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August 24, 2015 - 5:43pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, pathstone.

Press release:

The City of Batavia has partnered with PathStone Corporation to provide homeowners and landlords access to services that will provide a greater ability to maintain and manage their properties and build a stronger a community. In addition, the City is taking a proactive step to provide landlords with additional tools to screen potential tenants and monitor their properties.

“We have caring residents and great neighborhoods. The partnership with PathStone and additional programs by the Police Department will help our residents add value to their homes,” said Council President Brooks Hawley. “These new initiatives are geared towards providing homeowners and landlords with greater resources and tools for improving and maintaining their properties. The programs are designed to help current owners add to the existing stability of the City’s housing stock.”

Stuart J. Mitchell, president and CEO PathStone Corporation said, "PathStone Corporation is very pleased to partner with the City of Batavia to provide comprehensive housing services to landlords, tenants and homeowners. Our years of hands-on experience and expertise combined with generous funding will make it possible for many families and businesses to improve living conditions for both owner-occupied and rental properties. The City of Batavia will benefit from an improved housing stock and a stabilized and expanded tax base."

The following initiatives are announced to help homeowners and quality rental properties continue to succeed.

In partnership with PathStone Corporation through a New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) grant, PathStone will be providing free workshops to homeowners and landlords so they can receive free/reduced cost energy audits, income-based energy improvements grants of up to 50 percent, and help them access low interest NYSERDA loans to make their homes and rental units more comfortable and reduce utility bills.

Following these workshops, PathStone continues to assist landowners by selecting Energy Star contractors and identify alternative funding for their home improvements. The next free energy-saving workshop will be Oct. 20th from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Batavia PathStone office, 7 Batavia City Centre. For more information please call (585) 442-2030, ext. 213.

The City will be partnering with The Housing Council at PathStone to host the area's first Operating Rental Property Workshop. It will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 10. The workshop will cover topics such as Fair Housing Laws, Screening & Selection of Tenants, Leases & Security Deposit, and Overview of Eviction Process. Also, special guest and local attorney Thomas Williams, Esq., will present on neighborhood legal services and navigating the legal system as a landlord. The cost of this workshop is $45 per person. Pre-registration is required, for more information call (585) 546-3700, or register on-line at www.RocLandlord.com.

The City Police Department will be providing landlords with the ability to easily request tenant records checks for tenant selection. Records checks have to be submitted in person to the Police Department by potential tenants and the City Police Department will provide both the tenant and landlord with a search of all Batavia Police Department records and the Genesee County Sheriff’s records for any arrest and contact information about the tenant within the last five years. The cost of the records check is $10 and can be paid by the tenant. Forms can be downloaded from the City website at http://www.batavianewyork.com/Files.

The City Police Department will be providing landlords with the ability to receive Police Department contact reports for their respective properties. Similar to a Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) request, a property owner can request a report including police contact with their respective rental properties that will include the date, time, location and incident type. This will provide landlords with easy access to information pertaining to activity surrounding rental properties.

FOIL requests only have to be completed once by the landlord providing the property address(es) they would like to receive information regarding and on the second Monday of every month a PDF report, including all police contacts for their respective properties, will be e-mailed to the landlord. Paper reports can be requested at $.25 (cents) per page. Any unauthorized information will be redacted per FOIL and released. Forms can be downloaded from the City Web site at http://www.batavianewyork.com/Files.

"The police department tenant record check and contact reporting is another avenue for landlords to get tenants in their rentals that are beneficial and positive for the city's neighborhoods" said Council President Hawley.

The City’s 2012 Community Improvement Plan recommended the City take advantage of its existing residential stability and affordability by developing programs that will generate the greatest reinvestment in existing housing stock. The plan identified that the City’s stable and affordable housing market, both owner-occupied and rental, as a great value.

PathStone is a Rochester based not-for-profit community development and human services organization, that provides services to low-income families and economically distressed communities throughout New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana, Virginia, Vermont, and Puerto Rico. It is a certified Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI).

The Housing Council at PathStone is one of New York State’s largest HUD-approved comprehensive housing counseling agencies. A not-for-profit corporation founded in 1971, in Rochester, The Housing Council provides landlord education, foreclosure prevention, pre-purchase counseling, emergency housing services and fair housing education. The Housing Council provides property management tools and strategies to landlords in order to enhance their business skills and familiarize them with their rights and responsibilities.

August 24, 2015 - 4:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia.

