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April 22, 2017 - 11:11pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in accident, Oakfield, news.

A one-car motor vehicle accident, unknown injuries, is reported in the area of 2776 Lockport Road, Oakfield.

A single caller reports hearing a noise and now hears a car horn.

Oakfield Fire and Mercy EMS responding.

UPDATE 11:15 p.m.: Traffic being shut down at Lewiston and Lockport.

UPDATE 11:17 p.m.: Mercy EMS can continue non-emergency. "It seems like we might have a sign off," reports a chief.

April 22, 2017 - 10:47pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia, news.

Police received reports of possible youths dropping bricks or throwing bricks from the train track overpass on Lehigh Avenue, Batavia.

Units responded and two individuals have been spotted and police are trying to catch them as they move along the train tracks.

Both are described as white males, one wearing a black sweatshirt and black pants and the other is wearing a red sweatshirt.

UPDATE 10:51 p.m.: There is debris in the roadway that needs to be cleaned up.  Police are still searching for the two individuals.

April 22, 2017 - 7:29pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in St. Joe's, batavia, news.

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The crowd at St. Joe's annual Mammoth Sale today was huge before I could there, I'm told, but even later in the afternoon, there were still a lot of great deals for shoppers.

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April 22, 2017 - 7:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Earth Day, DeWitt Recreation Area, environment, news.

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Volunteers of all ages came out to DeWitt Recreation Area in Batavia today to help clean the park and participate in various learning activities.

One of the activities was an "emerald ash borer game," where several children were emerald ash borers, two were volunteers and one was a park ranger. The emerald ash borers had 10 seconds to lay their eggs in as many ash trees in a wooded area (represented by small, green disks). Then volunteers would identify infected trees and the park ranger would come along and replace the ash trees with another kind of tree.  The game illustrated how much faster an infestation can spread than forest rangers can act to do anything about it.

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April 22, 2017 - 6:58pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in softball, sports, batavia, news.

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After running teams for a couple of years in Byron-Bergen, Stan Kaus and Matt Landers got to talking last year about getting more girls involved in fastpitch softball and bringing the teams back to Batavia.

"After last year we decided there are more girls inBataviaa who want to play softball, so we kind of looked at each other and said, ‘are you sure you want to go bigger,’ and we said, ‘as long as the parents step up and help,'" Kaus said.

The response, Kaus said, "has been phenomenal.

The new Batavia Girls Fastpitch is incorporating as a non-profit with an eight-person board. There are eight new coaches, 17 sponsors and so far 35 girls signed up.

There are two 12-and-under teams and for the first time a 10-U team. Next Tuesday, they will host a meeting to form at least one, and maybe two, 15-U teams, which will ad another 12 to maybe more than 20 more girls participating.

"I think the word will get out," Kaus said. "I think a lot of girls felt their only choice for playing ball was Little League. I think if they can come out and watch softball and see fast pitch, I think it will be great."

The Stingers, as the teams are known, also have new uniforms.

"The fact that it's back and we're breathing new life into fast pitch softball is kind of exciting," Kaus said.

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April 22, 2017 - 11:32am
posted by Howard B. Owens in chris collins, NY-27, town hall, alexander, news.

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The event last night was billed as a "town hall," a chance for all constituents in New York's 27th Congressional District to come to the Alexander Fire Hall and voice their issues, raise their concerns and ask questions of Rep. Chris Collins.

If Collins bothered to show up.

Of course, he didn't.

In his place on the dais was an empty chair.

If he had filled that chair, he would have found himself on a panel of people billed as experts in various topic areas who, rather than represent the range of political ideology in the 27th District, seemed to largely hold liberal and progressive viewpoints.

The more than 400 people who attended were all given 8 1/2 x 11 colored pieces of paper -- raise green when you agreed with a speaker's point and red when you disagreed. Rather than showcase a diversity of opinions, green cards tended to go up in unison for points favored by the audience and red cards raised altogether when audience members wished to jeer a negative point made about Collins or the current presidential administration.

This, though Michelle Schoeneman in her opening remarks, suggested the audience might represent a range of political views and party affiliations.

"Whether you are a Democrat or a Republican, whether you are conservative or liberal, whether you voted for Collins or not, you are all here because you care enough about democracy to take time out of your busy lives to make your voices heard," Schoeneman said.

