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August 5, 2020 - 2:35pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, GC 4-H, Market Animal Auction Program 2020.

Submitted photos and press release:

Congratulations to the Genesee County 4-H members who participated in the 2020 Genesee County 4-H Market Animal Auction Program.

Although the Genesee County Fair was cancelled this year, 4-H youth remained committed to raising high quality meat animal projects. The auction was held in an online-only format July 29-30 and featured poultry, goat, lamb, dairy steer, beef steer and hog projects raised by local 4-H youth.

The Genesee County 4-H Program would like to thank all of the friends and businesses who supported the 4-H Market Animal Auction by bidding on or purchasing a 4-H project animal.

The 4-H Program would also like to extend a huge thank you to the William Kent Family for providing their online auction services and to the Genesee County Agricultural Society for their dedication in providing a facility for our youth to showcase their project animals.

Above, Madison Harrington, Champion Live Placing Poultry.

4-H Market Poultry Results

  • Champion Project – Jillian Brewer
  • Champion Live Placing – Madison Harrington
  • Reserve Champion Project – Madison Harrington
  • Reserve Champion Live Placing – Chloe Lamb
  • Master Showman – Maggie Winspear
  • Reserve Master Showman – Jillian Brewer

Above, Campbell Riley, Champion Project and Champion Live Placing Goat.

4-H Market Goat Results 

  • Champion Project – Campbell Riley
  • Champion Live Placing – Campbell Riley
  • Reserve Champion Project – John Riley
  • Reserve Champion Live Placing – John Riley
  • Master Showman – Campbell Riley
  • Reserve Master Showman – Clare Mathes

Above, Chelsea Lippert, Champion Live Placing Lamb.

4-H Market Lamb Results

  • Champion Project – Madelynn Pimm
  • Champion Live Placing – Chelsea Lippert
  • Reserve Champion Project – Makayla Sugg
  • Reserve Champion Live Placing – Chelsea Lippert
  • Master Showman – Madelynn Pimm
  • Reserve Master Showman – Emily Ehrmentraut

 Above, Justin Deleo, Champion Project and Champion Live Placing Dairy Steer.

4-H Dairy Steer Results
  • Champion Project – Justin Deleo
  • Champion Live Placing – Justin Deleo
  • Master Showman – Justin Deleo
  • Rate of Gain – Justin Deleo

 Above, Caleb Carlson, Champion Project and Champion Live Placing Beef Steer.

4-H Beef Steer Results

  • Champion Project – Caleb Carlson
  • Champion Live Placing – Caleb Carlson
  • Reserve Champion Project – Shianne Foss
  • Reserve Champion Live Placing – Shianne Foss
  • Master Showman – Caleb Carlson
  • Reserve Master Showman – Audrey Dorman
  • Rate of Gain – Shianne Foss

Above, Ben Kron, Champion Live Placing Market Hog.

4-H Market Hog Results

  • Champion Project – Cody Carlson
  • Champion Live Placing – Ben Kron
  • Reserve Champion Project – Cody Carlson
  • Reserve Champion Live Placing – Cody Carlson
  • Master Showman – Ben Kron
  • Reserve Master Showman – Hudson Weber
August 5, 2020 - 1:44pm

From the Upstate New York Poison Center in Syracuse, Aug. 5:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently added more names to the list of hand sanitizers contaminated with methanol. Methanol, or wood alcohol, is a toxic substance that is not approved for use in hand sanitizers.

Since mid-July alone, the Upstate New York Poison Center has received 49 calls about these products from our 54-county service area. Overall calls for information about hand sanitizers in general and for ingestions/exposures has more than doubled from last year.

Most hand sanitizers contain ethyl alcohol (ethanol). While dangerous if ingested, it is safe when used as directed for keeping hands clean from germs. Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for any hand sanitizer.

Also known as wood alcohol, methanol is often used in pesticides, paint thinner and antifreeze. It can be toxic if absorbed through the skin (though this is rare) and deadly if ingested. Children especially are at high risk as they often explore their surroundings by taste.

“Unfortunately, with these products, there is no way for consumers to tell if the product contains methanol,” says Gail Banach, director of public education and communications at the Upstate New York Poison Center. “Methanol is not approved for use in hand sanitizers, so it will not be listed on the ingredient panel, even if it is inside, so we recommend everyone check the list from the FDA.”

The FDA has composed a list of the companies and products involved and posted a do-not-use list of dangerous hand sanitizer products. Some of the products on the FDA’s list have been recalled, others are recommended for recall are still on the market. The products all appear to have been produced in Mexico.

Consumers are asked to check the FDA’s list and compare the information with any hand sanitizer they may have in the home including: manufacturer name, product name and national drug code (NDC) number.

As the number of related calls to poison centers and health departments increases, the FDA is working with U.S. manufacturers to keep or remove these toxic products from the market. If any of the identifiers on a purchased product match those on the list, the FDA urges consumers to immediately stop using the hand sanitizer.

Call the Upstate New York Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222 with any questions.

