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covid-19

July 27, 2020 - 4:43pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received four new positive cases of COVID-19, for a total of 253 positive cases.
    • The positive individuals reside in Batavia and Le Roy.
    • Two of the positive individuals are in their 30s, one is in their 40s, and one is in their 80s.
    • The positive individuals were not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Five of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Six new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • One of the individuals is hospitalized.
       
  • Orleans County received one new positive case of COVID-19, for a total of 274 positive cases.
    • The positive individual resides in Ridgeway.
    • The positive individual is in their 20s.
    • The positive individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Two of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Sixteen new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • One of the individuals is hospitalized.
July 27, 2020 - 4:28pm

From Genesee Community College:

An outdoor ceremony for graduates of the Antoinette Marchese Clancy School of Nursing at Genesee Community College was held Friday afternoon.

As the next line of first responders, the nurses were honored with a tribute from others on the front line. A Mercy Flight helicopter flew above the campus, tipping its wings at the newly minted nurses. Town of Batavia firefighters on Ladder Truck #22 were there, with lights flashing, siren and horn blaring.

Ingenuity, kindness, tradition and hard work converged to nudge aside the COVID-19 pandemic for just an hour so for the annual Recognition Ceremony, organized this year as a drive-in event in keeping with New York State's social distancing guidelines.

Graduates and their families parked their cars facing the lectern that was set up outside on the berm by the Student Success Center, and all guests could listen to the program on WGCC 90.7FM from their car radios, or watch it remotely through the livestream access.

"It certainly was an evening to remember," said Laurel Sanger, director of the Antoinette Marchese Clancy School of Nursing. "With the help and support of numerous people and departments across GCC's campus and our wonderful community, I think we gave the Class of 2020 a memorable event. It really is a testament to how proud we are of these graduates."

This class of nurses were not officially "pinned," however. Rather they were handed the emblem and certificate representing their accomplishments, and all were wearing masks and standing safe distances apart.

Pinning ceremonies are a time-honored nursing school tradition that signifies official initiation into the brotherhood and sisterhood of nurses. In a typical year, this event happens the same day or weekend of GCC's annual Commencement. But the nursing staff and College administrators decided to plan something special and a little different this year.

Approximately 18 graduates from a total class of 54 were able to attend Friday's event. Another 49 watched the program via livestream.

"For the easiest access of parking lots, late Friday afternoons in the summer are best for the campus community," Sanger said. "Yet we were worried that families would not be able to hear the ceremony from their cars. That's when WGCC stepped in, and then Media Services provided the remote live streaming access.

"And of course, it was wonderful that our Campus Safety team was able to network with local authorities for the parade. We are grateful to all for a special twenty-first century plan of action during a pandemic for this centuries-old tradition."

Pinning ceremonies are rich with symbolism and history and date all the way back to the Crusades of the 12th century. During this time, the Knights of the Order of the Hospital of St. John the Baptist tended to the injured and infirmed Crusaders with new monks vowing to serve sick soldiers in a ceremony where each monk was given a Maltese cross, the first badges given to those who nurse.

In more modern dates, Florence Nightingale was awarded the Red Cross of St. George in recognition for her tireless service to the injured during the Crimean War in the 1850s. To share the honor, she in turn presented a medal of excellence to her brightest graduates. By World War I, the practice of pinning new graduates and also awarding them caps, became a standard practice throughout the United States.

Genesee Community College continues its own tradition of teaching the next class of nurses and welcomes potential new students to sign up for one of the upcoming online Nursing Information Sessions scheduled at the following times:

Non-LPNs Only:

Monday, Aug.10, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Monday, Aug. 17, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Advanced Placement (LPN-RN) Only:

Tuesday, Aug. 18, 9 - 11 a.m.

Wednesday, Sept. 23, 4 - 6 p.m.

To register online go to: https://www.genesee.edu/academics/programs/health/nursing/

Photos courtesy of Genesee Community College.

July 27, 2020 - 12:55pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, covid-19, alexander, 2020-21 fiscal year budget.

