Local Matters

Community Sponsors

October 14, 2021 - 6:30pm
Comments
October 14, 2021 - 5:40pm
posted by Press Release in Genesee Lumber, business, batavia.

Press release:

Genesee Lumber is excited to announce the acquisition of Smith Lumber and Hardware Center at 5833 Big Tree Road in Lakeville, NY. For over 65 years, Smith Lumber and Hardware Center has been serving the community as a family-owned, quality lumber yard and home improvement center.

Going forward, Genesee Lumber will continue to carry premium products, superior hardware, and maintain staff with the expertise to assist both contractor and homeowner. This acquisition will serve to increase delivery and product availability in Lakeville and the surrounding area.

“This is a great opportunity for us to expand our business within the Western New York region. When the opportunity presented itself, we quickly realized it would be a good long-term move to strengthen both companies”, said John Harrower, president, and CEO.“

Genesee Lumber, also a family-owned business, has been serving Western New York for over 90 years. Built on the same family values that have been key to their success, Smith Lumber and Hardware is a welcomed addition to the Genesee Lumber family.

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 5:34pm
posted by Joanne Beck in Alabama, Basom, animal shelter, pets.

2021101095155428.jpg

Usually, people are asked to take action if they happen upon a loose dog. However, with a particular white-coated Great Pyrenees, please heed the warnings of what not to do, Genesee County Animal Control Officer Sarah Fountain says.

“We need the public’s help,” she said Thursday. “Do not chase, call out, or feed (the dog).”

The dog has been skittish of humans, and approaching it may just frighten it away. Although no one wants the dog to starve, letting it get hungry might just motivate the canine to retrieve food from a trap placed on Wednesday, she said.

The large dog has been spotted roaming the area of Ledge Road in Basom since this past Sunday (Oct. 10). It was last spotted on Tuesday (Oct. 12) in the same area, she said. 

Fountain advised that any sightings be called into the animal shelter at 585-343-6410, Option 7. To date, no one has claimed the dog, she said. 

Photo submitted by Sarah Fountain

20211010951554590.jpg

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 5:33pm

james_1_a.jpg

Genesee County legislators, substance use disorder and mental health professionals have a million reasons to celebrate today after meeting New York State Attorney General Letitia James at The Recovery Station on Clinton Street Road.

James is conducting a statewide tour to recognize communities for their efforts in fighting the opioid epidemic and to distribute funds awarded to New York through a settlement with opioid manufacturers and distributors. This afternoon, she presented oversized ceremonial checks in Waterloo, Rochester and Batavia.

For Genesee County, that amount is $1,060,280.71.

“Addiction doesn’t discriminate and transcends all political boundaries and affiliations and artificial constructs,” James said. “This really is a demonstration of what government should do, and that is provide for the needs of New Yorkers and the constituents that we all serve. And to hold those individuals responsible for what they did; we hit them in the pocketbook.”

James said her office “closed down pharma … and five manufacturers and three distributors of this poison.”

Unfortunately, she said, overdosing continues to be a huge problem.

“We’re seeing more overdoses because we know that individuals who use opioids sort of walked into the use of heroin, which is now laced with poisonous fentanyl,” she advised. “So, whatever we can do in our capacity to provide you with additional services, with some medically assistance treatment to assist those who are dealing with not only with opioid use disorder but mental illness.”

Assemblyman Steven Hawley thanked James for her role in the settlement and her “attention to all folks who are having problems with addiction.”

“It doesn’t really identify geographic areas for folks who are having trouble with addiction – whether we live in an urban area or a rural area or a suburban area. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done for a living. It can get everybody …” he added.

Legislature Chair Rochelle Stein, speaking for families “that have been torn apart,” touched upon the significance of James’ tour.

Stein pointed out that Genesee is one of the few counties that operates a mental health department with its own clinics.

“We are struggling, quite frankly, in getting the clinicians. That is a real need,” she said. “If we could get some help there in getting folks into our state or even support for those positions, so that we could have more people available to us to help provide those services.”

James brought up that she has been hearing that the state agencies of the Office of Addiction Services and Supports and the Office of Mental Health do not work together and operate under regulations that often conflict with one another.

