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March 12, 2020 - 2:01pm
posted by Billie Owens in health, COVID-19, coronavirus, news.

Closures and cancellations announced March 12 as precautionary measures to prevent the risk of exposure to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19):

  • This weekend's Batavia Indoor Soccer Tournament, March 14th and 15th, is cancelled according to Jim Dillon.
  • The New York State Public High School Athletic Assocation winter regional and state championships will be postponed indefinitely.

  • Takeout only for Lenten Fish Fries on Fridays at St. James Episcopal Church in Batavia -- no dining in for remainder of Lenten season (through April 3).

  • Le Roy Village Green takes the threat of COVID-19 very seriously and has been taking proactive measures to ensure the health and safety of our residents and staff. We are following the guidance of the Center for Disease Control and Centers of Medicaid and Medicare and our Local Health Department and have implemented visitor restrictions and screens for staff and essential visitors. It is essential that anyone who potentially carries the virus does not enter our facility. Our commitment is to protect our residents and employees to keep them safe and healthy.
  • Premier Genesee Center for Nursing & Rehabilitation has banned visiting through 3-25-2020.
  • Genesee Community College cancelled today's Tech Wars; Classes will not be held on March 16th, 17th, or 18th; Classes will resume via remote delivery on Thursday, March 19th, and continue through the end of the semester.
  • Sheriff William A. Sheron Jr. has suspended all inmate visitation at the Genesee County Jail, effective Friday, March 13, until further notice.
  • The Alabama-Oakfield Senior Lunch Group – "We’ve Only Just Begun" – has canceled monthly meetings until further notice. The scheduled April 27th bus trip to Orleans County is also cancelled.

NOTE: If your group or agency is canceling or postponing an event, email [email protected]. We'll compile a list, post it, and keep it updated.

March 12, 2020 - 10:26am
posted by Howard B. Owens in COVID-19, coronavirus, news, notify, health.

Press release:

“In response to Monroe County releasing a travel-related positive case of COVID-19, we want to assure Genesee and Orleans county residents that our health departments are continuing efforts to be prepared and ready for action when COVID-19 is diagnosed in one of our residents,” said Paul Pettit, director, Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments.

“It has been determined there is no indication of community transmission in the Monroe County case. We currently have one person under precautionary quarantine and (that person) is not displaying signs of illness. Our responsibility in this outbreak is fourfold: 1. To prepare and be ready. 2. Detect, protect and treat. 3. Reduce transmission and, 4. Innovate and learn.”

“Our departments have been preparing for events such as this, Pettit said. "We are diligently in conversation with the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for updated guidance.

"As we move forward with this outbreak we will be working with those returning from travel from Level 3 and Level 2 Travel Health Notice Countries as well as those who may have contact with someone who traveled and are displaying symptoms.

"We encourage residents to remain calm; be prepared by making sure you have supplies on hand, including a thermometer, fever-reducing over-the-counter medication, such as ibuprofen; and listen to factual reports from the CDC, NYSDOH, and Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments."

You can also call the NYS toll-free Novel Coronavirus Hotline at 1-888-364-3065 or visit this Genesee County website.

It is important for everyone to be aware of how they can reduce transmission, not just for COVID- 19, but other respiratory-related illnesses, such as the flu.

For the majority of individuals infected with COVID-19, they will have mild symptoms, however for those at risk, such as older people or those with underlying health issues such as heart, lung, diabetes, etc. they are at a higher risk of potentially life-threatening symptoms.

Limiting exposure to large group events and staying home when unwell are important steps. Organizations should start planning how they will meet the needs of their constituents if there is community transmission in our counties.

While there is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19, these simple steps can help stop the spread of this and other respiratory viruses, including the flu (influenza), which is currently widespread:

  • If you need to go to your primary care provider, a health center or the emergency room, call ahead to let them know your symptoms, travel and contact history.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60-percent alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home if you are sick. If you have a fever, vomiting and/or diarrhea you should stay home at least 24 hours after the last incident without fever-reducing / anti-diarrhea medications.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you don’t have a tissue cover your mouth with your elbow.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
March 8, 2020 - 7:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in COVID-19, coronavirus, health, news.