When the two brothers appeared in Genesee County Court this afternoon with their mother, they did not appear as young men you would readily pick out as those accused of a violent gang assault.

Polite, well dressed and clean cut, Terrence D. Johnson and Leonard A. Johnson III, entered not guilty pleas to the charges of first-degree gang assault 1st and first-degree assault.

They were indicted by a grand jury, along with Terrance M. Schramm, for their alleged part in the assault of a man on Holland Avenue in the city on April 29.

Initially, charged with a misdemeanor of assault, 3rd, Schramm and the Johnsons, faced the more serious felony counts once the case was presented to the grand jury.

The gang assault statute really has nothing to do with whether the defendents are affiliated with a street gang -- in fact, there's no indication that's the case here -- but that a violent act was carried out with more than two people participating. The exact language of the penal code is:

A person is guilty of gang assault in the first degree when, with intent to cause serious physical injury to another person and when aided by two or more other persons actually present, he causes serious physical injury to such person or to a third person.
 

Schramm and the Johnson brothers were allegedly involved in an argument with the victim at 27 Holland Ave. and are accused of kicking the victim and using some hard object, such as brass knuckles, to hit him.

The victim's injuries were initially reported as minor, hence the initial misdemeanor charge, but District Attorney Lawrence Friedman sought the felony counts as the result of the victim apparenlty suffering "permanent impairment of health."

The exact nature of the victim's injuries are not available at this time.

Leonard, 22, appeared in court in a sharp gray suit, white shirt and tie. Terrence wore gray pants, a lighter gray shirt and a tie.  

Friedman did not seek bail for either defendant. They were both released under supervision of Genesee Justice.

Noonan noted that given the serious nature of the charges, a no-bail release is unique.

"A gang assault charge would normally result in a sustantial bail," Noonan said. "It's a great concession to Mr. (Leonard) Johnson to release him under supervision."

There is no record of prior arrests for Terrence Johnson, which contributed to his ability to get a release under supervision.

Leonard Johnson, who lives with his brother on Hutchins Street, must be in his residence every day from 6 p.m. until 7 a.m. Terrence Johnson can only be out during those hours while at work or traveling directly to and from work.

They are to have no contact with the alleged victim.

The attorney for the 25-year-old Schramm is on vacation so his arraignment on the grand jury indictment won't be until next week.

The three men are facing from five to 25 years in state prison on the Class B violent felonies.

August 24, 2015 - 3:52pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in City Church, batavia, downtown.

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Workers outside the City Church building on East Main Street this afternoon. Pastor Marty Macdonald said the floodlights are being replaced with LEDs and crews also do some masonry maintenance.

August 24, 2015 - 3:37pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in City Fire, batavia.

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August 24, 2015 - 3:32pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in BARNS, alexander.

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August 24, 2015 - 12:47pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Wiener Dog Race, Batavia Downs, sports.

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Press release from Batavia Downs

The third time racing in the annual Batavia Downs Wiener Dog races sponsored by Genesee Feeds was the charm for Heidi Kaiser’s dachshund “Piglet." He cruised to a comfortable victory defeating nine other fleet-footed wiener dogs in the champion final.

Ten elimination heats were conducted to determine the final field.

Sarah Farley’s “Ruby” rallied on the far outside to out finish Adrienne Pender’s “Pablo” for second. "Pablo” was the most impressive heat winner and appeared to be the dachshund to beat.

The owners of top three finishers all received gaming free and Clubhouse buffets. All participants received a doggy bag from Genesee Feeds. 

The beautiful day included a first time ever visit by harness ambassador Sydney Weaver. The 15-year-old, known to everyone in North American harness racing, and her parents Lisa and Don Weaver were special guests of Batavia Downs.

Attendance for the dog races, the final piece of Fun Family Day was estimated at 3,200.

Photos by Howard Owens.

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In the fourth race, the wiener dog "Wienie," owned by Debbie Odrobina and who relied on a wheeled cart for its hindquarters, was attacked by another competitor. The dogs were separated and put back in the race, but the other dog turned on "Wienie" again. "Wienie" was allowed to run again in a subsequent race, and was a clear crowd favorite, but he got a slow start the second time around and ambled up the track.

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August 24, 2015 - 9:20am
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia, Alabama, Le Roy.

Edwin David Young, 54, of Furnaceville Road, Ontario, Canada, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .25 or greater, failure to keep right, and moving from lane unsafely. Young was reportedly involved in an accident at 6:55 a.m. Friday on Route 77, Alabama, which was investigated by Deputy Lonnie Nati. 

