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October 21, 2015 - 12:44pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office, law enforcement.

Via our news partner, WBTA.

Bodycams may be in the future for Genesee County Sheriff’s Deputies.

Genesee County Sheriff Gary Maha proposed the idea to the Public Service Committee for recommendation Tuesday. The Sheriff said the department "has been researching the implementation of a body camera program for our officers for about two years."    

There’s room in the department’s budget for the $495 bodycams according to the Sheriff, with a total cost of $42,000 for the 32 deputies.

Sheriff Maha also remarked that "Some people tend to act differently when they know they are being recorded and that's also a benefit to our people out in the field."

The cameras would record both audio and video and could potentially be used as evidence for both prosecution and defense.

September 30, 2015 - 4:12pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office, crime.


Long and lean, this silver streak of a machine practically still has that new car smell with only 28,000 miles on it.

And it could be yours, if you're the highest bidder in an online auction that will open Oct. 6.

The 1999 Corvette was surrendered by its former owner, Anthony A. Leone, a 47-year-old former Jackson Street resident who is currently in prison. Leone signed over the car to the county under forfeiture laws pertaining to drug possession. Leone was stopped by a Le Roy police officer while driving the car and a subsequent investigation, which included the Local Drug Task Force, found a quantity of crack cocaine and pills in the vehicle. 

Since the Sheriff's Office has no legitimate law enforcement use for the Corvette, the county is putting it up for sale. The proceeds will be shared by the agencies that comprise the local Drug Task Force -- Sheriff's Office, Batavia PD, and Le Roy PD. The money can only be used for law enforcement purposes and only for expeditures beyond normal annual budget spending. For example, if the county wanted to buy new surveillance cameras for the task force, but those cameras aren't an otherwise anticipated purchase, the money could be used for that purpose.

Pictured with the car are Undersheriff William Sheron and Sheriff Gary Maha.

The auction site is Bidding opens Oct. 6 and closes Oct. 13. The minimum bid is $15,500.

The car can be viewed by potential bidders at the Sheriff's Office, 165 Park Road, Batavia. For an appointment, contact Chief Deputy Jerome Brewster at (585) 345-3000, ext. 3503.





July 23, 2015 - 8:00am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.


Press release:

The Genesee County Sheriff’s Office has filled two vacant Deputy Sheriff positions with the hiring of Chad P. Cummings and Richard S. Schildwaster.

Deputy Cummings is an Army veteran and is a 1996 high school graduate from BMC Durfee High School in Fall River, Mass. Following high school, Deputy Cummings enlisted in the Army from 1998 to 2008 and held the position of platoon sergeant and earned several commendations and awards. He began his college education at Jefferson Community College while stationed at Fort Drum and transferred to Genesee Community College, earning an A.A.S Degree in Criminal Justice in 2011. Deputy Cummings was previously employed by the NYS Thruway Authority and the Valley Metro-Barbosa Group.

Deputy Schildwaster is a Navy veteran. While enlisted, he held the positions of mechanic, military police and recruiter and earned several medals. Deputy Schildwaster attended Genesee Community College for studies in Criminal Justice. He was previously employed by the Air Force and Veterans’ Affairs as a police officer.

Deputy Cummings and Schildwaster recently graduated from the Monroe County Law Enforcement Academy at Monroe Community College on July 10. Deputy Cummings was class platoon lieutenant. The keynote speaker at the graduation was Brockport Police Department Chief Daniel Varrenti.

Sheriff Gary Maha stated, “Deputy Cummings and Deputy Schildwaster have completed our 14-week field-training program and performed exceptionally well. They are great additions to our road patrol.”

July 9, 2015 - 8:00am
posted by Traci Turner in Sheriff's Office, Badge of Honor Association.


Working midnight shifts in the days before he died of a heart attack, Deputy Frank Bordonaro handled some very stressful calls -- a fire where he may have saved the life of a homeowner and a farm-vehicle accident that took the life of a 22-year-old man. 

People don't realize it, but stress and motor-vehicle accidents claim the lives of more police officers than crimes of violence, said Gary Pullen, of the Badge of Honor Association.

Bordonaro was honored today by the Badge of Honor Association in a sign dedication outside the Sheriff's Office headquarters on Park Road, Batavia.

A few tears were shed as Bordonaro's two sons, Bryce and Chase, stood solemnly with their heads bowed and unveiled the sign dedicated to their father. Yesterday marked the one-year anniversary of his death. Bordonaro died unexpectedly of a heart attack after handling several high-stress calls. 

