Online News. Community Views.

>> Download <<
The Batavian Mobile
Droid | iPhone

Recent comments

Community Sponsors

Ellicott Station

August 10, 2017 - 1:28pm

Press release:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced more than $1 million has been awarded to three municipalities in the Finger Lakes to help local businesses expand and create 67 jobs in the area.

The award comes from the federally funded Community Development Block Grants program, which provides financial assistance to eligible counties, cities, towns and villages to help develop viable communities by providing decent affordable housing and attracting, retaining, and spurring job creation.

Today's announcement complements Finger Lakes Forward -- the successful initiative that is driving economic growth in the region.

"With this funding, we are investing in New Yorkers while fostering partnerships with local businesses across the region," Governor Cuomo. "The Finger Lakes has seen economic growth and resurgence in recent years and by investing in these businesses, we remove barriers and offer them the support they need to succeed in this state."

The Town of Batavia was awarded $465,000 to assist Freightliner & Western Star, Genesee County was awarded $225,000 to assist in the expansion of Resurgence Brewery in the City of Batavia, and the Town of Lima was awarded $315,000 to help Bristol ID Technologies expand its production facility.

Funds will be used to purchase machinery and equipment. Awards announced today include:

$465,000 to the Town of Batavia in Genesee County to assist Freightliner & Western Star of Batavia in constructing a 45,000-square-foot truck service and education facility

·         This expansion will create 31 full-time jobs over two years, with 18 to benefit low - moderate income persons. Freightliner & Western Star is an affiliate of Fleet Maintenance Inc. of West Seneca and a certified Women's Business Enterprise. The facility will consist of service bays, a warehouse, and a classroom and service bay to accommodate up to 20 students as part of the BOCES vocational diesel technician training program. The service operation will serve local businesses as well as truckers using the New York State Thruway, which is adjacent to the project site. The project will link Genesee Valley BOCES with hands-on technical training to students in a workplace environment, and inject more than $8.1 million into the local economy.

$225,000 to Genesee County to assist Resurgence Brewery in expanding their facilities and creating the Resurgence Powerhouse and Beer Garden

·         This funding will help create 15 full-time jobs over two years, with 13 to benefit low - moderate income persons. Resurgence Brewery, located in the City of Batavia is a wild beer fermentation and production brewery for specialty or craft beers. The expansion is part of downtown Batavia's Ellicott Station development project, and furthers Governor Cuomo's Craft Brew initiative, designed to increase tourism and economic development. The proposed project will inject $790,000 into the economy. Empire State Development also provided $145,000 for the project.

$315,000 to the Town of Lima to assist in the expansion of Bristol ID Technologies

·         Bristol is a leading card manufacturer known for innovative advances in card technology within many markets including ID/Security, Gift/Loyalty, Promotional & Print, and Hospitality. The project will involve the acquisition of the company's current facility, construction of an 8,000-square-foot building expansion, and the acquisition of high volume machinery and equipment that will allow for improved efficiency and a substantial increase in capacity and output. The project will create 21 full-time jobs over two years, with 17 to benefit low - moderate income persons, and inject more than $5.3 million into the local economy.

Empire State Development President, CEO & Commissioner Howard Zemsky said, "Craft beverage production in New York is thriving under Governor Cuomo, who has worked hard to cultivate and promote the industry. The expansion of Resurgence Brewery will generate economic activity and support the growing momentum of the Finger Lakes region."

RuthAnne Visnauskas, commissioner of New York State Homes and Community Renewal said, "The awards announced today are yet another example of the Community Development Block Grant program at work creating jobs and stimulating local economies. The program is an invaluable tool in the economic development tool box and will allow businesses to purchase the machinery and equipment they need to grow and meet demands. HCR is proud to be part of the Governor's investments and commitment to move the Finger Lakes forward."

Assemblymember Stephen Hawley said, "I am very pleased with the distribution of two Community Development Block Grant awards to businesses within my district. Supporting local economic growth and encouraging a broad range of jobs is of central importance to any community. By helping these local businesses expand their markets and create economic confidence, we can encourage job growth and more opportunities for citizens of Western New York to chase dreams of owning their own business."

Raymond Cianfrini, chair of the Genesee County Legislature, said, "Resurgence Brewery will be a welcome addition to Batavia and will add to the continued boom we are seeing in this area. Governor Cuomo has made the renaissance of the Finger Lakes and the growth of the craft beverage industry important priorities and we are happy to be part of the excitement."

Gregory Post, supervisor of the Town of Batavia, said, "This is an exciting opportunity for the Town of Batavia and the entire county. Freightliner & Western Star's expansion will provide jobs for area families, valuable education, and training for students, and help grow our local economy. I'm very happy to see the progress we're making in Batavia and throughout the region thanks to Governor Cuomo's commitment to strategic economic development investments that move the Finger Lakes forward."

Jeff Ware, owner of Resurgence Brewing Company, said, "The state's award to Genesee County will go a long way towards the upfront costs of opening our doors and helping to bring Batavia back to life. We are seeing this entire region grow thanks to the Governor's commitment to the Finger Lakes economy, and we are proud to be part of this area's exciting future."

Deborah Gawron, president of Freightliner & Western Star, said, "We are thrilled to be expanding Freightliner & Western Star into the Finger Lakes and adding to the economic growth that is taking place throughout the region. It's wonderful to have the support of Governor Cuomo and New York State and to be part of the effort to move the Finger Lakes forward. We look forward to offering good jobs and future opportunities to local residents, as well as top-notch truck service to area businesses."

August 4, 2017 - 12:52pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in GCEDC, Ellicott Station, Gateway II, batavia, news, business.

Press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) approved incentives for the $17.6 million Ellicott Station project by Savarino Companies in the City of Batavia at the agency’s Aug. 3 board meeting. The GCEDC Board also accepted an application for assistance from Gateway GS LLC, which is proposing to invest $2.625 million for a phase one development of a 25,000-square-foot spec structure in the Gateway II Corporate Park.

The $17.6 million development by Savarino is anticipated to create approximately 60 new jobs. It was recently announced that the first tenant for the site will be the Resurgence Brewing Company. This project would contribute to the Batavia Pathway to Prosperity (BP2) redevelopment fund and be eligible to draw funds out of the fund to support the project investment related to infrastructure and related improvements in and around the site which offers a “public benefit.”