Horatio Coleman, 61, of Oak Street, Batavia, is charged with trespass. Coleman was allegedly in Walmart after being banned from the store.

Scott D. Fairfield, 21, of Maple Avenue, Batavia, is charged with DWI and driving with a BAC of .08 or greater. Fairfield was arrested following a report of a suspicious condition by Le Roy PD.

Stephen E. Couglar, 45, of Wayland, is charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. Couglar was charged following a traffic stop by Le Roy PD.

Erin K Douglas, 39, of Lyell Ave, Rochester, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 or greater, aggravated unlicensed operation, failure to change address and speeding in zone. Douglas was stopped by Le Roy PD on Aug. 15. He was jailed on $750 bail.

Dezarae P. Benedict, 22, of Bigelow Avenue, Silver Springs, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 or greater, failure to keep right and inadequate muffler. Benedict was stopped Saturday by Le Roy PD.

Steven A. Miller, 25, of Clark Street, Spencerport, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 and speeding in zone. Miller was stopped Sunday by Le Roy PD.

August 24, 2015 - 9:03am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Eugene Jankowski Jr, sports, shooting.

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Press release:

Eugene Jankowski Jr. finished the 2015 3 Gun Nation Semi Pro season ranked 18th in the country after a strong performance at the 2015 3 Gun Nation Eastern Regional held Aug. 1st at Peacemaker National Training Center, Gerrardstown, W.Va. Finishing in the top 25 nationally, earned Jankowski an invitation to the 3 Gun Nation 2015 National match & Pro Qualifier.

3 Gun Nation Nationals & Pro Qualifier is an invite-only, major national match, with slots earned based on 3 Gun Nation Member participation and merit. Presented by Remington Outdoor Company, the match will be held at the U.S. Shooting Academy in Tulsa, Okla., this October.

The 3 Gun Nation Nationals will be held in conjunction with the televised 3GN Pro and Lady Pro Series Championships. 3 Gun is a shooting sport requiring the use of a modern rifle, shotgun and pistol interchangeably during each stage of fire.

August 24, 2015 - 8:35am
posted by Howard B. Owens in pets, animals, alexander.

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A resident of Alexander Road, Alexander, found this apparently lost cat. The cat has a flea collar, so the cat definitely has a home and an owner. Contact 585-813-4560.

August 21, 2015 - 4:54pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Notre Dame, football, sports.

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Any season that Notre Dame doesn't make sectionals might seem like a disappointing year, but Head Coach Rick Mancuso doesn't look on 2014 that way at all for his squad.

"Disappointing? No. We were building all they way through the season and I thought we got better every week," Mancuso said. "I think we're just going to take from last year, where we built to, and keep building going forward here."

All but two of last year's starters are returning this year, and from the looks of things the 2015 team is bigger and stronger.

"We have lot more experience," Mancuso said. "It makes it a lot easier, what we're trying to go through, what we're trying to teach them and we don't have to go over a lot of things. We're a lot sharper. We're fine-tuning more than coaching from the base up."

Key returners include CJ Suozzi at tight end, Ethan Osborne at full back, and half-back duties will be split between Peter Daversa and Jack Sutherland. Mancuso has yet to name his starting QB.

"We have a great group of kids," Mancuso said. "Our linemen look great. They've spent a lot of time in weight room since November and starting to show. I
really think our conditioning is probably the best we've seen in the long time."

It will take a record of 5-2, maybe even 6-1 for a spot in the post-season. It will be a week-by-week, game-by-game effort to get there, Mancuso said, but he seems to like his team's chances.

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August 21, 2015 - 3:34pm

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Today, in Austin Park, the 2nd Annual Children's Carnival, sponsored by Community Action of Genesee and Orleans Counties.

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August 21, 2015 - 2:58pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia.

Batavia PD is trying to keep a tight lid on information about its investigation into the death of Troy Hickman.

Hickman's body was found Aug. 7 floating in the Tonawanda Creek in an area behind Kibbe Park.

While the Medical Examiner's Office in Monroe County won't say yet that he was dead longer than two days, Det. Eric Hill did confirm this afternoon that Hickman was last seen alive July 31.

That's even more information that investigators want to put out, Hill said, because people who knew Hickman are still being interviewed and detectives won't want to taint anybody's recollection of events.