From the Town of Alexander Board:

Genesee County has shared sales tax revenue for many years with its towns and villages. Due to increased capital needs to fund building a new jail and the repair and or replacement of large culverts and bridges throughout the County, a new revenue sharing agreement was proposed where the level of funding for towns and villages would be capped at the amount shared in 2018.

The County would use any increase in sales tax to Fund Capital Projects and if there was a decrease in sales tax the decrease would be shared equally by all parties. The County passed a resolution in 2018 and another in 2019 committing the legislature to sharing sales tax revenue at the 2018 level for years 2020 and 2021 so that the towns and villages could incorporate those revenues when creating their budgets.

Once the COVID-19 pandemic started there were projections of decreased sales tax revenue and the County legislature passed a resolution to rescind the previous resolutions, which committed them to sharing sales tax revenue with the towns and villages for years 2020 and 2021. They had already made the first quarter payment for 2020.

At the same time New York State was short on cash so they decided to not fund CHIPS. CHIPS is money that the state and federal governments provide to reimburse municipalities for road repair and building. We do the road work and then submit the bills for reimbursement; 80 percent is funded by the federal government and 20 percent has been in the past been funded by New York State.

What does this mean for the Town of Alexander 2020 budget?

We have a budget of $1,770,000 for 2020. Of that, $519,000 comes from your taxes; $582,000 from sales tax revenue;, $126,000 from CHIPS; $190,000 from services to other governments, which is plowing and mowing state and county roads in our town; $172,000 from other services and $181,000 from Fund Balance.

We anticipate that the CHIPS reimbursement will be down 20 percent (-$25,200). The sales tax revenue will be down $309,000 if no more money is shared by the County. Also other state aid may be reduced.

We had a highway truck ordered to be delivered in 2020 and on advice from our highway superintendent we cancelled the order, which reduced our expenditures by $221,500, but it also reduced our potential revenue by $15,000 as we no longer have a used truck to sell.

We are looking at ways to reduce expenditures to bridge our current budget gap and if necessary will use more Fund Balance to get us through this year.

As you can see the Water District #5 in the southwest corner of the Town is progressing. The funding for this project is through a federal loan and grant which are guaranteed once we commit to the project and are not part of our Town budget.

July 24, 2020 - 5:02pm
posted by Billie Owens in steve hawley, covid-19, chicken wings, news.

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley is calling out his state Assembly colleagues for allowing atrocious bills to be passed in the state Legislature late last night.

Among them is automatic voter registration, which automatically registers New Yorkers to vote whenever they interact with what are determined as "qualified" government agencies like the DMV or Department of Health.

A Step Too Far

“I’m all for ensuring we participate in our democratic society to the fullest; that’s the only way democratic societies can work,” Hawley said. “But what was done last night is simply a step too far.

"Superseding the state constitution and writing far-reaching bills, with few checks and balances to ensure they cannot be taken advantage of leads me to believe this will cripple the voting system more than uplift it. Well intended or otherwise, the Downstate legislators need to realize they’ve just opened up a can of worms that will not yield good results.”

In addition to that, the state Legislature passed a redistricting bill that would amend the state constitution and allow for further redistricting in the state. The move comes in a suspected effort on the part of the majority to draw new districts that would be politically advantageous to them.

Disgraceful Politics

“It’s a gross misstep in the use of authority and Majority power, and will almost certainly mean that many voices are at risk of being unheard in the future,” Hawley said. “There really is nothing more disgraceful in politics than trying to uphold your own power and keep the people in the dark.”

Furthermore, the Assembly Majority continues its grip on its monopoly of power by refusing to remove the governor’s emergency powers that he claimed at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York. With these powers, he’s continued to hamper businesses like bars and prevent them from reopening and supporting the economy.

The Beef About Chicken Wings

He insists that people order food while ordering alcohol but claims that chicken wings are not substantial food for bars. He added that sandwiches were the "lowest level" of substantive food. 