The town hall took on the feel of a partisan political rally when Schoeneman concluded her remarks and said Collins might have a rough go of it in the next election.

"Mr. Collins, if you’re watching this right now, I’m here to tell you that this is your last term," Schoeneman said. "Come 2018, we will have a new representative. It may be a Republican. It may be a Democrat, but it will not be you. We will vote into office a person who does not consider it unreasonable to want to talk with you. We will listen and weigh every decision that is made."

That was the loudest applause line of her opening remarks and the room was filled with green cards held high.

The expert panel included a 22-year-old organic farmer from East Aurora who runs a 24-member CSA (Community Supported Agriculture group) and an educator who runs I Am Syria and is the founder of the Summer Institute for Human Rights and Genocide, even though a couple of the nation's top experts on agriculture and immigration live right in Genesee County.

Dean Norton, former president of the New York Farm Bureau who helped draft comprehensive immigration reform in 2013 (it didn't pass, though Collins supported the bill), said he got an invitation through Instant Messanger that he didn't see until after the event was over, though he didn't specify if the invite was to speak or just attend.

Maureen Torrey, who runs with her family one of the largest produce farms in the region, and has been to Washington, D.C., and traveled the nation in support of immigration reform, said she was invited to attend but was not invited to be on the panel.

Even though economics and trade, as well as foreign policy and criminal justice, were all big topics in the recent presidential campaign, there were no experts on the panel in those subject areas, even though in the county and in the region there are available experts.

Comprising the expert panel were:

  • Healthcare: Gary A. Giovino, professor, and chair, Department of Community Health and Health Behavior at UB;
  • Great Lakes and Rivers: Barry Boyer, who taught environmental law and administrative law at UB;
  • Small business: Ginine Capozzi, owner of KnowledgeForce Consulting LLC in East Amherst;
  • Local environment, fish, and wildlife: Dick Thomas, retired from a 33-year career with NY Department of Environmental Conservation;
  • Education: Chris Cerrone, cofounder of WNY for Public Education;
  • Diversity and social justice: Jeremy Besch, head of Upper School at the Park School in Buffalo;
  • Immigration: Andrew Beiter, director of I Am Syria and is founder of the Summer Institute for Human Rights and Genocide;
  • Climate change: Sandra Chelnov, who is "deeply concerned" about climate change and has attended several conferences;
  • Laura Colligan, owner of Dirt Rich Farm in East Aurora.

The town hall was sponsored by several progressive organizations: GLOW Progressives, WNY Peace Center, Buffalo Resists, Sister District of WNY, Invisible NY 27th, Turning Emotion into Action, ACTion Buffalo, and Citizens Against Collins.

As part of each expert's introduction, the speakers were invited to say a word about why they were there. Some speakers gave just a brief introduction, others used the time to share stronger opinions.

Giovino said the current healthcare system is not designed to help you get well, rather it's designed to ensure you keep coming back.

"My concern about healthcare is that it’s for profit," Giovino said. "In every other country, every other rich country, it’s not for profit. I think capitalism is a great thing, but when it comes to health, we need a catalytic converter on that engine."

Thomas said the environment is his passion.

"I think it’s everybody’s passion whether we know it or not," Thomas said. "Elections are guided by politics and not so much guided by science. Environmental protection suffers from the ebb and flow of global leadership changes and at the same time, that environment is generally not working in many cases. Under our current federal government leadership, the divide between economic interests and the environment is wider than it ever has been."

Besch got a laugh with his introduction.

"I’m a white guy who does diversity work," Besch said.

He added later, "For a long time this country has had a political environment that has sort of secretly and quietly marginalized already-marginalized groups to drive a culture of fear to push its agenda. What I’ve seen in recent years is that action is no longer quiet and secret. Preservation of wealth and privilege is coming at the expense of those who don’t have either of them.

"If we don’t find ways stand up and stop that then a situation that is already pretty precarious and getting worse is going to get a heck of a lot worse and a heck of a lot more quickly than I think any of us care for."

Capozzi said she's tried to talk with Collins many times about a range of issues that affect small business owners, from healthcare to immigration to tax policy to education to workforce readiness and manufacturing.

"There isn’t a part of our communities that is not impacted by the small business community and he doesn’t have anything to say," Capozzi said. "Literally, nothing to say, since May of 2014. I’m really concerned about our opportunities, or lack thereof, to talk to the congressman across all spectrums and all areas of business and all the impacts that affect us."