Lynda Battaglia, the county’s director of Mental Health & Community Services, said the agencies on a local level have excellent working relationships.

“We collaborate … for the greater good. As we move forward, everybody has the same mission,” she said, later adding that the COVID-19 pandemic has rippled through the industry, causing waiting lists into the hundreds for services due to the adverse effects on delivery and the strain on mental health and substance use counselors.

John Bennett, executive director of Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (which operates The Recovery Station), explained that in Genesee County, several agencies meet on a regular basis, sharing information to increase efficiency across the various sectors.

“Criminal justice, judges, services, community-based organizations, medical care workers – we’re at the table and we talk to each other,” he said. “We try not to let anybody drop through the cracks. We don’t have a ton of services but what we have, they get utilized.”

James said it’s important to not engage in “victim blaming and to be compassionate.”

She said her office is looking at this as a health crisis, reiterating Genesee County’s belief that the funds can be used only for treatment, prevention, education, outreach, etc.

“Unlike the tobacco settlement of old (where) the funds were used for roads and bridges and lights,” she said. “I don’t have anything wrong with roads and bridges and lights – they serve their purpose and hopefully that infrastructure money (federal bill) will build more of them. But these funds have to be related to the litigation and also to assist you in expanding services, and maybe, giving people some raises because they do the work of the angels.”

Bennett mentioned that GCASA is hoping to open its new detoxification center by the first of the year and is advertising for 25 positions, mostly nurses.

“It’s challenging. Right now, we’re biting our nails, going through resumes,” he said.

In closing, James said her goal was to “shine a light on what all of you do here.”

“I come from New York City and half the time the attention is on the city, but we need to focus on rural communities, rural counties because there’s a demand here -- and they cannot be ignored; they cannot be invisible.”

County Manager Matt Landers said the county’s intent is to use the money as directed by the settlement.

“We’ll have interested stakeholders come together to build a consensus on how best to tackle this problem,” he advised.

James said the Finger Lakes Region (Monroe and surrounding counties) will be receiving $53,124,938 from the settlement.

Her plan is to travel to Buffalo, part of the Western New York Region, on Friday.

james_4a.jpg

Photo at top: State Attorney General Letitia James speaks with County Legislature Chair Rochelle Stein, left; GCASA Executive Director John Bennett, and Assemblyman Steven Hawley. Photo at bottom: Presentation of a check to the county to combat the opioid epidemic.

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 3:47pm


Comments
October 14, 2021 - 3:29pm
posted by Press Release in BOCES, accident, news, batavia.

Press release:

Today, at approximately 12:45 p.m., a school bus carrying Batavia Career and Technical Education students to the Building Trades house project site, was involved in an accident. In order to avoid hitting a car, the bus swerved, went off the road and into a ditch. The accident occurred on Route 98 in the Town of Alexander.

EMS responded to the scene, along with GV BOCES Administration, School Resource Officer, and the school nurse. The bus driver was not injured. All students are being evaluated at the accident scene by EMS and the school nurse.

The students are being evacuated from the accident scene and returned to the Batavia Career and Technical Education Center.

“The safety and security of our students is of utmost importance; hence we are taking every precaution possible,” said Kevin MacDonald.

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 12:00pm


Click here for more information!

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 11:54am

compost_site_alabama_2.jpg

The Genesee County Planning Board is expected to review the site plan for a compost production facility at 396 Wright Rd. in the Town of Alabama at tonight’s monthly meeting at County Building No. 2 on West Main Street Road, Batavia.

EcoVerde Organics, LLC, of Buffalo, is looking to operate the plant on a 27-acre parcel of land owned by Shawn Wilkins and William Eberhard, who reside in Akron and Clarence, respectively.

The location has an Akron mailing address but actually is in an Industrial District in the Town of Alabama.

According to documents submitted by EcoVerde Organics, the company will utilize approximately five acres to process source-separated organics, manure and yard waste, specifically food scraps, solid manure/bedding, select food processing waste and crop residue, and leaf and yard waste from municipalities and landscape professionals.

Biosolids will not be accepted.

