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August 8, 2016 - 10:38am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Botts-Fiorito Post #576, American Legion, Le Roy, news.

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Photos and info submitted by Jerry Diskin.

The American Legion post in Le Roy, Botts-Fiorito Post #576, conducted a flag disposal ceremony Sunday afternoon, burning flags that had been dropped off with the Legion and deemed no longer serviceable.

The ceremony was held at the Northwoods Sportsman Club on Gulf Road with the assistance of the Le Roy Volunteer Fire Department. 

There were approximately 335 flags disposed of in the ceremony, including the giant flag that was replaced on the Orcon Industries building on Lake Road.

The ceremony was conducted by Post Commander Don Schafer. 

The ceremony is based on Public Law 344, passed by the 94th Congress in 1978:

"When the flag is in such a condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, it should not be cast aside or used in any way that might be viewed as disrespectful to the national colors, but should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning or by some other method in harmony with the reverence and respect we owe to the emblem representing our country.”

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August 7, 2016 - 1:03pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Empire State Antique Truck Show, Stafford, news.

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These photos are from yesterday's Empire State Antique Truck Show in Stafford (the event is continuing today) were submitted by Rob Radley.

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August 7, 2016 - 12:43pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Deal of the Day, Sponsored Post, advertisement.

This is our third day of running out new Deal of the Day program.

Many people have already registered, which will make it easier to jump right in and buy today's deals. If you haven't registered (see the link below), you should, even if you aren't planning to purchase today. It will help you make a quicker purchase in the future.  Some deals do go fast.  The registration system makes it easier for you to know which items you are eligible to purchase within the four-month time frame.

You will still need to log into your PayPal account, or pay with a credit card through PayPal, to complete your purchase (we've always used PayPal for Deal of the Day, so if you think you haven't used it before to make a Deal of the Day purchase, you have).

Finally, this isn't the same registration used on The Batavian for comments and such.

August 7, 2016 - 12:05pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Attica Rodeo, Attica, sports, rodeo.

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Being from California, raised by a family with deep roots in Southeastern Colorado, I always enjoy being around cowboys, so it's always fun to spend an afternoon at the Attica Rodeo.

For more rodeo coverage, visit the Wyoming County Free Press.

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August 7, 2016 - 10:39am
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire services, agriculture, batavia, news.

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It's been a long time since there was a grain bin incident in Genesee County, which is one reason a training session for volunteer firefighters at the Fire Training Center on State Street Road was so important yesterday, said Jim Bouton, one of the county's emergency management coordinators.

"It's important to keep up your skills and learn what has been working and not working over the years," Bouton said. 

Saturday's training was conducted by Dan Neena, director of the National Education Center for Agriculture Safety. The training session was co-sponsored by the Genesee County Farm Bureau and some local farmers attended, as well.

A farm worker might enter a grain bin because the top has become encrusted or for other maintenance work, and if he or she falls into the grain, can easily become trapped.

A rescuer can't simply grab a person buried in grain and pull him or her out.

"Once you’re trapped in the grain, the deeper you are, the more pounds that have to be exerted to release the person," Bouton said. "If we were try to pull a farmer who was trapped up to his neck, it would take like 650 pounds of pressure to try and pull him straight out. Well, that’s not possible."

Neena showed rescuers how to use a modular tube that is fitted around the victim's body, sunk into the grain, and then grain can be removed with an auger to suck the grain out of the tube, allowing the person to climb out of the grain.

The other danger for firefighters and the victim is that a grain bin is a confined space, which means potentially lower oxgyn levels, so rescuers need to be aware when breathing aparatus is required.

Firefighters were also trained how to use an especially designed saw for the task, to cut vents in the side of the grain bin so that grain can be released from around the person.

To learn about becoming a volunteer firefighter in your community, visit ReadyGenesee.com.

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August 6, 2016 - 6:30pm

No purchase necessary. For a coupon code for a free ad, email [email protected] posted in jobs available, housing and autos are $5 each for 14 days. All others are free.

August 6, 2016 - 3:26pm
posted by Billie Owens in accident, Alabama.