Cerrone slammed support for school choice.

"Chris Collins supports the Trump-Betsy DeVos privatization schemes that will devastate our local, public schools," Cerrone said. "If this raised achievement, I would be all behind it, but studies show that school choice sounds good, but choice does not work. It does not raise achievement, which is our number one concern, but also it’s a boon to those who want to privatize and profit off our tax dollars with no accountability." (Fact Check: the studies are not as one-sided as Cerrone states, but decidedly more mixed.)

Beiter said he came to the event to talk about the refugee ban and the "war on immigrants." He was critical of the Trump Administration's position on immigration.

"His policies are wrong and xenophobic," Beiter said. "They also hurt the economy, our agricultural development and who we are as a people."

Walter Eckert, of Mendon, asked the first question and it was on immigration, so it went to Beiter.

"It's the businesses that employ illegal immigrants who are breaking the law," Eckert said. "Why do we not charge the employers of illegal immigrants?"

Beiter said that was a good question and he blamed greed.

He said agriculture in New York is a $3.5 billion industry and farmers fear with a clamp down in illegal immigration they will not be able to fill vital positions. He said in Niagara County, there are 1,200 migrant workers between May and November. He said these workers are exploited by farm owners.

"On one level this is a human tragedy," Beiter said. "It's slave labor that lowers the prices of our groceries, so the answer to this is comprehensive immigration reform. I think what you’re going to see as to why these businesses and corporations are not prosecuted is because they’re profiting from it." (Fact Check: The average migrant farm worker makes $12 an hour in the United States, with some earning as much as $15 an hour, and migrants are also provided housing at no cost on many New York farms.)

He said during the George W. Bush administration and the first part of Barack Obama's two terms, there were attempts at immigration reform, but that greed prevented these reforms.

"These issues tried to get on the table, but they were put down because corporate America makes too much money from our brown-skinned brothers and sisters who are here in our communities," he said.

Actually, there was comprehensive immigration reform bill considered in 2013. Dean Norton helped draft it and Collins supported it. It didn't pass.

Collins has said many times that never in his political career does he participate in town hall meetings because he doesn't find them productive. He would rather meet with small groups of people around specific topics. He has said he will talk with any constituents who ask for a meeting.

Maureen Torrey, for example, has said she and other farmers have had a productive relationship with Collins. 

"Since the election, Congressman Collins and his staff have been working with the agriculture community in his district with all the family farms and agribusinesses in his district weekly," Torrey said. "He has held bipartisan meetings on trade, immigration, and the economy of agriculture. He has been working hard to arrange meetings and educate people on what our needs are.

"He knows our issues and hasn't been afraid to speak them. He talked about our needs on national TV. He has opened doors for us. For the first time in many years, I feel we are making progress on issues."

There were also people at the event who let reporters know that they've requested meetings with Collins, but they haven't gotten a response.

The Batavian has been trying to arrange an in-person, hour-long, multi-topic interview with the congressman since late January. We've made at least a dozen requests and despite assurances that such an interview will take place -- and statements by Collins himself that he will sit down for an interview and that he enjoys being interviewed by The Batavian and would be happy to talk -- we have yet been able to secure a date for such an interview.

UPDATE/CLARIFICATION & DISCLOSURE: One of the organizers, Jane Cameron, has said I was invited to be a speaker at the town hall.  I honestly didn't remember the invitation. I found the email from March 30 where she said she wanted to talk with me about "your possible participation in a Town Hall ..." I wasn't sure what she meant by this, but I said I would cover the event but that I don't participate in partisan politics.  She also said there were two conservatives on the panel without specifying who those individuals are.

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Michelle Schoeneman

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Jeremy Besch

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Laura Colligan

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Andrew Beiter

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Walter Eckert, of Mendon

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April 22, 2017 - 10:46am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Le Roy, accident, news.

An accident is reported at Clay Street and Myrtle Street, Le Roy.

A subject has a complaint of chest pain.

Le Roy fire and Le Roy ambulance dispatched.

April 22, 2017 - 10:04am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Deal of the Day, advertisement.

