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December 7, 2014 - 9:12pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, fire.

A garage fire is reported at 12 Adams St., Batavia.

City fire is dispatched.

UPDATE 9:14 p.m.: A second call, flames showing.

UPDATE(S)(By Billie) 9:20 p.m.: The garage fire is fully involved. Town of Batavia is requested to provide mutual aid at the scene. Stafford is asked to fill in at city fire headquarters.

UPDATE 9:22 p.m.: Alexander fast team and Elba fire are called in. The location is between Madison and Roosevelt avenues.

UPDATE 9:31 p.m.: There was an explosion. Gasoline is running down the driveway, mixed with water. The fire appears to be nearly knocked down, but there are hot spots remaining.

UPDATE 9:35 p.m.: Mercy medics are called to stage at the scene.

UPDATE 9:40 p.m.: The son of the property owners said his parents were watching TV and saw flames coming from the corner of the garage. After his father came outside, there was an explosion. The cause of the blaze is unknown. The son said there was no electricity in the part of the garage where the fire appears to have started.

UPDATE 9:52 p.m.: The garage contained a 20-gallon container of gasoline, acetylene tanks, and a propane tank. Many tools were also inside, but not the car -- it's in the repair shop.

UPDATE 10:55 p.m.: Streets that were shut down in the area are being reopened. Alexander has been released. Some equipment being picked up.

UPDATE 11:55 p.m.: City crews remain on scene. There's still a strong odor of gasoline on the downhill side of Adams Street. We spoke with Chief Jim Maxwell. He said the cause of the fire is under investigation. There is no indication right now as to how it started. "I don't want to speculate," Maxwell said. "It's under investigation. We'll see where that takes us."

Below is 58 seconds of video from the scene. At this point, firefighters are letting the fuel burn itself out while containing the fire to that one location.

December 7, 2014 - 5:26pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire, pembroke, corfu.

The tears were gone. She had no more, said Renee Franclemont in the midst of a conversation yesterday about the fire that destroyed her business in a barn on Alleghany Road, Corfu, an hour before sunrise Thursday morning.

The fire consumed more than $20,000 in inventory, killed 17 chickens, devoured a season's worth of hay and straw, and turned a grand and well-aged barn into ash and rubble.

Franclemont grew up in Corfu. She is the daughter of a former Corfu fire chief and a mother who was a volunteer EMT.

She knew all the firefighters Thursday morning, and they knew her.

"It was sad," she said. "They felt helpless."

The old farmhouse 100 paces to the north of the barn, was built in 1890 and added onto over the years, has, of course, been the home to families, as it is now to Franclemont, her two boys, two girls and partner Clinton Konfederath. It has housed the Rarick law firm and accommodated countless guests as a bed and breakfast.

Four years ago Franclemont bought her house and the 14 acres of land that go with it because she loved the barn.

"I moved to this house because I wanted my barn," Franclemont said. "I wanted that barn. My kids all know. We moved in and I didn't even unpack boxes. I went into that barn and I set to cleaning the barn. I wasn't even thinking about a business. I wanted the barn."

The structure was even older than the house and functioned as a co-op antique store formerly owned by Gemma Rarick in the 1980s and 1990s. Back then, in red letters made of wood slats affixed below its peaked roof was the official business name: "The Barn." The words, bold and artful, were eight feet tall and could be seen hundreds of yards away by travelers heading north on Route 77.

To avoid any sign ordinance issues, Franclemont called her business "The Farm" and kept the same lettering nailed to the gray, asphalt shingles that at some point were installed as siding on the oldest end of the building.

Nobody insures businesses housed in 150-year-old barns. Franclement tried to have it insured, and for a time it was, for just $29,000, which Franclement felt was well below its real value.

"That's all they would insure it for because it was that old," Franclemont said. "They didn't look at it like you and I look at a barn. They looked at it as rough and horrible. We look at it and think, 'that's perfect.' "

When the insurance company realized there was a licensed business in the barn, the policy was yanked and all of her pleas for coverage went unheeded.