A three-car accident with minor injuries is reported at the intersection of Alleghany and Judge roads in Alabama. It is blocking traffic. Alabama fire and Mercy medic #2 are responding.

August 6, 2016 - 12:00pm

Vitsit D&D Cleaning for more information on services and products. Like us on Facebook to stay up to date on new products! We hope to see you this Saturday!

August 5, 2016 - 7:00pm

Super location for this solid and well maintained 4 bedroom, 2 full bath home! This is a home you must come into to see everything it has to offer - excellent layout and a space for everything, there is over 33ft. of closet space-storage galore! Also, an extra large garage! Many updates including tear off roof, windows and entry door. The home features a white Georgia marble fireplace with gas insert for cozy nights! Outside has awesome 12x16 deck overlooking peaceful park like backyard for fun summer nights! Great neighborhood and neighbors and awesome location makes this one a must visit! Call Lynn Bezon today at Reliant Real Estate 585-344-4663 to see this beauty or click here to view this listing.

August 5, 2016 - 5:37pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, batavia, pembroke, Darien, news.

Scott Thomas McCoy, 47, of Main Road, Pembroke, is charged with criminal possession of a hypodermic instrument and unlawful growing of cannabis. McCoy was allegedly found with marijuana plants growing on his property in Pembroke and hypodermic needles. The investigation is ongoing and additional charges may be pending.

Bonnie Marie Breissinger, 62, of County Line Road, Darien, is charged with criminal contempt, 1st, and harassment, 2nd. Breissinger allegedly subjected another person to physical contact in violation of a no offensive conduct order of protection.

Robert Arthur Shuttleworth III, of Scotland Road, Akron, is charged with theft of services. Shuttleworth was arrested in Depew on a warrant out of Town of Batavia Court. He was jailed on $500 bail.

August 5, 2016 - 5:22pm

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The tourism division of the Genesee County Chamber of Commerce wants to help local poke hunting to go well, so to assist trainers, the Chamber has established a special group on Facebook: Pokémon Go in Genesee County, NY.

Anybody can join and post their local pokemon hunting tips and suggestions, including any pokestops or gyms they think people should know about.

August 5, 2016 - 5:15pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in family reunions, batavia, news.

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Submitted:

The families of the late Baptist and Christina (Costa) Stefani, and Dominic and Johanna (Rigoni) Costa gathered for their 36th consecutive annual family reunion at  Mumford’s Freeman Park on Sunday, July 24, 2016.  Both founding families made their homes in Lime Rock.

Christopher and Ann (Tracy) Publow of Rochester were this year’s event chairs.

After a cook-out topped off with a buffet of cookies and ice cream novelties, there was a short business meeting.  A review of family news since last year included:

Andrea Stefani, the daughter of Richard and Melanie Stefani of Batavia, married Jacob Klos of Watertown on July 18, 2015.

Samantha Blake gave birth to our newest family member, Ryder Christopher Barclay of Byron on May 16, 2016.

Twenty-month old Kate Aradine was the youngest in attendance.  She is the daughter of Jeffrey and Bethany (Pocock) Aradine of Bergen.

Bethany’s parents, Merlin and Marilyn (Costa) Pocock of Bergen were the longest married couple in attendance, at 41 years of wedded bliss.

Dorothy (Stefani) Bater of Leroy was the oldest person in attendance, followed closely by Dolores (Stefani) Lathan of Caledonia, who is one day younger.

Following the meeting, the family took photos, made spin art paintings, pelted each other in a water balloon toss, and tossed Cheetoes onto the shaving-cream covered heads of partners in a messy game of laughter and endurance (followed by cleaning each other off!).

Next year’s event chairs are Linda (Orlando) Totten of Elba, Carol (Orlando) Panepento of Pavilion, Gloria (Orlando) Oliver of Leroy, and Amy Panepento of Leroy.

Top photo: Dorothy (Stefani) Bater of Leroy, Marilyn (Costa) and Merlin Pocock of Bergen, and their granddaughter, Kate Aradine of Bergen were the oldest, longest married and youngest in attendance in this year’s Stefani-Costa family reunion.

