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GC health department

July 23, 2021 - 9:00am

From the county health department:

New York will once again be taking part in a nationally coordinated effort to halt the spread of raccoon rabies in 16 states. The Oral Rabies Vaccine Field Evaluation will be held in New York, July 26 – Aug. 24.

Ongoing field evaluation of a new oral rabies vaccine (ORV) called ONRAB will occur in Clinton, Essex counties in the Empire State as part of an evaluation that also includes parts of northern Vermont and New Hampshire.  Additionally, evaluations will also occur in Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Jefferson, Lewis, Niagara, Oneida, Onondaga, Orleans, Oswego, St. Lawrence, and Wyoming counties.

These sites were selected in part because of ongoing collaborations with partners from the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Canada, in the fight against rabies to protect human and animal health and reduce significant costs associated with living with rabies across broad geographic areas.  Aerial and hand distribution of baits will take place in New York from July 26 – Aug. 24. 

Rabies is a serious public health concern because if left untreated it is invariably fatal. Costs associated with detection, prevention and control of rabies conservatively exceed $500 million annually.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, greater than 90 percent of reported rabies cases in the United States are in wildlife. The cooperative USDA, APHIS, Wildlife Services, National Rabies Management Program (NRMP) was established in 1997 to prevent the further spread of wildlife rabies in the United States by containing and eventually eliminating the virus in terrestrial mammals.

The majority of the NRMP efforts are focused on controlling raccoon rabies, which continues to account for most of the reported wildlife rabies cases in the United States. Raccoon rabies occurs in all states east of the established ORV zone that extends from Maine to Northeastern Ohio to central Alabama.

Continued access to oral vaccine and bait options that are effective in all target wildlife species remains critical to long-term success. 

During 2011, the NRMP worked with other Federal, State, and local partners to conduct the first raccoon ORV field trial in the United States in over 20 years.

This field trial was designed to test the safety and immunogenicity of the oral human adenovirus-rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine ONRAB (Artemis Technologies, Guelph, Ontario, Canada), which has been successfully integrated into comprehensive rabies control programs that resulted in elimination of raccoon rabies from Canada.

Encouraging results from the U.S. trial in West Virginia represented a major milestone that led to expanded evaluations in four additional states (N.H., N.Y., Ohio, and Ver.) during 2012-2020.

In 2021, the use of ONRAB will further expand into two additional states (Pa. and Tenn.). Data from these evaluations will support licensing of this vaccine for broader, more aggressive management of raccoon rabies by the NRMP and partners, with the goal of eliminating the variant of the rabies virus that cycles in raccoons.

The ONRAB bait consists of a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blister pack, containing the vaccine. To make the baits attractive, the blister packs are coated with a sweet attractant that includes vegetable-based fats, wax, icing sugar, vegetable oil, artificial marshmallow flavor, and dark-green food-grade dye.

Humans and pets cannot get rabies from contact with the bait. However, people who encounter baits directly are asked to leave them undisturbed.  Should contact with bait occur, immediately rinse the area with warm water and soap and contact your local health department at (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555, for Genesee County or (585) 589-3278 for Orleans County.

Please do not attempt to remove a bait from your dog’s mouth. The bait will not harm the dog. If you have additional questions related to the field evaluation in New York, please contact the Wildlife Services office in Rensselaer at (518) 268-2289.

March 26, 2021 - 3:15pm
posted by Press Release in news, GC health department, lead-paint hazards, HUD.

Press release:

In January of 2019, the Genesee County Health Department received a $1.3 million federal grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to address lead-based paint hazards in residential buildings within the counties of Genesee and Orleans.

Of this $1.3 million total, HUD has directed that $1 million be used specifically for lead-based paint hazard-reduction activities, while $300,000 is to be directed to other health-related home repairs, maintenance and upgrades.

“The funds were initially earmarked strictly for use in the City of Batavia and the Village of Albion,” said Darren Brodie, lead coordinator for Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments (GO Health).

“Fortunately, in December of 2020, HUD approved an expansion of the 'Genesee-Orleans Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes Program' to include qualified properties throughout all municipalities in both counties."

Eligible homeowners and landlords with eligible tenants may apply to receive these funds.

