase employment opportunities nad expand the city's tax base.

In the three census tracks considered distressed, the poverty rate is 30 percent (it need be only 20 percent to be considered distressed) and the unemployment rate in excess of 7 percent is more than 2 percentage points higher than the rest of the community.

Hyde, Molino noted, is fond of saying that economic development isn't a sprint, it's a marathon. But dealing with brownfield areas, Molino said, isn't a marathon. It's a triathlon, because the issues to deal with are so big and so complex.

Often brownfield properties need a great deal of environmental remediation, which substantially increases the cost of redevelopment and scares off those who might otherwise sink their investment dollars into a commercial or mixed-use project.

BP2 will help address that issue by providing funds that can help with brownfield cleanup.

Hyde said he's seen attempts at creating other such projects around the state, but they never get off the ground because of infighting among the various taxing jurisdictions. He's encouraged by the cooperation so far from the city, county and school district.

At Monday's meeting, nary a negative question or comment came from council members, who will be asked at a future meeting to pass a resolution authorizing the city's participation in the project. Similar resolutions will need to be passed by the County Legislature and the Board of Trustees for Batavia City Schools.

Only projects within the city limits that are approved by GCEDC for PILOTs would contribute to the funds, and only brownfield projects in the three census tracks that make up the BOA could receive funds from the pool.

Under state law, development projects in all six census tracts in the city are eligible for PILOTs, even retail and commercial development, which are normally excluded, because of the highly distressed nature of three central census tracts.

The fund could be used, Molino said, to: mitigate the extraordinary cost related to hazardous material cleanup; demolish buildings that contribute to blight; rehabilitate buildings that can and should be saved; modernize infrastructure;  install broadband/WiFi downtown to support economic growth initiatives; and to advance the planning and engineering of the Ellicott Trail, which will run right through the heart of the BOA, and help secure more project capital for the BOA.

Within the BOA there are five critical, strategic sites:

  • Creekside, behind the Falleti Ice Arena
  • The Dellapenna building on Ellicott Street
  • City Centre
  • The medical corridor, particularly around where the old Elks Lodge used to be
  • The Harvester Center

"If over the next five years we really spent some time trying to redevelop these areas, it could have a tremendous impact on our community," Molino said.

Hyde is optimistic about our community's future, reversing the trend that has seen Genesee County go from 5,000 manufacturing jobs in 1990 to 3,500 today.

"We're on the cusp of great growth here, especially in light of last week's announcement (the new project in STAMP)," Hyde said. "The state and feds are investing in the innovation economy, especially up and down the I-90 corridor, and we've now got the largest project in the state right along that corridor."

Batavia needs to be ready for that growth and strengthening the urban core is vital to benefitting from economic development elsewhere in the county. 

For every high-tech job, studies show there are five additional jobs created along the economic chain, Hyde said. Those jobs only come to Batavia if Batavia is ready for the opportunity. That means upgrading the housing, increasing office space, fixing infrastructure and "making this place as beautiful as the people who live here."

Pages

Subscribe to

Calendar

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30
 

Upcoming

Copyright © 2008-2016 The Batavian. Some Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Original content available for non-commercial use under a Creative Commons license.
Contact: Howard Owens, publisher (howard (at) the batavian dot com); (585) 250-4118

blue button