The Batavian - Local Matters https://www.thebatavian.com/ en https://www.thebatavian.com/themes/barrio_batavian/images/thebatavian_logo.png The Batavian https://www.thebatavian.com/ Local Matters © 2008-2023 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Mon, 22 Apr 2024 11:15:40 -0400 https://www.thebatavian.com/themes/barrio_batavian/images/thebatavian_logo.png Mon, 22 Apr 2024 07:48:00 -0400 HLOM mini-exhibit 'St. Joseph's Drum Corps: 53 years later' https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/hlom-mini-exhibit-st-josephs-drum-corps-53-years-later/639105 Press Release:

Come by the Holland Land Office Museum and check out our new mini-exhibit, "St. Joesph's Drum Core: 53 Years Later!"

From April to the end of September, view photographs, uniforms, and other artifacts relating to the nationally ranked local drum corps from the twentieth century!

Beginning in 1931 under the direction of Rev. T. Bernard Kelly, pastor of St. Joseph's Church in Batavia, the St. Joseph's Drum Corps was created and went on to be nationally ranked. Winning 8 New York State American Legion titles and other national titles! The drum crops were active until 1971. However, they have a reunion corps called the "Mighty St. Joe's" in Le Roy.

The exhibit includes uniforms, photographs, instruments, and much more of members of alumni of the Drum Corps.

The mini-exhibit is available during regular museum hours, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. with regular admission. Come and check it out on your next visit to the Holland Land Office Museum.

]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/hlom-mini-exhibit-st-josephs-drum-corps-53-years-later/639105#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/hlom-mini-exhibit-st-josephs-drum-corps-53-years-later/639105 Apr 22, 2024, 7:48am The Batavian - Local Matters Press Release:

Come by the Holland Land Office Museum and check out our new mini-exhibit, "St. Joesph's Drum Core: 53 Years Later!"

From April to the end of September, view photographs, uniforms, and other artifacts relating to the nationally ranked local drum corps from the twentieth century!

Beginning in 1931 under the direction of Rev. T. Bernard Kelly, pastor of St. Joseph's Church in Batavia, the St. Joseph's Drum Corps was created and went on to be nationally ranked. Winning 8 New York State American Legion titles and other national titles! The drum crops were active until 1971. However, they have a reunion corps called the "Mighty St. Joe's" in Le Roy.

The exhibit includes uniforms, photographs, instruments, and much more of members of alumni of the Drum Corps.

The mini-exhibit is available during regular museum hours, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. with regular admission. Come and check it out on your next visit to the Holland Land Office Museum.

]]>
HLOM mini-exhibit 'St. Joseph's Drum Corps: 53 years later' <p>Press Release:</p><blockquote><p>Come by the Holland Land Office Museum and check out our new mini-exhibit, "St. Joesph's Drum Core: 53 Years Later!"</p><p>From April to the end of September, view photographs, uniforms, and other artifacts relating to the nationally ranked local drum corps from the twentieth century!</p><p>Beginning in 1931</p></blockquote>
Column: Memories of Making Bread https://www.thebatavian.com/anne-marie-starowitz/column-memories-of-making-bread/639110
bread oven hlom
Photo courtesy the Holland Land Office Museum.

Today, making bread is easy. You buy a loaf of frozen bread, defrost it, and bake it. In 1996, there was a machine called the Bread Machine. You would put all the ingredients into the machine and turn it on. It would mix the ingredients, time the bread to rise, and then bake the bread. Now, you can go to a supermarket and buy fresh bread.

In the ‘60s, my grandmother, Jennie Bellow, would bring her homemade bread to Batavia every Sunday. We all enjoyed her bread and took it for granted. On one of my Sunday sleepovers in Le Roy, I watched my grandma get out all sorts of things to make her white bread. Flour, yeast, and Crisco were some of her ingredients. She also took out a flat piece of wood, a towel, and five bread pans. I asked why she was getting everything out the night before, and she said I would find out the following day. 

Jennie Bellow
Jennie Bellow

Early the next morning, I watched her make her bread. I had no idea it would take all day. First, we would measure the flour, put the yeast in warm milk, and add one scant wooden spoonful of Crisco. We would mix the ingredients by hand, which is called kneading. The towel was to cover the dough, hoping it would rise. Finally, the bread was ready for the pans. The result was beautiful but so time-consuming. My grandmother was born in 1900, and making bread was a way of life for women in the 1900s as it was in the 1800s.

One of the first things Joseph Ellicott did as a local agent of the Holland Land Company was to have mills, both grist and saw, built in Batavia to encourage settlement. Before the erection of the gristmill in Batavia in 1804, the people sometimes did not have bread or anything to make it from. Flour was brought on packhorses before the roads were of such a character as to allow better transportation. The Tonawanda Creek dam was used to power a sawmill and, a little later, a gristmill.

Both corn and wheat grain had to be ground for bread and other foods. The grindstones at the gristmill reduced corn to meal and wheat grain to flour. “Rye and Indian,” made from cornmeal and rye flour, was the only bread the early settlers could make. Grinding the grain into flour for the pioneers meant a journey to the gristmill by ox sled in both summer and winter.

I wonder if the giant stone doughnuts that stood on East Main Street near the corner of Ross Street could have been gristmill stones. Many years ago, they were at the entrance of a burned house. I can remember them always being there; after the fire, they disappeared.

In the Holland Land Office Museum, there is a colonial kitchen. You can imagine our early settlers cooking in the kitchen using a fireplace. Upon request, you can view a reflector oven. This was one way the early settlers made bread. A reflector oven is a box usually made of tin designed to enclose an article of food on all but one side to cause it to bake by capturing radiant heat from an open fire and reflecting the heat toward the food. The next time you buy freshly baked bread at your local supermarket, think of the time it took to make bread from “scratch!”

I treasure the memories of cooking and baking with my grandmother. I know how to make her bread from scratch, but it is not the same not having my grandmother next to me in her cobbler apron showing me how to knead the bread.

]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/anne-marie-starowitz/column-memories-of-making-bread/639110#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/anne-marie-starowitz/column-memories-of-making-bread/639110 Apr 22, 2024, 7:30am The Batavian - Local Matters
bread oven hlom
Photo courtesy the Holland Land Office Museum.

Today, making bread is easy. You buy a loaf of frozen bread, defrost it, and bake it. In 1996, there was a machine called the Bread Machine. You would put all the ingredients into the machine and turn it on. It would mix the ingredients, time the bread to rise, and then bake the bread. Now, you can go to a supermarket and buy fresh bread.