"It's still a sensitive issue because it's an ongoing investigation," Hill said. "I don't know how much more information we'll be able to release at this point."

In all, five Batavia PD detectives are working on the case, though they continue to handle other cases while waiting for calls to be returned or potential interview subjects to be located.

Hill said detectives are interested in talking to anybody and everybody who might have information about Hickman leading up to the time of his death.

"We don't know at this point (how he died)," Hill said. "Nothing is off the table, from homicide to suicide to accidental drowning. We don't know at this point."

Previously:

August 21, 2015 - 9:34am
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia, Darien.

Amanda R. Gillett, 32, of Clifton Avenue, Batavia, is charged with obligation of a parent (curfew violation). Gillett's 14-year-old son was allegedly found out and about in violation of the city's 10 p.m. to sunrise curfew for minors.

Donna A. Laird, 47, of West Main Street, Batavia, is charged with obligation of a parent (curfew violation). Larid's 15-year-old son was allegedly in Williams Park in violation of the city's 10 p.m. to  sunrise  curfew for minors.

Chandra M. Propst, 46, of Central Avenue, Batavia, is charged with obligation of a parent (curfew violation). Larid's 15-year-old son was allegedly in Williams Park in violation of the city's 10 p.m. to sunrise curfew for minors.

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     Adrienne Bradford

Adrienne A. Bradford, 39, of Darien, is charged with harassment, 2nd, and menacing. Bradford was arrested by State Police following a report of a domestic incident involving a knife. Bradford allegedly menaced another person and exited the residence holding two large kitchen knives. Troopers report it was necessary to deploy a Taser to subdue Bradford before taking her into custody. She was jailed on $1,000 bail.

Salvatore F. Pedone, 20, of Fairport, is charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. Pedone was a passenger in a car stopped for speeding on Judge Road in the Town of Alabama. Marijuana residue was allegedly found in a container in Pedone's possession.

Maricarmen Rivera, 24, of Kenwood Avenue, Batavia, is charged with DWI, driving with a BAC of .08 or greater and speeding in zone (61 in a 30 mph zone). Rivera was stopped at 2:18 a.m. Thursday on Oak Street, Batavia, by Officer Christopher Lindsay.

Leonard C. Millard, 58, of Jackson Street, Batavia, was arrested on a warrant for alleged failure to appear on a court case.

James Edward Wroten, 48, of Raymond Avenue, Batavia, is charged with violation of an order of protection. Wroten was allegedly found in the home of the protected party.

A 16-year-old resident of Darien is charged with criminal mischief, 4th, unlicensed operation, leaving the scene of a property damage accident and speeding in special hazards. The charges were filed in Wyoming County following an accident on Folsomdale Road, Bennington. The vehicle was allegedly stolen out of Cowlesville and was owned by the youth's parents. The youth was also charged in Genesee County.

August 21, 2015 - 6:00am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Batavia's List, thebatavian, Sponsored Post, advertisement.

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Visit Batavia's List and post your ad today!

Also: Sign up for our new daily e-mail newsletter. Get the day's headlines plus the latest marketplace posts delivered to your inbox every day at 5 p.m.

And: Like Batavia's List on Facebook.

August 20, 2015 - 5:41pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, animals, Deer, DEC.

Deer are causing damage in Batavia and residents say the problem is as bad as they can ever remember it, but that doesn't mean a solution will be easy to find.

DEC Biologist Art Kirsch led a two-hour meeting on the issue Wednesday night, but offered no clear answers and said it could take years for Batavia to thin its deer herd to a less destructive level.

City Manager Jason Molino agreed.

"We've got the right folks at the state level to help us," Molino said. "We've just got to get the right folks in the community to participate and try to come up with a solution. Unfortunately, the solution isn't a cookie-cutter solution and I don't think the time frame is either. I don't think what anyone can predict what type of obstacles we might receive in the process."

Several residents told of the problems they face, including Gus Galliford.

"We're concerned about the deer just ravaging our property," Galliford said. "They're coming in numbers we've never seen before. I built my house 25 years ago and lived in the neighborhood all that time, but after this past spring, they're just destroying the whole thing."

The deer have cost his family thousands and thousands of dollars, Galliford said.

Kirsch said an overpopulation of deer are a problem on at least three levels: ecological damage, car accidents and transmission of disease.

His best suggestions for now: fencing, repellents, and fertility control.

Molino suggested the city may need to set up a committee to study the issue and recommend a solution.