Landlords are required to match 10 percent of the total project costs. For example, a landlord would be required to pay $500 toward a $5,000 project, or $2,000 toward a $20,000 project.

Buildings containing more than one unit are accepted, even if all units are not eligible based on the requirements described below.

No match is required for owner-occupied dwellings.

All recipients of these grant funds are required to maintain ownership of the residence for 5 years following project completion.

Projects are bid on and completed by a preapproved list of local contractors, all verified as properly trained and EPA-certified in lead-safe work practices. Contractors who wish to be on our list should contact this office.

Applications can be obtained by contacting lead program staff at the Genesee County Health Department.

Program staff can quickly determine your initial eligibility and will help to guide you through the application process, which requires document gathering and filling out forms by the owners and tenants.

In order to be eligible to receive these funds you must meet all of the following requirements:

  • Low-income tenants or homeowners (call for details regarding vacant units);
  • Dwelling was built prior to 1978;
  • Dwelling contains lead-based paint;
  • Dwelling houses a family with at least one child under the age of 6 living there or visiting frequently, or an expectant mother.

If you need help determining if your family or home fits the criteria, contact lead program staff.

For additional information contact the Genesee County Health Department at (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555, or visit their website.

February 18, 2021 - 4:01pm

Health Alert

The COVID-19 2nd Dose Vaccine Clinic scheduled for Friday, Feb. 19, at Genesee Community College in Batavia -- for appointments between 9 a.m. and 1:45 p.m. -- will be rescheduled due to the weather-related delay of vaccine delivery. 

Anyone with an appointment during this time slot will be contacted directly by provided email or phone number to reschedule your appointment next week.

We apologize for the inconvenience.

The Genesee County Health Department

October 1, 2020 - 2:53pm
posted by Press Release in anti-rabies clinic, news, GC health department.

Press release:

The Genesee County Health Departments will host a FREE drive thru anti-rabies immunization clinic Oct. 15.

Note that last month, Orleans County had two exposures from feral cats that tested positive for rabies and resulted in unnecessary and costly post exposure treatments. It’s important to avoid contact with unknown animals both wild and domestic – love your own, leave the rest alone. It is an important reminder that all dogs, cats and ferrets are to be updated on their rabies vaccines.

  • The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Oct. 15th from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).
  • To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

  • Click here (pdf) to print out and fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out TWO copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you. Masks are required when speaking to staff and when outside of your vehicle at the vaccination station.

    For more information, please contact:

Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Press Release in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here (PDF) to print out and fill out a rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here to fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

August 10, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in anti-rabies clinic, news, pets, GC health department.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments will be hosting FREE drive-thru anti-rabies immunization clinics this month.

The Genesee County clinic will be on Thursday, Aug. 13th from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia).

Paul Pettit, Public Health director, notes that this is the first time the departments will be offering a drive-thru clinic.

“The drive-thru style will allow for the health departments to provide a vaccination clinic to our communities while adhering to the health and safety guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic," Pettit said. "This will ensure social distance protocols can bemaintained in an organized manner.”

Upon arrival, staff will instruct you to stay in your vehicle and form a single lane to the clinic area. Public health workers will be screening the occupants in each vehicle for COVID-19 symptoms.

County workers will be directing traffic flow. At the veterinarian immunization station, pet owners will be instructed to exit their vehicle and bring their pet(s) out for the veterinarian to vaccinate.

Once directed to do so, animals must be secured on a leash or in separate carriers at the immunization station.

Face masks, cloth face coverings, or face shields are required when speaking to staff and when outside of their vehicle at the vaccination table. Please limit four animals per vehicle.

“Animal rabies continues to be a serious public health problem in Genesee and Orleans counties," Pettit said. "We encourage all residents to take advantage of this opportunity to make sure that their animals are immunized against rabies and that the vaccinations are kept up to date."

To assist with crowd control, the vaccination clinics are only for respective county residents. The Genesee clinic will only be for Genesee County residents.

You do not need an appointment but please arrive no later than 30 minutes prior to the end of the clinic. For Genesee, please arrive no later than 6:30 p.m.

Click here (pdf) to print put and fill in the rabies certificate for your pets. Be sure to print out two copies for each pet to be vaccinated and bring them with you.