In the ‘60s, my grandmother, Jennie Bellow, would bring her homemade bread to Batavia every Sunday. We all enjoyed her bread and took it for granted. On one of my Sunday sleepovers in Le Roy, I watched my grandma get out all sorts of things to make her white bread. Flour, yeast, and Crisco were some of her ingredients. She also took out a flat piece of wood, a towel, and five bread pans. I asked why she was getting everything out the night before, and she said I would find out the following day. 

Jennie Bellow
Jennie Bellow

Early the next morning, I watched her make her bread. I had no idea it would take all day. First, we would measure the flour, put the yeast in warm milk, and add one scant wooden spoonful of Crisco. We would mix the ingredients by hand, which is called kneading. The towel was to cover the dough, hoping it would rise. Finally, the bread was ready for the pans. The result was beautiful but so time-consuming. My grandmother was born in 1900, and making bread was a way of life for women in the 1900s as it was in the 1800s.

One of the first things Joseph Ellicott did as a local agent of the Holland Land Company was to have mills, both grist and saw, built in Batavia to encourage settlement. Before the erection of the gristmill in Batavia in 1804, the people sometimes did not have bread or anything to make it from. Flour was brought on packhorses before the roads were of such a character as to allow better transportation. The Tonawanda Creek dam was used to power a sawmill and, a little later, a gristmill.

Both corn and wheat grain had to be ground for bread and other foods. The grindstones at the gristmill reduced corn to meal and wheat grain to flour. “Rye and Indian,” made from cornmeal and rye flour, was the only bread the early settlers could make. Grinding the grain into flour for the pioneers meant a journey to the gristmill by ox sled in both summer and winter.

I wonder if the giant stone doughnuts that stood on East Main Street near the corner of Ross Street could have been gristmill stones. Many years ago, they were at the entrance of a burned house. I can remember them always being there; after the fire, they disappeared.

In the Holland Land Office Museum, there is a colonial kitchen. You can imagine our early settlers cooking in the kitchen using a fireplace. Upon request, you can view a reflector oven. This was one way the early settlers made bread. A reflector oven is a box usually made of tin designed to enclose an article of food on all but one side to cause it to bake by capturing radiant heat from an open fire and reflecting the heat toward the food. The next time you buy freshly baked bread at your local supermarket, think of the time it took to make bread from “scratch!”

I treasure the memories of cooking and baking with my grandmother. I know how to make her bread from scratch, but it is not the same not having my grandmother next to me in her cobbler apron showing me how to knead the bread.

]]>
Column: Memories of Making Bread <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="bread oven hlom" class="image-style-large" height="600" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/img_2329hlom-bread-oven.jpg?itok=kUQKGdBu" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Photo courtesy the Holland Land Office Museum.</em></figcaption> </figure> <p class="text-align-justify"><span>Today, making bread is easy. You buy a loaf of frozen bread, defrost it, and bake it. In 1996, there was a machine called the Bread Machine. You would put all the ingredients into the machine and turn it on. It would mix the ingredients, time the bread to</span></p>
Byron-Bergen, Elba and O-A team up to ‘stick it’ to T1 Diabetes https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/byron-bergen-elba-and-o-a-team-up-to-stick-it-to-t1-diabetes/639103
jdrf-team-stick-it.jpg
Submitted photo of Team “Stick It” (Front left-right) Oakfield-Alabama Teacher Jen Prichett, Byron-Bergen Athletics Secretary and Oakfield-Alabama parent Mary Hughes, Byron-Bergen Director of Instructional Services Betsy Brown 
(Back left-right) Byron-Bergen High School Counselor Kristie Holler, Oakfield-Alabama SRO Jordan Alejandro, Elba parent Jimmy Diehl, Byron-Bergen SRO Josh Brabon.

Press Release:

The Byron-Bergen, Elba, and Oakfield-Alabama learning communities are teaming up to “stick it to type one diabetes”. All three districts have students and staff affected by Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and are working together to make a big impact at the largest T1D event in the world.

On Sunday, May 19, the three communities will come together at Sea Breeze Park for the annual JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) One Walk. The global initiative raises millions of dollars for T1D treatments and cures but, for this team, it’s personal. 

“Oakfield-Alabama is proud to partner with our neighboring school districts and community members to support this cause,” said Oakfield-Alabama Superintendent John Fisgus. “So many people are affected by Type 1 Diabetes, and it is so important to raise awareness and join forces in these events.”

“I have two daughters, Sophia and Mckenna, with Type 1 Diabetes and I’m so grateful for the support from their Oakfield-Alabama school community,” said ‘Stick It’ team captain Mary Hughes, herself a staff member at Byron-Bergen. “I’m also amazed by how the Byron-Bergen community rallied to support me and my family when my second daughter was diagnosed last December.”

The same month that Hughes’ second daughter received her T1D diagnosis, Michael, a kindergarten student at Elba was also diagnosed. 

"The Elba community has been amazing during Michael's new diagnosis and has allowed his friends in school to learn about Type 1 Diabetes,” said Michael’s mother, Ashley Diehl. “Mary and I have been friends for years and now our children are in this together. We've joined forces to bring awareness to Type 1 Diabetes so others can look out for signs of diabetes in people who are undiagnosed and so our friends and family can help us work toward a cure.” 

“Elba Central School is pleased to participate in the walk to raise funds for JDRF,” said Elba Central School District Gretchen Rosales. “One of the cornerstones of Elba Central is to come together for our school family; when one of our Lancers is in need, we are all ready to help. Similarly, the Byron-Bergen and Oakfield-Alabama school districts operate with a shared mission - our school families support each other. I am pleased to join with Mr. McGee and Mr. Fisgus and the three-school community to fight for the collective future of all families in need. We are proud to be united in this effort.”

Each year the JDRF One Walk brings over 900,000 participants together worldwide, but team “Stick It” isn’t stopping there. Members of Team “Stick It” are heading to the Buffalo Marathon on May 26. Michael’s father, Jimmy Diehl, and Byron-Bergen Director of Instructional Services Betsy Brown will both run the half marathon. Oakfield-Alabama SRO Jordan Alejandro, Byron-Bergen SRO Josh Brabon, Byron-Bergen Athletics Secretary Mary Hughes, Byron-Bergen High School Counselor Kristie Holler, and Oakfield-Alabama Teacher Jen Prichett will run the full marathon to raise awareness for T1D.