Reporting for story provided by The Batavian's news partner, WBTA AM/FM.

August 20, 2015 - 5:03pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in agriculture, BOCES, Le Roy, Pavilion, education.

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Press release: 

Sarah Noble-Moag’s roots are deeply immersed in the business of agriculture. Her family tree spans across generations of farmers and thousands of acres of land. Although she is deeply immersed in her family business called Noblehurst Farms, she truly knows the value of giving back to the community.

Noble-Moag was recently honored with the Genesee Valley School Board Association’s Albert Hawk Award. This award is presented annually to a current or former school board member for outstanding contributions to public education and children in his or her own community.

Noble-Moag is modest about her accomplishments but the list of her contributions is long and noteworthy.

“I come from a family of educators. Becoming a board member was a natural extension of the stewardship that my family has supported for generations,” she said.

Noble-Moag serves on a number of local, regional and state boards including the Agricultural Affiliates Board of Directors, and the New York State Agricultural Society. In 2014, she was appointed to the Genesee Gateway Local Development Corporation Board of Directors.

She served for 11 years on the Pavilion School Board and held positions as trustee, vice president and president of the board of education. Her efforts for continued improvement resulted in the district being honored as a “Reward School” by New York state in 2007 and again in 2014. Noble-Moag was instrumental in the development of a new career and technical education program offered by the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership and Genesee Community College.

The Agri-Business Academy gives high school seniors the opportunity to explore careers in the agricultural field as they earn college credit. During her time as trustee, the Pavilion School Board was faced with difficult decisions especially when the district faced drastic budget cuts due to the Gap Elimination Adjustment. But some of her best moments were when she was able to witness students’ successes.

“After a capital improvement project was completed, I was at school for an event," Noble-Moag said. "I looked up and saw students on stage in the new auditorium. As I glanced around, I saw the."

Making those complicated decisions during challenging times can be difficult, said Ken Ellison, superintendent of Pavilion Central Schools. According to Ellison, Noble-Moag always kept the students’ best interests as the top priority.

He said: “During her board tenure, Sarah’s leadership contributed in so many powerful ways. Sarah was a valued partner during the merger/annexation study with Wyoming CS. A merger process can be an emotionally charged event and very divisive in the school communities involved.

"Sarah brought wisdom and perspective to a very challenging process. Sarah also served on the PCS Board during one of the most challenging fiscal periods ever faced by our school. At one point our Gap Elimination Adjustment was $1.6 million dollars. Sarah was a vital partner in developing strategies, and in some cases sacrifices, to keep the district on firm financial footing."

Education has always been a valued priority in her family hence the reason for her dedication to the Pavilion Central School District. Many generations of both the Noble and Moag families have graced the halls and walked the graduation stage at Pavilion Central. Noble-Moag’s mother was a home economics teacher and her mother-in-law worked in the library.

But what resounds deeply with Noble-Moag are words from her grandmother’s senior thesis from Cortland written in 1926.

“Just now there is fraud in business, humbug in politics, back biting, slander and deceit in social intercourse. Do you want your children to repair to such practices as a standard of conduct? We must give them an education, which will lift them infinitely above the moral and intellectual level of life outside the school, today. We must teach them to aspire to be all they can.” -- Written by Rella Smith in 1926.

“These words resonate with me; my grandmother was a wise woman. It’s vital that we provide our children with the best education possible," Noble-Moag said. “By becoming involved with their school districts, parents can make a difference and have a voice in making decisions for their children and students."

Noble-Moag is a graduate of Cornell University. She resides in Pavilion with her husband, Timothy Moag. They are the parents of three grown children, Griffin, Rella (named for Noble-Moag’s grandmother) and Austin.

August 20, 2015 - 4:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in agriculture, food processing, business, batavia, GCEDC.

Press release:

Genesee County has once again been recognized as one of the fastest growing “food processing employment leaders” by "Business Facilities," a national site selection publication.

Business Facilities provides annual rankings of metro and global areas in various categories, including food processing and job growth, among others. Genesee County ranked at number seven in a list of top 10 mid-sized metro areas for food-processing growth, making this year the fifth time in 10 years that Genesee County has earned national ranking in this category.

The agricultural, food and beverage sectors in Genesee County employ approximately 1,500 people. The region’s employment numbers continue to increase as economic development focused on agri-business remains a top priority of the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) Board of Directors.