On July 5, Bordonaro responded to a house fire on North Road in Le Roy. He saved one of homeowners from reentering the fire to rescue his dog. On July 6, he responded to a farm accident involving a pea combine and a car. Carmelo Rivera, 22, of Holley, was pronounced dead at the scene after he crossed the center line on Route 19 near Bissell Road in Bergen and struck a pea combine head on. Bordonaro completed both the investigations himself and worked his last shift on July 7, a night of heavy rains.

Bordonaro's family, officers from throughout the county, state troopers and members of the community attended the ceremony to remember a heroic comrade. The Genesee County Sheriff's Office and the Badge of Honor Association worked together to plan the sign dedication and memorial site. 

The association, a group of volunteers, many of whom are police officers, travel all over the state to put up memorial signs for officers who die in the line of duty. According to President Justin Collins, they have dedicated 150 signs in Upstate and Western New York. 

Next to the sign, a tree and flowers were planted. Bubba's Landscaping donated all the work and materials.

A tree was chosen to be planted for several reasons. The roots on the tree symbolize Bordonaro's roots as an officer. The trunk stands for the foundation and strength of the Genesee County Sheriff's Office. The leaves are living proof that Bordonaro's roots will carry on.

Sheriff Gary Maha remembered Bordonaro as a hard worker who was dedicated to serving the community. He served at the Sheriff's Office for 19 years. According to Maha, he put the safety of other officers before his own and would always be the first one to knock down the door and enter a dangerous situation. 

"He was there to back up his guys," Maha said. "He was a mentor for many of the young officers and you could depend on Frank."

Bordonaro's wife, Robin, is grateful for the tribute the Badge of Honor Association and Sheriff's Office dedicated to her husband. She knows her husband will never be forgotten and his memory will last among the department.

"The whole Sheriff's Department has been amazing to us and has treated us like family this whole time," Robin Bordonaro said. "They are our extended family and it's a brotherhood and we're still a part of it and they still will always be a part of us."

Robin Bordonaro urges people to consider the extensive amount of stress officers have to endure and the toll it takes on their health. Her husband had investigated several high-stress calls including a house fire and fatal motor-vehicle accident days before he took a heart attack and died. According to reports from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, the risk for cardiovascular disease is higher among law enforcement officers than for the rest of the population.

"I wish more people would realize throughout the county agencies that a line-of-duty death is more than just being shot and killed on the job," Frank's widow said. "The stresses of the job can cause heart attacks and take them away from their families and the county doesn't want to realize that. They are fighting us on that and it's a shame."

In addition to the sign dedication, the Badge of Honor Association is setting up a Go Fund Me page to raise money for the Bordonaro family.

Photos by Howard Owens.






July 8, 2015 - 8:24am
posted by Traci Turner in Sheriff's Office, Genesee ARC, Project Lifesaver.


(Deputy Kevin McCarthy shows parent Kari Powers how to use the tracking bracelet.)


The Genesee County Sheriff's Office partnered with Genesee ARC to provide tracking bracelets to children with disabilities and reassure parents that their child can be safely located.

Twelve children with disabilities were fitted for tracking bracelets today. Transmitters inside the bracelet emit signals and the Sheriff's Office can pick up the the signals with a receiver. The missing child can be located within 15 minutes. 

Sheriff Gary Maha has been trying to implement Project Lifesaver, an program that provides equipment to police officers to locate children who are at risk of wandering, in the county for several years. However, Maha was not able to get the funding until recently. The Sheriff's Office received the equipment through the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Service. The 13 transmitters and two receivers they were given cost approximately $7,500. Each transmitter is worth $350 plus the cost of batteries, which need to be replaced every month.

"I think it's important because there are children out there with disabilities including autism and Down Syndrome and many of these children have a tendency to wander," Maha said. "We have met with parents and they are overjoyed that we were able to get Project Lifesaver here in the county."

The Sheriff's Office worked with the Genesee ARC to help them implement the project. The ARC reached out to the families and assisted them with the process.


Morgan Powers, an 8-year-old with autism, was one of the children who received a bracelet. Her parents, Brian and Kari Powers, were relieved their daughter was getting a bracelet because she has wandered off several times and safety is their biggest concern.

"We are very excited to be here," Kari Powers said. "It has been a couple of months since we found out about the program and we are very strong advocates for it. Morgan is a risk taker. She does a lot of wandering off especially these past two weeks since she has been out of school."