Reminders of how the new Deal of the Day program works:

  • To make purchases, you must be registered. This is its own registration system, separate from the main registration for The Batavian.
  • Once registered you must be logged in.
  • You click on the orange button, if the item is not sold out, and it takes you to a PayPal button. This allows you to pay either with your PayPal account or with a credit card/debit card. The login for PayPal is completely separate from our accounts.
  • The first person to successfully complete the PayPal transaction wins the gift certificate.
  • You are eligible to buy the same item only once in a four-month period. We use the registration system to track this for you so you don't have to.
April 21, 2017 - 6:10pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Roswell Cancer Institute, batavia, news.

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Emma Harris, now 6, the subject of community support, including a cheer-a-thon fundraiser in 2015, has completed 826 days of chemotherapy in her fight against leukemia and today at Roswell Cancer Institute, she got to ring the bell celebrating the completion of her treatment.

Photo (submitted photo and info): Iris Hatcher, Hassan Harris, Emma Harris, and Athena Nesbeth. 

April 21, 2017 - 6:03pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Falcon Re-Furnishings, Harvester Center, batavia, business.

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The idea of starting a business, not working for somebody else, seemed like a good idea to Matt Cryer after he recently retired from the Army, so he and his wife Michelle talked it over and decided to work together on a new venture.

They've started Falcon Re-Furnishings, with manufacturing space in the Harvester Center.

The business is all about creating unique home decor and furnishing using salvaged items that can either be repurposed or restored. They either come up with their own ideas for their finds or they take custom orders.

"The beauty of it is we can build what you want," Michelle said. "How many times have you looked for a specific table for a specific spot in your house and it has to be this many dimensions? We needed one for in our bathroom. We only had a nine- to 12-inch space and we couldn’t find anything. Now we can do special orders for people, certain sizes or you need special colors to match your decor."

Their workspace has a few old chairs and tables that they will restore or repurpose -- Michelle is planning on recovering an old loveseat with lush, pink fur.

Matt does a work with discarded pallets, making tables, shelves, chairs and even a bar for a client.

One of the tables now is made from pallets and cast off cast iron from an old porch railing.

They're building a website, can be found on Facebook and plan to sell through Etsy.  They didn't want to open a retail store just yet, not until they understood the business better and see how it's going to grow.

Matt said with his military pension, as a fresh retiree, it seemed like the perfect time to give owning a business a try.

"If it works, it works," he said. "If it does, it doesn’t. At least I say I at least tried it."

Michelle thinks Batavia is a great market for them to try this type of business because much of what they'll make isn't available here, or there isn't much competition.

"You would have to go to Rochester or Buffalo to get a lot of this," she said. "We've got a lot of good feedback so far."

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April 21, 2017 - 5:26pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in byron-bergen, schools, education, news.
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Dr. Paul Brill
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Barry Miller

Press release:

Byron-Bergen Central Schools has named two alumni to the district’s Hall of Fame for 2017. Dr. Paul Brill (class of 1982) and the late Barry Miller (class of 1983) join the ranks of other distinguished Byron-Bergen alumni honored with a place in the Alumni Hall of Fame for their achievements after graduation.

The Byron-Bergen Alumni Hall of Fame recognizes the accomplishments of the district’s graduates, providing young people with positive adult role models and showing that graduates of Byron-Bergen can achieve high levels of accomplishment in their lives. This honor is in its 14th year and has become part of the school district culture. It is a permanent reminder to students about the outcome of hard work and diligence.

While at Byron-Bergen, Dr. Brill was involved in junior varsity and varsity baseball and track, along with Boys’ State. He also participated in peer counseling, yearbook planning and the Campus Life Club. After graduation, he attended Roberts Wesleyan College for two years prior to transferring to The College at Brockport where he graduated summa cum laude in 1987 with a bachelor’s degree in biology.

He obtained his medical degree at the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine, graduating magna cum laude in 1991. Dr. Brill served an internship in internal medicine at Allegheny General Hospital and residency training in diagnostic radiology at the University of Cincinnati. He switched career paths in 1994, and returned to at Allegheny General for his neurology residency. An additional fellowship year of training in neuromuscular was done at Duke University.

In 1998, he joined Anderson Neurological Associates (a group practice in Anderson, South Carolina), and has worked there as a neurologist ever since. Dr. Brill serves as the Neurology Clinical Director for the Medical University of South Carolina – AnMed Campus. He also has a teaching responsibility at The Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine. In 2014, Dr. Brill received the Patients’ Choice award, the Compassionate Doctor Recognition award, and was selected as one of the Top 10 Doctors in the State of South Carolina. Dr. Brill and his wife have two children, and are active in their local church and home school association.