According to the FDA, methanol exposure can result in nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision, permanent blindness, seizures, coma, permanent damage to the nervous system or death. Most of these poisonings occur when someone drinks this product.

Remember, dispose of the hand sanitizer as recommended by local waste management and recycling centers. Do not flush or pour these products down the drain or mix with other liquids.

August 5, 2020 - 1:11pm
posted by Billie Owens in Richmond Memorial Library, news, batavia.

By Samantha Stryker, Community and Adult Services librarian, Richmond Memorial Library:

What’s new at the library: Richmond Memorial Library is pleased to announce that the interlibrary loan system is once again available! Users can now place holds on items from other libraries in the NIOGA system.

To place holds, visit our online catalog at batavialibrary.org or call (585) 343-9550, ext. 3, with your card number.

Email notices are NOT currently being sent when holds are ready. You will receive a phone call if you have materials available.

The library is open regular hours for limited services, including browsing and borrowing materials, reference services, photocopying, faxing, and computer use limited to one hour session per day for essential tasks.

Also, you can make community room reservations for groups of up to 25 people wearing appropriate face coverings.

The shelves are full of new materials!

Appropriate face coverings must be worn for the entirety of your visit to the library.

Summer Reading continues for both children and adults. The programs end Sept. 1. Register at batavialibrary.org or at the library. Weekly take and make crafts and Little Scientists kits are available for children and teens – register via batavialibrary.org/calendar.

Upcoming Virtual Programs for adults -- registration is required for all virtual programsvia our website at batavialibrary.org. Attendees must have access to a computer and free Zoom account to participate.

The next series of Lunch Time Book Chats will take place at noon on Aug. 12, 19 and 26. Join Books Sandwiched In committee members and special guests for short reviews of fiction and nonfiction titles.

A few of the titles scheduled to be reviewed are: "My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton" by Stephanie Dray (historical fiction); "Highway of Tears" by Jessica McDiarmid (true crime); and "The Architectural Heritage of Genesee County, New York" by Catherine Roth (local history). 

Readers will meet to discuss "The Operator" by Gretchen Berg in our next Virtual Adult Book Discussion on Monday, Aug. 10 at 7 pm. “What if you could listen in on any phone conversation in town? With great humor and insight, "The Operator" "delivers a vivid look inside the heads and hearts of a group of housewives and pokes at the absurdities of 1950s America, a simpler time that was far from simple” (publisher description). The book is available as an eBook and audiobook on Hoopla. 

The next Virtual Reel Discussions will take place on Thursday, Aug. 13 at 7 p.m. Watch "Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont" on Hoopla and join us on Zoom for a discussion! 

For questions about these and other programs, visit batavialibrary.org or call the reference desk at (585) 343-9550, ext. 3. Check us out on Facebook @richmondmemoriallibrary, on Instagram @batavialibrary and YouTube @richmondmemlibrary

August 5, 2020 - 12:51pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Buffalo Federal Detention Facility, news, notify, ice, immigration.

Even though officials at the Buffalo Federal Detention Facility were able to contain an initial outbreak of COVID-19 back in April and there have been no new cases since, the New York American Civil Liberties Union apparently filed a lawsuit against Immigration and Customs Enforcement on behalf of inmates at the facility.

The lawsuit claimed vulnerable detainees were not given proper protection and the terms of a settlement reached this week, the NYACLU told WXXI, will ensure those protections are in place if there is another outbreak at the facility.

In April, there were 49 detainees who tested positive, all housed in two pods segregated from the rest of the facility's population, and most were asymptomatic. All recovered without the virus spreading out of those two pods.

A source at the facility at the time said because of the closed nature of a detention facility, all detainees are considered vulnerable, not just older detainees. As a result, staff has taken several measures to contain the spread of the virus, a source told The Batavian in April.

According to the source, at the start of the novel coronavirus outbreak, the director of the facility, Thomas Feeley, ordered regular, thorough cleaning, including wiping down door handles with bleach every hour.

"Every time you turn around," the source said, "you smell bleach."

There is medical staff on duty inside the facility 24/7 and posters have been placed in the facility to inform detainees about COVID-19 and how to protect themselves, the source said in April.

The facility can hold 650 detainees. Today, a spokesman for ICE said the facility has maintained about a 300-person detainee count since the outbreak to help ensure social distancing is maintained.

ICE issued the following statement about the settlement:

“The facility’s response to the public health crisis has been exemplary. There are currently no active cases of COVID-19 at the facility. The men and women employed at BFDF, including the dedicated medical professionals with ICE Health Service Corps (IHSC), are the best in their field and have taken extraordinary precautions to keep both our detainees and staff safe,” said ICE ERO Buffalo Field Office Director Thomas Feeley. “The settlement reached has affirmed the value of the proactive measures previously undertaken, which has protected both staff and detainees.”

There have been news reports of a "surge" of COVID cases at ICE facilities but there have been no new cases at the facility in Batavia since April and the ICE COVID-19 information page reports fewer than 50 detainees nationally have tested positive, with the largest count, 15, at a facility in Lousiana.