Maha hopes the Sheriff's Office can get more funding in the future to continue the program every year.

June 30, 2015 - 11:01am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office, Genesee ARC.


Press release:

For many families who have children diagnosed with developmental and intellectual disabilities, including autism, Project Lifesaver is viewed as exactly that – a LIFESAVER!

Genesee ARC has partnered with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Department in support of their effort to bring the Project Lifesaver program to Genesee County. 

The program is part of Project Lifesaver International, a nonprofit organization that bridges the technological gap for “at risk” populations and public safety agencies. It provides police, fire/rescue and other first responders with a comprehensive program including equipment and training to quickly locate and rescue individuals with cognitive disorders who are at risk due to behaviors of wandering and other safety concerns. 

Project Lifesaver has more than 1,400 participating member agencies throughout 48 states in the United States, six provinces in Canada, and Australia, and has performed 3,016 searches over the last 16 years with no serious injuries or fatalities ever reported.

The Genesee County’s Sheriff’s Office has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services and the Missing and Exploited Children Clearinghouse for the implementation of the Project Lifesaver program, which provides equipment, training, certification and support to law enforcement, public safety organizations and community groups.

Children identified and their families will participate in training and receive their Project Lifesaver bracelets at the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office in July. The program is overseen by Sheriff’s deputies trained in the Project Lifesaver program.

For more information on Project Lifesaver, visit

April 24, 2015 - 4:23pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

Press release:

Genesee County Deputy Sheriff Joseph A. Corona has been selected by the New York State STOP-DWI Foundation and Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) New York State to receive its “2014 Recognition Award."

Deputy Corona was nominated by Genesee County Sheriff Gary T. Maha for his very aggressive DWI enforcement during 2014. Deputy Corona made 43 alcohol-related arrests (38 DWI, three DWI Drugs and two DWAI) and also made 30 arrests for unlawful possession of an alcoholic beverage with intent to consume by persons under the age of 21. In May 2014, Deputy Corona was awarded an Exceptional Service Award by the Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (GCASA) for his efforts in combating DWI. 

The award was presented to Deputy Corona during a luncheon held in Schenectady on April 23 (see attached photo). He was one of among only 23 individuals statewide to be selected for this award. Attending the luncheon were Sheriff Maha, Chief Deputy Gordon L. Dibble and Genesee County Stop DWI coordinator Matt Landers.

April 14, 2015 - 2:15pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office, Genesee County Jail.

Press release:

The Genesee County Sheriff’s Office recently filled four vacant Correction Officer positions with the hiring of Eric T. Hayes, James M. Smart, Brett J. Peters, and Kevin P. Thomas. 

These four Correction Officers graduated in a class of 19 on Thursday, April 2, 2015, from the Erie County Basic Corrections six-week Academy that was held at the Erie County Training Facility. Speakers at the graduation were Erie County Sheriff Timothy B. Howard, Genesee County Sheriff Gary T. Maha and Wyoming County Sheriff Gregory J. Rudolph.  Training at the academy included instruction in the care and custody of inmates, inmate supervision, defensive tactics, firearms training, and other topics pertaining to corrections.

Sheriff Maha stated, “Correction officers Hayes, Smart, Peters and Thomas will be great assets to the Jail Bureau and excelled at the Corrections Academy."

April 14, 2015 - 10:25am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

The number of incidents handled by Sheriff's deputies during the first quarter of 2015 reflect a 19-percent increase over the same time period of 2014, according to a department review delivered by Sheriff Gary Maha to county legislators.

There were more felony investigations; the jail population was down during the first quarter of 2015, according to Maha.

There were complicating factors during the first three months of the year.

Dispatchers handled more calls, medical expenses rose for the jail, and the department has operated with fewer deputies following some key departures.

Jail Superintendent William Zipfel said the jail population is older and substance abuse problems are more complicated, leading to increased medical expenses.

While there were only 11 female inmates during the first quarter, some of them were harder to place in area facilities that can handle female prisoners. Some jails don't want to take on some of the kind of substance abuse issues some inmates have, and while the local jail is careful to keep pharmacy expenses down, other jails don't necessarily seek out generic prescriptions for inmates with health problems.

Some female inmates have monthly pharmacy bills of $3,000 to $5,000 per month.

Deputies made 470 prisoner transports compared to 465 a year ago.

The department currently has six fewer deputies following retirements, a medical injury to one deputy and the death of Frank Bordonaro. The Crash Management Team is down an investigator.