The Farm is truly a family business. Franclemont and Konfederath run it, of course, but all four children help out.

Austin, 19, and 15-year-old Dakota, both work there. Austin was last year's leading scorer and an all-league player on Pembroke's soccer team, and is now a student at GCC. His brother was a slender-framed punter on the football team, who walked into the kitchen Saturday dressed in camoflauge with a rifle slung over his shoulder (he bagged two rabbits that afternoon).

They can be left alone at times, Franclemont said, to run things if she needs to tend to errands.

Never left alone, but adept at sales and operating the cash register are Montana, 11, and Sawyer Mae, 6.

Montana is the real chicken farmer in the family. A chicken whisperer, her mother called her. Blonde, popular at school, into gymnastics and cheerleading, Montana keeps herself and her mom busy.

Only a week ago, Montana seemingly saved a chicken that appeared ill and unlikely to survive. The girl took the bird in her arms, wrapped it in warm cloth and held it while sitting in the store.

"We didn't think the chicken was going to make it and the next day it was running around, so she must have saved it," Franclemont said.

Sawyer Mae has no less energy than her older sister, but it's not always directed at school. She's a bit of a tomboy who favors plaid shirts, purple pants and cowboy boots.

"She could probably run the business by herself," Franclemont said. "She's the one who wants to miss school so she can pick pumpkins or just work around the farm or in the store."

As we spoke, visitors dropped by and popped in here and there. Some brought hugs, others clutched cards stuffed in bulging white envelopes. They entered the family room and adjoining kitchen and dining area through the back door off the gravelled driveway.

The visitors were tenderly welcomed into her home, which is decorated much like you might expect from a woman whose business is also her life. 

The flat-screen TV sits atop a black wood and cast iron 19th Century sewing machine table, so big it must have come from a Gilded Age factory. On the opposite wall is a wooden, weathered round-rung ladder that was carried from the old barn to adorn the family room wall. At one point, Franclemont took a plank from the barn and painted in white the words  "Bed and Breakfast" on it, to honor one of the prior businesses in her old house. That hangs above the couch.

The white-curtained dining room window faces south. The driveway and a small, bridge-covered creek separate the house from the cement foundation of the barn. Tom Konfederath and Rick Claire spent most of the previous 48 hours using backhoes and loaders to knock down and haul away the burnt, charred and twisted ruins of the barn. Clinton was out there breaking up cement so it, too, could be taken to a dump or recycling center.

Everybody thought it a good idea to get rid of the debris as quickly as possible so the Corfu Fire Department wouldn't be burdened with an endless string of rekindle calls.

All that remained of the store's inventory after the fire -- save produce kept in a cooler that just by coincidence and for no reason at all had a fireproof door -- was black ash or melted and mangled beyond recognition.

The inventory came from seven consignees, all but one a Genesee County resident. Almost everything they sold was repurposed from something old: Milk canisters with handpainted farm scenes; spiffed up 19th Century hand tools to hang on walls; lanterns that once lit the way but are best used these days as a "needful thing"; antique bed headboards converted into benches; and wood from other long lost barns cut sign-size and handpainted with clever and wise aphorisms.

In the home-decorating industry, the stock is called "primitive." It's the kind of baubles and curiosities that appeal to Western New Yorkers whose magazine subscriptions include "Yankee" and "Traditional Home" more so than "Dwell" and "Atomic Ranch."

The fire started in the chicken coop. We know that because that was the only thing with flames showing after Franclemont and Konfederath were awoken around 5 a.m. Thursday by a man pounding on their back door.

The chicken coop was newly constructed and purposefully placed next to the barn.

The kind of customers drawn to The Farm love farm animals. After acquiring some more chickens from another farmer who wanted to get rid of them, it seemed like a good idea to build the chicken coop closer to the customers.