“Byron-Bergen is all about taking action to support our community,” said Byron-Bergen Superintendent Pat McGee. “I’m proud to see the Bees hit the pavement with our friends and neighbors to raise awareness and support for our community members living with Type 1 Diabetes.”

“Our team’s goal is to educate our friends and family about Type 1 Diabetes and the research that is needed to find a cure for our kiddos and people everywhere,” said Hughes. 

For more information about these events or Team “Stick It”, visit the JDRF “Stick It” team page

]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/byron-bergen-elba-and-o-a-team-up-to-stick-it-to-t1-diabetes/639103#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/byron-bergen-elba-and-o-a-team-up-to-stick-it-to-t1-diabetes/639103 Apr 22, 2024, 7:30am The Batavian - Local Matters
jdrf-team-stick-it.jpg
Submitted photo of Team “Stick It” (Front left-right) Oakfield-Alabama Teacher Jen Prichett, Byron-Bergen Athletics Secretary and Oakfield-Alabama parent Mary Hughes, Byron-Bergen Director of Instructional Services Betsy Brown 
(Back left-right) Byron-Bergen High School Counselor Kristie Holler, Oakfield-Alabama SRO Jordan Alejandro, Elba parent Jimmy Diehl, Byron-Bergen SRO Josh Brabon.

Press Release:

The Byron-Bergen, Elba, and Oakfield-Alabama learning communities are teaming up to “stick it to type one diabetes”. All three districts have students and staff affected by Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and are working together to make a big impact at the largest T1D event in the world.

On Sunday, May 19, the three communities will come together at Sea Breeze Park for the annual JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) One Walk. The global initiative raises millions of dollars for T1D treatments and cures but, for this team, it’s personal. 

“Oakfield-Alabama is proud to partner with our neighboring school districts and community members to support this cause,” said Oakfield-Alabama Superintendent John Fisgus. “So many people are affected by Type 1 Diabetes, and it is so important to raise awareness and join forces in these events.”

“I have two daughters, Sophia and Mckenna, with Type 1 Diabetes and I’m so grateful for the support from their Oakfield-Alabama school community,” said ‘Stick It’ team captain Mary Hughes, herself a staff member at Byron-Bergen. “I’m also amazed by how the Byron-Bergen community rallied to support me and my family when my second daughter was diagnosed last December.”

The same month that Hughes’ second daughter received her T1D diagnosis, Michael, a kindergarten student at Elba was also diagnosed. 

"The Elba community has been amazing during Michael's new diagnosis and has allowed his friends in school to learn about Type 1 Diabetes,” said Michael’s mother, Ashley Diehl. “Mary and I have been friends for years and now our children are in this together. We've joined forces to bring awareness to Type 1 Diabetes so others can look out for signs of diabetes in people who are undiagnosed and so our friends and family can help us work toward a cure.” 

“Elba Central School is pleased to participate in the walk to raise funds for JDRF,” said Elba Central School District Gretchen Rosales. “One of the cornerstones of Elba Central is to come together for our school family; when one of our Lancers is in need, we are all ready to help. Similarly, the Byron-Bergen and Oakfield-Alabama school districts operate with a shared mission - our school families support each other. I am pleased to join with Mr. McGee and Mr. Fisgus and the three-school community to fight for the collective future of all families in need. We are proud to be united in this effort.”

Each year the JDRF One Walk brings over 900,000 participants together worldwide, but team “Stick It” isn’t stopping there. Members of Team “Stick It” are heading to the Buffalo Marathon on May 26. Michael’s father, Jimmy Diehl, and Byron-Bergen Director of Instructional Services Betsy Brown will both run the half marathon. Oakfield-Alabama SRO Jordan Alejandro, Byron-Bergen SRO Josh Brabon, Byron-Bergen Athletics Secretary Mary Hughes, Byron-Bergen High School Counselor Kristie Holler, and Oakfield-Alabama Teacher Jen Prichett will run the full marathon to raise awareness for T1D.

“Byron-Bergen is all about taking action to support our community,” said Byron-Bergen Superintendent Pat McGee. “I’m proud to see the Bees hit the pavement with our friends and neighbors to raise awareness and support for our community members living with Type 1 Diabetes.”

“Our team’s goal is to educate our friends and family about Type 1 Diabetes and the research that is needed to find a cure for our kiddos and people everywhere,” said Hughes. 

For more information about these events or Team “Stick It”, visit the JDRF “Stick It” team page

]]>
Byron-Bergen, Elba and O-A team up to ‘stick it’ to T1 Diabetes <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="jdrf-team-stick-it.jpg" class="image-style-large" height="572" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/jdrf-team-stick-it.jpg?itok=-o4KR-Ky" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption>Submitted photo of Team “Stick It” (Front left-right) Oakfield-Alabama Teacher Jen Prichett, Byron-Bergen Athletics Secretary and Oakfield-Alabama parent Mary Hughes, Byron-Bergen Director of Instructional Services Betsy Brown&nbsp;<br>(Back left-right) Byron-Bergen High School Counselor Kristie Holler, Oakfield-Alabama SRO Jordan Alejandro, Elba parent Jimmy Diehl, Byron-Bergen SRO Josh Brabon.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Press Release:</p><blockquote><p>The Byron-Bergen, Elba, and Oakfield-Alabama learning communities are teaming up to “stick it to type one diabetes”. All three districts have students and staff affected by Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and are working together to make a big impact at the largest T1D event in the world</p></blockquote>
Today's local deals: Jagged Edges Salon, Angry Charlie's, Fortune's, and more https://www.thebatavian.com/kar9104273653/todays-local-deals-jagged-edges-salon-angry-charlies-fortunes-and-more/639113 NOTE: Members of Early Access Pass get first crack (four hours earlier access than non-members) at making Deals of the Day purchases. Join Early Access Pass today to ensure you don't miss any valuable deals.

Today's Deals:

  • Jagged Edges Salon
  • Angry Charlie's Smokehouse BBQ
  • Fortune's Restaurant at Batavia Downs
  • Livia Beauty and Spa
  • Eden Cafe and Bakeshop
  • Batavia's Original
]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/kar9104273653/todays-local-deals-jagged-edges-salon-angry-charlies-fortunes-and-more/639113#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/kar9104273653/todays-local-deals-jagged-edges-salon-angry-charlies-fortunes-and-more/639113 Apr 22, 2024, 7:03am The Batavian - Local Matters NOTE: Members of Early Access Pass get first crack (four hours earlier access than non-members) at making Deals of the Day purchases. Join Early Access Pass today to ensure you don't miss any valuable deals.

