Genesee County Mental Health https://www.thebatavian.com/ en https://www.thebatavian.com/themes/barrio_batavian/images/thebatavian_logo.png Genesee County Mental Health https://www.thebatavian.com/ Local Matters © 2008-2023 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Wed, 28 Feb 2024 13:43:49 -0500 https://www.thebatavian.com/themes/barrio_batavian/images/thebatavian_logo.png Sat, 16 Sep 2023 08:15:00 -0400 Mental health course for law enforcement opportunity to 'transform crisis response' https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/mental-health-course-for-law-enforcement-opportunity-to-transform-crisis-response
GC Sheriff's mental health grad
Genesee County Sheriff's Investigator and co-instructor David Moore, left, and Mental Health Director and co-instructor Lynda Battaglia, far right, flank graduates of the New York State Crisis Intervention Team Training, Chad Cummings, Kyle Krzemien, Jenna Ferrando and Robert Henning upon completion of the course Friday at Genesee Community College.
Photo by Joanne Beck

Sheriff’s deputies encounter a lot of different scenarios when out on patrol, and after a weeklong training on various mental health issues, several of them will be more versed to handle crisis intervention training in this area as well, county Mental Health Director Lynda Battaglia says.

Battaglia and co-facilitator

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https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/mental-health-course-for-law-enforcement-opportunity-to-transform-crisis-response#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/mental-health-course-for-law-enforcement-opportunity-to-transform-crisis-response Sep 16, 2023, 8:15am Genesee County Mental Health Mental health course for law enforcement opportunity to 'transform crisis response' jfbeck_99_272012 <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div align-center"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="GC Sheriff's mental health grad" class="image-style-large" height="732" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2023-09/sheriffis-mental-health-grads.jpg?itok=m1Eqy3qt" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption>Genesee County Sheriff's Investigator and co-instructor David Moore, left, and Mental Health Director and co-instructor Lynda Battaglia, far right, flank graduates of the New York State Crisis Intervention Team Training, Chad Cummings, Kyle Krzemien, Jenna Ferrando and Robert Henning upon completion of the course Friday at Genesee Community College.<br>Photo by Joanne Beck</figcaption> </figure> <p>Sheriff’s deputies encounter a lot of different scenarios when out on patrol, and after a weeklong training on various mental health issues, several of them will be more versed to handle crisis intervention training in this area as well, county Mental Health Director Lynda Battaglia says.</p><p>Battaglia and co-facilitator</p>
From diagnosis to research to hope: removing the mask of 'fine' https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/from-diagnosis-to-research-to-hope-removing-the-mask-of-fine/635136
Peter Mittiga, Sue Gagne, Cheryl Netter
Peter Mittiga, deputy director of Genesee County Mental Health, Sue Gagne, and Cheryl Netter, talk about mental health issues from their personal and professional perspectives for a series of articles related to Mental Health Awareness. 

Editor’s Note: This is the fourth in a series of articles for May’s Mental Health Awareness focus. Despite it being the last day of the month, no topic as important as mental health can be hemmed into such a short time span anyway, as Genesee County Mental Health Director Lynda Battaglia says. Besides, this kicks off June’s “Rebuild Your Life Month,” which will continue with additional articles.

Little did anyone know that Cheryl Netter suffered from bipolar disorder throughout her life. And how could they? Netter herself didn’t know until she received an official diagnosis in her 20s.

“Finally, when I was diagnosed with something that I could explore, and educate myself on and find out, I was relieved. So many people will tell you otherwise, maybe, but I was totally relieved because I knew in talking with my gynecologist and my doctors through, the course of the years, I knew there was something more going on inside me.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/from-diagnosis-to-research-to-hope-removing-the-mask-of-fine/635136#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/from-diagnosis-to-research-to-hope-removing-the-mask-of-fine/635136 May 31, 2023, 9:05pm Genesee County Mental Health From diagnosis to research to hope: removing the mask of 'fine' jfbeck_99_272012 <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div align-center"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Peter Mittiga, Sue Gagne, Cheryl Netter" class="image-style-large" height="534" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2023-05/peter-sue-and-cheryl.jpg?itok=jFRglLMf" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption>Peter Mittiga, deputy director of Genesee County Mental Health, Sue Gagne, and Cheryl Netter, talk about mental health issues from their personal and professional perspectives for a series of articles related to Mental Health Awareness.&nbsp;</figcaption> </figure> <p><em>Editor’s Note: This is the fourth in a series of articles for May’s Mental Health Awareness focus. Despite it being the last day of the month, no topic as important as mental health can be hemmed into such a short time span anyway, as Genesee County Mental Health Director Lynda Battaglia says. Besides, this kicks off June’s “Rebuild Your Life Month,” which will continue with additional articles.</em></p><p>Little did anyone know that Cheryl Netter suffered from bipolar disorder throughout her life. And how could they? Netter herself didn’t know until she received an official diagnosis in her 20s.</p><p>“Finally, when I was diagnosed with something that I could explore, and educate myself on and find out, I was relieved. So many people will tell you otherwise, maybe, but I was totally relieved because I knew in talking with my gynecologist and my doctors through, the course of the years, I knew there was something more going on inside me.</p>
Be aware of mental health 365 days a year https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/be-aware-of-mental-health-365-days-a-year/635105
Lynda Battaglia
Lynda Battaglia, director of Genesee County Mental Health. Photo from Psychology Today website.