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Linda (Orlando) Totten of Elba and Ray Stefani of Holley struck a pose while enjoying the reunion’s beautiful weather

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Christine (Lathan) Rodwell of Rush and Michelle Goldstin of Piffard teamed up in the Cheetoes Toss.

August 5, 2016 - 5:05pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in steve hawley, veterans.

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Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) today announced that about 30 seats are still available for his Ninth Annual Patriot Trip to Washington D.C. The trip is open to local veterans and their family members with priority going to first time attendees. The trip will take place September 15-18 and will include a multitude of memorials and historic sites honoring veterans in the D.C. area.

“This is one of my favorite events of the entire year and I am honored to give back to the brave men and women and their families who have fought for our country’s freedom,” Hawley said. “This is an amazing opportunity for an affordable price and I encourage local veterans and their loved ones to join us on this amazing journey.”

Attractions Hawley plans to visit this year include:

  • WWII Memorial
  • Korean War Memorial
  • Vietnam War Memorial
  • Iwo Jima – The Marine Corps Memorial
  • American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial
  • Air Force Memorial
  • 911 Memorial at the Pentagon
  • Arlington National Cemetery, including the Changing of the Guard
  • Wreath Laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns – Vietnam Veterans

Only about 30 seats remain and are available on a first come, first served basis. If you or a veteran you know want more information about this year’s Patriot Trip IX, please call 585-589-5780 or email [email protected].

August 5, 2016 - 5:02pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Empire Access, batavia, business.

Press release:

Empire Access has received a $3.4 million grant award from the New NY Broadband Program.  The New NY Broadband Program was developed to help fund the expansion of high-speed broadband Internet service in New York State, with an ultimate goal of ensuring that all New Yorkers have high-speed broadband access by the end of 2018.

Empire Access is a locally owned and operated fast-growing telecommunications company, offering high-speed Internet, digital television, phone and security services to homes and businesses – all enabled by Fiber Optic technology – to over 25 communities in Upstate New York and Northern Pennsylvania.

The New NY Broadband Program grant provides Empire Access with significant funding for the expansion of high-speed broadband services to more than 1900 homes and businesses in the Southern Tier region of New York, including Burdett, Lodi and Odessa. These specific areas were identified by the New York State Broadband Program Office as underserved or unserved in Phase I of a multi-phase grant process.

Empire will offer residents in the awarded areas super-fast Internet service with standard speeds of 100 Mbps download x 20 Mbps upload, along with an even faster 1 Gigabit per second option. High definition digital television, digital phone, security and smart home services will also be available. All services will utilize a state-of-the-art 100% Fiber Optic dedicated connection.                       

“Empire Access is excited to be part of the state’s broadband initiative to expand high-speed broadband services throughout New York,” said Jim Baase, Chief Operating Officer, Empire Access. “We’re looking forward to working with Governor Cuomo and the state of New York to accomplish this goal.”

August 5, 2016 - 12:00pm

The third annual Hometown Trail has kicked off and a variety of shops in Genesee County have joined together to offer shoppers a fun way to explore unique stores and win prizes along the way. The Hometown Trail 2016 shops include:

  • Country Hill -- 11119 W. Park St., Pavilion. 584-3540. Tues-Fri 10-6, Sat 10-4.
  • The Hobby Horse -- 54-56 Main St., Le Roy. 768-8130. Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 12-3.
  • Walking in the Woods -- 3456 Galloway Road, Batavia. 344-2428. Fri-Sun 11-5.
  • Torrey’s Farm Market -- 7142 Oak Orchard Road, Elba. 355-1005. Fri & Sat 10-5.
  • The Mill -- 7061 Oak Orchard Rd., Elba. 746-1677. Thurs 12-5, Fri 10-5, Sat 10-4.
  • Vintage Vogue -- 36 Main St., Le Roy. 502-5333. M-F 10-6, Sat 10-4.
  • The Divine Tree -- 19 Main St., Le Roy. 502-5386. Mon. 10-6, Tues. 2-6, Wed. 10-6, Th-Fri. 10-7, Sat. 11-4.
  • Buttercrumbs Bakery -- 13 E. Main St., Corfu. 599-4550. Mon-Fri 7am-2pm, Sat 7am-2pm, Sunday: CLOSED.
  • The Farm -- 9079 Alleghany Road, Corfu. 409-1433. Open seven days 10am-5pm.
  • Danielle’s Countryside Antiques -- 8966 Alleghany Road, Corfu. 599-3808. Thurs-Sun 11-5.
  • Country Cottage -- 10448 Harper Road, Darien Center. 547-9591. Open 7 days 11-6.
  • Berried Treasures -- 13219 Broadway, Alden. 356-9895. Tues-Fri 10-4, Sat 8-2.