The next anti-rabies immunization clinic in Genesee County will be held on Sept. 17th. (The date is subject to change.)

For more information, please contact: Genesee County Health Department: (585) 344-2580, ext. 5555 / [email protected]

November 22, 2019 - 2:39pm
posted by Billie Owens in GC health department, lung cancer, radon, news.

From the Genesee County Health Department:

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month! Did you know that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer?

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Surgeon General’s office, radon is responsible for more than 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States. Fortunately, radon induced lung cancer can be prevented.

Radon is a radioactive gas that forms naturally when elements (uranium, thorium, or radium) break down in rocks, soil and groundwater.

People can be exposed to high levels of radon from breathing in the toxic gas when it seeps into homes and buildings through cracks or gaps in the foundation.

“When you breathe in radon, radioactive particles from radon gas can get trapped in your lungs” said Sarah Balduf, Environmental Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties. “Over time, these radioactive particles increase the risk of lung cancer. It may take years before health problems appear.”

People who smoke and are exposed to radon are at a greater risk of developing lung cancer. The only way to know if your house has high levels of radon is to test for it.

The EPA recommends taking action to reduce radon in homes that have a radon level at or above 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). In Genesee County, the average indoor radon level is 5.74 pCi/L compared to the State average of 4.42 pCi/L2.

Below is a graph of the towns in Genesee County and their average indoor radon screening level. These screening levels reflect tests that were administered in the basement.

Any radon exposure has some risk of causing lung cancer. If your home has a radon level at or above 4 pCi/L, a certified radon mitigator can install a radon reduction system that will ventilate the radon out of the air within your home. The lower the radon levels are in your home, the lower your family’s risk of lung cancer.

About the Genesee County Health Department Radon Program

The program has a limited supply of free short-term radon test kits available to Genesee County residents. These kits are available on a first-come-first-serve basis. The program also offers educational materials and in-services programs on the danger of radon and mitigation options for new or existing homes -- all available at no charge.

Test kits are available to order through the NYSDOH website for $11 here.

Health Signs of Exposure

If you think you might have been exposed to high levels of radon over long periods of time, talk with your doctor about whether you should get regular health checkups and tests to look for possible signs of lung cancer.

Be aware of possible symptoms of lung cancer, such as shortness of breath, a new or worsening cough, pain or tightness in the chest, hoarseness, or trouble swallowing, and tell your doctor if you start to have any of these symptoms.

For more information about the Radon Program in Genesee County, please call the Genesee County Health Department at 585-344-2580, ext. 5555, or click here.

August 9, 2019 - 12:54pm
posted by Billie Owens in dog bite, batavia, news, notify, GC health department.

Press release:

On Saturday, Aug. 3, at approximately 7 a.m. a man was bitten by an unfamiliar dog that was with its assumed owner but not on a leash. The incident occurred at the corner of Brooklyn Avenue on Pearl Street in the City of Batavia.

The assumed owner of the dog is described as a slender white male in his late 20s; he also had a second dog with him on a leash.

The dog that bit the man is described as being white in color and possibly a pit bull or a similar, resembling breed or mix. It was reported that the white dog was a female and appeared to have recently given birth to puppies.

The man who was bitten did not obtain any information from the man with the dogs and has not seen him since the incident.

“The purpose in locating the owner of the dog is to make sure the dog is up-to-date on its anti-rabies vaccine,” said Sarah Balduf, Environmental Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties. “If the owner cannot be located, the individual will have to go through unnecessary treatment.”

Anyone with information on the dog and/or dog owner is asked to contact the Genesee County Health Department at 585-344-2580, ext. 5555.

July 11, 2019 - 4:44pm

Press release from the GC Health Department:

The Genesee County Health Department has recently been awarded a grant to provide the hepatitis A vaccine to food-service workers at NO COST to them or the employer.

In Western New York and across the United States, foodborne outbreaks of hepatitis A have occurred as a result of infected food-service workers.

Brenden Bedard, director of Community Health Services for Genesee and Orleans counties, understands the severity of hepatitis A and the effect it can have on a business and community.

“Hepatitis A is a serious issue because most food-service workers will spread the infection before even knowing they have the disease," Bedard said. "A food-service worker can spread the virus to customers or other staff by contaminating surfaces, utensils and/or food, which can make unvaccinated individuals very sick.