Press release:

“With Governor Andrew Cuomo’s declaration of a state of emergency in New York in response to COVID-19, the Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments are focusing on preparedness to respond to potential positive cases of COVID-19 in both counties,” said Paul Pettit, director, Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments.

New guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) has authorized health care providers to order testing for COVID-19. There is no evidence of the disease reaching Western New York, however, this is a rapidly evolving situation and the likelihood of more cases being identified in the coming days is possible. We will continue to update with local media as appropriate.

In Genesee and Orleans counties, we’ve had 12 people undergo precautionary quarantine based on travel history. Eleven have been cleared, with none becoming ill; one remains in quarantine with no current illness and will remain under observation through the 14-day period.

“We encourage residents to remain calm; be prepared by making sure you have supplies on hand including a thermometer, fever-reducing over-the- counter medication, such as ibuprofen; and listen to factual reports from the CDC, NYSDOH, and Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments,” Pettit said.

“Our social media platforms will continue to post pertinent information/trusted links and can be found on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with GOHealthNY as our user name. You can also call the NYS Novel Coronavirus hotline at 1-888-364-3065.

While there is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19, these simple steps can help stop the spread of this and other respiratory viruses, including the flu (influenza), which is currently widespread:

  • If you need to go to your primary care provider, a health center or the emergency room, call ahead to let them know your symptoms, travel and contact history.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home if you are sick. If you have a fever, vomiting and/or diarrhea you should stay home at least 24 hours after the last incident without fever-reducing / anti-diarrhea medications.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you don’t have a tissue cover your mouth with your elbow.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
March 2, 2020 - 4:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in coronavirus, UMMC, health, news, notify.

The first case of coronavirus in New York was announced yesterday but that was in New York City and so far there is no evidence of the disease reaching Western New York. That doesn't mean, however, that Genesee County residents shouldn't be aware and have a plan for dealing with a nearby outbreak, local health officials say.

Local health agencies have been keeping an eye on COVID-19* since it was first reported in Wuhan, China about two months ago, said Paul Pettit, Genesee County health director.

He said local officials have been in discussion with state officials for weeks as well as communicating with and monitor information from the Center for Disease Control.

The plan right now is to encourage people to do what they normally should due during flu season:

  • Wash your hands frequently;
  • Cough and sneeze into a tissue or your elbow;
  • Don't put your hands to your face;
  • If you have flu-like symptoms, call your doctor and follow your doctor's instructions (don't go to the ER or your doctor's office unless instructed);
  • If you're sick, isolate yourself from other people;
  • Be informed with timely and accurate information.

"The primary goal is containment and (to) suppress it as best we can," Pettit said. "If we find a case, we want to develop a case history, find how who may people have been exposed, where the person has traveled if they've been out and about and at public events. That is the best way to suppress it and ensure to lock it down."

One thing you don't need to do: Hoard masks. The only people who need to wear masks, Pettit said, are health care workers and people already infected. They will do little to help people in the general public to protect them from infection and hoarding masks will make it harder for those who truly need them to get them.

One of the reasons this new virus was able to spread quickly -- outside of the Chinese government mishandling the initial outbreak -- is that a person can be a carrier for two weeks and show no symptoms. So if a person doesn't know he or she is infected, that person is going to go about their normal daily routine.

There are two ways the disease is transmitted in the United States -- either by those people who have traveled overseas in a region where Corvid-19 is spreading or by what authorities call "community transmission" (people who became infected by coming into contact with an infected person in the local community).

The one infected person in New York City is a woman in her 30s who recently returned from Iran, where more than 1,500 cases have been reported and 66 people have died (250 people have recovered).

Obviously, Pettit said, community transmission is the larger concern but people who have traveled to regions where the disease is present should be quarantined upon their return to the United States.