As a part of the project, the Batavia Development Corporation (BDC) will submit a “certificate of consistency” and infrastructure development plan, which is a requirement to enable funding to flow from the BP2 redevelopment fund.

Savarino is receiving approximately $1.5 million in sales and mortgage tax and property tax exemptions. For every dollar of public benefit, the company is investing $21 into the local economy.​

A Rochester area developer has created an LLC and is planning to invest $2.625 million to build a 25,000-square-foot “shell” spec building at Gateway II in the Town of Batavia. The building allows potential customers the flexibility in final design while reducing construction lead time. The master plan will build out in four or five phases of 27,000-square-foot facilities, each on 10 acres.

The GCEDC receives several RFPs annually from companies looking for “ready to go” warehouse, distribution, light manufacturing, technology and office space tenants. This has been a market opportunity that the agency has been unable to pursue in the past.

The company is seeking sales and property tax exemptions of approximately $140,000. Since the incentives being sought are more than $100,000 a public hearing will be held at a date and time to be determined.

“We are anxious to see work get started at Ellicott Station as this is a major investment in the City of Batavia under the B2P program,” said GCEDC Board Chair Paul Battaglia. “The spec building being proposed at Gateway aligns with our success in taking the ‘build it and they will come approach’ at our various business parks which has proven to be a successful business model.”

June 20, 2017 - 9:30pm

Update:

A planned public hearing at Tuesday night's City Planning & Development Committee meeting was postponed until next month to give Ellicott Station offiicals more time to deal with State Environmental Quality Review and other issues, said Duane Preston, chair of the planning board.

"We did a sketch plan review and overall it seems to be a great project," Preston said.

He said questions from the board focused on the height of the five-story apartment building -- "it will result in a bit of an up-and-down skyline," Preston said -- as well as the amount of parking and the size of a glass front facade.

---------------

No one from the public spoke at a public hearing on Tuesday afternoon at City Hall where $1.5 million in mortgage, sales and property tax abatements for the Ellicott Station project were presented.

The hearing was officiated by Chris Suozzi, Genesee County Economic Development Center vice president of business development. The completion of the public hearing now sets the stage for the GCEDC Board of Directors to approve the tax incentives as outlined in a press release below.

Samuel Savarino, president of Savarino Companies and developer of Ellicott Station, attended the public hearing, along with Julie Pacatte, Pier Cipollone and Mary Valle of the Batavia Development Corporation.

Savarino noted that he would be at the meeting of the Batavia Planning & Development Committee tonight, along with the project's architect and site engineer.

The Buffalo businessman said he has encountered numerous "challenges" with the project, but the biggest one -- getting proper financial aid -- already has been overcome.

"We have surmounted the major hurdle, closing the $5 million gap with help from Empire State Development and new market tax credits to make this happen," he said. "Overarching development costs make it difficult to make the economics work (without state assistance)."

Savarino also pointed out that the site of the former Santy's Tire Sales and Soccio & Della Penna Construction companies also presents flood hazards, is part of the Brownfield Opportunity Area (which warrants remedial work) and sits on top of what is being called a "grand canal" or tunnel that runs from the corner of Ellicott and Jackson streets right through the Ellicott Station property.

A portion of the canal, which is being utilized by the city, is located directly under where one of Savarino's apartment/retail buildings would be constructed.

On a positive note, he said he has encoutered similar problems in his many years as a developer and is optimistic that engineers will be able to work around this water-filled obstacle.

Savarino added that he has lined up investors and lenders, and hopes to start demolition and construction by this fall, with an eye on being "open for business" in the fall of 2018.

The mixed-use development will consist of a retail brewery/restaurant operated by Resurgence Brewing along with 16,800 square feet of office space and a five-story apartment building.

Savarino said rent for a one-bedroom, top floor corner unit will be around $1,200 per month while a two-bedroom unit with two full bathrooms will go for around $1,600 per month. Each apartment will feature a washer and dryer and a balcony, and the 51-unit building will include a fitness center and ground floor parking.

Pacatte said the BDC is looking at Ellicott Station as its "beacon of hope" for the city's bid to receive a $10 million Downtown Revitalization Initiative award (see story below).

"We're using Ellicott Station as the anchor for our DRI proposal, focusing on the quality of life piece -- especially on the south side of the city," she said.

Valle, owner of Valle Jewelers on Jackson Street, said that major improvements on Ellicott Street "will raise the bar for all of us" in regards to building upkeep and maintenance.

Press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center will hold a public hearing at 4 this afternoon to consider financial incentives for the Savarino Companies for the redevelopment of Ellicott Station in downtown Batavia. The public hearing will take place at City Hall.

The approximate 64,000-square-foot development will be a mix use of residential, office and retail spaces; a brewery; small beverage warehouse and hops processing facility; entertainment and event area; outside seating; and integration of the new Ellicott Trail pedestrian pathway.

The $17.6 million project is estimated to create up to 60 good paying full-time jobs.

The proposed incentives include $897,293 in sales tax savings, $128,232 mortgage tax savings and $537,398 in property tax savings. 

The project is being done through the “Batavia Pathway to Prosperity” (BP2) program which was created through an inter-municipal agreement between the City of Batavia, Genesee County, the Batavia City School District, the Batavia Development Corporation and the GCEDC.

BP2 was conceived to pool resources in order to invest in distressed areas in the City of Batavia. The BP2 program will be implemented though PILOT increment financing (PIF), referred to as the “BP2 fund,” which is the first of its kind in New York State where all local taxing jurisdictions are participating. 

Supported by the redirection of 50% of new project PILOT payments, the BP2 fund will play a critical role in generating development within the Batavia Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA), a 366-acre area within the City of Batavia containing five strategic redevelopment sites.

June 20, 2017 - 8:46am
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, Ellicott Station, savarino companies, GCEDC.

Press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center will hold a public hearing at 4 this afternoon to consider financial incentives for the Savarino Companies for the redevelopment of Ellicott Station in downtown Batavia. The public hearing will take place at City Hall.

The approximate 64,000-square foot development will be a mix use of residential, office and retail spaces; a brewery; small beverage warehouse and hops processing facility; entertainment and event area; outside seating; and integration of the new Ellicott Trail pedestrian pathway.

The $17.6 million project is estimated to create up to 60 good paying full-time jobs.

The proposed incentives include $897,293 in sales tax savings, $128,232 mortgage tax savings and $537,398 in property tax savings. 