"By offering the vaccine to food-service workers, we can prevent unnecessary illness from spreading in the community.”

Hepatitis A is a contagious (spreadable) liver infection that is caused by the hepatitis A Virus (HAV). It is typically spread through the feces (poop) of infected individuals.

Someone can become infected by consuming food or drink that has been contaminated by feces as well as having close personal contact with a person who is infected, or use of injection and non-injection drugs.

The symptoms of HAV may include sudden onset of fever, loss of appetite, nausea / vomiting, stomach pain, dark-colored urine and jaundice (a yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes). HAV usually does not have signs or symptoms until the second week of infection and is the most infectious during this time.

The good news is that hepatitis A can be prevented through vaccination!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the vaccine has a 94- to 100-percent efficacy rate.

The hepatitis A vaccine is a two-dose series that is administered six months apart. As the vaccine is not required to attend school or daycare, many people have not received it.

Currently three local restaurants have taken advantage of this opportunity for themselves and their employees who chose to receive the vaccine. The restaurants who have participated thus far have all expressed gratitude knowing their employees can protect themselves and their customers from the hepatitis A virus.

Any food-service worker employed in Genesee County can receive the vaccine.

By receiving the vaccine, you are also protecting yourself from getting the virus if you come in contact with dishes and/or utensils that may have been contaminated by a customer or coworker.

Restaurants that participate in this opportunity will receive a certificate honoring their commitment to protecting the health and safety of their workers and customers.

Limited vaccine is available through the funding, so the supply will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, please call the Genesee County Health Department at 585-344-2580, ext. 5555. The department is open Monday – Friday from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

For more information on the hepatitis A virus, click (PDF) here.

April 30, 2019 - 1:25pm

From the GC Health Department:

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and to celebrate the achievements of immunization programs in promoting healthy communities throughout the United States.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of this significant observance! Paul Pettit, Public Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties, proclaims the many benefits and accomplishments vaccines have on our communities.

“Vaccines are amongthe most successful and cost-effective public health tools available for preventing disease and death," Pettit said. "When you get vaccinated, you not only protect yourself but you also help protect the people around you who might be too young or too sick to get vaccinated themselves.

"This is called 'community immunity' or 'herd immunity.' If enough people stop getting vaccinated, more outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, will occur.”

Most parents choose the safe, proven protection of vaccines. Giving babies the recommended vaccinations by age 2 is the best way to protect them from 14 serious childhood diseases, like whooping cough and measles.

These diseases can be especially serious for infants and young children. Parents are encouraged to talk to their child’s doctor to ensure that their baby is up-to-date on vaccinations.

It is important to follow the recommended immunization schedule to protect infants and children by providing immunity early in life, before they encounter potentially life-threatening diseases.

The recent outbreak of measles in our country has reached the highest number of cases since the disease was eliminated in 2000. Most recent data shows the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 695 cases of measles from 22 states.

The return of the disease occurs when an unvaccinated traveler visits a country where there is widespread measles transmission, gets infected with measles, and returns to the United States and exposes people in a community who are not vaccinated.

Once measles enters an under-vaccinated community, it becomes difficult to control the spread of the disease. When measles enters a highly vaccinated community, outbreaks either don’t happen or are usually small.

This is why taking proper precautions and receiving the vaccine is so important to the health of our community.

Below is a summary of the vaccines children should receive by 2 years of age:

  1. The Varicella vaccine protects against chickenpox. Symptoms of chickenpox include rash, tiredness, headache, and fever. Complications of the disease include infected blisters, bleeding disorders, encephalitis (brain swelling), and pneumonia (infection in the lungs). Children need two doses of chickenpox vaccine. CDC recommends children receive the first dose between 12–15 months and the second between 4–6 years.

  2. The DTaP vaccine combines protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. Symptoms of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis includes sore throat, mild fever, weakness, and swollen glands in neck. Complications of these diseases included swelling of the heart muscle, heart failure, coma, paralysis, death. Children need five doses of DTaP vaccine. CDC recommends infants receive the first dose at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, the fourth between 15–18 months, and the fifth between 4–6 years.