Today's Deals:

  • Jagged Edges Salon
  • Angry Charlie's Smokehouse BBQ
  • Fortune's Restaurant at Batavia Downs
  • Livia Beauty and Spa
  • Eden Cafe and Bakeshop
  • Batavia's Original
]]>
Today's local deals: Jagged Edges Salon, Angry Charlie's, Fortune's, and more <p><em><strong>NOTE: Members of Early Access Pass get first crack (four hours earlier access than non-members) at making Deals of the Day purchases. Join </strong></em><a href="https://my.thebatavian.com/"><em><strong>Early Access Pass today</strong></em></a><em><strong> to ensure you don't miss any valuable deals.</strong></em></p> <p> Today's Deals: </p> <ul> <li> Jagged Edges Salon </li> <li> Angry Charlie's Smokehouse BBQ </li> <li> Fortune's Restaurant at Batavia Downs </li> <li> Livia Beauty and Spa </li> <li> Eden Cafe and Bakeshop </li> <li> Batavia's Original </li> </ul>
Former Batavia resident Terry Anderson, journalist taken hostage by terrorists in 1985 dies at age 76 https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/former-batavia-resident-terry-anderson-journalist-taken-hostage-by-terrorists-in-1985
terry anderson and jim owen
Terry Anderson, right, autographs a book for the late James Owen at an event at Batavia Downs commemorating the opening of the International Peace Garden in Batavia in February 2011.
File photo by Howard Owens.

Terry Anderson, a journalist and a Batavia High School graduate who gained international attention after being taken hostage by an Iranian-backed terrorist group, has died in Greenwood Lake, in the Hudson Valley.

He was 76 years old.

Anderson was the Beirut bureau chief in 1985 for the Associated Press when he was kidnapped by armed men who dragged him from his car after he dropped off a tennis partner following a match. The pistol-wielding men yanked him from his car and pushed him into a Mercedes-Benz.

The terrorists were reportedly members of Hezbollah, an Islamic Jihad Organization in Lebanon. He was reportedly blindfolded and beaten and kept in chains and moved to 20 different hideaways in Beirut, South Lebanon, and the Bekaa Valley.

His release came 2,454 days later following intense lobbying by his sister, Peggy Say.

Anderson and Say were born in Lorain, Ohio, where their father, Glen, was a village police officer. While still children, their parents moved to Batavia, where their father worked as a truck driver and their mother, Lily, was a waitress.

After Anderson was kidnapped, Say didn't feel the case was getting enough attention from the U.S. government and the United States. She launched a national campaign to raise the awareness of people to the plight of her brother and other hostages held by Hezbollah.

Say, who had returned to Batavia after relocating for a time, enlisted fellow journalists, humanitarian groups, world figures, and U.S. citizens in the cause, which led to the nation being festooned with yellow ribbons. 

She also received assistance from many fellow Batavia residents, such as Anne Zickl, who died in 2014.

Say died in 2015 at age 74.

Terry Anderson's daughter Sulome told the New York Times that Anderson died following complications from a recent heart surgery.

Anderson's last public appearance in Batavia was in February 2011 to dedicate the International Peace Garden.

]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/former-batavia-resident-terry-anderson-journalist-taken-hostage-by-terrorists-in-1985#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/former-batavia-resident-terry-anderson-journalist-taken-hostage-by-terrorists-in-1985 Apr 21, 2024, 9:45pm The Batavian - Local Matters
terry anderson and jim owen
Terry Anderson, right, autographs a book for the late James Owen at an event at Batavia Downs commemorating the opening of the International Peace Garden in Batavia in February 2011.
File photo by Howard Owens.

Terry Anderson, a journalist and a Batavia High School graduate who gained international attention after being taken hostage by an Iranian-backed terrorist group, has died in Greenwood Lake, in the Hudson Valley.

He was 76 years old.

Anderson was the Beirut bureau chief in 1985 for the Associated Press when he was kidnapped by armed men who dragged him from his car after he dropped off a tennis partner following a match. The pistol-wielding men yanked him from his car and pushed him into a Mercedes-Benz.

The terrorists were reportedly members of Hezbollah, an Islamic Jihad Organization in Lebanon. He was reportedly blindfolded and beaten and kept in chains and moved to 20 different hideaways in Beirut, South Lebanon, and the Bekaa Valley.

His release came 2,454 days later following intense lobbying by his sister, Peggy Say.

Anderson and Say were born in Lorain, Ohio, where their father, Glen, was a village police officer. While still children, their parents moved to Batavia, where their father worked as a truck driver and their mother, Lily, was a waitress.

After Anderson was kidnapped, Say didn't feel the case was getting enough attention from the U.S. government and the United States. She launched a national campaign to raise the awareness of people to the plight of her brother and other hostages held by Hezbollah.

Say, who had returned to Batavia after relocating for a time, enlisted fellow journalists, humanitarian groups, world figures, and U.S. citizens in the cause, which led to the nation being festooned with yellow ribbons. 

She also received assistance from many fellow Batavia residents, such as Anne Zickl, who died in 2014.

Say died in 2015 at age 74.

Terry Anderson's daughter Sulome told the New York Times that Anderson died following complications from a recent heart surgery.

Anderson's last public appearance in Batavia was in February 2011 to dedicate the International Peace Garden.

]]>
Former Batavia resident Terry Anderson, journalist taken hostage by terrorists in 1985 dies at age 76 <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="terry anderson and jim owen" class="image-style-large" height="531" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/terry-anderson-and-jim-owen.jpg?itok=LluNEnLh" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Terry Anderson, right, autographs a book for the late James Owen at an event at Batavia Downs commemorating the opening of the International Peace Garden in Batavia in February 2011.</em><br><em>File photo by Howard Owens.</em></figcaption> </figure> <p>Terry Anderson, a journalist and a Batavia High School graduate who gained international attention after being taken hostage by an Iranian-backed terrorist group, has died in Greenwood Lake, in the Hudson Valley.</p><p>He was 76 years old.</p><p>Anderson was the Beirut bureau chief in 1985 for the Associated Press</p>
State budget includes tax credit that addresses crisis in local news https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/state-budget-includes-tax-credit-that-addresses-crisis-in-local-news/639108 Press release:

Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature unveiled the final state budget Saturday, including a payroll tax credit for local news outlets, modeled on the Local Journalism Sustainability Act, in the sweeping package. With the passage of this bill, New York is now the first state in the nation to incentivize hiring and retaining local journalists. This game changer for the local news industry comes just months after the launch of the Empire State Local News Coalition, an unprecedented, grassroots campaign powered by more than 200 community newspapers across the state.