The project is being done through the “Batavia Pathway to Prosperity” (BP2) program which was created through an inter-municipal agreement between the City of Batavia, Genesee County, the Batavia City School District, the Batavia Development Corporation and the GCEDC.

BP2 was conceived to pool resources in order to invest in distressed areas in the City of Batavia. The BP2 program will be implemented though PILOT increment financing (PIF), referred to as the “BP2 fund,” which is the first of its kind in New York State where all local taxing jurisdictions are participating. 

Supported by the redirection of 50% of new project PILOT payments, the BP2 fund will play a critical role in generating development within the Batavia Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA), a 366-acre area within the City of Batavia containing five strategic redevelopment sites. 

June 9, 2017 - 10:52am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Ellicott Station, Dellapenna Building, batavia, news.

savarinobrickelevation_ellicottstation.jpg

The financing of the Ellicott Station project by Buffalo-Based Savarino Companies is complicated, but it's moving along at a swift pace and CEO Sam Savarino doesn't expect any delays in financing that would prevent construction from the starting this summer.

Savarino Companies will have a direct investment of about $3.5 million and will borrow approximately another $10 million or more and local, state, and federal programs will cover another $5 million or so of the more than $18 million in project expenses (a bit of an increase over prior project estimates).

Assistance programs to make the project viable come in three forms: tax abatements from the Genesee County Economic Development Center, grants from the State of New York, and a federal New Market Tax Credit program.

"We knew going in we had a hole in this budget of about $5 million," Savarino said. "The state came in, Empire State Development, and filled part of the hole with the grants that they have, but it's still left us out there and that's why we went out we said we need enough allocation to fill that hole."

That hole is being filled by the New Market Tax Credit program, created about two decades ago in part to replace grants that financed many failed urban renewal programs. Tax credits on the project that can be sold as assets help create a market-driven way to encourage development in economically distressed neighborhoods. It's a way for the market to help decide which projects are worthy of assistance rather than the federal government making the decision.

The tax credits are administered by Community Development Entities (these can be for-profit companies or nonprofit agencies). The CDEs decide which projects to back. The tax credits are then sold to investors, who can use the tax credits or sell them on the open market.

"An area like this particular area is a distressed area," Savarino said. "It's got way more unemployment than other areas in the county. It's got way more incidents of poverty of people living there, more than any other part of the county. It's also a brownfield site. So it's got all those things going against it. That's just the type of site -- and by the way that has prevented its redevelopment --  it makes it too expensive to really redevelop. It's not really marketable. That's exactly the type of project that the New Market Tax Credit program is meant to address. But there are federal tax credits and they're meant to bring life into sites and generally in cities that don't have that much of a chance."

Julie Pacatte, economic development coordinator for the Batavia Development Corp., said Ellicott Station is unique in the county because the total investment exceeds $5 million to $10 million, which is necessary to even attract New Market Tax Credits.

"That's what makes it difficult for rural communities to access the program because projects generally don't project to that kind of scale to access the program," Pacatte said.

Savarino said the Ellicott Station project will use about $7.5 million in tax credits, which will translate into about $2.5 million in direct investment into the project.

Without the assistance programs, traditional lenders wouldn't even consider a project with the liabilities of the former Della Penna property, which needs extensive environmental remediation and is in a neighborhood with higher than average unemployment and lower than average incomes.

"There's no way it would even be financeable," Savarino said. "It's not just a developer like ourselves coming in and so everybody can gainsay your efforts over there because of you and you are out there trying to -- you're not going to do this to lose money. We're judged more harshly by the people who come and provide the financing for something like this.

"So we take a risk for going out and risking that we're going to lease up these units. We're risking that will lease up the commercial space. We're taking the risk that we've got a cap on the cost, and we have all the normal risk that you have (in a development)."

Some of the risk is mitigated by the fact that Savarino has already secured an anchor tenant for the project, Resurgence Brewery, out of Buffalo, which will open a restaurant, beer garden and sour beer brewery at the location. That business is expected to create at least 15 full-time jobs.

Savarino said the Resurgence owners are eager to get going and would move in today if they could.

The complicated financing isn't anything new for Savarino Companies, which has been involved in redeveloping several properties in Buffalo that were also highly distressed and needed to make variety a variety of financing and investment options to make them viable. 

The New Market Tax Credit is limited to the commercial side of the project. For that, Savarino must secure the tax credits, attract the investors, find additional financing, get the proper approvals from local and state officials, and then the company must still also secure financing for the apartment complex.

Over the course of planning, the apartment complex has gone from 30 units to 42, to 47, and now the plans call for 54 units.

"When we started laying it out and we actually got the building down, we got to our unit mix and it turned out that we could fit 54 units in there," Savarino said.

That's one reason the costs have gone up a bit, but a recent environmental examination of the property also uncovered a surprise -- a previously unknown storm water drainage canal running under the entire length property.

The canal -- they're calling it the "Grand Canal" -- shows up on no maps, no site drawings, no infrastructure maps. It was built of brick long, long ago and forgotten about.

There's also evidence of contamination in the canal.

The best-case scenario is the canal can be declared as abandoned and filled in (as a matter of engineering, the buildings can't just be built on top of it), but if it needs to be rerouted, it can either be mitigated by connecting it to existing drainage lines under Ellicott Street or put under the easement for the new Ellicott Trail, which will run behind Ellicott Station. Savarino isn't expecting the canal to blow up the budget.

"Some of that is just the nature of the brownfield redevelopment and the remediation program of the state's is intended to offset those costs," Savarino said. "So to the extent that you find something that's a little worse than what you knew about, your site-prep costs will go up, and hopefully it works out such that you get the tax credits to offset that cost."

Savarino and Pacatte were at the Genesee County Planning Board meeting last night as part of the process of getting land-use approvals for the project.

The planning committee recommended approval of the site plan.

The project moves forward next with a GCEDC public hearing June 20 on the $1.5 million tax incentive package, which includes breaks on sales and mortgage tax, and a payment in lieu of taxes plan on the new tax liabilities generated by the increase in assessed value of the property. That same day, the city's Planning Committee will review the site plan and on June 22, the Zoning Board will review the plan.

This morning, the County Legislature held a special meeting to approve a $225,000 grant to assist construction of the brewery and restaurant for Resurgence Brewery. The grant is a pass-through of federal Community Development Block Grant money administered by the state's Office of Community Renewal. The special meeting was necessary because today was the deadline for completing the application.