Daytime hours of operation will vary depending upon the type of work involved, but the plant will be closed on Saturday and Sundays. The company anticipates developing regular collection routes and will accept source food scraps and manure from other haulers.

Company literature indicates its vision “is to reduce waste, reduce the use of chemical fertilizers, improve soil health and enhance the water quality of the Great Lakes basin.”

“To realize that vision, EVO will work with community stakeholders to locally source food scraps (SSO), manure, yard trimmings and other organic materials to create eco-friendly, tailored and tested composts for use in gardens, landscapes and farms, including applications requiring compost that meets organic-use specifications.”

County planning staff is recommending approval with the following modifications:

  • If plans are made to disturb one acre or more of land as a result of the operation, the applicant completes a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) and obtains a Stormwater Permit for Construction Activity from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) prior to that disturbance;
  • Per County Source Separation Local Law, the applicant register with the GLOW Region Solid Waste Management Committee and report at least annually the tonnage of materials recovered by the facility to the GLOW Recycling Coordinator.

Other referrals on the agenda include a special use permit request by New York Bus Sales, LLC, for its proposed 20,000-plus-square foot school bus service/sales facility at the corner of West Saile Drive and Call Parkway in the Town of Batavia, a site plan review for new storage units at West Batavia Storage, review of the Village of Bergen’s new zoning law and a new battery energy storage local law in the Town of Elba.

The meeting is scheduled to begin at 7 o’clock.

Photo, courtesy of Genesee County Planning Department: Aerial view of the propsed site for a compost facility on Wright Road in the Town of Alabama. 

October 14, 2021 - 10:12am

Although Village of Oakfield and Town of Oakfield governmental leaders are keeping their constituents informed of the status of their dispute over fire protection payments, they have yet to navigate a path to the negotiating table.

And, if judging by the latest information flyer that was hand-delivered to village residents last week, the village board has drawn a line in the sand before any talks will take place:

  • The Town pays the entire amount due to the Village for Fire Protection Services provided last year.
  • The Town signs the contract for 2021-2022 fire services (current year) or a multi-year agreement.
  • All parties jointly explore options to ensure this disagreement and withholding of payment does not happen again.

The village board claims the town owes $78,644.71 for fire protection services during the 2020-21 fiscal year, and is asking for full payment by Nov. 30 or Oakfield Volunteer Fire Department personnel will not be dispatched to fires or emergencies in the town, including the Oakfield-Alabama Central School District.

Other than an exchange of bulletins and website postings, Village Mayor David Boyle and Town Supervisor Matt Martin said there has been no verbal communication between the two boards.

The village owns fire trucks and equipment, and runs the fire service through the Oakfield Volunteer Fire Department, which owns the building on Albert Street.

Contacted on Wednesday, Martin pointed to information on the town website that spells out the town’s stance.

According to its Statement on Fire Agreement, dated Oct. 11, the town would like to see:

  • A three-year contract.
  • A service contract only – not to include capital -- because the village owns all fire equipment.

The town’s statement also indicates that its clerk sent a check for $39,322.36 – half of the above amount – to the village, but it has not been cashed.

Both Boyle and Martin have said the matter is in the hands of their attorneys, but the town’s latest statement indicates it has yet to be served with any legal action.

On Wednesday, Boyle said he was waiting for a return call from the village attorney.

The municipalities’ latest communications are as follows:

THE VILLAGE’S STANCE (as of Oct. 4)

1.  The Town Supervisor and Board is refusing to pay for the Fire Protection Services provided for June 1st, 2020 through May 31st, 2021, this is despite the Town’s 2021 tax bill to Town residents included a charge for fire protection based on the 2020/2021 Fire Protection Contract.  This money was collected as Town taxes in January of 2021.  The Town is responsible for creating the situation we are involved with at this time.

2.  The Town Supervisor has repeatedly stated that there is not a signed contract and the Town does not need to pay for services---despite the fact that the Town accepted fire protection services throughout the contract term while never indicating that the services were not wanted or needed.

3.  The contract between the Village, Fire Department, and Town has been an annual agreement for many years. This included an understanding between the Village and Town for payment of the contract after the Town collected its taxes (6 months after the contract begins).  The Town has collected the money to pay the contract but refuses to abide by law which says it must provide fire protection and payout the money collected for this purpose.

