Terry Anderson https://www.thebatavian.com/ en https://www.thebatavian.com/themes/barrio_batavian/images/thebatavian_logo.png Terry Anderson https://www.thebatavian.com/ Local Matters © 2008-2023 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Fri, 12 Jul 2024 22:42:35 -0400 https://www.thebatavian.com/themes/barrio_batavian/images/thebatavian_logo.png Sun, 28 Apr 2024 08:02:00 -0400 Terry Anderson recalled as 'strong advocate' during Batavia Peace Garden service https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/terry-anderson-recalled-as-strong-advocate-during-batavia-peace-garden-service
Paula Savage, President and founder of the international peace garden foundation speaking about Terry Anderson at the Holland Land Office  Photo by Steve Ognibene
Paula Savage, President and founder of the International Peace Garden Foundation, shares about Terry Anderson's involvement with the garden Saturday at the Holland Land Office Museum.
Photo by Steve Ognibene

Terry Anderson, a former Batavia resident and distinguished journalist who gained local and international celebrity status when he was taken hostage by an Iranian terrorist group, made a longlasting imprint, including right here in Batavia at the Peace Garden on West Main Street, International Peace Garden President Paula Savage says.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/terry-anderson-recalled-as-strong-advocate-during-batavia-peace-garden-service#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/terry-anderson-recalled-as-strong-advocate-during-batavia-peace-garden-service Apr 28, 2024, 8:02am Terry Anderson Terry Anderson recalled as 'strong advocate' during Batavia Peace Garden service jfbeck_99_272012 <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Paula Savage, President and founder of the international peace garden foundation speaking about Terry Anderson at the Holland Land Office Photo by Steve Ognibene" class="image-style-large" height="533" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/a76y4818.JPG?itok=t3q6prGk" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption>Paula Savage, President and founder of the International Peace Garden Foundation, shares about Terry Anderson's involvement with the garden Saturday at the Holland Land Office Museum.<br>Photo by Steve Ognibene</figcaption> </figure> <p>Terry Anderson, a former Batavia resident and distinguished journalist who gained local and international celebrity status when he was taken hostage by an Iranian terrorist group, made a longlasting imprint, including right here in Batavia at the Peace Garden on West Main Street, International Peace Garden President Paula Savage says.</p>
Former Batavia resident Terry Anderson, journalist taken hostage by terrorists in 1985 dies at age 76 https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/former-batavia-resident-terry-anderson-journalist-taken-hostage-by-terrorists-in-1985
terry anderson and jim owen
Terry Anderson, right, autographs a book for the late James Owen at an event at Batavia Downs commemorating the opening of the International Peace Garden in Batavia in February 2011.
File photo by Howard Owens.

Terry Anderson, a journalist and a Batavia High School graduate who gained international attention after being taken hostage by an Iranian-backed terrorist group, has died in Greenwood Lake, in the Hudson Valley.

He was 76 years old.

Anderson was the Beirut bureau chief in 1985 for the Associated Press when he was kidnapped by armed men who dragged him from his car after he dropped off a tennis partner following a match. The pistol-wielding men yanked him from his car and pushed him into a Mercedes-Benz.

The terrorists were reportedly members of Hezbollah, an Islamic Jihad Organization in Lebanon. He was reportedly blindfolded and beaten and kept in chains and moved to 20 different hideaways in Beirut, South Lebanon, and the Bekaa Valley.

His release came 2,454 days later following intense lobbying by his sister, Peggy Say.

Anderson and Say were born in Lorain, Ohio, where their father, Glen, was a village police officer. While still children, their parents moved to Batavia, where their father worked as a truck driver and their mother, Lily, was a waitress.

After Anderson was kidnapped, Say didn't feel the case was getting enough attention from the U.S. government and the United States. She launched a national campaign to raise the awareness of people to the plight of her brother and other hostages held by Hezbollah.

Say, who had returned to Batavia after relocating for a time, enlisted fellow journalists, humanitarian groups, world figures, and U.S. citizens in the cause, which led to the nation being festooned with yellow ribbons. 

She also received assistance from many fellow Batavia residents, such as Anne Zickl, who died in 2014.

Say died in 2015 at age 74.

Terry Anderson's daughter Sulome told the New York Times that Anderson died following complications from a recent heart surgery.