"We made this big beautiful coop," Franclemont said. "I wanted it closer to the barn because my customers love to see the chickens walk around. That's part of it. They love my pig and they love the chickens and I wanted the chicken coop close to the barn so the customers see all that. A lot of kids would go over and open the thing and check for eggs."

Somehow, while 17 adult chickens perished in the fire, 11 young ones (bigger than chicks), survived.

When they were hauled from the fire, the 11 babies were unconscious and laying on their sides. Franclemont thought they were dead, but when she shook them, the soot-covered fowl sprang to life.

When you're under stress and you see your life going up in flames, time passes slowly. Seconds seem like minutes, minutes like hours.

It seemed, Franclemont said, like it took forever for the first fire trucks to arrive at her barn on the Route 33 side of Cohocton Road.

Corfu Chief Dean Eck arrived on scene, as chiefs do, before the fire trucks.

"He felt helpless," Franclemont said. "We're both standing there just waiting for the trucks to come."

Konfederath does all the farming for the family business. He grows produce sold in the store, the corn with stalks that make for handsome decorations in the fall, the thousands of pumpkins sold in October, the hay and straw that was stored in the barn's loft, awaiting shipment to horse farm customers.

"Some firemen were showing up and I was saying, 'it can't get to that hay,' " Franclemont said. "If it goes up the wall and gets to where we store hay and straw, we're done. It hit the hay and it was like lightning -- woosh -- and it lit up the whole barn. It was gone."

As flames licked the side of the barn, Franclemont was frantic to save what she could from the business. She grabbed the cash box and then went back for some of her books. When she wanted to go in again, this time for the records of her consignees sales, a deputy stopped her. After some arguing with the deputy and the chief, they agreed to let Konfederath go in and see if he could grab the records quickly.

When he opened the door, the heat rushed out. There were already flames in the store and a black velvet curtain of smoke billowed in his face. It was too late to save anything more.

The tragedy of fire trails a painful, draining and difficult summer for Franclemont.

In June, she was in an ATV accident and tore up her knee pretty bad. Following surgery, she was driving something a little less adventurous than a four-wheeler. She needed a Hoveround to move through the house and in the shop. Even so, her work time was limited.

Then she developed spinal meningitis. That meant more hospitalization.  

In September, she needed knee surgery again, so more time on crutches and less time working in her shop.

"I finally got back to work and I was enjoying stuff and painting again and opening the store up because that's me," Franclemont said. "That's what I want to do. I didn't want somebody else to do it."

During her convalescence, Franclemont received plenty of help. Most of her consignees pitched in and kept the store open, including Franclemont's friend, consignee and employee Lauryn Brick, who put in a lot of hours helping Franclemont with her business and her life, including raising funds from the community to help with Franclemont's uninsured medical expenses.

Of course she helped, Brick said. Her friend does so much for the community without ever asking anything in return.  

She helped organize fundraisers for Austin Heinemen, the Pembroke teen and cancer patient who inspired Austin's Army, even going "Bald for Bucks." When another friend was in her own ATV accident a year ago, Franclemont helped raise funds to assist. 

"This girl will help anyone," Brick said. "You can ask anyone in our community."

Getting back to work was so very important to Franclemont. She immediately started building furniture again, and her father, Richard Franclemont, who also builds primitive-style furniture, added more inventory to her store.

Last week, Franclemont drove down to Pennsylvania and brought back a trailer full of unfinished Amish furniture.

Three days before the fire, she and Konfederath completed adding two more rooms to the shop for all the new inventory.

It's only a matter of happenstance that saved the recently purchased Amish furniture. A relative needed to use her large trailer, so all of the furniture was unpacked and hauled down to the house basement for storage.

The saved furniture gives Franclemont a step forward toward opening a new store in the same location in the spring.

She and her partner have already started planning the new building. It will be a pole barn with hemlock siding and a metal roof.