4.  Village residents pay double the tax rate for fire protection compared to Town residents.  The current rate for Village taxpayers is $1.62 per thousand of assessed value.  Why should the Village residents be forced to pay more?  Also, why is the Town so insistent that the Village Taxpayers take over more of the Town’s obligation?  Any shifting of cost to Village Taxpayers is very burdensome to them.

5.  Representatives from the Village (one of which is a fireman), Fire Department, and Town met as a committee to set the fire budget.  It is disappointing and possibly illegal that the Town Supervisor and Board is withholding payment to the Village for the 2020-2021 contract in order to dictate what funds they will pay going forward.  Keep in mind fire protection services to the Town continued to be provided over this time period, and that all structure fires occurred in the Town- not the Village.  In fact, of 10 structure fires, all were in the town. 

6.  Legally, a municipality cannot provide a free service.  The Town has refused to sign a contract for the 2020-2021 term and for 2021-2022 fire protection.  The Village cannot continue to provide a service with no indication that it will be paid for the services already provided, nor for the services going forward.

7.  Because of the Town’s refusal to pay for Fire Protection for over 15 months, the Village has communicated that fire services provided to the Town will cease on November 30th, 2021 unless payment for the 2020-2021 contract is made and a signed agreement for 2021-2022 is agreed upon by all parties.

THE TOWN’S STANCE (as of Oct. 11)

At this time, the Town has not been served with any legal action.

For five years, the Town of Oakfield has been trying to work with the Village of Oakfield to come to a fair and equitable Fire Agreement.

The Town Board disagrees with the content of the letters being circulated (by the Village Board), including the $1.62 being allocated to Fire Protection to the Village residents. The total taxable value of the Village is $52,040,355 (for bills sent out in June 2021).

Based on the Mayor’s statement that $1.62 of the village rate is for fire, they raised $84,305.38 for Fire Service within the village alone.

The Village Budget for 2021-22 for Fire is $95,000. Of that $95K, $10,320 is earmarked to go into a truck reserve. If you take that out of the $95K, you are left with $84,680 for a total operating budget. So, 58 percent (Town) is $49,126.

So, if the Village collected $84,680 and the Town owes them $49,126, then the total budget would be $133,806. What are they doing with the other $39K (actually $38,806) they collected if they did in fact collect it?

This should make the Village fire tax rate 0.89 cents per $1,000 (assessed value).

We also disagree with there being 10 structure fires within the Town of Oakfield. When a fire happens within our boundaries, both the Assessor and Code Enforcement Officer is contacted. Neither have been contacted for structure fires with(in) the Town.

Finally, in an attempt to sit at the table with the Village and negotiate an agreement, the Town sent the Village a check for $39,322.36 (half of the $78,644.71 the Town collected). The Village still has the check, refuses to cash it and will not entertain a discussion.

October 14, 2021 - 10:10am

firsttimehockeya.jpg

Press release:

GENESEE AMATEUR HOCKEY ASSOCIATION invites children to the Batavia Ice Rink on Evans Street on Saturday, November 6h for a Try Hockey For Free clinic as part of  Hockey  Week  Across  America.  Starting at 10:30 a.m. to 11:40 a.m. local youth, ages 4 to 9, are encouraged to experience ice hockey for the first time and learn the basic skills in a fun, safe environment.

“We look forward to welcoming families to Batavia Ice Rink to try our great sport of ice hockey” said Sharon Gray, Coordinator of the “Try Hockey for Free” event.  “Our goal is for these families to enjoy watching their kids learn new skills with big smiles on their faces.”

USA Hockey’s Try Hockey program, with the support of the National Hockey League and NHL member clubs, among others, is designed to provide youth hockey associations with a national platform for introducing children to the sport, free of charge. 

All your youngster needs is a helmet (bike or sports) and winter gloves.  Skates are available at the Rink and will be available Free of Charge through the Firland Rink Management Group. The GAHA organization does have some used hockey helmets available for the event as well as a few hockey sticks.

Players in attendance will be given a free hockey jersey to take home.