Anderson's last public appearance in Batavia was in February 2011 to dedicate the International Peace Garden.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/former-batavia-resident-terry-anderson-journalist-taken-hostage-by-terrorists-in-1985#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/former-batavia-resident-terry-anderson-journalist-taken-hostage-by-terrorists-in-1985 Apr 21, 2024, 9:45pm Terry Anderson Former Batavia resident Terry Anderson, journalist taken hostage by terrorists in 1985 dies at age 76 Howard Owens <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="terry anderson and jim owen" class="image-style-large" height="531" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2024-04/terry-anderson-and-jim-owen.jpg?itok=LluNEnLh" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption><em>Terry Anderson, right, autographs a book for the late James Owen at an event at Batavia Downs commemorating the opening of the International Peace Garden in Batavia in February 2011.</em><br><em>File photo by Howard Owens.</em></figcaption> </figure> <p>Terry Anderson, a journalist and a Batavia High School graduate who gained international attention after being taken hostage by an Iranian-backed terrorist group, has died in Greenwood Lake, in the Hudson Valley.</p><p>He was 76 years old.</p><p>Anderson was the Beirut bureau chief in 1985 for the Associated Press</p>
Terry Anderson will teach journalism at Syracuse University https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/terry-anderson-will-teach-journalism-syracuse-university/25723 Former Batavia resident Terry Anderson -- known internationally as the former Middle East Bureau Chief for Associated Press who was taken hostage in Lebanon for six years -- will serve as a visiting professor at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School of Public Communications.

Anderson, most recently a journalism professor the University of Kentucky, will hold a temporary appointment in the Department of Newspaper and Online Journalism and give guest lectures and teach classes on several subjects, including international reporting.

While Anderson was in Batavia in February to support the planned International Peace Garden, he told reporters he would like to return to Upstate New York.

Anderson, who holds a bachelor's degree from Iowa State University, has also taught at Columbia University and Ohio University’s Scripps School of Journalism. Anderson is a former Marine who worked as a combat correspondent during the Vietnam War.

Anderson's appointment is for the 2011-12 academic year.  

Photo from Anderson's recent visit to Batavia, as he signs a copy of one of his many books for Jim Owen.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/terry-anderson-will-teach-journalism-syracuse-university/25723#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/terry-anderson-will-teach-journalism-syracuse-university/25723 Apr 30, 2011, 10:26pm Terry Anderson Terry Anderson will teach journalism at Syracuse University Howard Owens <p> Former Batavia resident Terry Anderson -- known internationally as the former Middle East Bureau Chief for Associated Press who was taken hostage in Lebanon for six years -- will serve as a visiting professor at&nbsp;Syracuse University’s Newhouse School of Public Communications.</p> <p> Anderson, most recently a journalism professor the University of</p>
During his return to Batavia, Terry Anderson sees hope for the Middle East https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/during-his-return-to-batavia-terry-anderson-sees-hope-for-the-middle-east/24552

It's an auspicious time for Terry Anderson to return to Batavia to dedicate a peace garden.

Anderson, who grew up in Batavia, was chief Middle East correspondent for Associated Press when he was abducted on March 16, 1985, in Beirut following a game of tennis. Anderson was held in captivity by Hezbollah for six years and nine months.

As Anderson returns to his boyhood home, the Middle East is exploding in a way it never has before. Governments in Tunisia and Egypt have been toppled by pro-democracy demonstrators. Even the Iranian government, which backs Hezbollah, is facing youthful opposition.

Anderson is cautiously optimistic about what he sees happening.

"I watched Yasser Arafat and Isaac Rabin shake hands on the White House lawn," Anderson said tonight during a meet-and-greet at Batavia Downs. "It was one of the most optimistic days of my life, because I covered that conflict for years, and (look at) what has happened since.

"It doesn’t always turn out for the best. But yes, I see something new in the Middle East. I see something that promises something hopeful for the future."

One of America's most acclaimed and recognized journalists, Anderson was invited to return to his former hometown to help raise funds for a War of 1812 Peace Garden planned for a plot of land adjacent to the Holland Land Office Museum.

Anderson will have a busy day Friday, starting with an 8 a.m. visit to Batavia High School. He will also have lunch with GCC President Stuart Steiner followed by a public lecture at noon at GCC. At 2 p.m., there will be a press conference with Anderson at the Genesee County History Office, 7 W. Main St., and at 5 p.m., the main event -- a dinner at Terry Hills ($25 per person), where Anderson will be the featured speaker.

Thursday night, Anderson arrived at Batavia Downs shortly after 7 p.m. and he was warmly greeted by a few old friends as well as people involved in organizing the peace garden effort. Anderson also took a few minutes to talk with members of the media who where there.

Anderson -- who recently finished a teaching stint at the University of Kentucky and is now contemplating a return to residency in Upstate New York -- was animated as soon as the topic turned to the turmoil in the Middle East.