“Chicken wings are a Western New York food, so this feels incredibly personal to me and my constituents,” Hawley said. “We all know the governor’s ‘Big Brother’ method of governance and one-size-fits-all solutions are his modus operandi, but at a time where people are trying to responsibly reopen and follow health codes as they have been instructed, the governor and his administration continue to curtail the attempts of honest workers getting back to a normal routine. It’s despicable.”

July 24, 2020 - 4:13pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received three new positive cases of COVID-19.
    • The positive individuals reside in Batavia, Le Roy and Pembroke.
    • One of the positive individuals is less than 20 and two individuals are in their 50s
    • One of the positive individuals was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Zero of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Six new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
       
  • Orleans County received one new positive case of COVID-19.
    • The positive individual resides in Albion.
    • The positive individual is in their 50s.
    • The positive individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Zero of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Eight new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
July 24, 2020 - 2:14pm

Press release:

ITHACA -- Tompkins Financial Corporation (NYSE American: TMP), parent company of Tompkins Bank of Castile, Tompkins Insurance Agencies, and Tompkins Financial Advisors, today reported record year-to-date and second quarter earnings.

The company also has announced that its Board of Directors approved payment of a regular quarterly cash dividend of $0.52 per share, payable on Aug. 14, to common shareholders of record on Aug. 3, 2020, and has authorized a new stock repurchase program.

Tompkins Financial Corporation reported diluted earnings per share of $1.44 for the second quarter of 2020, up 13.4 percent compared to $1.27 reported in the second quarter of 2019. Net income for the second quarter of 2020 was $21.4 million, compared to $19.4 million reported for the same period in 2019. 

For the year-to-date period ended June 30, 2020, diluted earnings per share were $1.97, down 25.1 percent from the same period in 2019. Year-to-date net income was $29.4 million, down from $40.4 million, for the same period in 2019. Results for the 2020 year-to-date period were negatively impacted by economic stress resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, which contributed to the $16.3 million provision for credit losses recognized during the first quarter of 2020.

"We are pleased to report strong financial results for the quarter despite a very challenging business climate," said Stephen S. Romaine, president & CEO. "Although the longer term impact of the pandemic and related economic conditions are still unknown, there have been several recent positive trends noted with certain national economic indicators, such as reduced levels of unemployment, improving retail sales and improving consumer confidence.

"At Tompkins, we have seen several positive trends as well, with very strong mortgage application volumes in the second quarter, higher levels of debit card spending, and favorable credit quality measures when compared to last quarter. We are encouraged by some of these recent favorable trends, though the recent rise in COVID-19 cases nationally makes it clear that much uncertainty remains. We will remain vigilant in monitoring risk trends as we navigate these challenging times.”  

For full details, you can access the online versions through the links below.

About Tompkins Financial Corporation

Tompkins Financial Corporation is a financial services company serving the Central, Western, and Hudson Valley regions of New York and the Southeastern region of Pennsylvania. Tompkins Financial operates in Western New York as Tompkins Bank of Castile, Tompkins Insurance Agencies, and Tompkins Financial Advisors. Further information is available at www.tompkinsfinancial.com

Tompkins Bank of Castile is a community bank with 16 offices in the five-county Western New York region. Services include complete lines of consumer deposit accounts and loans, business accounts and loans, and leasing. Further information about the bank is available on its website, www.bankofcastile.com.

Tompkins Insurance Agencies Inc., offers personalized service, local decision-making and a broad range of services for consumers and businesses. It is an independent insurance agency offering personal and business insurance and employee benefits services through more than 50 different companies. The firm operates six offices in Central New York, 16 offices in Western New York and seven offices in Southeast Pennsylvania. Further information is available at www.tompkinsins.com

Tompkins Financial Advisors is the wealth management firm of Tompkins Financial Corporation. With more than a century of experience in helping clients to build, protect, and preserve wealth, Tompkins Financial Advisors provides financial planning, investment management, trust services and estate administration. For more information, visit www.tompkinsfinancialadvisors.com.

July 24, 2020 - 1:57pm

Press release:

Small businesses seeking loans to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic will soon have the information they need to make better borrowing decisions, thanks to the NYS Small Business Truth in Lending Act.

