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July 11, 2016 - 5:20pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in events, middlebury, Linden, batavia, World War II, Germany..

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On July 4, 1944, 1st Lt. Leonard B. Fuller had written in a letter home: 

Well anyway, as I set here looking at these pictures it sure brings back some swell memories of all the hell raising and work I have done around home there. The picture of Doug by the garage there is o.k.! I sure would like to have my picture taken in that same spot.

It was evident in Leonard Fuller’s letters that he was very homesick, as he wrote about it often. His father would send him pictures of the farm, complete with captions. The photo he was referring to was of his young nephew Dougie Fuller.

On July 7, 1944, his P-51 Mustang was hit by flak over Blankenhain, Germany. The exploding shells shot from the ground forced Fuller to bail out of his aircraft. During his descent, his parachute collapsed when he appeared to be trying to avoid some trees and a barn. Subsequently, he fell to his death and was buried in the Old Cemetery in Blankenhain.

On Sunday afternoon, under an azure sky dotted with large white, fluffy clouds, friends and family gathered at the West Middlebury Cemetery on Koppe Road, East Bethany, to honor Fuller. Just two days prior, a similar event took place in Weimer, Germany. 

Citizens from two different countries, divided by war more than 70 years ago, united to pay their final respects to an American soldier.

Around April 2015, Bernd Schmidt, a historian from Weimer, contacted Donna Bonning. Bonning, who had been working on a project for the Sons of the American Revolution, posted a photo of Fuller’s tombstone on the Findagrave website in 2006. Come to find out, Schmidt had seen the photo she had posted and emailed her. Through several exchanges of emails and after finding a treasure of letters, photos documents, and a few artifacts in Wayne Fuller’s attic, a nephew of Leonard’s, the puzzle pieces of the last days of a local veteran began to form a picture.

“I enjoy photographing tombstones and sharing the photos with others,” Bonning said. “Once in awhile I have come across stones that cause me to stop and take a second look. Leonard's stone was one of those. But my thoughts didn't drift very far beyond those engraved letters and beautiful wings. I never really stopped to think about what he was like as a person. What his life was like. Who his family was. What was the meaning behind those words...Forever Honored. Forever Mourned. 

“I found out what that meant the day I laid eyes on the Missing in Action and Killed in Action telegrams that Wayne told me about. I 'met' Leonard on the day we opened up a box from the attic and saw the black and white photo of him in his dress uniform.”

Leonard apparently had quite a sense of humor as well.

Dec. 20, 1942

Well, I just got my picture in the noon mail so when I get to the post office to get some airmail stamps I will send it home. Get a load of General McArthur in the ruff.

Jan. 1, 1943

I got a letter from Betty yesterday and she said that she received my picture. From what she said about it, I think I better get up there and take care of things. Me, I like to have people tell me nice things like that to my face. I suppose I will have to put up with it because I realize that I am quite naturally good looking. Well, why shouldn't I be good looking? Look at my mom and pop. I should get at least a quarter for that remark.

Not only did Leonard miss his home and family, he was also a very patriotic man. On May 28, 1944 he wrote:

Say, you know I wish a lot of people in the States could see some of these forces that go over into Germany day after day. Boy, it really gives me a thrill to know that I am fighting with an outfit like we have over here. When you can see a thousand bombers in the air along with as many fighters, it really gives a guy the idea that there are others around that are over there for the same reason. Every time I go over there I thank my lucky stars that I am an American all the way around. 

In a witness statement from Air Corps Capt. Leslie D. Minchen of the 357 Fighter Squadron, 355 Fighter Group, Station F-122 dated July 7, 1944, Minchen wrote:

I was leading Custard Squadron when we attacked fifty plus Me 410’s. Lt. Fuller was flying number three in my flight. The F/A led us over a town where we got heavy accurate flak at about 7,000 feet. Capt. Haviland, who was flying my wing saw him jettison his canopy, but did not see him get out. Lt. Fuller called me on the radio and said he was getting out. I answered his call and he said he was okay. I did not see him bail out. Air Corps Capt. Leslie D. Minchen.

In 1949 the pilot’s parents, Buell and Clara Fuller, traveled through the Iron Curtain (via Russia) to visit his gravesite and sprinkled dirt from the family farm on his grave – taking small comfort in the fact that he was resting in at least some American soil.

An excerpt from an article written in the Farm Journal, May 1951, recounts the visit of Buell and Clara and a description of the events which lead to the first lieutenant’s demise:

The cemetery comes into view...The caretaker’s cottage is only a few feet from their son’s grave. Ten “foreign” solders are buried in the little plot: French, Italian and one American – Leonard B. Fuller. 