Participate in the Hometown Trail this summer by shopping at these Genesee County shops. Get your card stamped at each shop by Aug. 31st to be entered in the grand prize drawings to be held on Sept. 12. Participants who collect all shop stamps will be entered in the Grand Prize Drawing for a $100 gift certificate that can be used at any of the participating shops.

Participants that collect all shop stamps PLUS participate in any of our bonus features on Facebook will be entered in our Ultimate Shopper Prize. The more you participate, the more chances you have to win! Winners will be notified and featured on our Facebook page
In addition to these great prizes, there will also be a trivia question giveaways on our Facebook page - The Hometown Trail - Click here.

Maps can be found at any of these shops. Trail-goers can explore along the way and get their map stamped at each store until the end of August when maps will be turned in for prize drawings. Find out more on The Hometown Trail Facebook Page. 

August 5, 2016 - 8:21am
posted by Howard B. Owens in GLOW Corporate Cup, batavia, business, news, sports.

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Collin Mulcahy, 22, of Batavia, and representing Batavia Downs, finished well ahead of the rest of the 1,000-participant field in the 2016 GLOW Corporate Cup 5K at Centennial Park on Thursday.

Mulcahy's time in the 90-degree weather was 15:31.

The top woman runner (next photo) was Kim Mills, from Freed Maxic, with a time of 19:30.

The top team was Batavia City Schools.

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August 5, 2016 - 7:44am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Bontrager Real Estate & Auction Service, batavia, news.

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Hundreds of people turned out to the first day, yes, just the first day, of a two-day auction fully of items that were on the farm property of Roger Saile.

The Saile farm has been in the family since the early 19th century, and many of the items kept in barns and outhouses are more than 100 years old.

There was also a collection of old trucks, a Model A, a plane, several tractors and farm equipment from the 19th century.

Saile, 90, passed April 30 as the result of a fire at his residence.

The auction continues at 9 a.m., Saturday, at 8056 Oak Orchard Road, Batavia. It is being conducted by Bontrager Real Estate & Auction Service. For more information, click here.

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More photos after the jump:

August 4, 2016 - 9:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Pokemon Go, darien lake theme park, Darien, business.

We heard Darien Lake Theme Park is a real hot spot for Pokemon Go players, we suggested it as a story to our news partner, 13WHAM, and here's their report.

August 4, 2016 - 7:12pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, City Church, St. Anthony's Batavia.

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The parking lot at Liberty Street and Central Avenue, part of the rich tradition of Batavia's Southside community, experienced a "revival," of sorts, early Thursday night when a couple hundred people enjoyed free food and entertainment courtesy of the congregation at City Church.

"We're spreading the love to this side of town," said Pauly Lamendola, of Le Roy, a regular attendee of City Church, the Main Street evangelical house of worship that recently purchased the former St. Anthony's Roman Catholic Church from the Diocese of Buffalo.

According to the Rev. Marty Macdonald, pastor of City Church, "The Picnic in the Parking Lot" was organized as a kick-off to future events and services at both the church and community center.

"It's all about lifting people up and bringing some hope," Macdonald said. "We're focused on building relationships and friendships and sharing God's love."

Macdonald said the church has big plans for the property, which is need of much work.