“The NYS Small Business Truth in Lending Act will bring common-sense transparency standards to small business financing at a time when it’s needed most,” said Linda MacFarlane, the nonprofit association’s Chair, who serves as the executive director of the Community Loan Fund of the Capital Region Inc.

One of her clients, a certified Minority Business Enterprise, needed cash to add to his inventory, and borrowed money from an online source. He then saw the daily repayment withdrawals from his bank account were much higher than he agreed to — and the debt service nearly closed down his store. Her client was told he must not have read the fine print in the agreement, and learned that overall interest was in the triple digits. The Community Loan Fund stepped in, paid off the loan and gave him a line of credit for new inventory and a small loan for store remodeling. 

“CDFIs are committed to offering loans in a fair, affordable and transparent manner,” MacFarlane said. “Unfortunately, some lenders have made it hard for small businesses to compare the true cost of their offers.CDFI Coalition members around the state are pleased to see that this measure will require lenders to disclose annual percentage rate (APR) and repayment terms.”

“Fair and honest lenders have nothing to fear with regard to transparency and the adoption of standard terms to describe the cost of loans,” said CDFI Coalition Board Member Kim Jacobs, president/CEO of Community Capital New York based in Elmsford. “This is a great opportunity for Governor Cuomo to help protect the small businesses in our state who are already overwhelmed dealing with the impacts of COVID-19 by swiftly signing this measure into law. We applaud NYS Senator Kevin Thomas and Assemblyman  Ken Zebrowski for their leadership on this important issue.”

“The passage of the New York State Small Business Truth in Lending Act (A10118 / S5470) represents a victory for New York’s small business owners,” said Dafina Williams, senior vice president of Public Policy at Opportunity Finance Network (OFN) and Executive Committee member of the Responsible Business Lending Coalition (RBLC).

“Bringing much-needed transparency to commercial lending, this bill equips entrepreneurs with the tools needed to easily compare financing options – allowing them to make the best financial decisions for their businesses. The RBLC thanks Assemblyman Zebrowski and Senator Thomas for their leadership and urges Governor Cuomo to promptly sign New York’s first-ever small business lending transparency bill into law.” 

The NYS Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Coalition represents the institutions that make innovative financing possible, foster financially vibrant and healthy communities, and strengthen all regions of New York State.

July 23, 2020 - 4:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received one new positive case of COVID-19.
    • The positive individual resides in Batavia.
    • The positive individual is in their 20s.
    • The positive individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Three of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Seventeen new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
  • Orleans County received zero new positive cases of COVID-19.
    • Zero of the previous community positive cases has recovered and has been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Eleven new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • Two of the total active positive cases are hospitalized. Please note those in the hospital may be from the community or a state-regulated facility. We do not separate them out to protect their privacy.    
July 22, 2020 - 8:28pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, notify, genesee county legislature, covid-19.

landers_and_gsell.jpg

As L. Matthew “Matt” Landers contemplates taking over as Genesee County manager in about three weeks, he figures that if he displays half the vim and vigor as his predecessor, he’ll do just fine in his new role.

“The energy level that Jay exudes – it’s infectious, it’s important. There’s a lot to be said in having that energy and that great personality and that great style,” Landers said following tonight’s Genesee County Legislature meeting at the Old County Courthouse. “I hope that I can come anywhere close to Jay’s ability to command an audience and liven a room …”

Landers was speaking about the high-octane Jay Gsell, who – when he retires on Aug. 14 – will have served the county in an effective and passionate manner for 27 years.

Legislators, prior to voting unanimously on the resolution to promote Landers from assistant county manager, honored Gsell with a proclamation recognizing his numerous accomplishments and extensive community involvement.

An Elba resident, the 43-year-old Landers said he admires Gsell’s ability to meet people, listen to them and quickly count them as friends.

“Jay’s ability to know everyone’s name – inside and out, third uncle, second twice removed – his ability to communicate in that manner is important,” he said. “To have that connection. He’ll see somebody out in the community and he’ll notice who they are, their name, their connections, their life story – how they’re connected to him. That’s impressive for somebody not from the area originally.”