Two more deputies may retire this year.

Three new deputies are in training and there are two background investigations under way for potential candidates.

As the number of calls for service keeps increasing in the county, Maha is considering a request for more personnel in the 2016 budget.

Since 2009, the number of calls in to the dispatch center has increased 38.8 percent. There were more than 75,000 calls in 2014.

The calls are increasingly complex and require more staff time to handle.

The department will likely need to add a senior dispatch position in 2016.

Deputies responded to 7,197 incidents during the first quarter, a 19-percent increase from a year ago.

There were 58 felony cases handled by investigators during the quarter, compared to 70 a year ago.

Investigations have grown more complicated with the rise of identity theft and computer fraud.

There is an increase in felonies committed by people outside of Genesee County.

Genesee Justice handled 145 release under supervision cases in the first quarter, significantly more than the typical 100 per quarter in previous years.

The department is dealing with more opiate addictions, which complicates supervision.

The DWI caseload has remained steady, the reports says.

March 25, 2015 - 1:49pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in law enforcement, Le Roy, Sheriff's Office.

Press release:

Sheriff Gary T. Maha has been informed by the Board of Directors of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund that Deputy Frank Bordonaro’s name has been approved for inclusion on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.

Frank passed away a few hours after his night shift ended on July 8, 2014, after 19 years of service with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office. His name will be formally dedicated, along with other fallen officers during 2014, on May 13, 2015, during the 27th Annual Candlelight Vigil held during National Police Week in Washington, D.C.  

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated May 15 as Peace Officers’ Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as Police Week. The Memorial Service began in 1982 as a gathering in Senate Park of approximately 120 survivors and supporters of law enforcement. Decades later, the event, more commonly known as National Police Week, has grown to a series of events which attracts tens of thousands of survivors and law enforcement officers each year to honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice. National Police Week draws in between 25,000 to 40,000 attendees. The attendees come from departments throughout the United States as well as from agencies throughout the world. This provides a unique opportunity to meet others that share a common brotherhood. 

“Several officers from the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office are planning on attending this event to pay tribute to Deputy Bordonaro,” stated Sheriff Maha.

February 27, 2015 - 4:24pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

Here are some statistical highlights from the annual report of the Genesee County Sheriff's Office for 2014:

There were 28,518 total calls for service.

Jail Bureau: Total bookings, 1,200. Highest single day population, 57; lowest, 54; average female population (housed at other facilities) 16.6; total meals served 75,987; inmate food expenses, $124,279.30; inmate medical expenses, $221,114.58.

Civil Bureau: Subpoenas served, 560; family court summons, 1,220; evictions, 123

Road Patrol: Training hours, 5,346

Warrant Activity: 345 cleared; 11 out-of-state warrant arrests

Safe Child IDs processed: 267

DWI arrests: 165; 58 were between midnight and 3 a.m.; 50 were on Saturdays, 40 on Sundays; 128 arrestees were male; 80 were age 21 to 35; nine were underage, including two under age 18; 35 were with a BAC of .18 or higher; 32 were felony DWI; 17 were ability impaired by drugs; 17 refused breath test; there was one BAC at least .31.

There were five fatal accidents in 2014. 

There were 206 personal injury accidents handled by the Sheriff's Office, 475 property damage accidents and eight involving pedestrians or bicyclists. Of the accidents, 114 were hit-and-run.

There were 579 motor-vehicle accidents involving animals.

Fifty-three of the accidents reported involved alcohol, and of the accidents, 560 resulted in arrests.

Of the fatal accidents, only one involved alcohol.

There were 321 citations issued involving vehicle inspection or insurance violations. 

Total equipment violations: 364

License and registration: 717

There were 857 citations issued for moving violations. Of those, 258 for disobeying traffic control device, 92 for failure to keep right, 42 for driving left of pavement markings, 89 for moving from lane unsafely, 61 for following too closely, and 94 for failure to stop for stop sign.

In all, 947 speeders were cited.

There were 403 total alcohol-related violations.

The total number of seat belt violations, 194, with 18 related to improper restraints for a child.

The total DWI arrests included 37 felony arrests and 122 misdemeanor arrests.

On the criminal front, there were 180 felony charges against arrestees, 503 misdemeanors and 1,036 violations.

Charges included 152 for burglary, 102 for criminal mischief, 103 for grand larceny, 137 for harassment, 319 for larceny, 343 for liquor law violations, 138 for unlawful possession of marijuana.