August 5, 2020 - 12:03pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Deal of the Day, advertisement.

Reminders of how the Deal of the Day program works:

  • To make purchases, you must be registered. Deal of the Day uses a registration system that is not connected to the registration for commenting on The Batavian (the main user login in the upper left of the homepage).
  • Once re gistered you must sign in using the "sign in" link in this box.
  • You click on the orange button, which appears if the item is not sold out, and it takes you to a PayPal button. This allows you to pay either with your PayPal account or with a credit card/debit card. The login for PayPal is completely separate from our accounts.
  • The first person to successfully complete the PayPal transaction wins the gift certificate.
  • You are eligible to buy the same item only once in a four-month period. We use the registration system to track this for you so you don't have to.
  • Only one gift certificate from the same business PER HOUSEHOLD is allowed in each four-month period. We do not have a way to automatically track duplicate purchases within a household; however, if we notice such a purchase, we reserve the right to cancel the purchase and refund the purchase money. Each individual buyer must use his or her own PayPal account for purchases. It's important that participating businesses not be asked to redeem multiple gift certificates from the same person/family at the same time.
  • Gift certificates should be used within 30 days of receipt.
  • Problems, questions, concerns about the Deal of the Day? Email Billie Owens:   [email protected]
August 4, 2020 - 7:50pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in notify, news, Oakwood Hills, Batavia Town Planning Board.

The Batavia Town Planning Board tonight saw no problem with the Oakwood Hills developer’s plan to subdivide a duplex to expedite a sale of one half of the dwelling at 5169-5171 Loral Oak Way.

Oakwood Hills is the 100-acre housing tract located off of East Main Street Road, adjacent to Seven Springs Road and across from Genesee Valley Agri-Business Park.

Developer Peter Zeliff applied for a minor lot subdivision in the residential zone after attracting a buyer for one half of the duplex.

“The plan all along was to build duplexes on some of lots and sell people a half a duplex – like a patio home or townhome the way it’s done in other places,” Zeliff said. “I have one of the halves sold, so now we have to split the lot with a zero lot line – the property division will go right through the house, the dividing wall of the duplex. I need to get this done so we can close the sale.”

Zeliff said the buyer is an individual moving into the area to work at HP Hood in the agribusiness park.

Before the unanimous vote to approve Zeliff’s application, Planning Board Member Paul McCullough asked if there were any deed restrictions or “provisions to prevent (the owner of) one side putting up a steel roof versus an asphalt roof or changing the color of the siding.”

Zeliff said that attorneys are drafting a “condominium agreement” that would require owners of both sides to place money into escrow (for potential changes) and to go before the Homeowner Association for review and final approval.

About 30 homes are occupied at Oakwood Hills, of which six are duplexes, said Zeliff, adding that he is looking to similarly subdivide the other five.

He asked planners if he would be able to apply to have the other five subdivided as a group prior to any future half-duplex sales, and Chairperson Kathy Jasinski said she thought that was a reasonable request.

Zeliff said that Ryan Homes built 15 houses last year and, currently, three homes are under construction. He also said that he sold six more lots this year.

The cost of the lots ranges from $30,000 for a 60- by 150- to 200-foot parcel to $70,000 for a lot of almost an acre, Zeliff said. Homes generally start at $190,000.

In another development, Building Inspector Daniel Lang said HP Hood officials indicated they are planning an addition to the plant’s refrigeration warehouse unit, but haven’t submitted an application yet.

August 4, 2020 - 6:02pm

BUFFALO -- The Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service is proud to announce that -- in addition to broadcasting over the air – its livestream and programs are now available online. The new service debuted July 31.

For people who can see, hold a book or newspaper, and turn a page, reading a printed publication is no big deal. But for thousands of people in Western New York, including Genesee County, who are blind, have low vision, or have other print disabilities, it is.

Over the last 30 years, hundreds of volunteers for the Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service have been reading local and national newspapers, magazines, books and other publication over a private radio transmission that was available to listeners who were loaned a special radio receiver.

While the broad range of reading material shared by the radio station with its listeners every day was great, the station always struggled to serve more people since every listener needed one of the radios.

And while the Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service will continue broadcasting over the air, adding an internet broadcast is a game-changer. Listeners will be able to access the programs they want, when they want them, wherever they are, on any internet-connected device – including smart phones and smart speakers, tablets, desktop and laptop computers.

And not only will listeners be able to catch the livestream just like they werelistening to the radio, they’ll be able to download and listen to many of the service’s most popular programs on their favorite podcast platform. Did they the miss the live reading of the morning paper? Pull down the podcast and catch up!

The new online functionality will also allow the organization to round out its reading list by adding new publications to its portfolio.

The Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service has served tens of thousands of listeners since it was founded in 1987. But that number has always been limited by the number of radios it had available to loan. No longer.

There are an estimated 20,000 people in WNY who are blind or have low vision. There are another 40,000 who have a cognitive impairment or a physical disability that makes reading difficult or impossible. Although its unlikely that every one of them will tune in, many now can.