In consideration of his civic duty and his dedication to healthcare and human services, Dr. Paul Brill serves as an inspirational role model to the youth of Byron-Bergen.

Barry Miller was Byron-Bergen’s senior class president in 1983, and worked with the lighting and sound crews for school musicals. He attended Genesee Community College and, in 1985, earned an Associate of Applied Science in computer repair technology. Three years later, he received a Bachelor of Science in organizational management. Miller was part of the graduating class of Leadership Genesee in 2008.

 

From 1986 through 1995, he worked at Business Methods, Inc., working his way up to the position of vice president of customer support. In 1996, he started Miller Millworks, Inc., his own company that provided cabinet and finish carpentry in Bergen. Additionally, he was one of the proprietors of the Beaver River Lodge in Stillwater, New York.

Miller served as a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician (EMT) for Bergen Volunteer Fire Department from 1983 to 2015, having held the position of president, secretary, and a member of the Board of Directors. A dedicated member of the rescue squad, he served as lieutenant, captain, and assistant chief. Miller also started the Bergen Fire Department EMT Explorer program, where he mentored members and provided training for becoming an emergency medical technician.

He served as one of the Genesee County coroners and was a member of the Bergen Town Board, Bergen Business and Civic Association, and Bergen United Methodist Church.

Miller was killed in 2015 while responding to an emergency call with the Bergen Fire Department. In 2016, through legislation proposed by Senators Kirsten Gillibrand and Charles Schumer, Congressman  Chris Collins, and signed by then-President Obama, the Bergen Post Office was renamed the “Barry G. Miller Post Office.” Miller was posthumously awarded the Liberty Medal, the highest honor that can be bestowed upon an individual by the New York State Senate. The award is given to individuals who have merited special commendation for exceptional, heroic, or humanitarian acts on behalf of fellow New Yorkers.

Miller continues to inspire the youth of the Byron-Bergen learning community through the legacy of his love, service, and support for the people in his hometown of Bergen and his passion and dedication to helping others.

The 2017 Byron-Bergen Alumni Hall of Fame inductees will be honored on Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at 7 p.m. in the Byron-Bergen High School Auditorium. Dr. Brill and a member of the Miller family will briefly speak to students and receive their Alumni Hall of Fame plaques during the school’s National Senior Honor Society induction ceremony. Dr. Brill will spend the day visiting with Byron-Bergen students and sharing how his school experience influenced his life.

April 21, 2017 - 5:16pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in BID, downtown, batavia, news.

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The Business Improvement District held its annual meeting and awards breakfast this morning at City Church's Generations Hall on Cedar Street, Batavia.

Above, Director Beth Kemp delivers opening remarks.

The Spirit of Downtown Award was given this year to Steve Hawley and his downtown business, The Insurance Center.  Hawley was out of town, so not available to accept the award.

Photos below: Amy Worthington, owner of Amy's Fluffy Friends, and a tireless volunteer for the BID, received one of two volunteer of the year awards. The other went to Corey Wolcott, bottom photo, manager of Angotti's Beverage, for his volunteer work on Beertavia, which is now heading into its third year as a local annual event.

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April 21, 2017 - 4:26pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in downtown, batavia, business, news, freshLAB.

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Demolition has started on the interior of the former Newberry's building in Downtown Batavia. The project will convert the building into a brewery and an incubator for startup restaurant businesses, known as freshLAB. The second and third floors will become apartments.

April 21, 2017 - 4:09pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in FAA, agriculture, oakfield-alabama, news.

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The Future Farmers of America chapter of Oakfield-Alabama-Elba received a $5,255 grant from the Tractor Supply Company and the National FFA. 

There were requests for funds totaling $86,170 from chapters in New York and only $27,911 was awarded to winning requests, including the $5,255 provided to OAE FFA to fund its projects, including a barn at Oakfield-Alabama High School that FFA members can use to raise livestock.

This will especially help FFA members who don't have property where they can raise livestock. FFA members will be able to sell their livestock at the annual 4-H Livestock Auction at the Genesee County Fair.

April 21, 2017 - 1:15pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in accident, alexander, news.