So far, four people in Genesee County (and five in Orleans County) who traveled to China have been quarantined. All four were isolated at home for two weeks and monitored daily for signs of illness. None became ill, Pettit said. None of the individuals had been to Wuhan, China.

Schools, faith-based organizations, community groups, and those holding public gatherings, also need to develop plans for responding to a potential outbreak, Pettit said. The CDC website can be a resource for local organizations to develop response plans.

"We don't want people to panic but we want people to understand it's a serious issue," Pettit said.

So far in China, there have been more than 80,000 cases reported out of nearly 90,000 reported worldwide. Globally, 3,056 deaths have been reported. In the United States, there are at least 90 confirmed cases and five deaths. There have been reports of community transmission in California, Oregon and Washington. There's concern that the virus spread in Washington for weeks without detection.

That isn't a concern here at this point, Pettit said, and this week, two of New York's infection disease labs became centers for testing for coronavirus.

United Memorial Medical Center is ready if the epidemic reaches Genesee County, said CEO Dan Ireland.

He said hospital staff, including Tricia Woodward, infection preventionist, have been monitoring the situation closely since the outbreak was first reported in China and keeping the rest of the hospital staff informed.

Like Pettit, Ireland said one of the best strategies to containing the disease is good information and acting on it.

"That means we're making sure we're prepared according to CDC guidelines," Ireland said. "We conduct education with the staff here, communicate out with our community partners, and Tricia does on-the-spot discussions with staff to make sure they have the correct information. We have routine education and drills to make sure our staff is always ready to respond."

If there is a local case, Woodward said the patient would be kept in a special isolation room and any staff entering the room would wear goggles, a mask, gloves and a gown.

Like Pettit, Woodward said the best strategy to level out transmission is for people who become sick is to stay home.

Not every case of COVID-19 is serious. Like the flu, most are not. The disease is most dangerous for older people, people with compromised immune systems, and people with respiratory difficulties, which is why the best recommendation for anybody who may become sick is to first, call your doctor. Don't leave the house unless directed to do so by a qualified medical professional.

"Having people flooding into ERs or doctors' offices when they suspect they're sick creates more of an environment where it can be transmitted, so it's not a bad thing to pick up the phone and call a doctor," Ireland said. "If you have a high fever, a doctor can provide proper guidance."

In China, there have been whole cities placed on a social isolation regime. That means people must stay home. Businesses and factories have closed. Public events were canceled.

If that happens here, people will need to be prepared with enough nonperishable, shelf-stable food and water to stay isolated for up to three weeks.

"Fortunately, we're nowhere near that stage anywhere in the U.S. or in this state," Pettit said. "Obviously the goal is to use quarantines to keep from getting to that point."

But a lot of any success is keeping the disease from spreading at China-like levels will depend on the actions of individual citizens, not government agencies.

"Everybody has to be personally accountable," Pettit said. "Everybody has to do their part and take care of themselves so they can take care of others."

*(According to the CDC: COVID-19, "CO" stands for "corona," "VI" for "virus," and "D" for disease.)

LOCAL NEWS MAKES FOR STRONGER COMMUNITIES. SUPPORT LOCAL NEWS.

December 3, 2019 - 12:42pm
posted by Billie Owens in national influenza week, health, flu, vaccine, news.

From the Genesee County Health Department:

Dec. 1st – 7th is this year’s National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW).

As family and friends are gathering for the holidays, flu activity is increasing. NIVW serves as a reminder it is not too late to get a flu vaccine.

Paul Pettit, Public Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties wants to remind folks that when you get a flu vaccine, you are also protecting your loved ones and your community.

“Getting vaccinated isn’t just about keeping  you healthy; it is also about helping to protect others around you who may be at risk of becoming very sick, such asbabies, older adults, and pregnant women,” he said.

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs.

When someone with the flu coughs, sneezes, or talks, they spray tiny droplets. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby.

People can also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touch their own mouth, nose, or eyes.