Savarino said he doesn't anticipate any delays in financing, that financing should close in July and construction will begin in August.

savarino_ellicottstationsiteplan2017.jpg

June 2, 2017 - 10:56am
posted by Billie Owens in news, batavia, business, GCEDC, Ellicott Station, savarino companies.

Press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) accepted an application for assistance from the Savarino Companies for the redevelopment of Ellicott Station in Downtown Batavia at the agency’s June 1 board meeting.

The approximate 64,000-square-foot development will be a mix use of residential, office and retail spaces; a brewery; small beverage warehouse and hops processing facility; entertainment and event area; outside seating; and integration of the new Ellicott Trail pedestrian pathway.

The $17.6 million project is estimated to create up to 60 good-paying full-time jobs. For every dollar of public sector investment there is an anticipated private sector investment of approximately $25.

The project is being done through the “Batavia Pathway to Prosperity” (BP2) program which was created through an inter-municipal agreement between the City of Batavia, Genesee County, the Batavia City School District, the Batavia Development Corporation and the GCEDC. 

BP2 was conceived to pool resources in order to invest in distressed areas in the City of Batavia. The BP2 program will be implemented though PILOT increment financing (PIF), referred to as the “BP2 fund,” which is the first of its kind in New York State where all local taxing jurisdictions are participating.

Supported by the redirection of 50% of new project PILOT payments, the BP2 fund will play a critical role in generating development within the Batavia Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA), a 366-acre area within the City of Batavia containing five strategic redevelopment sites.  

”The collaboration among various government jurisdictions is simply smart economic development,” said Paul Battaglia, GCEDC Board chairman. “The BP2 program is an opportunity to attract development and jobs to the urban core of Genesee County and just as important, create vibrant neighborhoods in economically disadvantaged areas of the city.”

May 31, 2017 - 1:46pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Ellicott Station, batavia, business, news, GCEDC.

As anticipated, Buffalo-based Savarino Companies has applied for financial assistance from the Genesee County Economic Development Center to help offset the costs of environmental cleanup and redevelopment of the long-vacant Della Penna property on Ellicott Street in the City of Batavia.

The GCEDC board will consider the application for the $17.6 million rehabilitation project at its meeting tomorrow.

Savarino is planning to replace most of the structures on the property and replace them with a 64,000-square-foot development that will include apartments, office space and a brewery and restaurant.

Once completed, there will be 47 market-rate apartments on the border of Downtown Batavia and businesses employing at least 60 full-time workers.

The terms of the application were negotiated by the city and GCEDC during the process of attracting a developer for the brownfield project and include $897,293 in sales tax abatement on materials during construction, relief on $128,232 in mortgage taxes and $537,398 in property taxes.

Savarino has already announced an anchor tenant for the Ellicott Station project, Resurgence Brewing Company of Buffalo, which plans to use the facility to increase production of a new product, a sour beer, as well as serve on tap its full line of beers that have proven popular in Buffalo.

The project is part of the Batavia Pathway to Prosperity (BP2) initiative, which is a cooperative endeavor between the city, GCEDC, Batavia Development Corp., City Schools and Genesee County.

BP2 was created to offer a tax abatement known as a PIF (PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes incremental financing), which is the first of its kind in New York. Half of the PIF payments will be used to help fund future brownfield redevelopment in Batavia, with the other half being returned to the original taxing jurisdictions.

The Batavia Opportunity Area (the brownfield redevelopment area) covers 366 acres in the city's core and contains five strategic redevelopment sites.

May 25, 2017 - 12:08pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Ellicott Station, batavia, business, news, Dellapenna Building.

dellapennastartmay252017.jpg

The first work toward revitalizing the Della Penna buildings into Ellicott Station -- apartments, office space, a restaurant, and brewery -- began today with a contractor digging test pits and checking soil samples.

The tests are the first step in any contamination remediation process. The tests will provide officials with information on the scope of any remediation that is needed.

The old industrial parcel on Ellicott Street will undergo a $17 million transformation that will eventually bring in Buffalo's Resurgence Brewing Company as the anchor tenant.

For previous coverage, click here.

dellapennastartmay252017-2.jpg

May 3, 2017 - 11:13pm

Are you ready for a resurgence in Batavia? It's coming.

Well, at least Resurgence Brewing Company of Buffalo is coming.

The popular Buffalo-based brewery is going to be part of the revitalized and rebuilt Ellicott Station (the former Della Penna property) on Ellicott Street on the edge of Downtown Batavia.

"We're obviously ecstatic about the project and seeing it come to fruition," said City Manager Jason Molino. "We're incredibly excited about Resurgence, a reputable brewery coming to the community and bringing a new, kind of niche beer, sour beer. I think it's going to help complement what we're trying to do downtown, bringing in more dining and entertainment options for people."

We've known for a long time that Ellicott Station would include a brewery and brew pub. What we didn't learn until today is that the company moving into the space would be a brand that has rapidly grown in popularity in Buffalo.

Resurgence will open a restaurant, a brew pub and beer garden that will serve their full line of beers, and a brewery that will produce sour beer, a kind of beer that has only recently started to reach the East Coast market.

Because its brew process is different and the yeasts involved can't mix with the other brews, Resurgence was looking for a location separate from their current Buffalo location.

In fact, Batavia had been on the map for Resurgence owners Chris and Jeff Ware for a long time, according to developer Sam Savarino. Savarino said he had heard the Wares had been looking at Batavia as a possible location for a brewery if not a restaurant and pub. After his company won the RFP for the Ellicott Station project, he contacted them and a deal came together very quickly, he said.

"They’re good people," Savarino said. "They’re dedicated to their craft and they care about the product they produce. That’s evident to anybody who has bought their products or visited their premises in Buffalo. As far as a brewer or retail tenant, they are a very good bet."

The Resurgence name comes from the founders' own belief in the resurgence and renaissance of Buffalo, which they've been a part of over the past several years.

Jeff Ware, company president, sent over a statement about how pleased the company is to find a location in Batavia.

"Resurgence Brewing Company is excited to announce their new brewing and biergarten location in Batavia," Ware said. "The brewery will anchor Savarino's Ellicott Station Development and help with the revitalization of downtown Batavia. With the help from New York State from Homes and Community Renewal (state pass-through of the Community Block Development Grant money mentioned below), we will be able to move project one step closer to reality."

Savarino got involved in the project after a third party told him about Batavia looking for proposals to redevelop the Della Penna property and that Savarino Companies might be a good fit.