A vehicle has gone off the road and into the creek somewhere off of Stroh Road and Sandpit Road in Alexander.

The driver called a fire chief who notified dispatchers.

The car is in the water. The driver may have passed out. He isn't sure of his exact location.

Alexander fire is dispatched.

UPDATE 1:17 p.m.: The driver tells the chief he's blowing his horn. He isn't visible from the roadway. The chief has not spotted where he might have gone in. Dispatchers are going to try and ping his phone to determine his location.

UPDATE 1:19 p.m.: The vehicle has been located at Genesee Street and Maplewood.

UPDATE 1:21 p.m.: The driver is out of the vehicle. Tow truck requested to the scene. The vehicle is in the water.

UPDATE 1:23 p.m.: A deputy says the tow truck needs to expedite. It's fast-moving water and the car is being pulled deeper in. It's about six feet into the water now.

UPDATE(S) (By Billie) 1:49 p.m.: The male driver had a medical emergency and an Alexander ambulance took him to UMMC for evaluation. The tow truck is working to remove the vehicle from the water-filled culvert.

UPDATE 3:12 p.m.: Marshall Merle, chief of the Alexander Fire Department, said the victim in this incident is his boss who called his job site to reach him -- since he knew he was a volunteer fireman -- when he came to after blacking out and found he had crashed into a culvert with swiftly flowing water. The man was unsure of his location. Merle contacted the Emergency Dispatch Center, and tones went out for Alexander to respond. "We were running around trying to find him -- it took awhile," the chief said, adding the he did not know how long the victim had been unconscious before he came to and found himself in a predicament. There were no brake marks, Merle said, "he just went right off the road into the water." Firefighter Jeff Fluker finally located the man, who by that time had gotten out of his vehicle, which was quickly filling with water, and scrambled onto its roof. Getting him to safe ground was not too difficult. They used a ladder that he climbed across. Safety was the biggest concern. "We didn't want to get anybody in the water," Merle said. "A car's not worth somebody's life. We can go back for the car. Safety of our guys is the primary concern." Merle added that "normally this crick isn't running like it is now." They had to act quickly in the rescue before the vehicle drifted into the larger "crick."

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April 21, 2017 - 1:10pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Calling All Dogs, batavia, business, pets, animals, news.

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Tori Ganino, owner of Calling All Dogs, in the Harvester Center, has been accepted for membership in the International Canine Behaviorists.

The England-based organization provides ongoing professional development for dog behaviorists and enforces a code of ethics and code of conduct and requires certification for membership.

Ganino said she believes she's the first member in the United States.

April 21, 2017 - 12:42pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Batavia Downs, batavia, entertainment, music, news.

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The Marshall Tucker Band

Press release:

Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel has announced the lineup for this year’s Rockin’ the Downs concert series, and classic rock and country music fans will be very excited.

Kicking off the series on Sunday, June 4th is country powerhouse Lonestar. Known for merging their country roots with strong melodies and rich vocals, Lonestar has sold over 10 million albums, and achieved 10 #1 country hits including "No News," "Come Crying to Me," and their crossover smash "Amazed," which was also #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. The band's awards include the 2001 CMA Vocal Group of the Year.

Next up, on Friday, June 23rd, is Dennis DeYoung and the Music of Styx. DeYoung was the songwriter of the band Styx’s hits like "Come Sail Away," "Babe," "Mr. Roboto," "The Best of Times," " Don’t Let it End," "Show Me the Way," and "Lady."

On Friday, June 30th, the money man, Eddie Money, will rock the house with his slew of massive hits that includes "Baby Hold On," "Two Tickets to Paradise," "Think I’m in Love," "Shakin’," "Take Me Home Tonight," and "I Wanna Go Back." Along with having sold more than 28 million records, Money’s songs have appeared in dozens of movies and television shows, and have recently been included in hit video games like Grand Theft Auto and Guitar Hero.

Founding member of Foreigner, Lou Gramm will be bringing down the house on Friday, July 7th. A native of nearby Rochester, Gramm has brought his amazing voice to the rock scene for more than 40 years. Gramm performed vocals on such hits as "Hot Blooded," "Feels Like the First Time," "Cold as Ice," "Double Vision," "Dirty White Boy," "Head Games," and "Juke Box Hero." With Gramm at the helm, Foreigner's first eight singles cracked the Billboard Top 20, making them the first band since The Beatles to achieve this.