"I'm never going to get that look again of the inside of my barn," Franclemont said. "I've been to a lot of stores. I'm going to try and make it look as antique and old inside as possible, though I don't know how we're going to do it. I don't like this new building look in a new store. I don't want that. I think once we put our furniture in there and our consigner stuff, it will create that feel."

The new barn will sit further back from the road because Franclemont, for the sake of children's safety, was always uncomfortable with how close the rows and rows of pumpkins would sit to Route 77. There will also be a lean-to for better display of produce. The big amenity the old barn lacked was a bathroom for customers. The new barn will have a bathroom.

If that sounds promising, like an upgrade, Franclemont isn't fooling herself into thinking it will be better than her old barn, with its notched, hand-hewn beams and aged wooden walls and sense of time and place that can only be created over the space of decades.

"This is an opportunity to do something new, but I was happy with just the way it was," Franclemont said. "I would rather have that barn than a new building any day. I'm sure we'll be better and everything will be fine, and we'll have some things we didn't have before, but I can't replace the barn."

News of the fire spread fast in the era of digital media. There were so many people offering help, or just a kind word.

The morning of the fire, Linda Richley, from Linda's Family Diner, already had 40 breakfast sandwiches made for firefighters when Al Graham showed up to see what he could get for the crews. She also delivered boxes of coffee.

In the fire's aftermath, the Reynolds family from Reyncrest Farms pitched in to clean.

The folks at Alleghany Farm Services provided transportation for the heavy equipment used in the cleanup.

The Farm's Facebook page was flooded with messages from well-wishers. Her phone was buzzing with phone calls and text messages. At one point, her friend Tricia Heinemen took the phone away from her and told her to go sleep.

There's so many people Franclement wants to thank. All of the letters for her marquee sign she kept along the edge of the roadway were destroyed by the fire, so with black spray paint she wrote, "Thank you / Everyone / XO."

"How do you thank everybody?" Franclemont said. "I tried to keep up and I can't. I know I've missed somebody. I don't even know what to say."

Lauryn Brick said she's overwhelmed by the thought of all that her friend lost, and how she poured her heart and soul into her business, only to see it destroyed in a matter of minutes by a chicken coup fire.

"She needs to rebuild everything that was so tragically taken from her," Brick said. "She has four children that she also provides for and to think, this happened during the holidays."

Brick, along with Renee Everett, have set up a GoFundMe account seeking community donations to help Franclemont rebuild and take care of her family.

Franclemont is unaccustomed to being the person on the receiving end of other people's charity. 

With her eyes still puffy from days of crying, and despite her thought that she had no more tears to shed, when she sat at her kitchen counter and recalled the outpouring of support from her friends and neighbors, the skin around Franclemont's eyes reddened and glistened again with tears.

She didn't want her picture taken once she started crying again.

"I'm not good at taking stuff from people," Franclemont said in her normally clear, alto tone, but then her voice went up an octave. "I'm the person," she said, voice breaking. "I like to give. I don't want people giving me stuff. I want to give to people.

"In my family, we do stuff for people," she added with the tears continuing to stream down her face. "I don't want people doing stuff for me. There's much worse off people than me. My friends have cancer. My friend was just in an accident. They're bad. I'm not bad. I have a house to live in. I'm not sick. I'm not fighting for my life. Those people need my help, not me. I know my community knows that, that I don't want any help. I know they're going to do it anyways because that's the way they are. Anybody that knows me knows that it's hard for me to take anything from anyone."

The way Brick sees it, her friend may not be asking for help, but she needs it.

File photo of Renee Franclemont in her store from 2012.

File photo of "The Barn" from September, 2010.

December 4, 2014 - 8:01am
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire, corfu.

A business simply called The Farm, that featured antiques and locally handcrafted items, was destroyed this morning when a fire broke out inside.

The cause hasn't been determined but an early guess, officials said, is that the fire started in a chicken coop area were heat lamps were used.

Owner Renee Franclemont lives in the house next door and a deputy had to stop her from going inside once the fire was already well involved because she wanted to save the business's financial records.