The company has been involved in a number of revitalization projects in Buffalo. They redeveloped several buildings in the Cobblestone District of Buffalo, renovating buildings and developing mixed-use projects. They redeveloped 500 Seneca Street, a large factory converted to mixed use. They also redeveloped River Landing in Buffalo, which was a brownfield project.

Savarino said when he looked at the Della Penna property, he checked off the qualifications: A distressed property with possible environmental contamination; a distressed census tract with 35 percent unemployment; a median income that is 50 percent of the area's median income; on the edge of a downtrodden downtown. 

"I joked with my friends that it had several strikes against it, so it's just the kind of project we like to take on," Savarino said.

The project will be more than just a restaurant and brewery. There will also be office space -- Savarino said he's in negotiations with possible tenants that he can't disclose yet -- and a 47-unit, four-story apartment complex.

The apartments will be especially great for Downtown, Molino said. Not only will tenants be just steps from Resurgence, within a block's walk are dining and drinking options such as City Slickers, Bourbon & Burger Co., O'Lacy's Irish Pub and Center Street Smoke House, Main Street Pizza Co., and T.F. Brown's.

"Those 47 market-rate apartments fit the demand we're seeing for living downtown," Molino said. "People want to live in downtown areas, whether it's Millennials, seniors or empty-nesters. They have overlapping interests."

Much of what we see on the Della Penna property will be demolished, Savarino said. The front of the Della Penna main building is too far gone to save and the garage to the east of the main building isn't structurally sound and is beyond repair. The main production area of the Della Penna will be restored, and that area is a perfect fit for what Resurgence plans to do, both for its size and design characteristics.

"It's important to have some link to the past," Savarino said. "It wouldn't be the same without that link. It makes the site unique to have a little bit of Batavia's past as a part of it."

Resurgence, combined with the new food establishments, brewery, and apartments going into the former Newberry building, he said, hit key redevelopment goals for Batavia.

"It really completes the project of living in a revived downtown," Molino said.

To help move the project along, Genesee County Economic Development Center is using money from the federal CDBG program. The $15 million project will receive $210,000 that will be half loan and half grant if project requirements are met. The restaurant and brewery are expected to create 15 full-time equivalent jobs, three-quarters of which will go to low- and moderate-income residents.

Getting the project to this point has been a long haul, said Julie Pacatte, coordinator of the Batavia Development Corporation.

"We've been talking about this project for a long time and people have been waiting for some movement," Pacatte said. "I think it just shows how long it takes to get things lined up before we can go public with an announcement."

Financing for the project is coming from several sources, Savarino said, and he expects financing to close in July. Construction should begin by August and Resurgence should open its doors during the first quarter of 2018.

The way the project came together, Molino said, with the involvement of the City School District, GCEDC, the county, BDC, and the City, it's really a model for how revitalization projects can be handled when everybody works together for a common goal.

"It was great work from everybody involved with great support from Resurgence," Molino said. "When you talk about how projects come together, it's really a model for best practices of the collaboration of the different entities involved.

The "heartfelt dedication" local officials had for the project was notable, Savarino said.

"I can’t say enough about working with the City of Batavia and the Batavia Development Corporation," Savarino said. "It’s quite unusual to have that level cooperation and to be working on the same side of the table with people like that."

Molino was pleased to hear the praise.

"That's what we're trying to say with the '$100 Million I'm All In' initiative," Molino said. "We want to give people the experience of great service. We want people to say, 'I can't imagine doing business anyplace other than the City of Batavia. His comment just reinforces what we're trying to say and do to make the experience great for people."

April 20, 2017 - 10:43am
posted by Howard B. Owens in GCEDC, batavia, Ellicott Station, news, corfu, pembroke, Yancy's Fancy.

Members of the County Legislature expressed support yesterday for two projects that will need some financial backing to move forward.

Mark Masse, VP of operations for Genesee County Economic Development Center, presented the projects to the Ways and Means Committee. There was no formal vote, just a sense of the committee that he should come back at a later date with formal resolutions for the Legislature to vote on.

The first proposal is loan/grant support for Ellicott Station, the proposed brewery, tap room and beer garden at the former Della Penna building on Ellicott Street in the City of Batavia.

GCEDC is proposing using the local development corporation's revolving loan program to provide $210,000 in assistance. Half of the funds would be a term loan, the other half would be a loan that would become a grant if specified project criteria are met.

The money originates from the federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.

The brewery and tap room -- a $700,000 project overall -- is the anchor tenant of the $15 million Ellicott Station renovation, and is anticipated to create 15 full-time equivalent jobs, with 75 percent of the jobs going to low- to moderate-income people.

In the past, similar programs have assisted Yancey's Fancy, O-AT-KA, and P.W. Minor.

While the Legislature must approve the loan/grant, the Genesee Gateway Local Development Corp. would administer the loan and monitor it for compliance.

The CDBG criteria require two public hearings, one before approval to consider whether other projects might be more worthy of the funds, and one during the project to take testimony on whether there are any violations of the program requirements.

The other project moving forward is an expansion of the sewer plant in Corfu. Right now it's processing 135,000 gallons of sewage per day, which is the plant's capacity.

The two travel plazas off the Thruway on Route 77 want to start using the facility and, more importantly, Yancey's Fancy, with production facilities on Main Road and a new one just down the street, wants to expand capacity. 

GCEDC has already approved a PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes) for the expansion, but the lack of capacity at the Corfu plant is holding up the project.

The expansion would consist of adding two processing units capable of handling 75,000 gallons per day (the twin units are needed so use can be rotated for cleaning and maintenance) at a cost of $2.7 million.

The county and school district would be asked to give up some tax revenue (for the county, about $272,000 over 11 years) to help fund the project. The Town of Pembroke currently has a zero-rate property tax, so its share of funding would only kick in if it passed a property tax over the next 11 years.

The travel plazas would pay about $1 million in hook-up fees, the GGLDC has already committed $100,000 to design and engineering plus another $40,000 a year over 11 years, and the balance of about $500,000 would be covered by grants.

The expansion would create 15 new jobs, Masse said.

Legislator Mike Davis, who works in the dairy industry, pointed out how important this project is. Yancey's Fancy's parent company is based in Pennsylvania and has already looked at expanding in that state. The plan here is to expand the original production facility on Main Road by 6,000 square feet and increase production of natural cheese.