Landers said he feels confident in his ability to communicate, acknowledging that his style “is a little more direct and to the point.”

“I can probably … say the same thing in a lot less words,” he said, before going on about Gsell’s energy and personality.

As far as the job itself, Landers said he is excited and prepared, having worked with Gsell the past six years.

“While it’s exciting, it’s also a challenge,” he said. “It’s going to be a lot of work … The most things I do, I’m pretty even-keeled and levelheaded. I’m not going to overthink this. I’ve got a job ahead of me and I’m ready … to jump right in.”

He said that COVID-19 is “creating a lot of challenges for us at the county that weren’t there a year ago when I was looking forward to taking this opportunity.”

“Obviously, the COVID is going to put a big financial constraint on our budget and our resources, and we’re meeting with department heads already, preplanning for our budget, and preparing for different strategies that we can utilize to get through this difficult financial time.”

Landers mentioned that providing enough water to county residents “at an affordable rate” and navigating through the pandemic and financial concerns to eventually build a state-mandated new jail are priorities.

Holder of a master's degree in Public Administration from Brockport State College, Landers spent 10 years as the county’s deputy treasurer before becoming the assistant county manager. He talked about the plan that legislators and management drafted for him to eventually replace Gsell.

“The plan, in general … I thought the logic at the time – if everything worked out – that this would be a potentially a good fit for me to take over someday for Jay,” he said. “I was in the treasurer’s office for 10 years, enjoyed working over there with Scott (German), but when the opportunity over here came up, it was something that I kicked the tires, and spoke with Jay and some of the legislators then.”

German thanked legislators for “seeing what I saw (in Landers) when I hired him in 2004, and then quipped that Landers was “one of the top five deputies that I ever had working for me,” even though he only had three.

Legislators Marianne Clattenburg, John Deleo and Rochelle Stein congratulated Landers, expressing their pride in being able to promote homegrown talent.

“Matt, I could not be happier for the success that you have ahead of you,” said Stein, the legislature chair. “It will be another quarter of a century before this (transition) plan has to be put in place again.”

Landers said he couldn’t have had a better mentor than Jay Gsell.

“I have been able to learn a lot more about the county outside of the treasurer’s office, and have been put in a good position to succeed in the manager’s office because of the six years working under Jay,” he said.

Landers is active in the Kiwanis Club (he is a former president) and coaches and helps run a girls’ softball program. He and his wife, Melissa, reside in Batavia with their two children, Kaitlyn, 14, and Benjamin, 10.

Landers’ appointment takes effect on Aug. 15, and he will earn a base salary of $121,000.

Photo: Matt Landers, left; his mother and stepfather, Manetta and Paul Potter; and Jay Gsell following tonight’s Genesee County Legislature meeting. Photo by Mike Pettinella.

July 22, 2020 - 4:26pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received one new positive case of COVID-19.
    • The positive individual resides in Darien.
    • The positive individual is in their 30s.
    • The positive individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Zero of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Nine new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
  • Orleans County received zero new positive cases of COVID-19.
    • One of the previous community positive cases has recovered and has been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Nine new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • Two of the total active positive cases are hospitalized. Please note those in the hospital may be from the community or a state-regulated facility. We do not separate them out to protect their privacy.    
July 22, 2020 - 1:30pm

Batavia-based Graham Corporation (NYSE: GHM) announced Tuesday that due to the ongoing public health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to support the health and well-being of its stockholders, directors, officers and employees, the format of the Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the "Annual Meeting") of the Company has been changed.

As previously announced, the Annual Meeting will be held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 11, Eastern Time, however the Company has made the decision that this year's Annual Meeting will now be held solely by remote communication, in a virtual-only format.

The Annual Meeting will not be held at a physical location, and stockholders will not be able to physically attend the Annual Meeting. This does not represent a change in the Company’s stockholder engagement philosophy, and the Company expects to resume in-person stockholder meetings next year. 