A wooden framework encloses the Fuller grave, within which a fine-leaved boarder of green, carefully trimmed, sets off a bed of marigolds. Grouped around the white cross are delicate waxen blossoms of tuberous begonias...

...The villagers watched the two planes fighting to a finish. Suddenly the American plane was hit, and from it parachuted the pilot. He seemed to be maneuvering to avoid a clump of trees and a barn, to land in a cleared filed beyond. About 200 feel from the ground, the ‘chute suddenly collapsed and crashed to earth. They rushed to help him, but he had died instantly...

“The passage of time doesn’t make these things easier,” said Genesee County Historian Michael Eula, Ph.D. “His life resonated with me on several levels. I saw, in photos, a man shouldering responsibilities a young man should never have. They rose to meet the challenge of war.

“The conflict was not to be seen as what it was against, but what it was for...Freedom to enjoy liberties...The war was about a daily reality of what one was sure of and familiar: To return home for a meal, their girl, family, and friends. The ultimate tribute would be that maybe someday, the sacrifice of those like Fuller’s would be to avoid the sacrifice of so many of young people. May they never be forgotten.”

Leonard flew 40 missions in the P-51 Mustang and logged in 180 combat hours in a four-month time period.

According to Acepilots.com, North American Aviation originally designed the Mustang in response to a British (England) specification. The first prototype was started in April 1940 and was delivered to England for test flights by the end of 1941.

The first Mustangs were powered by the Allison V-1710 engine. While it was a good engine, it didn’t operate well at high altitudes. 

In April 1942, a British test pilot, Ronald Harker, while impressed with the plane, suggested that it would be a natural fit with the Rolls Royce Merlin 60-series engine – well-suited to high altitudes. The first Merlin-equipped Mustang, the P-51B, flew in November 1942. At 30,000 feet, the plane reached 440 mph, almost 100 mph faster than the Allison-equipped Mustang at that altitude. 

As it worked out, Craig Wadsworth, of the Geneseo War Planes Museum, was instrumental in having not one, but three P-51s do a “flyover” during the memorial ceremony.

“When I spoke with the pilot for Quick Silver at the airshow, Scott 'Scooter' Yoak, said he was going to bring along a few friends,” Bonning said. “Could it be any more amazing than that? In spirit I think of Leonard and two of his fighter pilot friends. One being Francis Eshelman who took the very last picture of Leonard’s P-51 – named MYRT II; and the other being Joe Engelbreit, who wrote a letter home to Leonard’s parent’s a month after his plane was lost. He still had no idea that Leonard was declared KIA (killed in action).

“When I see the one (photo) of Joe I imagine that he is looking to the sky and thinking of his friend and hoping his friend makes it back okay. They all flew in the same missions together.”

In a letter dated July 8, 1944, Air Corps Capt. W. H. Rush sent a “Missing Aircrew Report” to Commanding Officer, 355th Fighter Group, AAF Station F-122, APO No. 637. It stated in part: 

On July 7, 1944, at 0635 hours, Lt. Fuller piloting aircraft OS-E, took off from this field on an operational mission with the 357th Fighter Squadron. His call sign was Custard 82... This office had no radio contact with Lt. Fuller during the flight.

When Lt. Fuller failed to return to this base with the 357th Fighter Squadron, this office immediately notified combat operations.

Every effort was made to contact Lt. Fuller...

Leonard was born in May 1921 in Linden. He attended Linden grade school, graduated from Batavia High School in 1939, and belonged to the Bethany Grange. He enlisted in Air Corps on Oct. 20, 1942 in Buffalo. He trained in San Antonio, Uvalde, San Angelo and Mission, all in Texas.

On Oct. 1, 1943 he was commissioned second lieutenant. On Feb. 29, 1944 he sailed for England and was based at Steeple-Morden Field with the 8th Air Force 357 Squadron, 355 Group, 65 Wing Fighter. 

At the time of his death, he was credited with destroying seven-and-one-half planes and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Purple Heart.

In September 1950, his remains were brought to the United States and buried in the family lot in West Middlebury Cemetery. 

Although Wayne didn’t know his uncle, the loss of the man hit him at the laying of the wreath, and noted, with a slight twinkle in his eye, that part of his plane is buried with him.

In a recent email sent to Bonning, Schmidt wrote:

After 72 years we in Germany also wish to think of the victims of this war because we have these so-called enemies to THANK for our freedom and the ending of the war.