  3. The Hib vaccine protects against Haemophilus influenzae disease. Symptoms of Haemophilus influenza include fever and chills, headache, nausea, excessive tiredness, and altered mental status. Complications of these infections may include loss of limbs, brain damage, or hearing loss. Children need three to four doses of the Hib vaccine. CDC recommends infants receive thefirst dose at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months (if needed), and the last shot between 12–15 months.

  4. The Hepatitis A vaccine protects against the hepatitis A virus (HAV). Symptoms of HAV typically do not appear until four weeks after exposure or may not occur at all. Symptoms that may appear include fever, dark urine, abdominal pain, nausea, and jaundice (yellowing of the eyes and skin). Complications of the disease include liver failure, arthralgia (joint pain), kidney, pancreatic, and blood disorders. Children need two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine. CDC recommends babies receive the first dose when the child turns 1 and the second should be given 6-12 months later.

  5. The Hepatitis B vaccine protects against a liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Symptoms of HBV are fever, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, and jaundice. Complications of HBV can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and death. Children need 3-4 doses of the HBV vaccine. CDC recommends infants receive the first dose at birth, the second dose is given at 1-2 months, the third at 4 months (if needed), and the last is given at 6-18 months.

  6. The Influenza (Flu) vaccine protects against flu virus. Symptoms of flu include fevers, chills, coughing, runny nose, fatigue, sore throat, and muscle or body aches. Complications of flu may include sinus and ear infections, pneumonia, inflammation of the heart, brain or muscles, organ failure, and even death. The influenza vaccine is started at 6 months and is needed every fall or winter for the rest of your life. CDC recommends children 6 months and older receive the vaccine once a year.

  7. The MMR vaccine combines protection against measles, mumps, and rubella. Symptoms of these diseases may include fever, headache, rashes, and eye irritation. Complications of measles, mumps, and rubella include deafness, brain damage, swelling of the spinal cord, infection of the lungs, and death. Children need two doses of the MMR vaccine. CDC recommends the first dose should be given between 12-15 months and the second dose between 4-6 years.

  8. The Polio vaccine protects against the infectious polio disease. Symptoms of the disease may include muscle and joint weakness and pain, sleep-related breathing disorders (such as sleep apnea), general fatigue (tiredness) and exhaustion with minimal activity, and muscle atrophy (muscle loss). Complications can include paresthesia (feelings of pins and needles in the legs), meningitis, paralysis, and death. Children need four doses of polio vaccine. CDC recommends the first dose should be given at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third between 6-18 months, and the fourth between 4-6 years.

  9. The Prevnar vaccine protects against pneumococcal disease. Symptoms include coughing, fevers and chills, difficulty breathing, and chest pains. Complications of this disease include brain damage, hearing loss, blood infection, and even death. Children need four doses of Prevnar. CDC recommends the first dose should be given at 2 months, the second at 4 months, the third at 6 months, and the fourth between 12-15 months.

  10. The Rotavirus vaccine protects against the contagious rotavirus. Symptoms of rotavirus include diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Complications of the disease include severe diarrhea and dehydration which can lead to death. Children need two to three doses of rotavirus vaccine. CDC recommends the first dose is given at 2 months, the second is given at 4 months, and the third is given at 6 months (if needed).

Protecting your baby from vaccine-preventable diseases begins even before your baby is born. Brenden Bedard, director of Community Health Services of Genesee and Orleans counties, educates on what vaccines mothers should get when they are pregnant.

“All pregnant women are recommended to receive the Tdap and influenza (flu) vaccine during each pregnancy," Bedard said. "The recommended time to get the Tdap shot is during the 27th through 36th week of pregnancy and the influenza shot can be given at any time during flu season, typically October through May.

"Pregnant women who receive these vaccines are also helping to protect their babies from diseases for the first several months after their birth, when they are too young to get vaccinated.”

In addition to mothers, it is also important for immediate family, such as spouses, grandparents, and anyone who will be in close contact with a new baby to receive the Tdap vaccine and the influenza vaccine during flu season.

While babies may experience some discomfort immediately after receiving vaccinations, it’s important to remember the pain is temporary, while the protection is long term. You work hard to help keep your baby safe and healthy! For more information on infant immunizations, please visit here.