The new online Podcasts & Streaming Initiative was made possible through a seed grant from the James H. Cummings Foundation that helped open the door to a major grant from the Facebook Journalism Project. Support from the Christos Foundation, the East Hill Foundation, the Erie-Niagara Sunshine Exchange Club, and Ingram Micro rounded out the funding.

Links, feeds and more information for the expanded service can be found on the Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Service’s website at www.nfradioreading.org.

Among the station’s program schedule are live readings of the Buffalo News six days a week and USA Today five days a week. The station also airs the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Niagara Gazette, Dunkirk Observer, weekly newspapers like the local Bees and Business First, a variety of magazines, and books curated from the NY Times Best Seller list.

The broadcast is carried over a subcarrier frequency provided by Buffalo Toronto Public Media through WNED 94.5 FM.

Niagara Frontier Radio Reading is an affiliate of Western New York Independent Living, a community-based nonprofit organization that serves more than 7,000 people with disabilities annually through peer counseling, support for independent living, transitional services, advocacy and information & referrals.

The agency is primarily funded through philanthropic contributions and donations, grants, and special events. The organization currently receives no government funding. Major supporters include the Community Foundation of Greater Buffalo, Nascentia Health, WNY Independent Living, the WNY Lions Clubs, and the United Ways of WNY.

August 4, 2020 - 5:50pm
posted by Billie Owens in 2020 U.S. Census, news, U.S. Census Bureau.

From Susan M. Perry, senior Partnership Specialist, New York Regional Census Center, Field Division, U.S. Census Bureau:

The U.S. Census Bureau continues to evaluate its operational plans to collect and process 2020 Census data. Today, we are announcing updates to our plan that will include enumerator awards and the hiring of more employees to accelerate the completion of data collection and apportionment counts by our statutory deadline of Dec. 31, as required by law and directed by the Secretary of Commerce.

The Census Bureau’s new plan reflects our continued commitment to conduct a complete count, provide accurate apportionment data, and protect the health and safety of the public and our workforce. 

  • Complete Count: A robust field data collection operation will ensure we receive responses from households that have not yet self-responded to the 2020 Census.
    • We will improve the speed of our count without sacrificing completeness. As part of our revised plan, we will conduct additional training sessions and provide awards to enumerators in recognition of those who maximize hours worked. We will also keep phone and tablet computer devices for enumeration in use for the maximum time possible.
    • We will end field data collection by Sept. 30. Self-response options will also close on that date to permit the commencement of data processing. Under this plan, the Census Bureau intends to meet a similar level of household responses as collected in prior censuses, including outreach to hard-to-count communities.
  • Accurate Data and Efficient Processing: Once we have the data from self-response and field data collection in our secure systems, we plan to review it for completeness and accuracy, streamline its processing, and prioritize apportionment counts to meet the statutory deadline. In addition, we plan to increase our staff to ensure operations are running at full capacity.
  • Flexible Design: Our operation remains adaptable and additional resources will help speed our work. The Census Bureau will continue to analyze data and key metrics from its field work to ensure that our operations are agile and on target for meeting our statutory delivery dates. Of course, we recognize that events can still occur that no one can control, such as additional complications from severe weather or other natural disasters. 
  • Health and Safety: We will continue to prioritize the health and safety of our workforce and the public.  Our staff will continue to follow Federal, state, and local guidance, including providing appropriate safety trainings and personal protective equipment to field staff.

The Census Bureau continues its work on meeting the requirements of Executive Order 13880 issued July 11, 2019 and the Presidential Memorandum issued July 21, 2020. A team of experts are examining methodologies and options to be employed for this purpose. The collection and use of pertinent administrative data continues.

We are committed to a complete and accurate 2020 Census. To date, 93 million households, nearly 63 percent of all households in the Nation, have responded to the 2020 Census. Building on our successful and innovative internet response option, the dedicated women and men of the Census Bureau, including our temporary workforce deploying in communities across the country in upcoming weeks, will work diligently to achieve an accurate count.

We appreciate the support of our hundreds of thousands of community-based, business, state, local and tribal partners contributing to these efforts across our Nation. The 2020 Census belongs to us all.

If you know someone who has not yet responded, please encourage them to do so today online at 2020census.gov, over the phone, or by mail.

August 4, 2020 - 4:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received one new positive case of COVID-19.
    • The new positive case resides in Batavia.
    • The positive individual is in their 50s.
    • The individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Thirteen new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • One of the individuals is hospitalized.
       
  • Orleans County received two new positive cases of COVID-19
    • The new positive cases reside in Murray and Kendall.
    • The individuals are in their 30s.
    • Both of the individuals were not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Six new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • One of the individuals is hospitalized.
August 4, 2020 - 3:16pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, honey bees, video, batavia.
Video Sponsor

Last year, Unity Hospital in Rochester became the first hospital in Upstate New York to launch a rooftop honeybee program. This summer that program expanded with honeybee hives now on the roofs of Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic, Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, Rochester General Hospital and Batavia's United Memorial Medical Center, as well.