Influenza can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Although the majority of hospitalizations and deaths occur in people 65 years and older, healthy young children and adults can have severe disease or even die from the flu.

“To be protected against the flu, you have to get the vaccine every year,” said Brenden Bedard, director of Community Health Services of Genesee and Orleans counties.

“Because flu viruses are constantly changing, flu vaccines may be updated from one season to the next to protect against the viruses that research suggests may be most common during the upcoming flu season. For the best protection, everyone 6 months of age and older should get vaccinated annually.”

In addition to receiving the flu shot, it is also important to practice good health habits.

The tips below will help you learn about ways you can protect yourself and others from germs this season.

  • Stay home when you are sick. If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing – or cough/sneeze into your elbow if no tissues are available. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Flu and other serious respiratory illnesses, like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and whooping cough are spread by coughing, sneezing, or unclean hands.
  • Wash your hands. Good hand washing takes 20 seconds. Sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice while you wash. Scrub with soap and water to remove germs. Always wash hands before eating, and after coughing, sneezing, spending time outside, touching animals, using the bathroom, or changing a baby’s diaper. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Practice other good health habits. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

Flu seasons are unpredictable and can last late into the spring.

As long as flu viruses are spreading and causing illness, vaccination should continue throughout the flu season in order to protect as many people as possible. It’s important to remember that it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against influenza virus infection.

If you have not received your annual flu vaccine this year, now is the time! To find a place near you to get a flu vaccine, visit HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

For information about Health Department services contact the Genesee County Health Department at 344-2580, ext. 5555, or visit their website.

October 19, 2019 - 2:10pm

The University at Buffalo’s Clinical Research Institute (CRIA) and the NYS Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) are sponsoring a free buprenorphine waiver training for clinical health care providers.

It will be held at GCASA in Batavia from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Nov. 16.

The buprenorphine waiver eight-hour training is offered in a half-and-half format (4.5 hrs. of in-person training followed by 3.5 hrs. of online training).

Light refreshments will be served.

Participants will receive CME credits.

Physicians (MDs, DOs) need to complete the half-and-half course to apply for the waiver. Nurse Practitioners (NPs) and Physician Assistants (PAs) are required to complete the standardized buprenorphine waiver 8-hour training as well as an additional 16 hours of online training as established by the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA).

Please contact us for further information.

Trainer:
Dr. Paul Updike 
Director of Addiction Medicine and Recovery Services, Catholic Health System

Location:
Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Inc. 430 E Main Street, Batavia, NY 14020

Online registration for the workshop:   https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZBQF7P9

Directions:   https://goo.gl/maps/8KZecbdEKYP2

Questions: Please contact Dr. Christopher Barrick (716-829-3280)

October 19, 2019 - 1:01pm
posted by Billie Owens in PrEP, pre-exposure prophylaxis, HIV infection, health, news.

From the Genesee County Health Department:

Did you know there is a pill to prevent HIV? Pre-exposure prophylaxis, also known as PrEP, is a safe and effective daily pill that can greatly reduce your risk of HIV infection.

PrEP is prescribed for HIV-negative people who are at a higher risk for getting HIV, most commonly through sex, injection drug use, or sharing needles. A lot of people still don’t knowabout the benefits of using PrEP to protect against HIV.

That’s why the New York State Department of Health has declared Oct. 20 – 26 as PrEP Aware Week.

“If you are exposed to HIV, the medicines in PrEP stop the virus from spreading throughout your body, preventing anHIV infection” said Brenden Bedard, director of Community Health Services of Genesee and Orleans counties. “People at high risk for getting HIV should talk to their healthcare provider about starting this preventative treatment.”

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), when taken daily, PrEP is highly effective for preventing HIV. Studies have shown that PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99 percent when taken daily. Among people who inject drugs, PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV by at least 74 percent when taken daily. PrEP is much less effective if it is not taken consistently.