The Genesee and Orleans County Health departments participate in the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program. This federally funded program will assist families who are uninsured or underinsured receive childhood vaccines at no cost. For more information, please contact your local health department.

For a copy of the 2019 Recommended Immunization for Children Birth though 6 Years Old, please visit here.

For information about this article or Health Department services contact:

  • Genesee County Health Department at: 344-2580, ext. 5555, or visit their website here.
April 18, 2019 - 3:04pm

Press release:

As the opioid epidemic continues to distress our community, local agencies are coming together to offer more services to those in need.

“Last fall, 24 counties in New York State, including Genesee, that are deemed ‘opioid burdened’ received funds from the CDC and New York State Department of Health to take local action to address the epidemic,” said Paul Pettit, Public Health director for Genesee and Orleans counties.

“After looking at our current services and speaking with local partners we wanted to launch an innovative program we learned about a few months earlier during a GOW Opioid Task Force meeting where Police Chief Volkman from Chatham spoke about the Police Assisted Addiction Recovery Initiative, more easily known as PAARI (pronounced PARR-REE).

"Using the funding to bring the successful approach of this program from Chatham into Genesee, will allow those who want to get into substance use treatment a 24/7 opportunity by going to one of the partnering first-responder agencies for help.”

The PAARI program will launch locally on Tuesday, April 23rd.

It will allow anyone who wants help with their addiction to walk into any police station or the city fire station and get the help they need. The program is supported by City of Batavia Police, City of Batavia Fire Department, Le Roy Police, and Genesee County Sheriff’s Office.

“The funds will help pay for overtime that will likely be incurred by staff of Public Safety agencies, as well as help pay for peer recovery coaches from Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (GCASA) that will be contacted once a person seeking treatment walks through the door," Pettit said.

"GCASA is an equally important partner in this, as they have hired the peer recovery coaches, who have been trained in providing services in the community early after receiving these funds.

"The peers will work with each individual and identify where they can go for the proper services,regardless of if it’s local or not, and make sure they get there. Ultimately, being a support in that moment and in the future, too. This program highlights the commitment and collaboration of our community partners to help address this crisis.”

GC Sheriff William A. Sheron Jr. agrees with Pettit regarding the collaboration of our first responders and the commitment to help address the opioid epidemic.

“This is a good collaboration between police, fire and the public," Sheron said. "I fully support the program and hope it will help people get the treatment services they need.”

For more information or for immediate help, please call GCASA’s peer services hotline at (585) 815-1800.

January 4, 2019 - 4:09pm

Public Health Colmun from the Genesee County Health Department:

January is Radon Action Month! Did you know that radon is a naturally occurring, radioactive gas? It has no smell, taste, or color. Radon forms from the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water and circulates into the air you breathe.

When radon is formed under homes and buildings, it can penetrate through cracks in the foundation, leading to high levels of radon, especially in enclosed areas.

Sarah Balduf, Environmental Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties, explains how easily radon can seep into your home.

“Radon can enter your home through cracks in the foundation, walls, joints, dirt floors, opening of sump pump, in well-water supply, and from gaps around suspended floors and pipes. Any home can have high radonlevels, whether it is old or new, has a basement or is built on a slab.”

It is understandable how this colorless, odorless gas can go unnoticed. If high levels of radon in your home are undetected for an extended period of time, the risk for developing lung cancer can occur. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. If you smoke and live in a home with high radon levels, your risk for developing lung cancer significantly increases.

Testing your home with a short term radon test kit is the quickest way to determine if there are high levels of radon present in your home. The Genesee County Health Department has an allotment of short-term test kits that are free of charge for Genesee County residents. These test kits are easy to use and contain basic instructions on how to receive the most accurate results when testing your home for radon.

“Testing your home for radon and taking action sooner rather than later could save the health of your family,” Balduf said. "Testing your home for radon is a simple process that is free of charge to Genesee County residents when you request a kit from the Genesee County Health Department."

If you do live outside of the county, inexpensive radon test kits can be purchased at hardware stores. If test results come back and the radon levels in your home are greater than 4 picocuries per liter of air [pCi/L], which is the “take action” level determined by the EPA, a certified radon mitigator can install a radon reduction system in your home. Take action against radon this January!

For more details about the program or to receive any of these services call the department at 585-344-2580.

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