"We haven't pinpointed anything (specific) yet, but we've already put on a brand-new roof and new electric service, and we're working on the heating, we're painting and cleaning it up," he said.

He added that the pews, stained glass and pipework of St. Anthony's Church will remain intact as he and his staff prepare to launch a weekly service either on Saturday evening or Sunday afternoon.

Several of about 30 volunteers from City Church, some wearing orange T-shirts and others wearing blue T-shirts, served hot dogs, hamburgs, french fries, ice cream and brownies, while Paul Berardini of Big Pauly's Pizza cooked his sheet pizzas on ovens in the former St. Anthony's School basement.

"Pastor Marty called me and asked me to help out and I said, 'Sure,' " Berardini said. "After all, I went to elementary school here, and it's close to home as I grew up on Wood Street. This place is a big part of the Southside; the church was a staple for us."

Those in attendance tonight were entertained by the Divine dance troupe and the City Church praise band led by Macdonald's son, Garrett.

Some came for the food, some to relive their time spent at the St. Anthony's Lawn Fete, and others -- such as Dawn Orlando, of Wood Street -- because they just happened to be walking by and were invited to partake.

For all the reasons, 13-year-old Paige Vinyard, of Perry, who attends City Church with her family, may have said it best:

"We thought it would be a good idea to support our church," she said. "I think it's wonderful that they're doing this -- showing how much they love the community and showing people the love of God."

Picnic sponsors included R.J. Nicometo Electric, Attica Carquest Auto & Ace Hardware, Country Cottage, Craig's Mowing & Landscaping, Crazy Cheap Cars, Divine Dance Studio, Wortzman Furniture, Jeremy & Tina Northup, Max Pies Furniture, Oakfield Fitness, Big Pauly's Pizza, Rick Caton, Terance Cranston Construction, Vinyl Sticks, Weekly Rooms LLC, Southside Deli and Batavia Cross-training.

Top photo: A couple hundred folks came out on a hot and humid Thursday night to attend The Picnic in the Parking Lot at St. Anthony's Church, which is now part of the ministry of City Church.

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The church's Divine dance troupe and praise band entertain the picnic-goers.

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Paul Berardini and Jessica Rae of Big Pauly's Pizza supported the cause by donating sheet pizzas, made with Pauly's own recipe in the St. Anthony's basement ovens.

August 4, 2016 - 5:46pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, public service committee, csx, railroad disaster.

Crude oil makes up the lion's share of commodities rumbling over railways traversing Genesee County. Ethanol is number two. And if a railcar carrying one of these highly volatile products derailed, it would not be good.

"Neither one of those things are really good products for us to see 100-car trains going through with 30,000 gallons on each one," said Tim Yaeger, county Emergency Services manager, who gave a review of his department Tuesday at the Public Service Committee.

"That's a lot of product going through. Bakken is down to one to two shipments a day; it was up to three, to four, even five at one time, but petroleum prices drive that."

(Bakken oil comes from a massive shale formation primarily in North Dakota, but it is also found in Montana and two Canadian provinces.)

And yet any rail disaster here now would likely be more ably dealt with than in the past.

There's a couple of reasons for that.

Firstly, the railroad operator, CSX, is more concentrated these days on public safety that in moving products swiftly. That's the sense Yaeger said he got from attending a CSX hazardous material outreach training program, which he lauded as "excellent."

"I can tell you that CSX really impressed me -- their commitment to safety, their commitment to communities," Yaeger said. "It used to be their number-one goal was to get the train moving again. Now it's really safety and making sure that the community is safe before they worry about moving trains again."

The emphasis on beneficial PR is probably, at least partially, rooted in the call for industry-wide reform that followed the company's disastrous derailment accident in Lynchburg, Va., in May 2014 in which tankers carrying crude oil caught fire along with the James River.

At the time, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board said it was a "wake-up call" for a slow, ineffectual federal rule-making process that failed to protect Amercians in a time when the amount of crude oil being moved by rail in the United States quadrupled in less that a decade.

"They've showed their weaknesses over the years," Yaeger acknowleged. "They show their ability now to respond better and integrate with the local communities as well. I was pleased."

