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April 13, 2018 - 11:55pm

Convicted felon charged in Arby's armed robbery

posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia, news, notify.

img_1790arrest.jpg

mug-michael_piasta.jpg
Michael Piasta in  2010

More than seven years ago, Michael J. Piasta stood before Judge Robert C. Noonan and said he thought he could turn his life around.

"At this point, I just want to say I don’t feel that I’m hopeless," Piasta told Noonan before receiving a maximum state prison term of seven years for burglary. "Regardless of what happens today, I think I can make things better."

Piasta served the maximum term. He was released Oct. 24.

In March, he allegedly robbed the Arby's Resturant in Batavia. Today, he was arrested by Batavia PD with assistance from members of the Local Drug Task Force.

He is charged with robbery in the second degree, criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, and grand larceny in the third degree.

He allegedly got away from the Arby's robbery March 23 with more than $6,000 in cash.

When he was arrested on West Main Street, three other individuals were in the truck with him. Batavia PD did not release any information on those individuals or whether they were charged with any crimes.

Piasta was jailed without bail following arraignment in City Court.

When he appeared before Noonan in 2010, Piasta already had a lengthy criminal record. 

On Nov. 5, 2010, Piasta entered a guilty plea to burglary, 3rd, and two counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument. Piasta also admitted that he broke into a business at 56 Harvester Ave., Batavia, and stole a credit card -- running up more than $500 in charges -- and checks. He attempted to forge the checks at two local banks.

That summer, Piasta was also accused of stealing DVDs from Pandora's Boxx and shoplifting from Wilson Farms.

Rich Richmond
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"At this point, I just want to say I don’t feel that I’m hopeless," Piasta told Noonan before receiving a maximum state prison term of seven years for burglary. "Regardless of what happens today, I think I can make things better."

This perfectly illustrates that crime is fun, and profitable with minimal consequences for bad behavior. Piasta played society for a sucker. Until we go back harsh sentences and make prisons places to be avoided, and not a temporary rest-over, we'll continue to have more of the same.

Doug Yeomans
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Rich, he got 7 years and served all of it last time. 7 years in the pokey has got to be a difficult stretch, but he must not have hated it enough to do something that'll probably get him 20 years this time.

Rich Richmond
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Doug,

I agree. It didn't phase him a bit.

Commitment History for PIASTA, MICHAEL J
10B3916 - MALE - Born 05/10/1980

Michael J Piasta has multiple commitments to NYS DOCCS. The commitments are listed below, most recent first. Inmate names are taken from court documents and so may vary.

10B3916 PIASTA, MICHAEL J DISCH M E AUBURN
06B0401 PIASTA, MICHAEL J JR DISCH M E ORLEANS
03B0078 PIASTA, MICHAEL J JR PAR PAROLE LIVINGSTON

Howard B. Owens
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The vast majority of people who are convicted of crimes fit one of two categories -- sociopaths and drug addicts.

Longer prison sentences won't stop either of them from committing crimes.

The sociopath doesn't care and the drug addict isn't thinking about the consequences.

We've been losing the drug war for 40 years. We got tougher with drugs and the drug problem is worse than ever.

I know you've heard it before, the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over expecting different results.

If you love big government and more and more money being drained from the pockets of taxpayers with worse results, then, yes, by all means, let's lock drug addicts up for longer periods. Let's continue to make sure people who commit minor drug-related violations get criminal records so it's harder for them to join the military, get into a good college, get better job training, get hired into good paying jobs, and find there isn't much better to do with their lives than keep taking drugs.

That strategy has worked so well for us so far, hasn't it?

BTW: There's nothing conservative about proposals that grow government and deliver poor results.

Rich Richmond
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Howard,

If the vast majority of people who are convicted of crimes fit one of two categories -- sociopaths and drug addicts, why do you want to send them to college to sell drugs or worse to our children? Do you think the Military wants sociopaths in their ranks?

Howard B. Owens
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Rich,

I advocated nothing about sociopaths. My comment is devoid of any recommendation of what to do with sociopaths or any opinion about them.

I discussed the failed war on drugs.

Not every person who uses drugs is an addict. Not every person who becomes an addict is irredeemable.

Why do you want to waste more of my tax money on a failed war on drugs? My taxes are already too high. I hate wasting money. I believe in shrinking the size of the state and federal governments not endlessly expanding it.

Rich Richmond
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Howard,

Where in Post #1 or Post #4 did I say anything about the War on Drugs?

Howard B. Owens
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In your first comment, you state that locking up addicts longer will solve the problem of drug-related crime.

As I stated, addicts won't think about the consequences before committing a crime. Make all crimes life sentences (which would be the logical conclusion of that line of thinking). It won't mean people stop committing crimes. It will just mean we spend more money on prison.

We've added all kinds of sentencing enhancements over the past few decades. They've been great for attorneys and prison guards not so great for the rest of us who foot the bill.

The war on drugs mentality of "just lock them up longer" is obviously a failure.

Rich Richmond
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My first comment was about the words-statement, convicted recidivist felon, Michael J. Piasta to Judge Noonan. I also never stated "locking them up longer," those are your words. Harsh and longer have different meanings.

You, however, stated, explicitly "The vast majority of people who are convicted of crimes fit one of two categories -- sociopaths and drug addicts.”

Of course, having sociopaths and drug addicts locked up will keep them from committing a crime. Convicted recidivist felon, Michael J. Piasta, didn’t commit a single armed robbery while he was in prison.

Again, where in Post #1 or Post #4 did I say anything about the War on Drugs? Where did I explicitly state that locking up addicts longer will solve the problem of drug-related crime?

Howard B. Owens
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Rich, you should go back and read the story from 2010 about Micheal J. Piasta.

Again, how much of my tax money do you want to waste locking up drug addicts instead of dealing with addiction in a way that reduces taxpayer expense and has a better chance of A) making fewer addicts; B) gets more addicts off of drugs?

Rich Richmond
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Howard,

Why won't you answer my questions? Again, where in Post #1 or Post #4 did I say anything about the War on Drugs? Where did I explicitly state that locking up addicts longer will solve the problem of drug-related crime?

Did I explicitly make those statements, yes or no?

Howard B. Owens
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Every time I read your first comment, I read it the same way, as I’ve articulated. I believe I’ve answered your question.

Rich Richmond
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Thank you for the prevarication, disguised as an articulated answer, Howard. They have very good drug treatment programs in prison should the addict chose to participate. The fact remains, convicted recidivist felon, Michael J. Piasta didn’t commit any crimes while in prison, and that is money well spent.

Howard B. Owens
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I’m not sure they have good drug treatment programs in prison. I’ve seen one too many addicts shot up the day they get out.

But more importantly, the place to do drug treatment isn’t in prison, it’s before somebody developes the criminal record that gets them there. We need to stop turning people into criminals for simple possession so they have a better chance of stopping the downward spiral before it starts.

Once somebody reaches the stage to of committing felonies the answers are much more elusive. Longer prison sentences clearly are failing society, drug treatment has a low efficancy rate, so we’re in a real bind.

Howard B. Owens
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Again, it doesn’t appear drug treatment is all that effective — 95 percent of addicts resume use after release.

https://www.nadcp.org/sites/default/files/nadcp/Facts%20on%20Drug%20Cour...

Rich Richmond
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They have good treatment programs in prison. Inmates must attend classes to be eligible for early release or they must serve their entire sentence. There are treatment facilities on the outside should the addict or potential addict choose to go there. Many of these people are already receiving help from Social Service, and we don't require drug testing. How do you force, convince, cajole, whatever, an addict or potential addict to seek treatment if they don't want to go?

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