In order to attend the virtual Annual Meeting, stockholders of record as of the close of business on June 19, 2020 must sign-in via the internet at www.virtualshareholdermeeting.com/GHM2020.

To vote at the virtual Annual Meeting, stockholders will need their 16-digit control number included within their proxy card, notice of internet availability of proxy materials or voter instruction form.

Graham Corp. is a global business that designs, manufactures and sells critical equipment for the oil refining, petrochemical and defense industries.

July 21, 2020 - 4:57pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received one new positive case of COVID-19, for a total of 244 positive cases.
    • The positive individual resides in Batavia.
    • The positive individual is in their 70s.
    • The positive individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Two of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Fifteen new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
  • Orleans County received one new positive case of COVID-19, for a total of 272 positive cases.
    • The positive individual resides in Clarendon.
    • The positive individual is in their 80s.
    • The positive individual was not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
  • One of the previous community positive cases has recovered and has been released from mandatory isolation.
  • Forty-five new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
  • Two of the total active positive cases are hospitalized. Please note those in the hospital may be from the community or a state-regulated facility. We do not separate them out to protect their privacy.
July 21, 2020 - 2:05pm

Above: Christina Brown, a student from Batavia City School District, created a design called "Covid-19" and placed third in The DIGIES Graphic Arts division -- Grades 7-9.

Submitted image and press release:

Despite cancellation due to COVID-19 of the annual media awards event called "The DIGIES" put on by the School Library System, there were more entries than ever this year and a total of 14 third-place winners from Genesee County.

The system's media conference, festival and awards is a program of the Genesee Valley Board of Cooperative Educational Services -- BOCES.

The mission of The DIGIES is to strengthen the digital media continuum between PreK-12 schools, higher education and professional institutions. The DIGIES recognizes student potential in an annual festival format and students compete from all throughout the region and the Upstate New York area.

The year’s festival awards event was scheduled to be held last month at The Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester. 

Emilee Hillman and Andrea Fetterly, Library Technologies’ specialists coordinate this conference. Fetterly said that school building closures due to COVID-19 did not dampen enthusiasm for this year’s festival, which drew a number of entries.

“We are excited to celebrate the amazing creativity and skill demonstrated by the participants in this year's DIGIES festival," Fetterly said. "Despite a shortened in-person school year and extraordinary circumstances, students continue to achieve great success."

Below is a listing of categories, grades, winners and school districts from Genesee County. (Other categories were Audio and Interactive Media, but there were no winners from Genesee County.)

Congratulations to these imaginative students!

GRAPHIC ARTS

Grades 7-9

1st:                   The Stranger by Zac Hakes -- Hilton CSD

2nd:                  Fatoma by Cornelia Adakah -- Pittsford CSD

3rd:                  Covid-19 by Christina Brown -- Batavia CSD

3rd:                   En Pointe by Cammi Eccleston -- Hilton CSD

VIDEO

Grades 7-9

1st:                   The Silk Road by Jonathan Popper -- Pittsford CSD (Submitted by Animatus Studio)

2nd:                  Land Rover Series III Pickup: Desert Joyride by Zachary Heiman -- Dansville CSD

3rd:                  Things to do in Quarantine by Matthew Covert -- Le Roy CSD

Grades 10-12

1st:                  Doors by Jacob French -- Geneseo CSD

2nd:                 Michi by Ashlyn Kreiss -- Pittsford CSD

3rd (tie):           A Quest to Learn Part I by Devon Deuel -- Dansville CSD

3rd (tie):          Quarantine Catch by Mikayla Hickey, Makenna Boyce, Kayla Yax, Adeline Kautz, Kelsey Kautz, Samantha Sawyer, Neva Saile, Emma Raines, Courtney Schum, Emily Balduf, Sydney Smith and Taylor Fletcher (Alexander Softball) -- Alexander CSD

(Editor's note: we asked, but entries from the Le Roy and Alexander winners were not available from GV BOCES' School Library System, which runs The DIGIES event.)