The office took 182 non-criminal reports, 437 domestic incident reports and 86 mental health complaints.

January 31, 2015 - 12:20am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Le Roy, Sheriff's Office, John Duyssen.

The best way to describe John Duyssen's decision to retire after 21 years as a deputy sheriff is, it's just time.

That's what he said in an interview Friday, his last day of duty, "It's time."

In law enforcement, you're always on the edge, more so in today's environment. The death of his friend and fellow Le Royan Frank Bordonaro weighed on Duyssen, a father to five adopted children. As a member of the crash management team, he's seen enough mangled and battered bodies. The son and brother of farmers, he has his own spread on Bater Road to run. The Le Roy School District can use him as a bus driver and that seems like a good route to take at this juncture in his life.

It's just time.

"I've had a great career," Duyssen said. "I'm leaving happy. I'm not disgruntled. I'm at the top of my game. The Sheriff just gave me an awesome award here the other day. That was kind of cool because it was almost like a career wrapper. "

The best part of the job, Duyssen said, was seeing justice work. He takes a lot of satisfaction in the confessions he's obtained and the convictions of people who did bad things to his friends and neighbors.

Mostly working the east side of the county, he gave his personal cell phone number out to hundreds of people. They called him with their complaints and when appropriate he opened cases.

One such case was a series of thefts of timber from several property owners in the Le Roy area in 2010.

The investigation took more than a year. It involved several victims, including older residents and farmers and landowners who simply enjoyed the park-like settings of their property.  

Duyssen made arrests and defendants eventually entered guilty pleas.

"When you work a case hard and you see it to the end, and see the people who were stolen from, defrauded, to see them get justice, is my biggest thing," Duyssen said.

Law enforcement, however, isn't without its dangers. Living on the edge takes its toll, even physically, Duyssen said.

"You don't know what you're pulling up on," Duyssen said. "Last year when that one guy attacked us in Pavilion, we didn't know what to expect. He was huge. I had a recruit with me, brand new, out of the academy, and he came right at us. We won, but when you've got a guy that has arms that big around and he's way bigger than me and you're not prepared for it, the door comes open and he comes flying at you, yeah, you're adrenaline goes through an adrenaline rush."

One of Duyssen's duties the past several years was leading the investigations on many fatal accidents. It's a matter of science and mathematics to reconstruct a scene, but you're also dealing with the human costs, the dead bodies and their friends and relatives. 

"I can remember, as I drive around the county and see the crosses, the memorials from fatal accidents," Duyssen said. "All the guys who have to work these cases, the community doesn't know the carnage that a deputy, trooper, police officer sees throughout 20 some years. You can remember smells, sights, sounds, and you can relive that.

"So I know what PTSD is all about. In the crash world, to use the science and the evidence and translate that to reconstruct a scene, to see that those who are physically wrong, if it's a DWI manslaughter case, and justice serves, there's nothing better."

Never, Duyssen said, are these accidents really accidents.

They're collisions.

"An accident is if you or I spill our coffee or milk," Duyssen said. "A car crash is either reckless, careless or negligent."

Drugs, drink, not enough sleep, speed, distracted driving, are all choices.

"I've seen some of these little kids tear me up," Duyssen said. "You just say, 'why?' and that's why it's time. I've seen enough. I've done enough. It's time for another, younger guy to take over."

A decade ago, Duyssen received the Carl Drexler Award, one of the highest honors in the state for a deputy sheriff for exceptional career achievements and conscientious devotion to duty. Both Duyssen and Sheriff Gary Maha mentioned at the awards ceremony memorable moments in the deputy's career.

One of the things that made Duyssen an exception deputy, Maha said, was his ability to relate to people. He was so good at getting suspects to talk and even confess, that Maha said he would have made a great detective.

"He had a lot of common sense and sometimes that makes a big difference in an officer," Maha said.

Yup, Duyssen, said, he could always talk with people.

"Law enforcement doesn't mean you have to be the biggest Hulk Hogan guy to enforce the law," Duyssen said. "I'm definitely not the biggest guy. My biggest asset is talking with people and solving things that way. If you treat people nice, they reciprocate I think, and they'll tell you want they did wrong. How do we get confessions? By treating people the right way. You know that hard-ass cop stuff just doesn't work."

More than once, Chief Deputy Jerome Brewster would remind him, "Just go out and talk, John," Duyssen said. "Talk to them."