Southern rockers The Marshall Tucker Band bring their 40 years of hits to Batavia Downs on Friday, July 14th. With hit singles like "Heard it in a Love Song," "Fire on the Mountain," "Can't You See," and "Take the Highway," The Marshall Tucker Band earned seven gold and three platinum albums while they were on the Capricorn Records label. During the '90s, the MTB scored four hit singles on Billboard's country chart and one on Billboard's gospel chart. Their music has also been featured on the soundtracks of movies such as "Smokey and the Bandit," "Blow," "The Pursuit of D.B. Cooper," "Shipwrecked," "Crank 2," "Don’t Mess with Zohan," "Stop Loss," "Swing Vote," "Taking Chance" and many others as well as many TV Shows.

On Friday, July 21st, Lee Greenwood brings his chart-topping music to the Downs. His hit song, "God Bless the USA" has been voted the most recognizable patriotic song in America. Greenwood has won numerous industry awards including, Male Vocalist of the Year for the Academy of Country Music in 1983, two Male Vocalist of the Year awards from the Country Music Association, 1983 and 1984 and a Grammy for Top Male Vocal Performance in 1985 for “I.O.U.” With seven number-one songs and 25 charted singles, his hits include "It Turns Me Inside Out," "Ring on Her Finger Time on Her Hands," "She’s Lyin'," "I don’t Mind the Thorns if You’re the Rose," and "Dixie Road."

Tickets for all six concerts are available at www.BataviaConcerts.com and sales began at 10 a.m. today (April 21). Individual tickets to each concert are $10 for General Admission while VIP tickets are $25. Tickets can also be purchased in-person at Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel at their “Made in America” store located in the lobby.

“We are very proud to offer our loyal patrons and the people of this region an amazing lineup of music legends that are sure to electrify Batavia Downs with their hits from today and yesterday,” said Ryan Hasenauer, director of Marketing at Batavia Downs Gaming. “The fact that we are able to keep General Admission ticket prices at just $10 ensures that local music fans aren’t priced out of seeing their favorite artists.”

Hotel room/ticket packages will be available for each concert. Each concert ticket is also redeemable once at Player’s Club in the three days following the concert for $10 Free Play to be used on one of Batavia Downs Gaming’s 800+ gaming machines. Additional information may be found at www.BataviaDownsGaming.com.

April 21, 2017 - 12:35pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Charles Schumer, agriculture, news, trade.

Press release:

“President Trump and I spoke yesterday about reversing Canada's new and unfair dairy-pricing policy. It is an unwise policy that violates our agreements and hurts our farmers, and we agreed to work together to immediately address the issue.

"Since Canada’s damaging policies also impact dairy farms in Wisconsin, I suggested reaching out to Speaker Ryan. The three of us, in conjunction with Senator Tammy Baldwin and other stakeholders, will develop a comprehensive plan to tackle this issue.

"We can all agree that, it is critical to level the playing field for our hard-working dairy farmers and make sure our Canadian neighbors rescind their unfair policy and again play by the rules,” said Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer.

Previously: Schumer uses stop in Bergen to raise concerns about rail safety and trade with Canada

April 21, 2017 - 12:30pm

ladyantfordlcpac2017.png

The concert lineup for the 2017 season at Darien Lake Performing Arts Center continues to fill out, with a total of 23 shows schedule after the latest addition, Lady Antebellum.

Other shows added over the past few weeks: Goo Goo Dolls, Train, Zac Brown Band, Third Eye Blind, Nickleback, One Republic, Kings of Leon, and John Mayer.

This is the 25th season for Darien Lake PAC and to celebrate, concert tickets are also good for admission to the theme park.

For a complete concert lineup and ticket information, click here.

April 21, 2017 - 12:16pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Deal of the Day, advertisement.

Reminders of how the new Deal of the Day program works:

  • To make purchases, you must be registered. This is its own registration system, separate from the main registration for The Batavian.
  • Once registered you must be logged in.
  • You click on the orange button, if the item is not sold out, and it takes you to a PayPal button. This allows you to pay either with your PayPal account or with a credit card/debit card. The login for PayPal is completely separate from our accounts.
  • The first person to successfully complete the PayPal transaction wins the gift certificate.
  • You are eligible to buy the same item only once in a four-month period. We use the registration system to track this for you so you don't have to.

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