Secondly, in conjunction with CSX training, representatives from the Department of Environmental Conservation traveled throughout the state in the spring developing emergency response plans for the entire rail system in the State of New York, working with local officials in each county.

"Basically, they come in and look at hazards within that area -- with about a five-mile buffer on either side of the tracks -- and find out what type of infrastructure is in the area -- schools, hospitals, things like that in the community -- and then identify the resources that we need to respond to that area," Yaeger explained to the committee.

In his CSX disaster training, Yaeger said he learned that "the entire heat signature goes up, not outward. So our concern, the fire service concern, is that we can't get near it because the amount of BTUs that come off the material is difficult. We have to basically wait for it to burn down.

"Luckily, 'the whip' -- its path -- is not that long. If we have a spill or a movement downhill or into a waterway ... it's a bad event, (but) it's really impressive to see what happens when that catches fire and we have multiple products. The actual damage is about 500 to 1,000 feet, so although it looks terrible, it's not that bad and that heat is going straight up."

Today, first responders in the fire service have full masks to wear to protect themselves from the fumes in fighting this type of conflagration. But they also have a different view about the appropriate response, as compared to, say, the state.

"The state has a different philosophy," Yaeger said, "that we're going in and save the day. And talking to the experts, you're going to be fried before you get close enough to try and do any of those things."

Rather, firefighters are going to use water to cool the exposures first, cool the tanks, and keep them from exploding. (This is known as a B.L.E.V.E -- pronounced "blevy" -- or Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosion, which is an explosion caused by the rupture of a vessel containing pressurized liquid above its boiling point.) 

Foam is not going to be employed initially.

"When the fire's out, we try and suppress the vapors, and then we'll be applying the foam."

Useful, too, is a new software program in the Emergency Services office to track "any shipment of cargo through this county," Yaeger said. 

Genesee County training for reaction to volatile commodity spills on highways or railways is continuing with sessions in Baltimore, and Pueblo, Colo.

Overall, emergency response education is strong and productive, with 344 students having participated this year in state programs at the local fire training center, and 22 students completed advanced EMT classes.

On the communications side, Emergency Services is testing pagers with new technology that allows them to switch between 800 megahertz (emergency dispatch radio) and VHF (paging) frequencies. They can be purchased, in conjunction with the Sheriff's Office, with government grant money.

After the county switched to the new emergency dispatch system, procedures changed; certain channels were no longer available and this created issues with first responders who were out of radio range.

The new pagers being tested are not radios. Those paged to respond to a call can't speak on them, but they can hear emergency dispatches and the directives of the incident commander on scene.

Before, responders would be paged on their pager, but then have to get within range of an 800 megahertz radio frequency to hear the emergency dispatch conversations. The new pagers are like "little scanners" that can switch between the two banks "to hear both sides of the conversation." They cost a couple of hundred dollars more than the old pagers and would only be provided to key individuals who "are always responding."

In terms his investigation team, Yaeger said workers are continuing their certifications and they are looking to retool how they do business in light of "the cancer issues that were coming out of the fire service."

Example: there are now more detailed processes in place for handling contaminated gear -- evaluating what gets bagged, what gets disposed of, what gets sent out and cleaned and brought back into service.

As regards fire records management, Yaeger said that 18 fire departments and first responders are now using the same records management system. Le Roy Ambulance Service is expected to join soon. 

Public Service Committee Member Rochelle Stein asked how that was going, if it's serving the communities' needs and if everybody likes it.

" 'Like' is a subjective term," Yaeger quipped, and that got a laugh. He offered the word "tolerate" in lieu of "like" and credited Bill Schutt, West Battalion coordinator for the Genesee County Emergency Management Office, for deftly handling the customer-service aspect of things.

"We're 100-percent reporting," Yaeger noted. "That's very important to New York State. Everybody's reporting their incidents. We're breaking some records. We had some issues, but it's working well."

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Contact: Howard Owens, publisher (howard (at) the batavian dot com); (585) 250-4118

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