"So, you head back out, things start rolling and next thing you know, you hand them a pen and a piece of paper and tell them, 'why don't you just tell me what happened?' " Duyssen said. He smiled, mimicked writing on a piece of paper, and added, "Five pages was the last one."

John and his wife, Jessica, decided to go the adoption route to start a family, and one adopted son encouraged them to try a second, then a third and finally a fourth and fifth.

They are Jonah, 17, Colt, 17, Julian, 13, Miranda, 6, and Jaden, 5.

All are homeschooled, though Jonah and Colt started at Le Roy High School this year, their senior year. Jonah is playing his first year of varsity basketball and will attend Bible Baptist College in Scranton, Pa., next year, where he plans to continue pursuing his hoop dreams. Colt is a wrestler and soccer player.

With more time for the farm, Jonah might get that second hog barn he wants and John will add some beef cattle. They'll continue to grow and sell their famous strawberries and raspberries.

And John will drive a school bus, working a morning shift, coming home to do chores and then heading back to the bus garage to start a round of afternoon drop-offs.

That's how John Duyssen will spend his time.

At shift change Friday afternoon, Sheriff Gary Maha presented John Duyssen with a Certificate of Appreciation and a keepsake retired deputy badge and ID.

Deputy John Duyssen signs off as GS-33 for the last time.

January 29, 2015 - 9:22am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

Press release:

Deputy Daniel M. VanValkenburg, of the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office retired December 20, 2014, after 20 years of service. Deputy VanValkenburg started his career with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office on December 5, 1994, as a Correction Officer at the Jail.  He was appointed Deputy Sheriff-Road Patrol in 1998 and for the past two years, was assigned to the Court Security Detail. In addition to his normal duties, he also participated in community events on behalf of the Sheriff’s Office with the Safe Child ID Program. During his career, Deputy VanValkenburg has earned two Commendation Awards. 

Deputy John R. Duyssen, of the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office will retire effective at the end of his shift tomorrow, January 30, 2015, after 21 years of service. Deputy Duyssen started his career with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office on April 19, 1993. In addition to his normal duties, he was also a Crash Reconstructionist, Field Training Officer and also conducted farm safety training for the agricultural community. During his career, Deputy Duyssen earned several awards which included Officer of the Year in 1998, three Meritorius Awards, and four Commendations. 

“Deputies VanValkenburg and Duyssen have been valued employees with the Sheriff’s Office, and everyone here wishes them all the best in their future endeavors,” stated Sheriff Gary Maha.

January 16, 2015 - 11:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

Deputy Frank Bordonaro, who died in July at age 44, in his 19th year of service to the Sheriff's Office, was honored today during a luncheon as Officer of the Year.

Accepting his award where his wife Robin and sons Bryce and Chase.

It was a solemn moment during an event otherwise often punctuated by laughter and hearty handshakes.

The Officer of the Year is nominated by Sheriff's Office staff members. The selection committee is comprised of members of the command staff and union representatives. 

Several members of the department, Sheriff Gary Maha said, nominated Bordonaro. A nomination letter written by Deputy Kevin McCarthy was read by Deputy Matthew Butler.

McCarthy recalled how Bordonaro encouraged him as a rookie deputy, gave him space to ask questions, to learn, to grow. He also said Bordonaro led by example, recalling an incident in Le Roy during one midnight shift when, as watch commander, Bordonaro could have ordered the younger deputies into an apartment where there was a possibly armed suspect holed up, but Bordonaro took the lead position himself.

As Butler read the letter, throughout the room, heads were bowed and a few tears were shed (two pictures below).

Senior Emergency Services Dispatcher Robert H. Tripp received the Distinguished Service Award.

Longevity Awards went to:

  • Correction Officer Vincent S. Maurer, 10
  • Deputy Joseph M. Graff, 10
  • Dispatcher Stephen R. Smelski ,10
  • Deputy John P. Weis, 15
  • Deputy Brad D. Mazur, 15
  • Investigator R. Pete Welker, 20
  • Deputy Nathan W. Balduf, 20
  • Deputy Eric J. Koziarski, 25
  • Investigator Roger M. Stone, 40

Commendations were awarded to:

  • Correction Officer Howard O. Wilson
  • Dispatcher Michael T. Sheflin
  • Correction Officer Michael A. Cox
  • Sr. Dispatcher James W. Holman
  • Correction Officer Andrew D. Hurley
  • Deputy Joseph A. Corona
  • Deputy Andrew B. Hale
  • Deputy Kevin R. McCarthy
  • Sr. Dispatcher Barbara J. Eddy
  • Dispatcher Nathan L. Fix
  • Deputy Jason E. Saile
  • Deputy Lonnie A. Nati
  • Deputy Brian A. Thompson Sr.
  • Dispatcher Robert H. Tripp