Senator Brad Hoylman-Sigal, the Senate bill sponsor, said: “I’m elated that our first-in-the-nation Local Journalism Sustainability Act is passing in the state budget. A thriving local news industry is vital to the health of our democracy and it’s our responsibility to help ensure New Yorkers have access to independent and community-focused journalism. Thank you to Senate Majority Leader Stewart-Cousins, Governor Hochul, our Assembly Sponsor Woerner and the over 200 local publications of the Empire State Local News Coalition who helped pass our bill. Our efforts will help ensure that our democracy will not die in darkness.”

"Without local news coverage in our community, there would be a lot that our local governments do that voters would never know about nor have any way to realistically question; there would be no accountability," said Howard Owens, publisher of The Batavian.  "We created Early Access Pass to give the community an opportunity to support local journalism and help us hire more reporters. This tax credit will help those dollars, along with our vital sponsor support, go further, and should open the door for us to hire more reporters, which is the legislation's primary purpose. We're hopeful this legislation will help ensure Genesee County continues to get the local news coverage it needs and deserves.

"I also want to thank our local representatives, Assemblyman Steve Hawley and Sen. George Borrello, for their support of this critical piece of legislation," Owens added. "They both recognize the importance of local news coverage to our community and understand the crisis state the local news industry is in."

The program--$30 million per year for three years--allows each eligible newspaper and broadcast business to receive a 50% refundable tax credit against the first $50,000 of an employee's salary, up to a total of $300,000 per business. $4 million will be allocated to incentivize print and broadcast businesses to hire new journalists. The remaining $26 million will be split evenly between businesses with fewer than 100 employees and those with more than 100 employees, ensuring that hyperlocal, independent news organizations can access these funds. 

After stalling for years, the Local Journalism Sustainability Act catapulted into a top legislative priority this session following the early-2024 founding of the Empire State Local News Coalition and the coalition’s mobilization of support from hundreds of New York hometown papers as well as a broad range stakeholders from around the country, including the Rebuild Local News Coalition, Microsoft, and El Diario. Organized labor, including NYS AFL-CIO, CWA District 1, and national and local news guilds, also played a critical role in mobilizing support for this historic bill. 

"The Empire State Local News Coalition is thrilled by the state budget’s inclusion of a payroll tax credit for local news outlets modeled on the Local Journalism Sustainability Act. New York is now the first state in the nation to incentivize hiring and retaining local journalists–a critical investment given that hundreds of New York’s newspapers have closed since 2004, leaving too many New York communities without access to vital local information. The objectivity of this credit shows that there is a fair way for public policy to support local news without jeopardizing journalistic integrity. This program is a model for other states across the U.S. to follow as communities across the country raise their voices to save local news,” said Zachary Richner, founder of the Empire State Local News Coalition.

“We’re incredibly proud of the 200 newspapers in our coalition, which built an unprecedented grassroots movement in support of saving New York’s local news industry in a few short months. We’re especially grateful to Senator Brad Hoylman-Sigal, whose tireless advocacy for this tax credit was instrumental in moving it through the legislative process. The coalition thanks Governor Hochul, Majority Leader Stewart-Cousins, Speaker Heastie, Assembly Sponsor Carrie Woerner, and the entire legislature for supporting this industry-saving policy, and we look forward to continuing our advocacy for local news in the years to come," Richner continued. “Other states and stakeholders interested in replicating this playbook and hearing about lessons learned should reach out to us at info@savenylocalnews.com.”

Since launching in February, the coalition has quickly mobilized stakeholders across the state to rally behind the bill. In addition to rallying with grassroots advocates in Westchester and Albany, members led petition drives, letter-writing campaigns, editorials, and advertisements, sounding the alarm on the decline of local journalism.   

New York’s leadership on this issue could change the course of local journalism in the U.S. The budget’s inclusion of this tax credit comes at a watershed moment for the journalism industry: New York State has experienced hundreds of newspaper closures in the past few decades. 

]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/state-budget-includes-tax-credit-that-addresses-crisis-in-local-news/639108#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/state-budget-includes-tax-credit-that-addresses-crisis-in-local-news/639108 Apr 21, 2024, 6:45pm The Batavian - Local Matters Press release:

Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature unveiled the final state budget Saturday, including a payroll tax credit for local news outlets, modeled on the Local Journalism Sustainability Act, in the sweeping package. With the passage of this bill, New York is now the first state in the nation to incentivize hiring and retaining local journalists. This game changer for the local news industry comes just months after the launch of the Empire State Local News Coalition, an unprecedented, grassroots campaign powered by more than 200 community newspapers across the state.

Senator Brad Hoylman-Sigal, the Senate bill sponsor, said: “I’m elated that our first-in-the-nation Local Journalism Sustainability Act is passing in the state budget. A thriving local news industry is vital to the health of our democracy and it’s our responsibility to help ensure New Yorkers have access to independent and community-focused journalism. Thank you to Senate Majority Leader Stewart-Cousins, Governor Hochul, our Assembly Sponsor Woerner and the over 200 local publications of the Empire State Local News Coalition who helped pass our bill. Our efforts will help ensure that our democracy will not die in darkness.”

"Without local news coverage in our community, there would be a lot that our local governments do that voters would never know about nor have any way to realistically question; there would be no accountability," said Howard Owens, publisher of The Batavian.  "We created Early Access Pass to give the community an opportunity to support local journalism and help us hire more reporters. This tax credit will help those dollars, along with our vital sponsor support, go further, and should open the door for us to hire more reporters, which is the legislation's primary purpose. We're hopeful this legislation will help ensure Genesee County continues to get the local news coverage it needs and deserves.

"I also want to thank our local representatives, Assemblyman Steve Hawley and Sen. George Borrello, for their support of this critical piece of legislation," Owens added. "They both recognize the importance of local news coverage to our community and understand the crisis state the local news industry is in."