This program supports Rochester Regional Health’s sustainability mission to strengthen and support our local environment. The bees produce honey and is bottled and available to employees, patients, and visitors for purchase. There are about two million bees total between all video hospital roofs.

Video supplied by Rochester Regional Health; edited by The Batavian.

August 4, 2020 - 1:32pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in golf, sports, Stafford Country Club.

Dr. Matthew Prindle, of Geneva, shot his first-ever hole-in-one while playing at the Stafford Country Club on Saturday with his father-in-law Bill Hayes, of Batavia, and Dan Prong and Sam Frank.

Hayes, who submitted the video, said it's a tradition for them is to play at the Ricky Palermo Tournament at Terry Hills in the morning and then take in 18 more holes at Stafford.

Prindle hit a pitching widge on the 120-yard, Par 3, fourth hole.

August 4, 2020 - 12:54pm

The proprietor of Mancuso Bowling Center in Batavia believes the future of the industry is at stake if Gov. Andrew Cuomo doesn’t allow bowling centers to reopen immediately.

Rick Mancuso, in a letter sent to Assemblyman Stephen Hawley today, is imploring the governor to let bowling centers reopen in a safe and conscientious manner, adding that the month of August sets the stage for operations continuing into next spring.

“If we do not get our leagues signed up and committed, bowlers will find other options for entertainment,” Mancuso wrote. “There will be no coming back for this recreational past time that has provided for local communities in a multitude of ways.”

Mancuso is speaking for proprietors of nearly 300 bowling centers and close to 9,000 employees in New York State, many of whom have written similar letters, signed petitions and sent emails, held press conferences – and even sent bowling pins featuring pleas to reopen to the governor – in an effort to solicit a response from Albany.

Bowling centers were forced to close in mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic, wiping out the end of their league seasons and any tournaments on their schedule. And while centers in Connecticut and New Jersey have reopened; halls in New York remain dark. At least two centers in the state have closed for good, including Miller Lanes in Honeoye Falls.

A fixture in the community for nine decades, Mancuso Bowling Center is one of 10 centers serviced by the Genesee Region USBC, a local association affiliated with the United States Bowling Congress. The USBC cancelled its national tournaments in 2020 and, more recently, announced that it will not conduct any events through the rest of this year.

Mancuso said he is very concerned for the future of individual businesses and the industry, in general.

“The timeline for events in the bowling business begins from the beginning of August to the middle of August for the upcoming 30-week season and the startup of leagues is generally immediately after Labor Day,” he indicated in his letter. “We need to get some guidance and communication now as to what the plan is for bowling centers across the state … a plan as to how we are going to survive and move forward.”

He also noted that the bowling industry has been in a steady decline over the last couple decades due to a number of factors, mostly unrelated to the owners’ own actions.

“This (present) time is threatening to push the industry over the edge and force closure of centers. Hundreds of thousands of square feet of buildings will become vacant, which will affect not only local/state taxes but the quality of life in hundreds of communities,” Mancuso said.

In a related development, Randy Hanks, owner of Oak Orchard Bowl in Albion, was on a Zoom videoconference this morning, and he reported that the New York State Bowling Proprietors Association will be distributing a two-minute public service announcement to NYS proprietors.

“It will explain what we’re doing in regard to social distancing, disinfecting and other measures to ensure that we open safely for everyone – customers and our employees,” he said.

NYS BPA President Doug Bohannon, proprietor of Kingpin’s Alley Family Fun Center in South Glens Falls, said that proprietors will be reimbursed up to $50 for posting the “Safe, Sanitized and Ready to Roll” commercial spot and sharing it with as many people as possible.

“We are working hard to get the governor’s attention … to keep the awareness up there concerning our situation,” Bohannon said.

He also mentioned that fitness center and gym owners are in the process of filing a class action suit against the governor, but that the NYS BPA is not considering going down that route at this time.

August 3, 2020 - 5:59pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news, notify.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received five new positive case of COVID-19.
    • The new positive cases reside in Batavia, Elba and Pembroke.
    • One of the positive individuals is in their 20s, one is in their 40s, one is in their 50s, one is in their 60s, and one is in their 70s.
    • The individuals were not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Thirty-three new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • One of the individuals is hospitalized.
    • Five of the previous positive individuals have recovered and have been removed from mandatory isolation.
       
  • Orleans County received one new positive case of COVID-19.
    • The new positive case resides in Yates.
    • The individual is in their 50s.
    • The individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Twenty-seven new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • One of the individuals is hospitalized.
August 3, 2020 - 4:26pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, GOW opioid task force, health department.

Press release:

COVID-19 may have temporarily put a stop to large gatherings, but the coronavirus pandemic is no match for the GOW Opioid Task Force’s commitment to informing the public of the dangers of opioid drug use and ways to prevent potentially deadly overdoses.