The alarm for Corfu fire was sounded about 5:45 a.m. 

Chief Dean Eck said when he arrived on scene there was still only light flame from one end and one window, but the black smoke was heavy. The fire spread fast inside the old 19th Century-era barn.

Mutual aid departments included East Pembroke, Pembroke, Indian Falls, City of Batavia, Alabama, Darien and Alden. 

Previously: Locally grown and locally made items featured at new store in Corfu

December 2, 2014 - 2:23am
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire, Le Roy.

A fully involved house fire is reported 8695 Oatka Trail Road, Le Roy.

That's right at the county line.

Le Roy fire with Bergen, Pavilion and Stafford dispatched, along with mutual aid from Livingstone County companies.

UPDATE 5 a.m.: Two family dogs barked and awoke the residents to the fire, according to a deputy on scene. All residents were able to get out of the house safely, along with the dogs, though a family cat was still missing. The house is a total loss. The fire spread quickly. The valves of two propane tanks blew off, sending flames shooting high into the air. Firefighters executed an exterior attack on the outside of the structure, which was already fully involved by the time the first trucks were on scene, said First Assistant Chief Dale Ehrhart. Assisting Le Roy fire were Caledonia, Mumford, Bergen, Byron, Pavilion, Stafford, Churchville and Scottsville. County records list the property owner as Maria  Hunter. The early morning temperature at the time the volunteers were out fighting this fire was 24 degrees.

UPDATE 9:30 a.m.: The Sheriff's Office reports that the cause of the fire remains under investigation, but it appears to have started "at a wood burning fireplace insert."  There were three people living in the residence and all escaped unharmed. They are being assisted by the Red Cross.

UPDATE: Video submitted by a reader:

November 30, 2014 - 1:49pm
posted by Billie Owens in Oakfield, fire.

A combine fire is reported at 3238 Maltby Road. Oakfield Fire Department is on scene.

UPDATE 2:41 p.m.: Fire is out. The Oakfield assignment is back in service.

UPDATE: Photo submitted by a reader.

November 27, 2014 - 11:45am
posted by Billie Owens in fire, alexander.

A kitchen fire is reported at 3013 Pike Road, Alexander. It is believed to be contained to the oven. Alexander fire is responding.

UPDATE 11:52 a.m.: Confirmed -- burnt food. Alexander back in service.

November 26, 2014 - 8:53am
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, fire.

There is a structure fire at 22 Manhattan Ave. and city firefighters are on scene. Town of Batavia fire is asked to stand by in its hall.

UPDATE 9:05 a.m.: This was a kitchen fire that was called in about 25 minutes ago. Firefighters were able to contain it to the kitchen and now the fire is out.

UPDATE 9:07 a.m.: A pet cat was found in the house, brought safely out and taken to a neighbor for safekeeping. A code enforcement officer is on scene. There remains a faint smell of smoke inside but the blaze did not produce much smoke.

UPDATE 9:26 a.m.: Engine 12 is back in service. Town of Batavia is released from its standby.

November 16, 2014 - 2:02pm
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, fire.

Smoke is reportedly coming from a mobile home in the West End Trailer Park at 4016 W. Main Street Road. Town of Batavia Fire Department is responding.

UPDATE 2:04 p.m.: A chief on scene says someone is burning leaves, although it could appear to the caller that the smoke was coming from the mobile home itself.

November 11, 2014 - 3:13pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire, pembroke, east pembroke, indian falls.

A quick response by the East Pembroke Fire Department helped save a house on Indian Falls Road this afternoon when a fire destroyed a detached garage and heat from the fire was causing the siding of the house to melt.

Chief Don Newton said all of the department's trucks rolled within minutes of the alarm.

When Newton arrived on scene driving one of those engines, the garage was already gone. 

One firefighter described it as "rolling flames."

Newton said crews deployed hand lines and acted quickly to protect the house and knock down the fire.

