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Alzheimer's Association of Western New York

March 24, 2020 - 5:19pm

Press release:

While the COVID-19 pandemic threatens the health of millions in this country and around the world, the novel coronavirus presents unique challenges for more than 400,000 New York State residents living with dementia and their care partners.

Most notably, public health strategies aimed at limiting contact with others is nearly impossible for people living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, who rely on family caregivers and others to live their daily lives.

This reality affects these individuals across all settings, including home, adult day services, residential and assisted living facilities and nursing homes. 

To help family caregivers navigate the quickly changing environment, the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is offering additional guidance to families:

  • Free dementia education programs and support groups via the internet. Learn more at communityresourcefinder.org or call 1.800.272.3900.
  • You also have access to prerecorded educational courses available at any time at training.alz.org.
  • Early Stage Social Engagement programs will be available virtually including: Virtual Tour of the Albright Knox; Virtual Art Gallery tours ; Virtual De-stress and Restore Chair Yoga; Virtual Music Jam Session. To register, please call 716-626-0600, ext. 8997, or email  Maggie at [email protected].
  • Care Consultations will be available in several ways: • 24/7 by Phone: 1-800-272-3900 • Live Chat via our website  www.alz.org/help-support/caregiving • Video Call during business hours at (716) 626-0600, ext. 313, to schedule a time that works for you.

Our website offers some tips and tools for home-based caregivers and for those whose loved one is in a facility. That info can be found at alz.org/COVID19.

December 6, 2019 - 11:31am

Press release:

Visiting with relatives over the holidays may raise questions about the physical and cognitive health of family members.

Although some change in cognitive ability can occur with age, serious memory problems are not a part of normal aging. Recognizing the difference between normal aging and cognitive impairment can help identify when it may be time to see a doctor.  

The Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter expects to see a rise in calls to its 24-hour helpline (800-272-3900) during and after the holiday season when people visit with friends and family whom they may not see as frequently during the year.

“The 10 Warning Signs are a good place to start when trying to decide if you should talk to your doctor about the changes you are noticing in yourself or a loved one,” says Chapter Program Director Rachel Rotach.

There can be other explanations for cognitive impairments, so it is always best to see a physician if any of these 10 warning signs is apparent:

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life: forgetting recently learned information; forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; or relying on memory aids;
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems: changes in the ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers, or trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills;
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks: driving to a familiar location, managing a budget at work or remembering the rules of a favorite game;
  • Confusion with time or place: people with Alzheimer's can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time or forget where they are or how they got there.
  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships: difficulty reading, judging distance and determining color or contrast.
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing: trouble following or joining a conversation or stopping in the middle of a conversation and not being able to continue; repetitive comments; struggles with vocabulary;
  • Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps: putting things in unusual places, such as ice cream in the medicine cabinet or being unable to trace steps to find a misplaced object and accusing someone of taking it;
  • Decreased or poor judgment: changes in judgment or decision-making, especially when dealing with money; inattention to personal care and grooming;
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities: refraining from favorite hobbies, social activities, work projects or sports;
  • Changes in mood and personality: confusion, suspicion, depression, fear, anxiety or irritability may occur without apparent cause. 

The WNY Chapter offers a free "Know the 10 Warning Signs" education program several times every month across the region.

In Genesee County, you can attend this class on Tuesday, Jan. 21 at The Manor House, located at 427 E. Main St. in the City of Batavia. The class begins at 4:30 p.m. but just prior at 4:15 p.m. a free, light meal of soup is available for attendees.

To attend, please register by calling the Alzheimer's Association Western New York Chapter, toll free at 1-800-272-3900 or (716) 626-0600.

*****************

Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias is an important step in getting appropriate treatment, care and support services.

The Alzheimer’s Association website lists resources for those with dementia, their families, and their caregivers (alz.org/WNY) and help is always available via the toll-free Helpline phone number: 800-272-3900. That number is available 24/7 to answer questions and provide information about local resources for those living with dementia and their care partners.

About the Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

About the Western New York Chapter
The local Chapter provides programs, services and other resources for those living with dementia, their care partners, healthcare professionals and others across eight counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming. You can learn more by calling (716) 626-0600 during traditional business hours, or 24/7 at 800-272-3900 or alz.org/WNY.

November 21, 2018 - 12:55pm

Press release:

Holiday visits to older loved ones may raise questions about a person’s physical and cognitive health, especially if it’s been a while since the last visit. Although some change in cognitive ability can occur with age, memory problems that impact daily living are not a part of typical aging.

Recognizing the difference between typical aging and potentially more serious problems can help identify when it may be time to see a doctor.

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter is an excellent resource for those with questions about typical age-related memory lapses and indications of more serious cognitive impairment.

The Chapter offers free educational programs that include a discussion of the 10 Warning Signs:

  • memory loss that disrupts daily life -- forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events;
  • challenges in planning or solving problems, such as trouble following a familiar recipe; 
  • difficulty completing familiar tasks, such as a budget or playing a favorite game;
  • confusion with time or place, including losing track of the seasons;
  • trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships, including trouble reading or recognizing the face in the mirror;
  • new problems with words in speaking or writing, including repetitive conversations;
  • misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps, or accusing others of stealing items they can’t find;
  • decreased or poor judgment, such as giving large amounts of money to telemarketers;
  • withdrawal from work or social activities, or lack of interest in sports;
  • changes in mood and personality that can include confusion, suspicion, depression, fear or anxiety.

Every year around the 2017 Thanksgiving holiday, the Alzheimer’s Association sees increases in calls to its 24-hour Helpline (800.272.3900), as people visit with friends and family they may not see as frequently during the year. That phone line is always staffed by trained experts, who provide confidential consultations around-the-clock, andthis holiday season will be no different.

Those with questions or concerns about memory lapses or behavioral changes in their loved ones will find compassionate people who can answer questions or listen to concerns at any time of the day or night through the long holiday weekend. Information can also be found online at www.alz.org/wny.

Experts from the WNY Chapter are also available to arrange private, in-person consultations via that same toll-free number: 800.272.3900.

About the Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

About the Western New York Chapter
The local Chapter provides programs, services and other resources for those living with dementia, their care partners, healthcare professionals and the public across eight counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming. You can learn more by calling (716) 626.0600 during traditional business hours or 24/7 at 1.800.272.3900 or visiting online at alz.org/WNY

September 18, 2018 - 1:47pm

Press release:

People who really listen to others are gifted with compassion and empathy, and the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York is looking for volunteers willing to share those gifts!

Every month, the Association’s Western New York Chapter oversees close to three dozen support groups for caregivers of individuals with dementia, including four such meetings across Genesee County.

These groups are led by Chapter-trained facilitators who provide a vital service by encouraging caregivers to share their concerns, find support among their peers and hear advice about providing the best care they can from others in a similar situation.

The Chapter is looking to provide free training for volunteers to lead monthly support group meetings in Batavia and Le Roy. If you are interested in sharing your time in a meaningful, rewarding and vital way, please call Marie Baun at the WNY Chapter between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday Through Friday at (716) 626-0600, ext. 8994. She can also be reached via email at [email protected].

About the Alzheimer’s Association WNY

 The Alzheimer’s Association is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization for care, support and research of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The elimination of the disease through advancements in research, providing and enhancing care and support for all impacted, and reducing the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health define  the organization’s mission.

The WNY Chapter is located at 2805 Wehrle Drive, Suite 6, in Williamsville and offers a 24/7 Helpline for services and support at 1.800.272.3900. The Association also offers online resources, including secure sites for caregivers, training for professional care partners and information about local support services at alz.org/WNY.

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