To register for this Try Hockey For Free event, please visit

www.TryHockeyForFree.com

Photo: File photo from 2013.

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 10:00am
posted by Press Release in girl scouts, pembroke, news.

img_20211012_173414.jpg

Photos and write-up submitted by Julie Beach

Hannah Beach and Lilly Senko worked together in conjunction with Pembroke Jr/Sr High School in creating a sensory "park" area for their peers who sometimes need to take time out of the school day and have a space where they can unwind, relax, and stimulate their sensory needs.

After much planning and interaction with the kids in the 6:1:1 class, plans began for their project.

The park includes an interactive music wall, a sensory wall, a bench, and a sensory garden with plants that students can feel, smell, and even taste.

The girls had a formal presentation of their project to the school on Tuesday, October 11th, with the principal, teachers, the superintendent, several members of the school board, and parents present.

The school was very excited about this new area for the students.

51575.jpg

Dianna Kutter worked with the Ronald McDonald House. She reached out to them to see what was needed. She set up several containers for the collection of pop tops, periodically checked her containers, and tracked her progress. Dianna organized a drive to collect needed items for the Ronald McDonald House, she used funds to create care packages to be given out to families staying at the house, also dispersing gift cards to be used by families. Dianna also painted several inspirational rocks that she placed along the gardens surrounding Ronald McDonald House Ronald McDonald house was very happy to receive the gifts

received_1756079744759455.jpg

Savannah Meyer was inspired to help the Genesee County Animal Shelter, as she loves animals. She reached out to the animal shelter to see what items they needed. Savannah organized a donation drive to obtain all the needed items for the shelter. She also researched ideas for making animal beds and made several beds and toys for the animals. Savannah hand-painted a storage cubie to hold all the donations at the shelter. The animal shelter was very grateful for all the donations to the shelter 

All four girls have worked very hard at their projects, and have learned so much during the process. 

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 9:52am
posted by Howard B. Owens in news, county legislature.

legprocsoct142021-2.jpg

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Fire Prevention Month and National Cybersecurity Month, the County Legislature presented proclamations to representatives of those causes at the start of its Wednesday meeting.

Top photo: Chairwoman Shelly Stein presents a proclamation to Lisa Franclemont, a health educator with UMMC. To read the full proclamation, click here (pdf).

legprocsoct142021-3.jpg

Emergency Management Coordinator Tim Yaeger speaks after accepting a proclamation from Legislator John Deleo while Gary Patnode, assistant coordinator, looks on. To read the full proclamation, click here (pdf).

legprocsoct142021.jpg

Legislator Chad Klotzbach presents a proclamation to Michael Burns, IT director for Genesee County. To read the full proclamation, click here.

October 13, 2021 - 6:18pm

northgate.jpg

It might be said that news of Northgate Free Methodist Church leadership’s desire to underwrite a nine-hole disc golf course on its property at 8160 Bank St. Rd. could be a sign of redemption for Phillip Boyd, the City of Batavia resident who caused a firestorm in May when he proposed placing a course at Centennial Park.

“I was Public Enemy No. 1 for a while, but now I just laugh it off,” Boyd said this afternoon, adding that he and Northgate personnel have joined forces to build a course behind the church in the Town of Batavia.

Boyd also said that he and fellow disc golf enthusiast Matt Strobel are working with the Genesee Community College Board of Trustees about a course there -- and have left the door open to a course at Williams Park in the city.

“At one point, it didn’t look like anything was going to happen, and now we may be getting three in the area,” Boyd said, recognizing the irony in all of it.

The subject of disc golf came up at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting, with City Manager Rachael Tabelski (responding to a public comment) saying that she hadn’t heard from Boyd recently.

Boyd said he left a message yesterday with Ray Tourt, the city’s maintenance supervisor, seeking to continue talks about a course at the Pearl Street recreation area.

“I am looking to get final approval on the course at Williams Park and then make a new proposal to City Council at a future Business Meeting,” Boyd said.

While the city may still be an option, Boyd said he currently is focusing on assisting Northgate Youth Pastor Dan Calkins with the logistics of setting up the course at Northgate.