The other Pembroke facility is used for processing cheese.

Dairy farmers are finding there is a local shortage of milk processing facilities, so the expansion will help local dairy farmers, Davis said. 

"I would say this is important to us all the way around," Davis said.

December 13, 2016 - 8:48am
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, Ellicott Station, Batavia Development Corp., freshLAB.
  • The startup and/or expansion of seven Batavia-based businesses that capitalized on microenterprise grants;
  • The imminent transformation of the former J.J. Newberry building on Main Street into a brewing company and “freshLAB” restaurant;
  • And, of course, the $17 million renovation and redevelopment of the former Santy’s Tire Shop and Soccio & Della Penna Construction site on Ellicott Street into a retail/commercial/residential complex.

These projects, along with a handful of other grant-aided ventures, signal a continuing, successful effort by the Batavia Development Corp. to revitalize the city’s downtown and broaden the tax base throughout the municipality, said the president of the organization’s board of directors.

Speaking Monday night at the City Council meeting, Ray Chaya, a BDC board member for nine years who is “terming out” next month, said Batavia’s positive, can-do message has resonated with regional and state economic development agencies. As a result, grants have been awarded to initiatives to the tune of more than $2 million.

“We’ve come to be a community of believers,” Chaya said, noting that the passing of resolutions by government boards, phone calls from local leaders to regional executives and media coverage were key factors in last week’s awarding of the $1.9 million Consolidated Funding Application grant by the Finger Lakes Regional Development Council for the Ellicott Station project.

He added that the BDC also expects to receive a $500,000 Restore NY grant for environmental remediation of the Santy’s/Della Penna site, and the developer, Savarino Cos. of Buffalo, is in line to receive federal new market tax credits “to help close the gap” and make the project worthwhile.

City Manager Jason Molino said the BDC is looking into “multiple funding sources to offset the cost,” including Brownfield cleanup tax credits and the Batavia Pathway to Prosperity fund – a partnership of the City of Batavia, Genesee County, Batavia City School District and Genesee County Economic Development Center.

“The Pathways to Prosperity addresses the anti-poverty issue and is a feather in the cap,” Molino said. “The way we were able to transfer the property as an LLC to the BDC and then to the developer is the first of its kind on several different levels … and that’s what has drawn attention to it.”

Chaya named seven businesses that participated in the BDC’s microenterprise grant program, which empowered the agency to piecemeal the distribution of $200,000 to qualifying entrepreneurs who participated in the program.

Those businesses are Hidden Door, Batavia Brewing Co., Gams Sweet & Savory, Teddy Bear Day Care, T-Shirts Etc., Amy’s Fluffy Friends and Trash Away. All of the businesses’ expenditures are closely monitored by the BDC and the state’s Office of Community Renewal, with milestones and metrics having to be met per grant regulations.

The Batavia Brewery Co./freshLAB project also has been boosted by several performance-based grants, Chaya said, namely a $500,000 Main Street anchor grant, $60,785 from the United States Department of Agriculture and a $100,000 National Grid Revitalization grant.

Additional tax credits could come if the building – which also will house market-rate apartments on the upper floors -- is put onto the National Register of Historic Place as sought by owners Matthew Gray and Matt Boyd.  

Chaya said that bidding on construction is taking place through Jan. 6 and work is expected to begin in late winter. The overall cost of this project is estimated at $1.5 million.

The city also received two other FLREDC grants -- $25,000 for the Downtown Batavia Healthy Living Campus’ feasibility study and $12,500 to the Batavia Business Improvement District for a Downtown Batavia Public Market Study.

Chaya also reported that an Empire State Development grant in the amount of $15,000 is being used to develop a plan for the Harvester Park subdivision.

December 8, 2016 - 4:45pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, Ellicott Station, Batavia Develoment Corp..

The Batavia Development Corp. and Buffalo developer Samuel Savarino received the news they have been waiting for today when the Finger Lakes Regional Development Council announced the release of $1.9 million in funding for the Ellicott Station project on Ellicott Street in the City of Batavia.

“This is fantastic for Ellicott Station, phenomenal for the City of Batavia, but what is really great is that the governor (Andrew Cuomo) and the regional leaders believe that we can transform Batavia, and they’re ready to help us do that,” said Julie Pacatte, BDC coordinator.

The $1.9 million Consolidated Funding Application grant is the second-largest award of this round of funding in the Finger Lakes Region – surpassed only by the $2 million awarded to the Sibley’s project in Rochester.

Gov. Cuomo announced that more than $700 million in economic and community development funding was awarded today to the state’s 10 regional councils through Round VI of the Regional Economic Development Council initiative.

In the press release from the governor’s office, he said that “through the Regional Economic Development Councils, we have replaced the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to economic growth with a ‘ground-up’ strategy that focuses on cooperation and investing in regional assets to generate opportunity.

“By bringing together ideas from local government and community leaders with state resources, we are giving these councils the tools to create jobs and drive economic activity in their communities for generations to come.”

Rachael Tabelski, marketing director for the Genesee County Economic Development Center, applauded the news, adding that the support of FLREDC Co-Chairs Anne Kress and Danny Wegman gives the city a strategic edge.

“It’s a major, major project for downtown Batavia that is going to transform everything, and the backing of the regional co-chairs ensures that this project will happen, and happen on its full scale,” she said.

Other project awards coming to Genesee County include:

-- $150,000 to Sysco (Western NY Depot) to clear land and build a facility to house delivery management for distribution services;
-- $96,000 to Genesee County Chamber of Commerce (Haunted History Trail of NYS, 2017 initiatives) to conduct a conversion/economic impact study for the haunted history trail, the first and only statewide paranormal tourism trail in the United States;
-- $47,500 to Genesee County (Genesee County Housing Needs Assessment) to complete a housing needs study;
-- $50,000 to City of Batavia to complete a stormwater capital plan;
-- $25,000 to the City of Batavia (Downtown Batavia Healthy Living Campus) for a feasibility study for a comprehensive, multipurpose health campus downtown;
-- $12,500 to the Batavia Business Improvement District (Downtown Batavia Public Market Study) for an assessment and conceptual market master plan for sites in downtown Batavia.

Pacatte noted that the Healthy Living and Public Market grants are for areas within the Batavia Opportunity Area that her agency has been focusing on for redevelopment.

“Both initiatives are BOA-centric, and will improve the core – the civic center – of our county,” she said.