“Our Overdose Awareness Day is not able to be held this summer due to social distancing guidelines and restrictions on the use of parks, so we will be transitioning to an online event,” said Christen Ferraro, task force coordinator. “All the information that would have been shared at Austin Park in Batavia will be put on our Facebook page.”

Ferraro added that the task force plans to post – on a regular basis throughout August -- articles, videos, local data and stories from individuals that have been affected by an overdose.

Genesee/Orleans Public Health Director Paul Pettit, a member of the task force, said he is well aware of the widespread impact of the opioid epidemic.

“Any loss of life is devastating to a community,” he said. “The effect is far-reaching as it devastates the family system – economically as a number of financially productive years are lost and emotionally as no dollar amounts can equal the loss of a life due to addiction.”

Pettit said that setting aside a period of time, be it a month or a day, to remind people of the various issues surrounding opioid use is important.

“There are so many services available for those experiencing addictive behaviors or are experimenting with various substances, and we encourage people to use those services before it is too late,” he said.

Ferraro also advised that another virtual opioid overdose prevention and Narcan training is scheduled for Aug. 26, with sessions at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

The training will cover the disease of addiction, a brief history of the opioid crisis, signs and symptoms of opioid use and overdose, the overdose reversal drug Narcan and the administration of Narcan.

Attendance is required at just one of the sessions for the participant to receive credit for the course.

“Those completing the training will learn more about how to prevent an opioid overdose and will receive a free Narcan nasal spray kit,” Ferraro said. “It is important to bring awareness to this day and the impact an overdose can have on an individual, their families and the community.”

The registration deadline is Aug. 24. To register, contact Ferraro at [email protected]

For more information and to see the event flyer, go to Facebook.com/gowopioidtaskforce.

August 3, 2020 - 4:22pm
posted by Billie Owens in crime, news, notify, Le Roy, Oakfield.

Joanne Merica Pangrazio, 49, of South Street Road, Le Roy, is charged with criminal obstruction of breathing, two counts of endangering the welfare of a child, and criminal mischief. On Aug. 2, Pangrazio was arrested and arraigned in Bergen Town Court. The charges stem from a domestic incident reported about 1:50 p.m. on Aug. 2 on South Street Road. She was arrested at the scene and transported to Genesee County Jail for processing and virtual arraignment. She was released on her own recognizance and is due in Genesee County Court at 10 a.m. on Sept. 15. The case was investigated by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Andrew Mullen.

Judd Allen Farewell Jr., 29, of Maltby Road, Oakfield, is charged with criminal mischief -- intentionally damaging property. On Aug. 3, Farewell was arrested after he allegedly intentionally damaged the toilet in his jail cell at the Genesee County Jail. He was issued an appearance ticket and is due in Batavia City Court to answer the charge on Aug. 18. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Andrew Mullen.

August 3, 2020 - 3:51pm
posted by Billie Owens in Grand Jury, crime, news, batavia, notify, alexander, Le Roy, elba.

Nelson E. Figueroa Jr. is indicted for the crime of predatory sexual assault against a child, a Class A-II felony. It is alleged that on May 1 in the City of Batavia, the defendant -- who is 18 or older -- committed the crime of criminal sexual act in the first degree by engaging in oral sexual conduct with another person who was less that 13 years old. In count two, he is accused of the same crime. It is alleged that from Jan. 1 through April 30, he committed the crime of course of sexual conduct against a child in the first degree by engaging in two or more acts of sexual conduct, which included at least one act of oral sexual conduct with a child under age 13, over a period of time not less that three months in duration. In count three, Figueroa is accused of the crime of first-degree sexual abuse, a Class D violent felony. It is alleged in count three that on May 1 Figueroa was age 21 or older and subjected a person less than 13 years old to sexual contact. In count four, he is accused of endangering the welfare of a child, a Class A misdemeanor. It is alleged in count four that Figueroa, from Jan. 1 through April 30, knowingly acted in a manner likely to be injurious to the physical, mental or moral welfare of a child less than 17 years old.