“The growth of the food processing sector in our region reflects the positive economic climate here which has been significantly enhanced through the Genesee Valley Agri-Business Park, the first agri-business site of its kind in New York State,” said Steve Hyde, president and CEO of the GCEDC. “We are very pleased to be once again recognized by 'Business Facilities' as a leader in food processing employment and plan to continue expanding our efforts in this critically important economic sector.” 

The Genesee Valley Agri-Business Park encompasses 211 shovel ready, pre-permitted acres strategically located between Western New York and the Finger Lakes Region in Batavia, NY. 

The site provides access to a short and main line rail access to move products, and large capacity municipal sewer and water. Through the support of National Grid and National Fuel the site has an enhanced utility infrastructure.

Alpina Foods, LLC, a leading dairy producing company in Colombia and South America, opened its first specialty yogurt manufacturing plant at the Genesee Valley Agri-Business Park in 2013. In 2013, PepsiCo, in a joint venture with German dairy company Theo Müller, opened a $206-million yogurt manufacturing facility, Muller Quaker Dairy.

Other key food processing and related companies in Genesee County include O-AT-KA Milk Products and Bonduelle USA, Inc.

For more information about the ranking in Business Facilities, please visit  http://businessfacilities.com/2015/07/metro-and-global-rankings/.

August 20, 2015 - 3:13pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in calendar.
August 20, 2015 - 10:30am
posted by Howard B. Owens in darien lake performing arts center, Darien, business.

A sold-out Chris Brown show at Darien Lake Performing Arts Center kept emergency responders busy for hours last night, but other than making for a long, tiring night, it wasn't that bad, said Chief Deputy Gordon Dibble, Genesee County Sheriff's Office.

There were no serious fights and there are no reports of serious injuries, and while there were 16 arrests at the show, they were mostly for run-of-the-mill offenses, from trespassing to unlawful possession of marijuana.

"Generally, it was a very pleasant crowd," Dibble said. "They were polite, for the most part, even when caught in traffic coming in, they mostly had a good attitude. Some of these people coming in waited a long time and for the most part they were very nice. They just wanted to get to the show like everybody else."

The traffic tie-ups were not unexpected, Dibble said. The traffic jams around the park were typical of a sold-out concert on a weekday night, when everybody gets off work and heads to the show instead of coming in over the course of the day, like on a Saturday or Sunday.

Traffic started to back up shortly after 5 p.m. and traffic jams slowed down concertgoers coming in from all directions. Three or four minor traffic accidents caused some blocked lanes and tollbooth workers at times had a hard time keeping up, causing traffic to back up on the Thruway.

"So many of the roads were built when that place was a swimming hole, a hot dog stand and a couple of lifeguards," Dibble said. "Those are the same roads then as they are today."

Dibble is aware there are still people who advocate for a return of private parking around the venue, but that's not the answer Dibble said. Those lots, he said, create more problems than they alleviate.

"I'm under the opinion after my many, many years out there that congestion on Sumner makes it worse," Dibble said. "You have masses of people walking on Sumner and mixing pedestrians and traffic isn't good. This is much safer. And then you had people pulling into private lots dickering with the people taking the money and backing up traffic. There's no way I want to go back. Darien Lake has the space available to handle the parking."

There's been talk for years about how to open up more entrances and exits to the lots, but there's no easy answer, Dibble said.

Colby Road isn't the answer because of the configuration of the roadway.

"Exiting, that would be good, but the topography of that road, the hills and blind spots, make that difficult and very dangerous," Dibble said.

Dibble noted that Cherry Hill Campground continues to accept concert parking and that doesn't really help matters.

"They get them in there and then abandon them there and that's a problem for us when it's time to leave," Dibble said.

Early in the evening, local emergency responders were overwhelmed by the sheer volume of medical calls, mostly for alcohol-related illnesses. That was a combination of the alcohol and the heat, Dibble said.

The county needed backup units from Erie and Orleans counties and patients were transported to multiple hospitals so no one hospital became overwhelmed.

Live Nation had two doctors in the venue, as is now standard practice for sold-out shows.

"There are a lot of things they're able to take care of right on property instead of transporting them," Dibble said.

Dibble didn't have a count yet on how many citations were issued for underage drinking, but they were numerous.

"Each band has its own personality and its own following and this particular band attracted a the type that was younger and there was a lot of underage drinking," Dibble said.

The early-evening enforcement of ABC violations helps cut down on problems later in the night, Dibble said.

"For the number of people there, it was really a good night, actually," Dibble said.

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