Before you start PrEP, your doctor will test you to make sure that you do not have HIV and that your kidneys and liver are healthy. While you are on PrEP, your doctor will test you every three months for HIV and at least every six months for other STIs.

Even though PrEP is one important tool for protecting yourself from HIV, you can further reduce your chance of getting HIV by using condoms during sex and by using new sterile (clean) needles if you inject drugs.

The CDC offers these guidelines on people who should consider taking PrEP:

  • Anyone who is in an ongoing relationship with someone who is HIV-positive.

  • Gay or bisexual men who have sex without a condom or have been diagnosed with an STI in the past six months.

  • Heterosexual men or women who do not regularly use condoms with partners with an unknown HIV status who are at substantial risk for HIV infections (people who inject drugs).

  • People who have injected drugs in the past 6 months and have shared injection equipment or have been in treatment for injection drug use in the past six months.

Many insurance plans, including Medicaid, cover PrEP. Assistance may also be available if you are uninsured or if your co-pay or deductible is too high. For additional information about PrEP, including a directory of medical providers who prescribe PrEP, and information about resources to pay for PrEP, please visit www.health.ny.gov/PrEP.

For more information about PrEP, please click here.

For information about Health Department services contact the Genesee County Health Department at: 344-2580, ext. 5555, or visit their website.

September 11, 2019 - 1:40pm
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, news, urology, health, prostate cancer, Us TOO Rochester.

Information provided by Patrick Fisher, event organizer for Us TOO Rochester:

The Center for Urology in Batavia, a practice of seven urologists in the city, is one of this year's major sponsors of the fifth annual Prostate Cancer Walk and Health Fair on Sunday, Sept. 15 inside The Mall at Greece Ridge.

Us TOO Rochester hosts the event, which is its primary fundraiser and proceeds benefit local patient programs. It is the regional affiliate chapter of Us TOO International, a nonprofit 501c3 organization providing patient support, education and advocacy for those affected by prostate cancer in Rochester and the Finger Lakes Region.

Registration for Sunday's Walk and Health Fair is $30 at the door and includes an event T-shirt while supplies last. All are welcome.

Online registration is only $20 and the last day to register online is Sept. 12. Click here to register online.

On-site registration opens at 8:30 a.m. and the final lap begins at 10 a.m.

Children age 13 and under are admitted free.

This is a family fun event that includes: prize drawings worth hundreds of dollars; DJ Blaze as Master of Ceremony; a collection of classic cars displayed by Street Machines of Rochester; entertainment by mascots for Rochester Red Wings (Spikes) and Amerks (Moose); face painting by Freckles; a performance by Oasis Senior Tappers; free Dunkin’ Donuts (The Luis Ribeiro Group); free Gloria Jean’s Coffee (Rumit Patel, Mgr.); and cookies by Kiss Me Cookie in Webster.

See the '10-foot-tall Enlarged Prostate'

Among the sights will be the region's largest “enlarged prostate” -- a 10-foot-tall educational tool that informs you about how prostate cancer develops and spreads when left untreated.

In addition to educational exhibits, UR Medicine Labs and Urology will conduct free PSA screening on site for qualified men who have no medical insurance.

Ample parking is available at the mall near door #8. For full details about the walk and fundraiser, visit here.

The Mall at Greece Ridge is located at 271 Greece Ridge Center Drive in Greece.

The annual Prostate Cancer Walk and Health Fair is held in September because it is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. The disease is the most common non-skin cancer in American men, and the leading cause of cancer death in men second only to lung cancer.

The National Cancer Institute reports that 29,430 men in the United States will die from prostate cancer annually. More than 16,000 men in Rochester and the Finger Lakes region are diagnosed with the disease that left untreated may affect other organs or lead to bone cancer and death.

According to the NYS Department of Health, every year another 42 men from Batavia and Genesee County will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.

African-American men are at even greater risk and from an earlier age than their caucasian counterpart. However, not only men suffer. This cancer has the potential to affect spouses, significant others and relationships in meaningful ways, too.