Meritorious Service Awards went to:

  • Dispatcher Lynn B. Riccobono
  • Community Victim/Services Counselor, Correction
  • Officer Vincent S. Maurer
  • Deputy John R. Duyssen

More on the awards from the Sheriff's press release:

Officer of the Year: Deputy Frank Bordonaro
Deputy Frank G. Bordonaro distinguished himself as a professional, dedicated, hard-working officer who quietly and consistently provided a high level of service to the citizens of Genesee County and the Genesee County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Bordonaro was a Field Training Officer (FTO), a Child Safety Seat Technician and mentored several new officers during his tenure with the Genesee County Sheriff's Office. He served as Officer-in-Charge on several occasions and was highly respected as a leader. Deputy Bordonaro set an example for others to strive for and was always concerned for his fellow officers. Deputy Frank G. Bordonaro is being awarded this recognition posthumously and has brought great credit upon himself and the Genesee County Sheriff's Office and is most deserving to be named Officer of the Year.

Distinguished Service Award: Senior Emergency Services Dispatcher Robert H. Tripp
Senior Emergency Services Dispatcher Robert H. Tripp has distinguished himself as a member of the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office. Senior Dispatcher Tripp has been instrumental with the implementation of the new Harris Radio System along with the collection, cataloging and packaging of county-owned radio equipment to be returned to Sprint/Nextel as part of a multi-million dollar capital project. Senior Dispatcher Tripp has been a Communications Training Officer for several years and assisted with the training of five new, part-time dispatchers during 2014. He has also provided critical insight and assistance with upgrades, maintenance, and operational configurations of the Genesee County Emergency Dispatch Center computer-aided dispatch program and phone and radio consoles. Senior Emergency Services Dispatcher Robert H. Tripp reflects great credit upon himself and the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office.

International Association of Chiefs of Police Tribute:
During the Awards Luncheon, Sheriff Maha and Undersheriff Sheron presented Robin Bordonaro, widow of deceased Deputy Frank Bordonaro, with a recognition award from the International Association of Chiefs of Police who pay tribute to active duty officers who die feloniously or accidentally during the course of performing their police functions while on or off duty. Deputy Bordonaro unexpectedly passed away after suffering a heart attack at his home shortly after completing his midnight shift on July 8, 2014.

The Genesee County Sheriff's Office also paid tribute to Deputy Bordonaro by placing a plaque in the patrol briefing room in memory of Deputy Bordonaro's service.

Dispatcher Tripp receiving his Distinguished Service Award from Sheriff Maha, right, and Undersheriff William Sheron.

Investigator Roger Stone being congratulated by Maha on 40 years of service to the department.

Dispatcher Nate Fix, with his son, receiving his award from Director of Emergency Communications Steven Sharp.

Group photo with Deputy Frank Bordonaro's family.

To purchase prints, click here.

January 6, 2015 - 10:46am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

There is now a prescription drug drop box at the Sheriff's Office, 165 Park Road, Batavia. Residents are encouraged to drop off unwanted pharmaceuticals anytime, 24/7. Drop-offs are anonymous. Sharps, such as syringes, as well as thermometers, aerosol sprays, inhalers and hydrogen peroxide are not accepted.  The Sheriff's Office will properly dispose of the pharmaceuticals. 

Photo and information submitted by the Sheriff's Office.

July 12, 2014 - 11:20pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Le Roy, Sheriff's Office.

In his homily during the funeral service for Deputy Frank Bordonaro, Father Michael Donovan addressed Frank's sons directly.

The one thing he wanted them to remember, what should be part of the stories they tell of their dad someday, Donovan said, was the outpouring of respect, love and support of the friends, family and colleagues gathered in St. Peter's today.

Bordonaro, 44, a 19-year veteran of the Genesee County Sheriff's Office died July 8 of an apparent heart attack.

He leaves behind a wife, Robin, and two young sons, Bryce and Chase.

In a memorial letter read by funeral director Vern Falcone, Robin thanked Frank for raising his sons right and setting them on a good path.