May has had the special designation of being Mental Health Awareness Month, and although public service campaigns and messages remind people about the importance of heeding one’s own and others’ mental health needs, it’s far from a 30-day requirement, Lynda Battaglia says.

“The county Legislature gave a proclamation for mental health awareness month, but really, it is a specific month to recognize individuals with lived experience who are peers who might be in recovery and to really bring light to the community that people need to be aware of what mental health is, from various perspectives,” said Battaglia, director of Genesee County Mental Health, during an interview with The Batavian.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/be-aware-of-mental-health-365-days-a-year/635105#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/be-aware-of-mental-health-365-days-a-year/635105 May 31, 2023, 9:05am Genesee County Mental Health Be aware of mental health 365 days a year jfbeck_99_272012 <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div align-left"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Lynda Battaglia" class="image-style-large" height="400" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2023-05/lynda-battaglia-psych-today.png?itok=569rz2gY" width="320"> </div> </div> <figcaption>Lynda Battaglia, director of Genesee County Mental Health. Photo from Psychology Today website.</figcaption> </figure> <p>May has had the special designation of being Mental Health Awareness Month, and although public service campaigns and messages remind people about the importance of heeding one’s own and others’ mental health needs, it’s far from a 30-day requirement, Lynda Battaglia says.</p><p>“The county Legislature gave a proclamation for mental health awareness month, but really, it is a specific month to recognize individuals with lived experience who are peers who might be in recovery and to really bring light to the community that people need to be aware of what mental health is, from various perspectives,” said Battaglia, director of Genesee County Mental Health, during an interview with The Batavian.</p>
AJ: 'I'm still here,' one man's mental health journey https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/aj-im-still-here-one-mans-mental-health-journey/635106
Rachel Mieney and AJ Scheuerman
Rachel Mieney, clinical director of Genesee County Mental Health, and AJ Scheuerman, a peer guide who has been diagnosed with bipolar and schizoaffective disorder, talk about mental health issues at the county health facility in Batavia.

AJ Scheuerman was 16 when he had his first episode of a yet-to-be-diagnosed mental health illness. It was not only the first incident, but also unforgettable, leaving AJ’s family broken, confused, physically injured, and the teenager left to deal with the consequences in a locked psychiatric ward.

Although AJ’s story may seem atypical compared to the millions of seemingly able-minded people suffering from depression on a day-to-day basis, they all share the importance of this month and what it means to be in tune with one’s own mental health awareness.

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https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/aj-im-still-here-one-mans-mental-health-journey/635106#comments https://www.thebatavian.com/jfbeck99272012/aj-im-still-here-one-mans-mental-health-journey/635106 May 31, 2023, 9:03am Genesee County Mental Health AJ: 'I'm still here,' one man's mental health journey jfbeck_99_272012 <figure role="group" class="caption caption-div align-center"> <div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img alt="Rachel Mieney and AJ Scheuerman" class="image-style-large" height="980" loading="lazy" src="https://www.thebatavian.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/2023-05/rachel-and-aj.jpg?itok=b5e7elpK" width="800"> </div> </div> <figcaption>Rachel Mieney, clinical director of Genesee County Mental Health, and AJ Scheuerman, a peer guide who has been diagnosed with bipolar and schizoaffective disorder, talk about mental health issues at the county health facility in Batavia.</figcaption> </figure> <p><span>AJ Scheuerman was 16 when he had his first episode of a yet-to-be-diagnosed mental health illness. It was not only the first incident, but also unforgettable, leaving AJ’s family broken, confused, physically injured, and the teenager left to deal with the consequences in a locked psychiatric ward.</span></p><p><span>Although AJ’s story may seem atypical compared to the millions of seemingly able-minded people suffering from depression on a day-to-day basis, they all share the importance of this month and&nbsp;what it means to be in tune with one’s own mental health awareness.</span></p>