No Early Warning Signs

While medical research has advanced how prostate cancer is diagnosed and treated, there are no early warning signs. The same BRCA2 gene that contributes to breast cancer in women, may also contribute to prostate cancer in men. Men who have a sister or mother known to have BRCA2 may benefit by being screened for prostate cancer.

Yet, the best outcomes begin with an early diagnosis. This makes it very important that men routinely talk with their provider about being screened for prostate cancer especially as they age.

Batavia's Dr. Anees Fazili, one of the urologists with the local Center for Urology, says he was honored to have helped bring a new exciting procedure to Western New York for the treatment of prostate cancer called High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). It reduces some of the usual risks of treatment associated with this disease.

"At Rochester Regional Health we also just purchased the 'FocalOne' HIFU device, which is truly revolutionary and allows for same day focal therapy of prostate cancer, and we are one of only a handful of centers in the entire country offering this amazing treatment option," Fazili wrote in an email to The Batavian.

He operates out of both United Memorial Medical Center and Medina Memorial Hospital, and is working on starting an Us TOO chapter for Genesee County.

A cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming, but the process for men to learn what they need to know in order to make informed decisions is a daunting task that typically requires many sleepless nights and weeks spent conducting research or getting second and third medical opinions.

Us TOO is a good resource for help and information.

Their monthly meetings provide a safe environment where men and their care givers may share about their experience or learn from others regarding current options.

August 16, 2019 - 1:03pm

From the Genesee County Health Department:

August is recognized as National Immunization Awareness Month. Today’s vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, whooping cough, and chickenpox.

Because of advances in medical science, your children and family can be protected against more diseases than ever before.

Paul Pettit, Public Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties, has continually supported vaccination and vaccine education in our communities and believes vaccines are the best defense against preventable diseases.

“Vaccination is safe and effective," Pettit said. "All vaccines undergo long and careful review by scientists, doctors, and the federal government to make sure they are safe."

Immunizations are important for a variety of reasons. When you get vaccinated, you not only protect yourself but you also help protect the people around you who might be too young or too sick to get vaccinated themselves. This is called “community immunity” or “herd immunity.”

If enough people stop getting vaccinated, more outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, will occur.

On June 13, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed legislation removing nonmedical exemptions from school vaccination requirements for children.

Public Health Law §2164(1)(a) defines “school” to include any public, private or parochial child caring center, day nursery, day care agency, nursery school, kindergarten, elementary, intermediate or secondary school.

This means that if your child does not have a medical exemption, your child must receive vaccines in order to attend school. This new law will help protect against vaccine-preventable diseases within our communities.

For more information on the law, please click here.

From infants to senior citizens, getting vaccines on time is one of the most important way to protect yourself and your family from serious diseases and infections.

During NIAM, the Genesee and Orleans County health departments encourage you to talk to your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare professional to ensure that you and your family are up to date on recommended vaccines.

We also encourage you to visit CDC’s Interactive Vaccine Guide, which provides information on the vaccines recommended during pregnancy and throughoutyour child’s life. Adults can use the CDC’s adult vaccine assessment tool to see which vaccines might be right for you.

For information about this article or health department services contact the Genesee County Health Department at: 344-2580, ext. 5555, or visit their website here.

March 7, 2019 - 3:00pm

stretchyoursoulsp.gif
Stretch your soul this Lent. If you are longing for the gift of inner peace, we invite you to experience the power of inner stillness through stretching the body and attending to the soul. Join us during the season of Lent for contemplative prayer through chair yoga and centering prayer. No previous experience necessary. The yoga will be very gentle, anyone with any level of ability can participate. Batavia First Presbyterian is located at 300 E. Main Street in Batavia.

March 4, 2019 - 10:52am
Event Date and Time: 
March 27, 2019 - 6:00pm

Library Community Health Talk

DOCTORS WILL TREAT AN ESTIMATED
145,600 NEW CASES OF
COLORECTAL CANCER IN THE U.S. THIS YEAR.