As far as Ellicott Station is concerned, three weeks ago Savarino provided an update to City Council, and specifically mentioned that the CFA grant that came through today along with a $500,000 Restore NY grant and new market tax credits were essential to making the project work.

Savarino’s plan is to convert the former Santy's Tire Sales and Soccio & Della Penna Construction sites a mixed-use, commercial/retail/residential complex.

The project is expected to cost around $17 million. 

November 14, 2016 - 8:48pm

savarino_1.jpg

Speaking from decades of experience in property redevelopment, Samuel Savarino, chief executive officer of Savarino Cos. of Buffalo, acknowledged the challenges involved in converting the former Santy's Tire Sales and Soccio & Della Penna Construction sites on Ellicott Street in the city into a successful commercial venture.

But he also said he is encouraged by the "great public support" locally and is hopeful that New York State comes through with the necessary grant funding to make Ellicott Station a reality.

Savarino, whose company was selected by the Batavia Development Corp. in the spring to revitalize the rundown, three-acre parcel in the city's Brownfield Opportunity Area, joined Julie Pacatte, BDC coordinator, and BDC Board members Ray Chaya and Mary Valle at Monday night's City Council meeting to update the governing body on the project's progress.

"We've been refining our plan, and after finding that one of the buildings on the site is unsafe, it will be demolished and is no longer part of our plans," said Savarino, who has spearheaded award-winning projects along Buffalo's waterfront.

However, he said, the main building on the Della Penna lot (phase 1 of the project) features "some unusual characteristics that will work well ... and will become the signature part of the development. Driving down Ellicott Street, you can't help but notice it."

Specifically, he said the Della Penna building that once was a transformer repair facility has room upstairs for a party area that looks out over the production floor.  He said he is "pleasantly surprised" that the building's shape, along with concrete beams and columns, will lend itself to a unique look and feel when completed.

Savarino said his company has been working with engineers and consultants in preparation of possible construction next spring. Plans are contingent on the awarding of an Empire State Development grant -- what Savarino called a "substantial contribution to close the gap" -- for the project, which is expected to cost around $17 million. He and Pacatte said they hope to hear from the ESD in December.

The developer also said that he has applied for new market tax credits to lessen the state's commitment to the project, noting that the fact that the site is in a highly distressed census tract and that Batavia is a rural community work in the project's favor.

He said the project likely will proceed in two phases.

"Della Penna is the first phase; Santy's is the second site," he said, adding that the building there also will come down. "That's the site that the city acquired through foreclosure after we were selected in the RFP process."

Savarino said the plan hasn't changed much from his original vision.

"We're still roughly consistent of what we originally proposed. We're using the existing building as a production brewery and restaurant. We've had some in-depth conversations with two established brewers, both of whom have a strong interest in the site -- I don't think that's an issue.

"We've talked to several commercial tenants for the space -- the two floors of commercial space that we have in both of the buildings. But the first phase would have 16 apartments and the second phase would have 16 apartments, for a total of 32. Commercial space on the first floor could be retail or it could just be commercial office. We've had an awful lot of interest from commercial office users and one bank in particular."

Samuel Savarino talks about the Ellicott Station project at Monday night's City Council meeting. Photo by Mike Pettinella.

October 18, 2016 - 7:08am
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, Ellicott Station, Ellicott Street, news.

When it comes to redeveloping the Santy and Della Penna properties on Ellicott Street in Batavia, local officials are ready to go, but on the Empire State Development's map of projects, the project is somewhere five years down the road.

To help move things along, Julia Pacatte, economic coordinator for the Batavia Development Corp., is seeking support from the County Legislature and the City School District, both economic partners in the project, to pass resolutions asking ESD to speed up the process.

"This is an affirmation that the local community is ready to support the project and asking the state to move more quickly than in the next five years," Pacatte said. "We’re ready to go now."

Most of the money for the $17 million Ellicott Station Project is coming from private investment, with a portion of financial support coming from local tax abatements. But officials are also looking for ESD to follow through on its commitment of $2.4 million in grants to pay for environmental cleanup of the properties.

The property qualifies for assistance under state programs because: of the environmental remediation required; the adaptive reuse of property that was developed but fell into disuse; and the economic struggles of the census tract the property is in, with 30 percent of the residents at the poverty level or lower and an unemployment rate of 7 percent. 

The project is expected to produce 60 temporary jobs and 90 permanent jobs.

There are already tenants lined up for office space and the entertainment and restaurant space within the project, and ensuring those potential tenants stay on the hook is one reason for trying to get a faster response from ESD.

The county's Public Service Committee approved the resolution unanimously and the school board will be asked to act on it tonight.

August 9, 2016 - 8:03am
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, Batavia City Council, Ellicott Station.

The City of Batavia has an excellent chance to receive a trio of grants that deal with "zombie" properties, low- to low-moderate income housing rehabilitation and mixed-use redevelopment, City Manager Jason Molino said Monday night.

He outlined the three opportunities to City Council, which, in turn, is expected to allow his office to pursue the grants.

The grant programs are as follows:

-- A $13 million grant program with funds generated through a settlement by the state's Attorney General that is open to municipalities with at least 5,000 people and a minimum of 100 vacant homes.

Batavia was not on the original list, Molino said, but was added after the city manager reached out to program administrators. He said monies received will go to compile database informaton and to develop strategies to combat the problem of vacant homes.

-- A Community Development Block Grant to rehabilitate homes owned by those with low- to low-moderate incomes who occupy the home. Molino said grants are limited to $24,500 per house.

"We received $450,000 in 2011 and another $400,000 in 2014 through this program and have applied that money to more than 35 homes," Molino said. "Currently, we have another 30 to 40 in the queue."

Council is expected to act on this on Sept. 12 and set a public hearing for Sept. 19.

-- A Restore NY grant program that is providing up to $50 million for redevelopment projects in urban areas.

Molino said Batavia will seek $500,000 to be used at Ellicott Station, site of the former Santy's Tire Shop and Soccio & Della Penna construction on Ellicott Street that has been targeted for mixed-use redevelopment by Buffalo developer Samuel Savarino.

"(Ellicott Station) is a picture perfect property for this project. It is turn-key, and has all the right elements," Molino said, adding that the city has a "high probability" of getting funded.

As is the case with the CDBG grant, Council has been requested to consider this application on Sept. 12.