“We’ve created a course design and the board unanimously voted yes,” Boyd said. “They said this is something they wanted to do for the community. I didn’t realize it but they’ve got about 50 acres behind the church.”

Boyd said they’ve cleared space for four of the nine holes thus far, and hope to make room for the remaining five before the end of this month. The goal is to open the course – which will be free to the public – next spring.

The course will feature tee pads, tee signage and baskets, he said, noting that the church’s financial commitment could approach $5,000.

Contacted today, Calkins said he read the articles detailing Boyd’s plight on The Batavian and approached Rev. Vern Saile, senior pastor, Mark Logan, operations director; and the board with the idea of locating a course on church grounds.

“Even if you don’t go to Northgate or never want to come to Northgate, we want to show that we love the community and we want to be a part of the community,” Calkins said. “We welcome the public to enjoy the course at no charge. Northgate is covering the sponsorship 100 percent.”

Calkins said disc golf fits in with the church’s outreach as it currently offers pickleball on Wednesdays at 2 and 8 p.m.

“We want to show the community that we’re more than just a Sunday church. We want to be part of their lives all week,” he said.

Boyd said he’s “pretty sure” the course at GCC will happen, considering that he and his partners have raised the money to fund it.

He also said that Adam Miller Toy & Bicycle in Batavia would be willing to sell disc golf equipment if the courses are built.

Photo above: Northgate Free Methodist Church.

October 13, 2021 - 6:00pm

a76y0582.jpg

For more than three decades, the Knights of Columbus, Msgr. Kirby Council No. 325 has been a strong supporter of St. Joseph Regional School and Notre Dame High School.

The council’s many contributions have gone toward building improvements, classroom and technology upgrades, beautification of both campuses, and tuition support scholarships.

“The scholarships provided by the Knights support our mission of advancing Catholic school education in Batavia,” said council trustee Steve Ognibene. “Many families throughout the region -- regardless of their financial position -- have been granted funds that have helped complete their education at St. Joseph’s and then graduate from Notre Dame.”

Ognibene said that hundreds of students have benefited from K of C sponsorship, especially when Notre Dame expanded to grades seven through 12 in 2020 and the council agreed to include students across all grade levels.

The council’s recent sponsorship allocated $4,000 to each school.

Notre Dame High Business Manager Tom Rapone applauded the council for its commitment to the schools.

“St. Joseph School and Notre Dame take pride in being top-ranked schools in the entire GLOW Region for the past two decades, and we have equal pride in our longstanding relationship with the Knights of Columbus,” Rapone said.

Photo above: Karen Green, principal of St. Joseph Regional School, receives a check from Knights of Columbus scholarship committee members, from left, Grand Knight Tom Trescott, Rocco Pellegrino, Sam LaBarbera and Chuck Mahler. Photo below: Tom Rapone accepts the check from the committee. Submitted photos.

a76y0591.jpg

Comments
October 13, 2021 - 4:50pm
posted by Press Release in dog bite, batavia, news, Centennial Park.

Press release:

The Genesee County Health Department is seeking information about the location of a dog and its owner following a dog bite incident on the late morning of Monday, October 11 at Centennial Park in Batavia (near Lincoln Avenue).

The dog is described as a grey pitbull with white markings around its neck, front paws, and left ear. The dog was approximately 55 to 60 pounds and was wearing a camo collar. The dog was NOT accompanied by its owner and was running loose throughout Centennial Park.

It is important to locate the dog to determine whether or not it is current on its rabies shot. If the health status is not identified, post-exposure rabies shots will be offered to the victim.  

If you have information about the location of the dog and its owner, please contact the Genesee County Health Department at 585-344-2580 ext. 5555.

October 13, 2021 - 4:44pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in accident, news, batavia.

A motor vehicle accident with unknown injuries is reported at East Main Street and Vine Street, Batavia.

City Fire and Mercy EMS responding.

UPDATE 4:48 p.m.: Apparent minor injuries.

Comments
October 13, 2021 - 4:30pm

Comments
October 13, 2021 - 4:20pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, notify, Batavia High Blue Devils, Section V football.

It looks as though the Batavia High Blue Devils will have to wait a bit longer to try for their sixth Section V football victory of the season.