Join Andrea Zucchiatti, MD on MARCH 27 AT 6PM
to learn about:

  • Colorectal Cancer Screenings
  • The Latest Trends in Care
  • Why This Matters in Our Community

Richmond Memorial Library
19 Ross Street, Batavia, NY 14020
Free to attend!
Call 585.344.5439 to register.

March 4, 2019 - 10:48am
Event Date and Time: 
April 10, 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Stretch Your Soul This Lent
If you are longing for the gift of inner peace, we invite you to experience the power of inner stillness through stretching the body and attending to the soul. Join us during the season of Lent for contemplative prayer through chair yoga and Centering Prayer. No previous experience is necessary. The yoga will be very gentle that anyone with any level of ability could participate.

March 4, 2019 - 10:46am
Event Date and Time: 
April 3, 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Stretch Your Soul This Lent
If you are longing for the gift of inner peace, we invite you to experience the power of inner stillness through stretching the body and attending to the soul. Join us during the season of Lent for contemplative prayer through chair yoga and Centering Prayer. No previous experience is necessary. The yoga will be very gentle that anyone with any level of ability could participate.

March 4, 2019 - 10:44am
Event Date and Time: 
March 27, 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Stretch Your Soul This Lent
If you are longing for the gift of inner peace, we invite you to experience the power of inner stillness through stretching the body and attending to the soul. Join us during the season of Lent for contemplative prayer through chair yoga and Centering Prayer. No previous experience is necessary. The yoga will be very gentle that anyone with any level of ability could participate.

March 4, 2019 - 10:43am
Event Date and Time: 
March 20, 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Stretch Your Soul This Lent
If you are longing for the gift of inner peace, we invite you to experience the power of inner stillness through stretching the body and attending to the soul. Join us during the season of Lent for contemplative prayer through chair yoga and Centering Prayer. No previous experience is necessary. The yoga will be very gentle that anyone with any level of ability could participate.

February 12, 2019 - 3:11pm
From the GOW Opioid Task Force:
 
The GOW (Genesee, Orleans, Wyoming) Opioid Task Force is excited to announce the opportunity to become a Peer Recovery Coach.
 
This training has been grant funded by the Health Resources and Service Administration and therefore is FREE.
 
Trainees should have a high school diploma or equivalent and lived experience is preferred -- in recovery, affected family member, experience working in the SUD/Recovery field.
 
Training is six-weeks in length (46 hours total) and you must commit to completing the program. Space is limited!
 
Training will take place at the Lake Plains Community Care Network at 575 E. Main St. in Batavia. Please check out the website and flier for more information here.
 
As part of the Community Based Recovery Support Training Project, training is offered to a select group of committed community members seeking to achieve NYS Peer Recovery Professional Certification.
 
This enables them to serve families and individuals affected by Substance Abuse Disorder with evidence-based recovery supports, skills and strategies.
 
The workshop facilitators are Lori Drescher (CARC, RCP) and Keith Greer (LCSW, PCC, PRC), who are professional coaches, recovery advocates and facilitators with a combined 55 years of experience.
 
If you have specific questions please contact Charlotte Crawford at [email protected] or by phone 585-345-6110.
February 6, 2019 - 10:33am
posted by Howard B. Owens in flu, news, health, UMMC.

Press release:

To help reduce further transmission of influenza, Rochester Regional Health is instituting visitor restrictions for the following hospitals:

  • United Memorial Medical Center
  • Rochester General Hospital (Rochester) 
  • Unity Hospital (Greece)

Visitor restrictions:

  • Visitors will be limited to no more than two people per patient at a time;
  • All visitors must be at least 14 years old;
  • Please do not visit a patient if you feel you are ill, including sore throat, fever, runny nose, coughing, sneezing or other flu-like symptoms - even if you have been vaccinated against the flu.

NOTE: The Batavian spoke briefly with Paul Pettit, county health director, and he said flu reports this season are above average -- about 40 cases -- but well below the 200 or so that were reported by this time last year.

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