"It is a great save to the house," Newton said. "These guys are awesome. This is what we train for. These guys do a hell of a job for me. I can't thank them enough for being here during the day. Middle of the day, it's tough to get people out and all the units that responded here from all the different departments, I can't thank enough for them being out here."

The house, at 2023 Indian Falls Road, suffered significant heat damage, but no apparent structural damage.

County records list the property owner as Timothy Franclemont.

"It was a good save on the garage as far as I'm concerned," Newton said. "There were a lot of chemicals in the garage, oils, gases, that were burning fiercely, running out of the doors with water on fire."

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

No injuries were reported.

Assisting East Pembroke were Indian Falls, Oakfield, Pembroke, Darien, Elba and Alabama.

(Initial Post)

November 11, 2014 - 12:52pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, east pembroke, indian falls.

A fully involved garage fire with exposures to other property is reported at 2023 Indian Falls Road. Indian Falls and East Pembroke fire departments are responding. The call has gone to a second alarm. Oakfield, Pembroke, Darien, Elba and Alabama are also called in and Town of Batavia is asked to stand by in East Pembroke Fire Hall.

UPDATE 1 p.m.: Corfu Fire Police are to shut down Indian Falls Road at Route 77.

UPDATE 1:19 p.m.: Howard at the scene reports flames are no longer showing. The garage is a total loss and the nearby house "has significant heat damage (outside)."

November 10, 2014 - 4:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, fire, Wood Street.

A fire this morning at 8 Wood S., Batavia, caused $35,000 in damage to the structure and building contents, according to the Batavia Fire Department.

The fire was caused by an electrical issue and started in the kitchen.

A second-floor resident climbed onto the roof of an alcove on the first floor and was rescued by a city firefighter.

A dog that barked to alert residents to the fire perished as a result of smoke in the residence.

The incident commander was Mark Mikolajczyk.

(initial post)

Photo by Frank Capuano.

November 10, 2014 - 11:01am
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, fire.

City fire is responding to 174 Ross St., lower apt., for the odor of something electrical burning inside a wall.

UPDATE 11:07 a.m.: A city code enforcement officer is called in.

November 10, 2014 - 6:59am
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, fire.

Smoke is reportedly coming from the house at 8 Wood St., located between Jackson Street and Pringle Avenue. Smoke is coming from the attic, too. City police are on scene and city fire is responding.

UPDATE 7 a.m.: The incident has gone to a second alarm.

UPDATE 7:05 a.m. Alexander's Fast Team and Elba fire is called to the scene. Mercy medics are requested for an evaluation. Town of Batavia fire is called to fill in at the city fire hall on Evans Street. Also, D "ESU 2" is called to the scene along with all off-duty platoons.

UPDATE 7:14 a.m.: Command reports fire knocked down. Overhaul started. The blaze is believed to have started in the kitchen.

UPDATE 7:27 a.m.: Alexander is returning to quarters.

UPDATE 7:50 a.m. (by Howard, info and photo from Alecia Kaus/Video News Service): A resident who lived on the second floor was rescued from the roof. A dog died. The fire started in the kitchen. Two people downstairs were evacuated. The second-floor resident is being evaluated in an ambulance on scene.

UPDATE (info from Alecia Kaus/Video News Service): the dog that perished had alerted residents to the fire. 

November 9, 2014 - 4:15pm
posted by Billie Owens in Oakfield, fire.

An unknown type fire is reported in a classroom at Oakfield-Alabama School, 7100 Lewiston Road. Command on scene tells firefighters to respond non-emergency.

November 7, 2014 - 7:52am
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, fire.

A fire is reported at the Walmart Super Center on Veterans Memorial Drive. The building has been evacuated. Flames are visible on the wall in the meat department of the food store. Town of Batavia Fire Department is responding.

UPDATE 7:52 a.m.: A fire is confirmed inside the meat cooler. Mutual aid from Oakfield fire is requested along with all available manpower from Town of Batavia.