He recalled that he was in captivity when Marcos fell in the Philippines, and that was followed by the regime falling in South Africa and then, of course, the toppling of the Berlin Wall and the fall of the Soviet Union.

"It just proves again what we knew then – you can have all of the police and secret police and guns and thugs in the world, and when your people stand up and say, ‘no, we’re tired of you,’ you’re gone," Anderson said.

He added, "Every country is different, but there is something going around that they all seem to have in common: They are tired of dictators and corruption and denial of human rights."

A Vietnam veteran, Anderson said that as a 19-year-old Marine, he visited the most famous peace garden in the world, the one at ground zero in Hiroshima, Japan. So when he was invited to return to Batavia to help bring about a new peace garden he thought, "who's not in favor of peace?

"Why would I miss a chance to dedicate a peace garden? It may be on a smaller scale, but why wouldn't I support it?"

Photo: Jim Owen gets an autograph from Terry Anderson on one of his books.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/during-his-return-to-batavia-terry-anderson-sees-hope-for-the-middle-east/24552#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/howard-owens/during-his-return-to-batavia-terry-anderson-sees-hope-for-the-middle-east/24552 Feb 18, 2011, 12:13am Terry Anderson During his return to Batavia, Terry Anderson sees hope for the Middle East Howard Owens <p> <img alt border="0" src="http://thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/images/ce.a6b712027a2bf666074cbe112a7b935c.terry_anderson_jim_owen01,j.jpg"></p> <p> It's an auspicious time for Terry Anderson to return to Batavia to dedicate a peace garden.</p> <p> Anderson, who grew up in Batavia, was chief Middle East correspondent for Associated Press when he was abducted on March 16, 1985, in Beirut following a game of tennis. Anderson was held in captivity</p>
Peace garden efforts moving forward; Terry Anderson expected to lend support https://www.thebatavian.com/blogs/howard-owens/peace-garden-efforts-moving-forward-terry-anderson-expected-lend-support/14538

With a nod of approval (no official vote could be taken) from the Legislature's Human Services Committee today, Marilyn Drilling and Barb Toal are ready to push forward with plans for a peace garden next to the Holland Land Office Museum.

They need to raise $55,000 in the next 11 months, and Drilling said a key component of the fundraising campaign will include a dinner with Terry Anderson as the keynote speaker.

Anderson, who was held captive in Lebanon for more than 6 years, from 1985 to 1991, hasn't visited his hometown of Batavia in 19 years.

He didn't want to make it 20, said Drilling, executive director of HLOM, and he agreed to support the peace garden effort at no cost to the organizers.

"Who better to talk about peace than a man who spent so much of his wonderful life behind locked doors," Drilling said.

The dinner is planned for Sept. 9.

The county owns the land next to the museum and must approve any new use of the strip of real estate hard against the Tonawanda Creek. To grant approval, the Legislature must receive a finished plan, which includes at least the potential of approvals from the City of Batavia and the Army Corps of Engineers, as well as contract language from County Attorney Charles Zambito and final engineering plans.

Without that, the Human Services Committee couldn't even poll members for consensus, but it was clear there were no objections from members for pushing forward with the project.

"Of all the people I've heard talk about it, I don't think I've heard anybody say they're not in favor of it," said Hollis Upson. "It's very interesting the amount of outpouring and number of volunteers who support it. It's been vary contagious."

Drilling is concerned that without a sense that the county supports the project, it will impede fundraising, which needs to proceed now.

There are 20 countries with official Peace Gardens, which is an international effort to promote and recognize peace among nations. The Peace Garden Foundation promotes the effort and was founded by current president Paula Savage, a resident and native of Batavia. The Batavia garden would be an honorary, not official, member. It would feature the 20 flags of the countries with official gardens.

Each country would be represented by its flag, and flag poles would be sold for donations of about $2,500 each, according to Drilling.

Drilling sees the peace garden as a natural extension of HLOM, helping to bring in tourists.

Toal, who chairs the local Peace Garden Committee, said it's a natural fit for Batavia and the strong interest in the region from War of 1812 enthusiasts.

Batavia, she said, served as a key defense in stopping the British advance after Buffalo was destroyed. Many tourists interested in the War of 1812 make the trip to Batavia, she said, and the peace garden at HLOM would be an appropriate destination point.