Mike Bromley, the Batavia City School District athletic director, told The Batavian this afternoon that this Saturday afternoon's game at Newark/Marion has been cancelled due to some of the home team's members getting COVID-19.

Unless Batavia can find another opponent on short notice, the Blue Devils, 5-1, will have this weekend off, Bromley noted.

Batavia's final regular season game is set for 7 p.m. Oct. 22 at home against Wilson Magnet.

October 13, 2021 - 2:00pm


Click here to visit our Facebook page or order food online.

Comments
October 13, 2021 - 1:52pm
posted by Press Release in Ed Rath, news, pembroke.

Press release:

Friday, October 8, Governor Kathy Hochul signed bill S6105/A6021 into law, Chapter 471 of 2021.  The law, sponsored by State Senator Edward Rath and Assemblyman Steve Hawley, designates state route 77 between Pembroke Town Park and the intersection of Indian Falls Road in the Town of Pembroke, County of Genesee, as the "Specialist Four (SP4) Clarence 'C. Jay' Hall Memorial Highway.”

“I am proud that Governor Hochul signed this legislation into law. It is especially significant for me as S6105 was my first piece of legislation to pass the Senate.” Senator Rath continued, “the story of Specialist Four Hall’s bravery and courage is truly awe-inspiring and his sacrifice should never be forgotten.  Thank you to everyone involved for sharing his story with me. I am honored to have had a role in bringing this proposal to reality and look forward to driving down "Specialist Four (SP4) Clarence 'C. Jay' Hall Memorial Highway” in the future.”

“As a veteran and representative, it humbles me any time there is an opportunity to honor those who served. There’s no time more solemn than when we are memorializing and giving thanks for the heroic and ultimate sacrifice of a soldier in combat, like Specialist Four Clarence "C. Jay" Hall. May God bless him and his family. We are all freer today because of his service,” said Hawley. “I am so proud to have worked with Sen. Rath to get this bill enacted into law, and I would also like to thank all of the veterans groups, Pembroke High School and Mr. Matt Moscato’s class, and all the members of the community who helped to support this initiative. I look forward to marking the official occasion with you all at an upcoming dedication ceremony.”

Specialist Four Clarence "C. Jay" Hall served as a rifleman in the United States Army in Binh Duong, Vietnam.  He was mortally wounded on October 7, 1969, during an intense attack by enemy forces.  Specialist Hall earned the NYS Conspicuous Service Cross, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal with One Bronze Star, Vietnam Campaign Ribbon, Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Silver Star, which is the nation's third-highest award for valor.  The Veteran’s Outreach Club and the Government classes of the Pembroke Jr. /Sr. High School requested this legislation.

The bill passed the Senate and Assembly on May 25 and June 8 respectively.  It was delivered to the Governor for consideration on September 28, 2021.

A formal presentation and renaming ceremony will be held at a later date.

Comments

Top Items on Batavia's List

Reliable Restaurant Staff Wanted

Reliable Restaurant help needed for the Alabama Hotel. Hiring all positions and multiple shifts including Bartender, Wait Staff, Kitchen Staff, and Bussers. Please call 585-948-9994 or stop in at 1353 Lewiston Rd., Basom to apply.
Tags: 
Jobs offered

Cleaning Position Open

BATAVIA OFFICE BUILDING is in need of a cleaning person with a neat appearance & some experience for 5 evenings a week Monday through Friday from 5pm-9pm at $12.50 per hour. Duties are general cleaning : cleaning restrooms, vacuuming, mopping, trash removal, etc. Email replies &/or resume to : [email protected]
Tags: 
Jobs offered

Cleaning Position Open

Cleaning Services Unlimited is looking to hire a cleaner/porter for a Batavia office complex. Applicants should have neat & clean appearance, some cleaning experience with attention to detail, & good communication skills. Schedule is 4 days per week from 9:30am-2:00pm. Rate of pay is $13.50 per hour. Duties include disinfecting, restocking restroom supplies & light dusting in common areas. BACKGROUND CHECK REQUIRED ! Contact : email resume to [email protected]
Tags: 
Jobs offered

Calendar

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Copyright © 2008-2020 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
 

blue button