UPDATE 8:06 a.m.: Oakfield is told to continue non-emergency with a fill-in unit for Town of Batavia's fire hall.

UPDATE 8:53 a.m.: Fire is out. A Health Department rep inspected the meat cooler and cleared the scene.

November 4, 2014 - 2:05pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, Bethany.

A leaf fire that is moving toward a wooded area is reported at 5482 Jerico Road. Bethany Fire Department is responding. Light smoke is showing in the vicinity.

UPDATE 2:25 p.m.: Fire is under control and firefighters are working to douse hot spots.

UPDATE 3:01 p.m.: Fire is out. Bethany is back in service.

November 1, 2014 - 11:41pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire, caledonia.

Four Genesee County fire companies are requested to the scene of a structure fire in Caledonia.

Le Roy responded first, and now tankers from Stafford, Pavilion and Bergen are requested to the scene.

The fire is at a commercial structure next to a residence at 2773 Caledonia-Le Roy Road.

UPDATE 11:54 p.m.: Mutual aid out of Wyoming County requested to the scene. Tankers from Perry, Perry Center, Wyoming are requested. Shortly after the tone out in Wyoming County, a chief at the Caledonia scene suggests that Perry come right to the scene, and another chief responded, "because their tanker is loading up with massive amounts of water right now."

UPDATE 12:01 a.m.: A chief instructs a crew, "no water should go on the back of the building where you're at now. It's full of fertilizer." 

UPDATE 12:09 a.m.: Photo submitted by Jeremiah Russell.

UPDATE 12:28 a.m.: Below a photo taken by Sean Valdes from the Genesee Country Village and Museum grounds. Valdes said he can feel the heat from the fire that far away and he believes he heard explosions earlier.

UPDATE 12:38 a.m.: From 13 WHAM:

Calls into 9-1-1 started coming in around 11:30 p.m. for the fire at Commodity Resource Corporation on Caledonia Leroy Road. CRC provides products and tools to agribusinesses across the country.

UPDATE 12:49 a.m.: Rochester's 13 WHAM has reporters on scene.They were kind enough to send over the two photos below. Be sure to tune into 13 WHAM for complete coverage of the fire.

UPDATE 12:52 a.m.: Here's another photo from 13 WHAM:

UPDATE 7:32 a.m.: Crews are still dealing with this fire. Le Roy Fire is still on scene, as is Stafford, Pavilion and Bergen. Alexander fire responded overnight, and Le Roy's ladder truck crew was given a break, relieved by Town of Batavia's ladder truck.

UPDATE 8:10 a.m.: Le Roy Fire is going back in service. The Genesee County emergency coordinator who has been on scene all night is returning, relieved by another coordinator. 

UPDATE 8:38 a.m.: South Byron fire requested to the scene, non-emergency.

October 20, 2014 - 1:35pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, Alabama.

A field fire is reported in the area of 1147 Lewiston Road. Alabama fire is responding.

UPDATE 1:50 p.m.: Alabama commands reports the fire is under control.

UPDATE 1:54 p.m.: Fire is out. Alabama is returning and in service.

October 17, 2014 - 4:38pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, east pembroke.

An "incendiary facility" on the grounds of Genesee Valley Farms is on fire, according to a caller to emergency dispatch. The address is 3520 S. Main Street Road, East Pembroke. Everyone is out of the structure. East Pembroke fire is responding along with mutual aid from Town of Batavia, Oakfield, Darien, and Alexander. Pembroke and Indian Falls are to stand by. The location is between Wortendyke Road and Lovers Lane Road.

UPDATE 4:48 p.m.: Howard at the scene reports there is a moderate amount of smoke showing but no flames. The incendiary facility is inside a small out building. Smoke appears to be coming from the eaves.

UPDATE 5:57 p.m.: Fire is knocked down. Some crews are picking up and preparing to leave.

October 16, 2014 - 6:10pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, fire.

A car is reported in front of Wendy's on Main Street, Batavia.

City fire responding.

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