Nearly every member of the Genesee County Sheriff's Office (all but those required to be on duty) was at the funeral. Several members of the Batavia Police Department, the Le Roy Police Department and the State Police were part of the honor guard that lined up in front of the church before and after the service.

Bordonaro's casket was carried to and from the church in his pickup truck.

The service centered around Matthew 25:34-40.

“Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

“Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

“The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’ "

Father Donovan noted that most people think of a police officer as just somebody who arrests people, but an officer of the law does so much more than that for his community. Deputy Frank Bordonaro, he said, was that kind of professional.

Deputy Bordonaro provided help to those he found hungry, or thirsty, or lonely and in need, or homeless, or sick. He provided help to those who needed it, and thereby lived the life Christ bade his disciples to follow.

That is the memory, Father Donovan said, that Bryce and Chase should hold of their father.

After the service, after the casket of Deputy Frank Bordonaro was driven away in his truck, the radios on the hips of emergency responders among those gathered on Lake Street, could be heard with the final dispatch for Deputy Frank Bordonaro. It was the only sound on the street until a Mercy Flight helicopter paid Deputy Bordonaro one last tribute with a pass over the church.

Listen (mp3).


Below: The funeral procession passes under a flag on Route 19 that was lifted by ladder trucks from Le Roy and Bergen fire departments. Photo submitted by George Henry.

July 9, 2014 - 6:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Le Roy, Sheriff's Office.

Funeral services for Deputy Frank Bordonaro will be at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, at Our Lady of Mercy Parish, St. Joseph's Oratory, 27 Lake St., Le Roy.

Bordonaro, a 19-year veteran of the Genesee County Sheriff's Office, died unexpectedly at home some time Tuesday afternoon.

The 44-year-old Bordonaro is survived by his wife, Robin Radwich Bordonaro, his sons, Bryce and Chase, his parents, Lawrence and Arlene, of Batavia.

Family and friends may call on Friday from noon to 3 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. at the Falcone Family Funeral & Cremation Service, Inc., 8700 Lake Road, Le Roy.

From his obituary:

He will be remembered as a very caring and compassionate man, who put his family and community first. He was very involved with all aspects of his sons’ participation in school and community sports programs.

July 8, 2014 - 9:11pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

On calls, he was known as GS-29, but there was no mistaking Deputy Frank Bordonaro's slow-rolling baritone.

GS-29 answered his final call some time this morning. 

Bordonaro's shift ended at 7 a.m. He went home, went to bed and was later found unresponsive.

Sheriff Gary Maha said Bordonaro may have had a heart attack.

Bordonaro was 44. He was with the Sheriff's Office for 19 years. He is survived by his wife, Robin, and two sons, Bryce, 14, and Chase, 12.

No further information is available at this time.

May 20, 2014 - 7:57am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Sheriff's Office.

Not wearing a seat belt while in a moving vehicle is always perilous to your health, but for the remainder of the month it will represent a little extra danger to your pocketbook.

The Sheriff's Office is participating in a nationwide effort over the next couple of weeks to more diligently enforce seat belt and child restraint laws.

Deputies routinely enforce these laws, Chief Deputy Gordon Dibble noted in a press release, but during this mobilization, there will be extra patrols on the streets and roadways specifically looking for seat belt violators.

The national program is called "Click It or Ticket."

The extra patrols will continue until June 1.

According to stats included in the press release, among motorists who were involved in a crash, those who were unrestrained were almost eight times more likely to require hospitalization. Unrestrained motorists are five times more likely to suffer traumatic brain injury. 

In 2011, 47 motorists in Genesee County who did not wear a seat belt were treated at a hospital for injuries. Those treatments resulted in $309,000 in emergency room charges.

May 4, 2014 - 4:40pm
posted by Billie Owens in Le Roy, Sheriff's Office.

Press release:

The Genesee County Sheriff Office recently hired Joseph D. Loftus to fill the position of Deputy Sheriff; a position that was left vacant by a Deputy Sheriff who was promoted to Sergeant earlier in the year.

Deputy Loftus is a 1997 graduate from Le Roy High School. Following high school, Deputy Loftus earned a bachelor of science degree in Criminal Justice, graduating cum laude, from Brockport State College.

Deputy Loftus was previously employed by Le Roy Police Department and McNeil/AECOM Security. Deputy Loftus recently graduated from the Rural Police Training Academy at Genesee Community College in March and and was Captain of his class.

Sheriff Maha stated, Deputy Loftus has been participating in our 14-week field-training program and is performing exceptionally well. He will be a great addition to our road patrol.




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