The program--$30 million per year for three years--allows each eligible newspaper and broadcast business to receive a 50% refundable tax credit against the first $50,000 of an employee's salary, up to a total of $300,000 per business. $4 million will be allocated to incentivize print and broadcast businesses to hire new journalists. The remaining $26 million will be split evenly between businesses with fewer than 100 employees and those with more than 100 employees, ensuring that hyperlocal, independent news organizations can access these funds. 

After stalling for years, the Local Journalism Sustainability Act catapulted into a top legislative priority this session following the early-2024 founding of the Empire State Local News Coalition and the coalition’s mobilization of support from hundreds of New York hometown papers as well as a broad range stakeholders from around the country, including the Rebuild Local News Coalition, Microsoft, and El Diario. Organized labor, including NYS AFL-CIO, CWA District 1, and national and local news guilds, also played a critical role in mobilizing support for this historic bill. 

"The Empire State Local News Coalition is thrilled by the state budget’s inclusion of a payroll tax credit for local news outlets modeled on the Local Journalism Sustainability Act. New York is now the first state in the nation to incentivize hiring and retaining local journalists–a critical investment given that hundreds of New York’s newspapers have closed since 2004, leaving too many New York communities without access to vital local information. The objectivity of this credit shows that there is a fair way for public policy to support local news without jeopardizing journalistic integrity. This program is a model for other states across the U.S. to follow as communities across the country raise their voices to save local news,” said Zachary Richner, founder of the Empire State Local News Coalition.

“We’re incredibly proud of the 200 newspapers in our coalition, which built an unprecedented grassroots movement in support of saving New York’s local news industry in a few short months. We’re especially grateful to Senator Brad Hoylman-Sigal, whose tireless advocacy for this tax credit was instrumental in moving it through the legislative process. The coalition thanks Governor Hochul, Majority Leader Stewart-Cousins, Speaker Heastie, Assembly Sponsor Carrie Woerner, and the entire legislature for supporting this industry-saving policy, and we look forward to continuing our advocacy for local news in the years to come," Richner continued. “Other states and stakeholders interested in replicating this playbook and hearing about lessons learned should reach out to us at info@savenylocalnews.com.”

Since launching in February, the coalition has quickly mobilized stakeholders across the state to rally behind the bill. In addition to rallying with grassroots advocates in Westchester and Albany, members led petition drives, letter-writing campaigns, editorials, and advertisements, sounding the alarm on the decline of local journalism.   

New York’s leadership on this issue could change the course of local journalism in the U.S. The budget’s inclusion of this tax credit comes at a watershed moment for the journalism industry: New York State has experienced hundreds of newspaper closures in the past few decades. 

]]>
State budget includes tax credit that addresses crisis in local news <p>Press release:</p><blockquote><p dir="ltr">Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature unveiled the final state budget Saturday, including a payroll tax credit for local news outlets, modeled on the Local Journalism Sustainability Act, in the sweeping package. With the passage of this bill, New York is now the first state</p></blockquote>
Lockport woman charged with murder in case of body found in Alabama https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/lockport-woman-charged-with-murder-in-case-of-body-found-in-alabama/639111
henry mugshot
Kathryn Henry

A 33-year-old Lockport woman has been charged with murder by the Genesee County Sheriff's Office for allegedly causing the death of Michael Poole and then attempting to conceal Poole's body in a remote area of the town of Alabama. 

Kathryn A. "Kat" Henry is charged with murder in the second degree, a Class A-1 felony, which carries a potential sentence of 15 years to 25 years in state prison. 

The body of the 59-year-old Poole, from Olcott, was found in Alabama on March 19 during an investigation into a report of a missing person from Niagara County.

Henry is accused of conspiring with another person in the death of Poole. The other suspect is not yet named and has not yet been arrested, but charges are expected. The Sheriff's Office said there is no concern for public safety.  The suspect is already in custody on another matter.

Henry is also charged with:

  • Assault in the first degree, a Class B felony
  • Concealment of a human corpse, a Class E felony
  • Hindering prosecution in the first degree, a Class D felony
  • Tampering with physical evidence, a Class E felony
  • Conspiracy in the second degree, a Class B felony
  • Conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony

Henry was arraigned on Friday and ordered held without bail.

]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/lockport-woman-charged-with-murder-in-case-of-body-found-in-alabama/639111#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/lockport-woman-charged-with-murder-in-case-of-body-found-in-alabama/639111 Apr 21, 2024, 3:43pm The Batavian - Local Matters
henry mugshot
Kathryn Henry

A 33-year-old Lockport woman has been charged with murder by the Genesee County Sheriff's Office for allegedly causing the death of Michael Poole and then attempting to conceal Poole's body in a remote area of the town of Alabama. 

Kathryn A. "Kat" Henry is charged with murder in the second degree, a Class A-1 felony, which carries a potential sentence of 15 years to 25 years in state prison. 

The body of the 59-year-old Poole, from Olcott, was found in Alabama on March 19 during an investigation into a report of a missing person from Niagara County.

Henry is accused of conspiring with another person in the death of Poole. The other suspect is not yet named and has not yet been arrested, but charges are expected. The Sheriff's Office said there is no concern for public safety.  The suspect is already in custody on another matter.

Henry is also charged with:

  • Assault in the first degree, a Class B felony
  • Concealment of a human corpse, a Class E felony
  • Hindering prosecution in the first degree, a Class D felony
  • Tampering with physical evidence, a Class E felony
  • Conspiracy in the second degree, a Class B felony
  • Conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony

Henry was arraigned on Friday and ordered held without bail.

]]>
Lockport woman charged with murder in case of body found in Alabama <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div align-right"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="henry mugshot" class="image-style-large" height="280" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/henry-mug.jpg?itok=cV89iZHr" width="200"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Kathryn Henry</em></figcaption> </figure> <p>A 33-year-old Lockport woman has been charged with murder by the Genesee County Sheriff's Office for allegedly causing the death of Michael Poole and then attempting to conceal Poole's body in a remote area of the town of Alabama.&nbsp;</p><p>Kathryn A. "Kat" Henry is charged with murder in the</p>
Senior Carley Shepard drives in 5 to lead Alexander past Alden 16-13 in 9 innings on Saturday. https://www.thebatavian.com/staff/senior-carley-shepard-drives-in-5-to-lead-alexander-past-alden-16-13-in-9-innings-on-saturday
alexaner girls softball
Submitted photo

Carley Shepard drove in five runs on three hits to lead Alexander past Alden 16-13 on Saturday at Alden.  