July 20, 2020 - 4:49pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news, notify.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received three new positive cases of COVID-19, for a total of 243 positive cases.
    • The positive individuals reside in Batavia, Bergen and Corfu.
    • Two of the positive individuals are younger than 20 and one is in their 50s.
    • The positive individuals were not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • One of the previous community positive cases has recovered and has been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Fifty-one new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
  • Orleans County received two new positive cases of COVID-19, maintaining a total of 271 positive cases.
    • The positive individuals reside in Ridgeway and Murray.
    • Both of the positive individuals are in their 30s.
    • The positive individuals were not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
  • Two of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
  • Thirteen new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
  • Three of the total active positive cases are hospitalized. Please note those in the hospital may be from the community or a state-regulated facility. We do not separate them out to protect their privacy.
July 19, 2020 - 3:59pm

Press release:

A day before he heads back to Washington, D.C., to lead negotiations on the next coronavirus recovery bill, COVID-4, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer revealed that U.S. Post offices, including those across Upstate New York, could be forced to shut their doors unless they get an immediate infusion of funds and the personal protective equipment (PPE) and supplies needed to keep workers and the mail-receiving public safe.

Schumer, citing the worry, made a vow, today, to fight for a critically needed $25 billion for the USPS so they can keep the doors open and the mail moving for all Americans.  

“All across Upstate New York, from Western and Central New York, to the Finger Lakes, Southern Tier, Capital District, Hudson Valley, or beyond, the USPS performs a lifeline service for countless Americans and the people of New York that must continue amid and beyond this pandemic,” said U.S. Senator Charles Schumer.

“The fact is, the coronavirus has severely crippled USPS operations and their funds. Despite that, they have kept the doors open, the mail -- and really the economy -- moving, and now they need the help to sustain their pace. The fight to keep our post offices open by injecting the dollars needed to do the job and purchase the personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies required to keep everyone safe will begin tomorrow, and I am here to say: I vow to lead it."

Schumer explained the fight to keep post offices across the country open will begin this upcoming week. He said the services provided by USPS amount to lifelines for millions of Americans that cannot be replaced or easily replicated, especially in certain parts of the country.

Schumer detailed how the coronavirus pandemic has crippled our post offices and their operations as he stressed their relevance and importance to our larger economic recovery.

According to the Associated Press, mail volume is down by more than 30 percent from last year because of the coronavirus, and the Postal Service says losses will increase by more than $22 billion over the next 18 months.

Schumer added that the monumental costs of personal protective equipment (PPE) are also driving huge costs for the USPS. Those supplies are needed to keep workers and the mail-receiving public safe. Schumer said the USPS will need dollars to purchase the PPE it needs, in addition to funding to offset the aforementioned operational shortfalls delivered by the coronavirus.

“We are unable to predict the duration of COVID-19 business closures and the duration of the recession we are currently experiencing: however, this situation will materially damage our financial condition,” said USPS Chief Financial Officer Joseph Corbett.

“While we continue to conserve capital and reduce expenses in areas where volumes are declining, our ability to continue to serve the nation will require substantial finding from the federal government or other sources.”

“The bottom line here," added Schumer, "is that without the U.S. Postal Service in operation, we might as well stamp ‘Return to Sender’ on any economic recovery plan that is presented.”   

The U.S. Postal Service is the only delivery service that reaches every address in the nation: 160 million residences, businesses and Post Office Boxes. The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations, according to the Service.

July 18, 2020 - 5:11pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in elba, video, covid-19, coronavirus.
Video Sponsor

With a grant from GO ART! the Elba Betterment Committee host live music in the village park featuring the Jimmie Leggs Trio.