Daniel J. Wolfe is indicted for the crime of first-degree criminal contempt, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Nov. 18 on Liberty Street in Batavia that he violated an order of protection by threatening to punch the protected party. In count two, he is accused of the same crime for allegedly punching the victim. In count three, he is accused of the same crime for allegedly threatening serious physical injury or death by displaying a dangerous instrument -- a sword. In count four, he is accused of second-degree harassment. It is alleged in count four that on Nov. 18 he intentionally harassed, annoyed or alarmed another person by striking, shoving, kicking or subjecting a person to physical contact, or attempting or threatening to do so. In count five, he is accused of second-degree menacing, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly intentionally placing a person in reasonable fear of physical injury, serious physical injury or death -- or attempting to do so -- by displaying a dangerous instrument -- a sword. In count six, Wolfe is accused of the crime of menacing a police officer, a Class D violent felony, for allegedly intentionally placing or attempting to place a police officer in reasonable fear of physical injury, serious physical injury or death by displaying a knife when the officer was performing official duties. In count seven, Wolfe is accused of the same crime as in count six but is accused of displaying a BB rifle. In counts eight, nine and 10, Wolfe is accused of criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class D felony. It is alleged in counts eight, nine and 10, respectively, that on Nov. 19 on Liberty Street in Batavia that he possessed dangerous instruments -- a knife, a samurai sword, and a BB rifle, with intent to use them unlawfully against a person. In count 10, Wolfe is accused of the crime of attempted killing of a police work dog, a Class E felony. It is alleged in count 10, that on Nov. 19, Wolfe attempted to kill Genesee County Sheriff's Office K-9 Frankie by swinging a knife at K-9 Frankie. In count 12, the defendant is accused of fourth-degree criminal mischief, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly intentionally damaging property belonging to another person in the City of Batavia; he is accused of breaking two windows. In Special Information filed by the District Attorney, Wolfe is accused of having been convicted of petit larceny, a Class A misdemeanor, on Feb. 20, 2014 in the City of Batavia Court and that conviction forms the basis for elevating counts eight, nine and 10 in the current indictment to criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree -- class D felonies.

William T. Hughes is indicted for the crime of first-degree criminal contempt, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Feb. 25 at an address on South Spruce Street in the City of Batavia, Hughes violated an order of protection issued in February by striking, kicking or shoving a victim protected by the order, or he attempted or threatened to do so. In count two, Hughes is accused of first-degree criminal contempt, also a Class E felony, for placing a person with an order of protection against him in reasonable fear of death, imminent serious physical injury or physical injury. In count three, Hughes is accused of criminal obstruction of breathing or blood circulation, a Class A misdemeanor. It is alleged in count three that the defendant intended to impede normal breathing or blood circulation of the victim by applying pressure on their throat or neck. In count four, Hughes is accused of second-degree criminal contempt, also a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly intentionally disobeying a mandate of the court in violation of an order of protection by telephoning the victim July 20. In count five, Hughes is accused of a second count of second-degree criminal contempt for allegedly phoning the victim in February in violation of an order of protection. In count six, the defendant is accused of a second count of first-degree criminal contempt for violating an order of protection by failing to stay away from the protected person as required by the court.

Franklin D. Cook is indicted for the crime of first-degree criminal contempt, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Jan. 8 in the Town of Elba, Cook intentionally disobeyed a family offense stay away order of protection by being in the presence of the protected party. In count two, Cook is accused of the same crime on March 27. In count three, the defendant is accused of the same crime for a third time for allegedly harassing, annoying, threatening or alarming the protected party and subjecting the person to physical contact. In count four, Cook is accused of criminal obstruction of breathing or blood circulation, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly appying pressure on the throat or neck of the victim. In Special Information filed by the District Attorney, Cook is accused of having been convicted of second-degree criminal contempt, a Class A misdemeanor, on Dec. 19 in Town of Elba Court and that conviction is within five years of the crimes alleged in the current indictment.

Roy L. Watson is indicted for the crime of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. It is alleged that on May 4 in the City of Batavia that Watson knowingly and unlawfully possessed a narcotic drug, cocaine, with intent to sell it. In count two, he is accused of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony, for allegedly knowingly and unlawfully possessing one or more preparations, compounds, mixtures of substances containing cocaine, and these had an aggregate weight of an eighth of an ounce or more.

David J. Reschke is indicted for the crime of fourth-degree grand larceny, a Class E felony. It is alleged in counts one through six that on Nov. 30 in the Town of Le Roy that Reschke stole, respectively per count: a Syrchony credit card; a Citi Simplicity credit card; a Chase credit card; Discover Business credit card; a Le Roy Sports Boosters debit card; and a Five Star Bank debit card. In count seven, the defendant is accused of a seventh count of fourth-degree grand larceny for allegedly stealing property having a value exceeding $1,000, in this case about $2,400 in U.S. currency. In count eight, he is accused of the crime of petit larceny, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly stealing a purse and its contents that day in the Town of Le Roy.

Judd A. Farewell is indicted for the crime of third-degree burglary, a Class D felony. It is alleged that sometime between the late evening hours of Jan. 16 and the early morning hours of Jan. 17, that Farewell knowingly and unlawfully entered a building on Lake Street in the Town of Le Roy with the intent to commit a crime. In count two, Farewell is accused of second-degree criminal mischief. It is alleged in count two that he intentionally damaged the property of another person in an amount exceeding $1,500. The property consisted of various copper piping and a valve on a boiler system on Lake Street in the Town of Le Roy. In count three, Farewell is accused of petit larceny, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly stealing an Xbox, Xbox controller and 15 Xbox games. In count four, he is again accused of petit larceny for allegedly stealing two blue totes containing miscellaneous tools.