Shepard’s biggest hit was a bases-clearing double to the left field gap in the fourth inning. 

The rest of Alexander's offense was also strong, as the team landed 22 hits on the day.   

Madison Boyce, Melanie Bump and Faith Goodenbury had three hits each during the contest.  Meanwhile, Emily Pietrzykowski, Melissa Sawyer, Claudia Ripstein and Lillian Szymkowiak notched two hits each on the day.

On the bump for Alexander, Emily Pietrzykowski pitched five solid innings, only allowing one earned run and striking out two Bulldogs. Madison Boyce earned the win as she hurled four two-hit innings while striking out 6 Bulldogs.

"We needed this one," said Coach John Goodenbury. "We knew that we haven’t been playing our best ball lately.  We needed to put our feet down and turn things around. They did just that today, and I am proud of these girls.  It was a very cold day as it was snowing off and on throughout the game, and we were missing our starting third baseman, but our girls battled through it and beat a very good and well-coached team on their home field.  Our team had at least one hit today, which was nice to see.  It felt like the ball had been going straight to fielders for putouts in our last three games, but not today.  We are looking forward to our showdown with Oakfield on Monday."

Stats:

  • Carley Shepard: 3-for-5, 5 RBIs, 1 Run, Double, SB
  • Madison Boyce: 3-for-5, 2 RBIs, SB
  • Faith Goodenbury: 3-for-4, 2 Runs, RBI, SB
  • Melanie Bump: 3-for-5, 3 Runs, Double, SB
  • Emily Pietrzykowski: 2-for-4, 3 Runs, 2 BB, 4 SB
  • Claudia Ripstein; 2-for-6, 1 Run, 2 RBIs
  • Melissa Sawyer: 2-for-5, 2 Runs, 2 RBIs, Double, 2 SB
  • Lillian Szymkowiak: 2-for-5, 1 Run

Pitching:

  • Emily Pietrzykowski: 5 IP, 6 hits, 1 Earned  Runs, 4 BB, 2 Ks
  • Madison Boyce: (W) 4 IP, 2 hits, 3 Earned Runs, 3 BB, 6 Ks
alexander softball
Submitted photo
alexander softball
Submitted photo
alexander softball
Submitted photo
alexander softball
Submitted photo
]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/staff/senior-carley-shepard-drives-in-5-to-lead-alexander-past-alden-16-13-in-9-innings-on-saturday#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/staff/senior-carley-shepard-drives-in-5-to-lead-alexander-past-alden-16-13-in-9-innings-on-saturday Apr 21, 2024, 2:42pm The Batavian - Local Matters
alexaner girls softball
Submitted photo

Carley Shepard drove in five runs on three hits to lead Alexander past Alden 16-13 on Saturday at Alden.  

Shepard’s biggest hit was a bases-clearing double to the left field gap in the fourth inning. 

The rest of Alexander's offense was also strong, as the team landed 22 hits on the day.   

Madison Boyce, Melanie Bump and Faith Goodenbury had three hits each during the contest.  Meanwhile, Emily Pietrzykowski, Melissa Sawyer, Claudia Ripstein and Lillian Szymkowiak notched two hits each on the day.

On the bump for Alexander, Emily Pietrzykowski pitched five solid innings, only allowing one earned run and striking out two Bulldogs. Madison Boyce earned the win as she hurled four two-hit innings while striking out 6 Bulldogs.

"We needed this one," said Coach John Goodenbury. "We knew that we haven’t been playing our best ball lately.  We needed to put our feet down and turn things around. They did just that today, and I am proud of these girls.  It was a very cold day as it was snowing off and on throughout the game, and we were missing our starting third baseman, but our girls battled through it and beat a very good and well-coached team on their home field.  Our team had at least one hit today, which was nice to see.  It felt like the ball had been going straight to fielders for putouts in our last three games, but not today.  We are looking forward to our showdown with Oakfield on Monday."

Stats:

  • Carley Shepard: 3-for-5, 5 RBIs, 1 Run, Double, SB
  • Madison Boyce: 3-for-5, 2 RBIs, SB
  • Faith Goodenbury: 3-for-4, 2 Runs, RBI, SB
  • Melanie Bump: 3-for-5, 3 Runs, Double, SB
  • Emily Pietrzykowski: 2-for-4, 3 Runs, 2 BB, 4 SB
  • Claudia Ripstein; 2-for-6, 1 Run, 2 RBIs
  • Melissa Sawyer: 2-for-5, 2 Runs, 2 RBIs, Double, 2 SB
  • Lillian Szymkowiak: 2-for-5, 1 Run

Pitching:

  • Emily Pietrzykowski: 5 IP, 6 hits, 1 Earned  Runs, 4 BB, 2 Ks
  • Madison Boyce: (W) 4 IP, 2 hits, 3 Earned Runs, 3 BB, 6 Ks
alexander softball
Submitted photo
alexander softball
Submitted photo
alexander softball
Submitted photo
alexander softball
Submitted photo
]]>
Senior Carley Shepard drives in 5 to lead Alexander past Alden 16-13 in 9 innings on Saturday. <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="alexaner girls softball" class="image-style-large" height="501" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/image00alexanersoftball3.jpg?itok=omB1TgsF" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Submitted photo</em></figcaption> </figure> <p>Carley Shepard drove in five runs on three hits to lead Alexander past Alden 16-13 on Saturday at Alden.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Shepard’s biggest hit was a bases-clearing double to the left field gap in the fourth inning.&nbsp;</p><p>The rest of Alexander's offense was also strong, as the team landed 22 hits</p>
Notre Dame plates 14 runs against Lyndonville https://www.thebatavian.com/staff/notre-dame-plates-14-runs-against-lyndonville/639107
faletti HR notre dame
Sofia Falleti touched them all in the sixth inning, driving in three runs with a blast over the centerfield fence.
Submitted photo. 

Batavia Norte Dame smacked around 21 hits on Friday afternoon, leading to a 14-5 win over Lyndonville in Girls Softball.

Hannah Tenney and Mia Treleaven each had four hits. Tenney had three RBIs and scored a run. Treleaven had an RBI. Sofia Falleti had a single, double and three-run blast over the center field fence.  Falleti finished with three runs scored and six RBIs.  Gianna Falleti contributed three hits, two RBIs and scored twice.  Loretta Sorochty, Katie Landers and Cayleigh Havens each had two hits, with Landers scoring three runs and Havens scoring once.