In other action, Council:

-- Approved a resolution to accept a supplemental agreement, called Marchiselli funding, that would reimburse the city for the cost of the design aspects of the Summit Street Reconstruction Project. This offers a 15 percent funding grant to the project through New York State, in addition to the 80 percent funding already approved through the Federal Highway program, Molino said. 

-- Approved a resolution permitting the city firefighters' union to open a one-year window for entrance into a more lucrative state retirement benefit plan. Molino said the one-time past service cost will be $27,441 and the estimated annual cost for this fiscal year will be $5,485.

-- Moved to the Sept. 12 Business meeting a request from Public Works Director Matthew Worth to trade or auction off five utility vehicles, with an estimated total value of at least $9,500. The vehicles, and their estimated value, are: a 1998 John Deere Gator 6x4 utility vehicle ($2,000 in trade toward a replacement utility vehicle); 1996 Ford LS9000 dump truck and accessories (auction value $3,000); 1997 Dodge Ram van (auction value less than $500); 1993 Jacobsen HR-15 flail mower (auction value $1,000); and a 1996 Elgin Pelican P series street sweeper (auction value $3,000 to $15,000).

-- Tabled Local Law No. 3, which would amend the Business Improvement District Plan in order for both the City and the BID to continue talks to settle disagreements over the BID's budget management and compliance with General Municipal Law. Molino said he expects to report back to Council with a definitive strategy at the Sept. 12 meeting.

March 16, 2016 - 7:05pm

Photos courtesy of our news partner WBTA. Above, city and county officials gathered at a news conference this afternoon on Ellicott Street where plans were unveiled for the former Della Penna and Santy Tires properties on the Southside.

Press release:

City and county officials gathered today to unlock the “Batavia Pathway to Prosperity” (BP2), a program created through an inter-municipal agreement between the City of Batavia, Genesee County, the Batavia City School District, the Batavia Development Corporation and the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC).

Savarino Companies was selected following a published Request for Proposal issued by the Batavia Development Corporation for the redevelopment of the Ellicott Station site, likely the first project to participate in the program.

Savarino Companies has provided a plan for the development site, including mixed-use residential, office and retail spaces; a brewery; small beverage warehouse and hops processing facility; entertainment and event area; outside seating; and integration of the new Ellicott Trail pedestrian pathway.

When fully realized, the site may accommodate more than 150 jobs and market rate housing to generate around-the-clock consumer demand Downtown.

"We are very pleased that our redevelopment proposal was selected by Batavia Development Corp.," says Sam Savarino, CEO of Savarino Companies. "Now the hard work begins. Our team is looking forward to working with all project stakeholders to make Ellicott Station the transformational development it is expected to be."

The project will consist of several phases and the company is expected to seek incentives from the GCEDC, as well as utilize other state and local economic funds for the project.

BP2 was conceived to pool resources in order to invest in distressed areas in the City of Batavia. The BP2 program will be implemented though PILOT increment financing (PIF), referred to as the “BP2 fund,” which is the first of its kind in New York State where all local taxing jurisdictions are participating.

"Congratulations to the City of Batavia, BDC, Genesee County, GCEDC and the Batavia City School District,” said Batavia City Council President E. Jankowski. “We’re off to a great start, working together to support economic growth in the City of Batavia with the Pathway to Prosperity program. Combining resources will be a force multiplier toward successfully cleaning up distressed areas in our community and benefit all of us who live and work here.”

"Batavia's Pathway to Prosperity is off to a great start with new plans to redevelop Ellicott Station. This program has the potential to increase property values, entice new employers and expand economic opportunities for all residents of Genesee County. I applaud Savarino Companies for investing in our community," said State Senator Michael H. Ranzenhofer.

“I am very pleased that more economic development will be coming to my hometown of Batavia,” said Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia). “I am excited to be a part of the ‘Pathway to Prosperity’ and pledge my assistance in any way possible.

"Public-private partnerships such as this have the potential to provide huge dividends for the local community and its residents. This is a perfect example of government working for the people instead of against them, and I look forward to experiencing Batavia’s transformation firsthand.”

“This is an exciting time for Genesee County. We have the reality of STAMP, new hotels, a new airport terminal and now the redevelopment of the City’s brownfield area. The County will continue to work with everyone involved to make the Pathway to Prosperity happen and keep our County at the forefront of economic development,” said Raymond Cianfrini, Genesee County Legislature chairman.

Supported by the redirection of 50 percent of new project PILOT payments, the BP2 fund will play a critical role in generating development within the Batavia Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA), a 366-acre area within the City of Batavia containing five strategic redevelopment sites.

“Through the BP2 fund, both the public and private sectors are working collaboratively to increase access to IDA programs and incentives for all project development opportunities within the City of Batavia,” said Paul Battaglia, GCEDC Board chairman.

“By targeting highly distressed locations and brownfield opportunity areas, this program encourages investors and developers such as Savarino Companies to take advantage of development opportunities in Genesee County and invest in the future of the city and region.”

Among the goals of the BP2 program include attracting new employers and jobs to the city of Batavia; increasing property values; and, exploring key market opportunities for economic development.

“Working together is essential to achieve a strong, sure, set of outcomes,” added Patrick Burk, Batavia School Board president. “Our Pathway to Prosperity will become a solid road of economic, educational and community growth. With that growth, we will see better jobs, a decrease in poverty and an increase in family stability and educational success. Our integration will make this possible. Our determination will make this our new reality." 

One of the program’s intentions is to target Millennials by creating vibrant neighborhoods and creating job opportunities in previously economically disadvantaged areas of the city.

Over the past several years the BDC has been persistent in championing community strategic development priorities, encouraging Brownfield Opportunity Area site designation and gaining tax credit eligibility for environmental cleanup of this significant tract of our downtown corridor,” said Ray Chaya Batavia Development Corporation Board president.

“The Pathway to Prosperity agreement is a significant development tool today and it will remain valuable well into our future. It is proof that mutually shared goals and a commitment to community transformation is achievable. The BDC is honored to take on the next development phases ensuring that all required entities are involved and unhindered in fulfilling the community's vision for this important site.”

To learn more about the City of Batavia’s Brownfield Opportunity Area, visit www.bataviaopportunity.com.

Subscribe to

Calendar

S M T W T F S
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 

Upcoming

Copyright © 2008-2016 The Batavian. Some Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Original content available for non-commercial use under a Creative Commons license.
Contact: Howard Owens, publisher (howard (at) the batavian dot com); (585) 250-4118

blue button