July 17, 2020 - 4:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received two new positive cases of COVID-19, for a total of 240 positive cases.
    • The positive individuals reside in Batavia and Le Roy.
    • One of the positive individuals is in their 20s and one is in their 60s.
    • The positive individuals were not on mandatory quarantine prior to testing positive.
    • Two of the previous community positive cases have recovered and have been released from mandatory isolation.
    • Five new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • No individuals are hospitalized.
  • Orleans County received zero new positive case of COVID-19, maintaining a total of 269 positive cases.
    • Eight new individuals are on precautionary quarantine due to travel from restricted states.
    • Three of the total active positive cases are hospitalized. Please note those in the hospital may be from the community or a state-regulated facility. We do not separate them out to protect their privacy.
July 17, 2020 - 3:16pm

Submitted photo and press release:

In an effort to brighten the day for local frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, Tompkins Bank of Castile, Tompkins Insurance Agencies and Tompkins Financial Advisors donated 3,400 Oliver’s Candy Bars to the Rochester Regional Health Staff.

The sweet treat will be handed out to all employees as a way to say "Thank You!"

Pictured from left are: Steve Beardsley, senior vice president, Commercial Banking regional manager, presents Jim Creighton and Gina Burden-Rambert of Rochester Regional Health with 3,400 candy bars to distribute to their staff.

July 17, 2020 - 2:11pm

Public Notice

Town of Batavia State of Emergency Declaration

A State of Emergency was declared in the TOWN OF BATAVIA, effective at 6 p.m. on July 16, 2020.

This State of Emergency has been declared due to the existing and continuing declared States of Emergency at the Federal, State, County, and City of Batavia, related to the COVID-19 virus.

This situation threatens the public safety.

This State of Emergency will remain in effect for 30 days or until rescinded by a subsequent order.

As the Chief Executive of TOWN OF BATAVIA, County of Genesee, State of New York, I, Gregory H. Post, exercise the authority given me under Section 24 of the New York State Executive Law, to preserve the public safety and hereby render all required and available assistance vital to the security, well-being, and health of the citizens of this Municipality.

I hereby direct all departments and agencies of TOWN OF BATAVIA to take whatever steps necessary to protect life and property, public infrastructure, and provide such emergency assistance deemed necessary.

Gregory H. Post,

Town of Batavia Supervisor

July 16, 2020

July 16, 2020 - 2:19pm
posted by Billie Owens in michael ranzenhofer, news, 61 Senate District, covid-19.

From Senator Michael Ranzenhoffer:

It goes without saying that 2020 has been one of the most unpredictable and challenging years of our lifetime. The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic will be felt for years to come.

As the Legislature prepares to return for a rare July session, many important questions remain unanswered.

In a recent Buffalo News article, it was stated that legislative leaders anticipated a “robust agenda” for the upcoming July session. It is my hope that we will not squander the opportunity and will start providing much needed clarity and assistance to families and businesses.

For years, I have advocated for increasing assistance to working families through an expansion of the Child Care Credit. This assistance is even more critical now as many families are struggling to find adequate childcare, while continuing to work from home.

In addition, it is critical that we develop plans to ensure that children and teachers can return to school safely and as soon as possible.

While I acknowledge that the current fiscal crisis could not have been predicted, it is still troubling that we have yet to be presented with the Governor’s suggested budget revisions.

Furthermore, it is impossible to ignore the fact that prior to COVID-19 the state was already experiencing an over $6 billion deficit. As part of my 2020 Legislative Questionnaire, over 51 percent of respondents said the state should address deficits by reducing spending and cutting outdated regulations.

Conversely, only 28 percent of residents advocated for tax increases or cost shifts.

Right-sizing New York State government is more critical than ever to ensure the quickest, most sustainable, economic recovery possible.

I strongly believe we need to examine how we utilize our economic development dollars. With so many small businesses struggling to survive we need to do all we can to assist them.

The Governor controls billions of dollars for economic development incentives to attract new businesses to the state. I can think of no better time redistribute these resources to support locally owned businesses.

In my previously mentioned questionnaire, nearly 53 percent of respondents said the state should not be in the business of picking winners and losers. Instead, they supported broad-based tax relief for businesses or not incentivizing private corporations at all. Only 13 percent of respondents believed that incentives were extremely important to help businesses.

Great challenges face government leaders as Legislative Session resumes. I hope the Governor and Senate and Assembly leaders will take real steps to assist hardworking families and struggling small businesses.

Best,

MIKE RANZENHOFER

State Senator – 61st District

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