On the mound, Loretta Sorochty went the distance, giving up four hits, one earned run and striking out 14 Lyndonville batters.
 
"Loretta kept us in the game once again until our bats came alive in the fifth inning," said Coach Otis Thomas. "Lyndonville is always one of the top teams in the league with a strong defense and good hitters.  I'm proud of how the ladies overcame the slow start and finished strong.  I'm especially happy to see the middle and bottom part of the batting order step up tonight and make significant contributions."  
 
]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/staff/notre-dame-plates-14-runs-against-lyndonville/639107#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/staff/notre-dame-plates-14-runs-against-lyndonville/639107 Apr 21, 2024, 1:37pm The Batavian - Local Matters
faletti HR notre dame
Sofia Falleti touched them all in the sixth inning, driving in three runs with a blast over the centerfield fence.
Submitted photo. 

Batavia Norte Dame smacked around 21 hits on Friday afternoon, leading to a 14-5 win over Lyndonville in Girls Softball.

Hannah Tenney and Mia Treleaven each had four hits. Tenney had three RBIs and scored a run. Treleaven had an RBI. Sofia Falleti had a single, double and three-run blast over the center field fence.  Falleti finished with three runs scored and six RBIs.  Gianna Falleti contributed three hits, two RBIs and scored twice.  Loretta Sorochty, Katie Landers and Cayleigh Havens each had two hits, with Landers scoring three runs and Havens scoring once.

On the mound, Loretta Sorochty went the distance, giving up four hits, one earned run and striking out 14 Lyndonville batters.
 
"Loretta kept us in the game once again until our bats came alive in the fifth inning," said Coach Otis Thomas. "Lyndonville is always one of the top teams in the league with a strong defense and good hitters.  I'm proud of how the ladies overcame the slow start and finished strong.  I'm especially happy to see the middle and bottom part of the batting order step up tonight and make significant contributions."  
 
]]>
Notre Dame plates 14 runs against Lyndonville <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="faletti HR notre dame" class="image-style-large" height="491" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/s-faletti-hr.jpg?itok=5JEpmrtK" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Sofia Falleti touched them all in the sixth inning, driving in three runs with a blast over the centerfield fence.</em><br><em>Submitted photo.&nbsp;</em></figcaption> </figure> <p>Batavia Norte Dame smacked around 21 hits on Friday afternoon, leading to a 14-5 win over Lyndonville in Girls Softball.</p><p>Hannah Tenney and Mia Treleaven each had four hits. Tenney had three RBIs and scored a run. Treleaven had an RBI. Sofia Falleti had a single, double and three-run</p>
Gala at Batavia Downs raises $30,000 for two area horse rescues https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/gala-at-batavia-downs-raises-30000-for-two-area-horse-rescues/639106
batavia downs horse rescue
Photo by Howard Owens

Press release:

Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel has announced that the Fur Ball Gala Fundraiser on Saturday, April 13th, raised $30,000 for Begin Again Horse Rescue in Lima and Whispering River Rescue in Gasport.

Over 90 baskets donated by local companies and individuals were raffled off to the more than 200 persons in attendance.  Hall of Famer Thurman Thomas took pictures with attendees while they enjoyed food and drink.  Attendees danced the night away as they enjoyed music from DJ Jimmy B.

The charities will use the funds from the gala to support their work, which includes caring for horses, donkeys and other farm animals. 

“After the success of last year’s event, we were excited to welcome even more people to our event this year, with our attendance going over 200 people.  We are indebted to local businesses and community members who came together in support of the Fur Ball Gala,” said Jacquelyne Leach, CFO for Western OTB / Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel and Jody Coffta, General Manager of Food & Beverage for Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel. “We want to thank all the volunteers, our staff and the many vendors who donated food and beverages for this event.  This was truly a great team effort.  To all those who contributed baskets for the raffles, please know we could not have done this without you.”

For those interested in getting involved with this year’s local animal organizations, information for each can be found here:

Begin Again Horse Rescue https://www.beginagainrescue.org/

Whispering River Rescue https://www.whisperingriverrescue.com/

 

batavia downs horse rescue
Photo by Howard Owens
]]>
https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/gala-at-batavia-downs-raises-30000-for-two-area-horse-rescues/639106#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/press-release/gala-at-batavia-downs-raises-30000-for-two-area-horse-rescues/639106 Apr 21, 2024, 1:09pm The Batavian - Local Matters
batavia downs horse rescue
Photo by Howard Owens

Press release:

Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel has announced that the Fur Ball Gala Fundraiser on Saturday, April 13th, raised $30,000 for Begin Again Horse Rescue in Lima and Whispering River Rescue in Gasport.

Over 90 baskets donated by local companies and individuals were raffled off to the more than 200 persons in attendance.  Hall of Famer Thurman Thomas took pictures with attendees while they enjoyed food and drink.  Attendees danced the night away as they enjoyed music from DJ Jimmy B.

The charities will use the funds from the gala to support their work, which includes caring for horses, donkeys and other farm animals. 

“After the success of last year’s event, we were excited to welcome even more people to our event this year, with our attendance going over 200 people.  We are indebted to local businesses and community members who came together in support of the Fur Ball Gala,” said Jacquelyne Leach, CFO for Western OTB / Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel and Jody Coffta, General Manager of Food & Beverage for Batavia Downs Gaming & Hotel. “We want to thank all the volunteers, our staff and the many vendors who donated food and beverages for this event.  This was truly a great team effort.  To all those who contributed baskets for the raffles, please know we could not have done this without you.”

For those interested in getting involved with this year’s local animal organizations, information for each can be found here:

Begin Again Horse Rescue https://www.beginagainrescue.org/

Whispering River Rescue https://www.whisperingriverrescue.com/

 

batavia downs horse rescue
Photo by Howard Owens
]]>
Gala at Batavia Downs raises $30,000 for two area horse rescues <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="batavia downs horse rescue" class="image-style-large" height="523" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/img_7355batdowns.jpg?itok=mOtFAfdq" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Photo by Howard Owens</em></figcaption> </figure> <p>Press release:</p><blockquote><p>Batavia Downs Gaming &amp; Hotel has announced that the Fur Ball Gala Fundraiser on Saturday, April 13th, raised $30,000 for Begin Again Horse Rescue in Lima and Whispering River Rescue in Gasport.</p><p>Over 90 baskets donated by local companies and individuals were raffled off to the more</p></blockquote>