No county funds would be used in building and maintaining the peace garden, which is why, Drilling said, it's important to get started on fundraising now.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/blogs/howard-owens/peace-garden-efforts-moving-forward-terry-anderson-expected-lend-support/14538#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/blogs/howard-owens/peace-garden-efforts-moving-forward-terry-anderson-expected-lend-support/14538 Apr 5, 2010, 11:24pm Terry Anderson Peace garden efforts moving forward; Terry Anderson expected to lend support Howard Owens <p></p> <p>With a nod of approval (no official vote could be taken) from the Legislature's Human Services Committee today, Marilyn Drilling and Barb Toal are ready to push forward with plans for a peace garden next to the Holland Land Office Museum.</p> <p>They need to raise $55,000 in the next 11</p>
Former Batavian and former hostage Terry Anderson files for bankruptcy https://www.thebatavian.com/blogs/howard-owens/former-batavian-and-former-hostage-terry-anderson-files-bankruptcy/10895 Terry Anderson, the former Hezbollah hostage who grew up in Batavia, filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy Nov. 3, according to Associated Press.

Now a lecturer at the University of Kentucky, Anderson was an AP correspondent in Lebanon in 1985 when he was abducted by terrorists following a tennis game. He was held hostage for six-and-a-half years.

According to AP, Anderson lists $60,000 in assets and $1.8 million in liabilities in his Chapter 7 filing. The filing lists 17 credit cards, some with debt related to a restaurant in the Virgin Islands.

Anderson filed a lawsuit against Iran over his captivity and received a $26 million settlement in 2002 from the government's frozen assets. With the money, according to Wikipedia, Anderson started charities and a blues bar in Athens, Ohio.

In 2004, Anderson ran for the Senate in Ohio. He was defeated by Republican Joy Padgett, whose campaign commercials suggested Anderson would be soft on terrorism. Anderson garnered 46 percent of the vote.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/blogs/howard-owens/former-batavian-and-former-hostage-terry-anderson-files-bankruptcy/10895#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/blogs/howard-owens/former-batavian-and-former-hostage-terry-anderson-files-bankruptcy/10895 Nov 14, 2009, 9:12am Terry Anderson Former Batavian and former hostage Terry Anderson files for bankruptcy Howard Owens <p>Terry Anderson, the former Hezbollah hostage who grew up in Batavia, filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy Nov. 3, according to <a href="http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hRK6R7DwPLVBC74Rqa9fdZ1SOQSwD9BUROKG0">Associated Press</a>.</p> <p>Now a lecturer at the University of Kentucky, Anderson was an AP&nbsp;correspondent in Lebanon in 1985 when he was abducted by terrorists following a tennis game. He</p>
Terry Anderson: No. 7 in "What Made Genesee County Famous" https://www.thebatavian.com/philip-anselmo/terry-anderson-no-7-in-what-made-genesee-county-famous/3224 Clocking in at No. 7 in the Twenty-Five Things That Made Genesee County Famous is Terry Anderson, America's longest-held hostage in the Middle East, whose release set off a media blitz upon the city of Batavia, the likes of which Genesee County had never seen.

Holland Land Office Museum Director Pat Weissend:

On March 16, 1985, former Batavia resident Terry Anderson had just finished a game of tennis in Beirut, Lebanon when three gunmen pulled up in a green Mercedes and kidnapped him. This was day one in a 2,454 day ordeal that captivated the City of Batavia, Genesee County, the United States and the world.

[...]

His captors were a group of Shiite Muslims. During his captivity, Anderson was tortured and beaten. He didn’t know from one day to the next if he would be released or killed. He turned to the Bible for peace and wrote poetry.

After being imprisoned for nearly seven years, Anderson was released on December 4, 1991. After his release he spent a few days in a hospital in Wiesbaden, Germany before returning to the United States. 

For more on Terry Anderson, visit the museum's Web site.

In a side note: This terra cotta sculpture here of Anderson was dropped off at the Holland Land Office Museum last week and should be up on display for folks who want to check it out up close.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/philip-anselmo/terry-anderson-no-7-in-what-made-genesee-county-famous/3224#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/philip-anselmo/terry-anderson-no-7-in-what-made-genesee-county-famous/3224 Dec 1, 2008, 1:28pm Terry Anderson Terry Anderson: No. 7 in "What Made Genesee County Famous" philip.anselmo <p>Clocking in at No. 7 in the <a href="http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/25things.html">Twenty-Five Things That Made Genesee County Famous</a> is Terry Anderson, America's longest-held hostage in the Middle East, whose release set off a media blitz upon the city of Batavia, the likes of which Genesee County had never seen.</p><p><a href="http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/home.htm">Holland Land Office Museum</a> Director</p>