Mark R. Ogee is indicted for the crime of driving while intoxicated as a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Feb. 24 in the Village of Le Roy, that Ogee drove a 2001 Chevrolet on state routes 5 and 19 while in an intoxicated condition. In count two, Ogee is accused of DWI, per se, also a Class E felony, for allegedly having a BAC of .08 percent at the time, as shown by a chemical breath analysis. In count three, Ogee is accused of aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, another Class E felony, for knowing or having reason to know that his driver's license was revoked by authorities in New York at the time of this incident and while he was under the influence of alcohol or a drug. In Special Information filed by the District Attorney, Ogee is accused of having been convicted of DWI, as a misdemeanor, on Oct. 15, 2018 in Town of Caledonia Court. The conviction forms the basis of count three in the current indictment.

Joshua L. Baltz is indicted for the crime of aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, a Class E felony. it is alleged that on May 23 in the Town of Alexander, that Baltz drove a 2019 Ford on Route 98 while knowing or having reason to know that his driver's license was suspended or revoked by authorities and while he was under the influence of alcohol or a drug. In count two, Baltz is accused of driving while ability impaired by drugs at the time. In Special Information filed by the District Attorney, Baltz is accused of having been convicted of DWI on March 3, 2008 in Town of Warsaw Court and that conviction forms the basis for the suspension or revocation referred to in count one. Furthermore, the District Attorney states that Baltz knew of the prior conviction and that his suspension or revocation was still in effect.

James J. Bartosik Jr. is indicted for the crime of driving while intoxicated, as a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Sept. 15 that Bartosik drove a 2005 Dodge on the Genesee County Fairgrounds parking lot while he was intoxicated. In Special Information filed by the District Attorney, Bartosik is accused of having been convicted of DWI, per se, as a felony, on Nov. 24, 2014 in Orleans County Court. The conviction was within 10 years of the crime alleged in the current indictment.

David Vega is indicted for the crime of aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Oct. 8 in the City of Batavia, that Vega drove a 2008 Chevrolet on Clinton Street while his driver's license was suspended or revoked. It is further alleged that he had 10 or more suspensions (14) imposed on at least 10 separate dates for failure to answer, appear in court or pay a fine: June 12, 1996 in the City of Canandaigua, Ontario County; March 10, 2009 in the Town of Ontario, Wayne County; April 14, May 19, June 2, July 28, Aug. 22, 2015, Rochester Administrative Adjudication Bureau, Monroe County; June 7 and July 8, 2015, Town of Gates, Monroe County; Nov. 18, 2015, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County; Dec. 19, Dec. 25, 2015 and Feb. 11, 2016, and Aug. 5, 2018 -- City of Rochester, Monroe County.

August 3, 2020 - 2:03pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in gas prices, news.

Press release from AAA:

Today’s national average price for a gallon of gasoline is $2.18, the same as last week. One year ago, the price was $2.72. The New York State average is $2.26 – also the same as last week. A year ago, the NYS average was $2.87.

AAA Western and Central New York (AAA WCNY) reports the following averages:

  • Batavia -- $2.23 (no change since last week)
  • Buffalo -- $2.20 (down 1 cent since last week)
  • Ithaca -- $2.18 (down 1 cent since last week)
  • Rochester -- $2.23 (down 1 cent since last week)
  • Rome -- $2.29 (down 1 cent since last week)
  • Syracuse -- $2.19 (down 1 cent since last week)
  • Watertown -- $2.28 (no change since since last week)

This week commences with many local pump prices dropping slightly. The national average remained unchanged since last week as the low fuel consumption trend continues.

Road trips are the preferred mode of travel, but travel levels are down significantly compared to last year. The decreasing demand for gasoline has helped pump prices to decrease nationally and locally and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) confirms that gas demand is down in the United States.

August 3, 2020 - 2:02pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Nate McMurray, Chris Jacobs, NY-27, news.

Press release:

Democratic Congressional candidate Nate McMurray released the following statement after Republican Chris Jacobs voted against an amendment that would keep taxpayer dollars from funding the Trump administration’s lawsuits to strike down the Affordable Care Act:

“Let me be clear: Every American deserves healthcare, and that is exactly what I will fight for in Washington. To watch the Republican assault on affordable, accessible healthcare with no plan of their own is horrifying. But it is inhumane for Trump and his followers like Jacobs to continue their attacks while our country is ravaged by the COVID-19 pandemic—using taxpayer dollars to strip protections for pre-existing conditions and sabotage a program that the majority of Americans support.

"Our country has seen over 150,000 deaths, an estimated 5.4 million Americans have lost their employer-sponsored health insurance, and after voting against sick pay for COVID-19 patients in Albany, Chris Jacobs is voting with Donald Trump to kill the Affordable Care Act.

“I have spent years in this district; the people from Canandaigua to Clarence, and everywhere in between, know that Nate McMurray fights for healthcare and the working class. The people of NY-27 are already up at night worrying about the pandemic, their jobs, schools reopening; and now, they have to worry about Jacobs taking away their healthcare.

“Thanks to House members of both parties in Western New York who voted ‘Yes,’ this amendment passed in spite of Jacobs and Trump. As he did on his first day, Jacobs stood alone again, hurting the people of NY-27.”

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