The old and young inhabitants of Blankenhain where Leonard crashed on July 7, 1944 and where he was buried for some years are very interested in information about Leonard. After all, the crash in their town is also a part of their history. And hatred and being enemies are long forgotten.

This past week…on July 8th, residents and guests of Blankenhain held a ceremony of remembrance for American Airman Leonard Fuller at the Old Cemetery in Blankenhain where he was buried for six years. Up until recently he was almost forgotten and unknown. However he now has a name again; we know his story and the suffering of his parents. Leonard is also not forgotten in Germany.

See related: Honoring the sacrifice of a fallen hero

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Editor's note: The above two photos were submitted by Donna Bonning.

July 7, 2016 - 8:00am
posted by Julia Ferrini in events, middlebury, Linden.

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(Photo submitted by Donna Bonning.)

On this date in 1944, 1st Lt. Leonard B. Fuller’s P-51 Mustang was hit by flack in Blankenhain, Germany. The exploding shells shot from the ground forced Fuller to bail out of his aircraft. During his descent, his parachute collapsed when he appeared to be trying to avoid some trees and a barn. Subsequently, he fell to his death and was buried in the Old Cemetery in Blankenhain. 

In 1949 the pilot’s parents, Buell and Clara Fuller, traveled through the Iron Curtain (via Russia) to visit his gravesite and sprinkled dirt from the family farm on his grave – taking small comfort in the fact that he was resting in at least some American soil.

At 1:30 p.m. Sunday, an Honor Guard ceremony will be held for the first lieutenant at West Middlebury Cemetery, 4949 W. Middlebury Road, East Bethany.

On Friday, a similar ceremony will be held in Blankenhain. 

In April 2015, Bernd Schmidt, a historian from Weimer, Germany, contacted Donna Bonning and told her he was very interested in the Fuller family and asked if she had any information on them. Bonning was working on a project for the Sons of the American Revolution when she posted a photo of Fuller’s tombstone on the Findagrave website in 2006. Schmidt had seen the photo and contacted her. Through several exchanges of emails and after finding a treasure of letters, photos documents, and a few artifacts, the puzzle pieces of the last day of a local veteran began to form a picture.

From an initial email from Schmidt:

We generations after World War II (I was born in 1949) have another view (of the war) and (would) like to change the minds about enemies. 

We like to remember for all victims of the stupid war. Finally, all Germans were happy that the Allied (Forces) finished it (the war) in 1945. Our town and area (was) surrendered peaceful(ly) without shots (fired).

I (have) know(n) about Leonard Fuller a long time. Friends told me about the U.S. pilot who was killed in 1944. But it was an accident with parachuting. (Some Allied (soldiers) were killed from Nazi officials. Terrible and again(st) Geneva (Convention).

The parents of Leonard came to East Germany in the Russian Zone to look for the grave of their son. Really, they found it in a good condition. Kind people were watching for it. I think, later Leonard was reburied to bring to the States or on a Military Cemetery...

In September 1950, Fuller’s remains were sent home to Linden.

Recently, Schmidt let the family know that the citizens of Blankenhain would like to hold a remembrance ceremony at the Old Cemetery where Fuller’s former grave was located. According to Bonning, it appears that Fuller and his parents are “local legends in a way and an early part of Blankenhain’s post-war history when it was plunged into the horrors of Communism.”

At the ceremony July 10 in Middlebury, Assemblyman Steve Hawley will be in attendance. Additionally, Genesee County Historian Michael Eula, Ph.D., and Professor Garth Swanson will make a few remarks. Sarah Thorton will also read a speech by Schmidt.

After the ceremony there is going to be a large display at West Middlebury Baptist Church located across the road, which will include many of the photos, letters and artifacts belonging to the Fuller family. It tells the story of his life and sacrifice, and that of his family.

June 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in events.
Event Date and Time: 
July 28, 2016 - 11:30am

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April 20, 2016 - 11:37am
posted by Julia Ferrini in batavia, alexander, Attica, events.

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The pride and joy of the man’s job now sits idle most days, his namesake lovingly wiping the dirt from her fenders as a myriad of emotions floated across his brow. Douglas Mess’s John Deere 4020 is built for heavy work, but could also be used for lighter duties, and as his son put it, “it’s the heart of any farm.”

Family and friends gathered at the Spring Farm Tuesday evening for the second annual Douglas Mess Memorial Tractor ride. April 19 marked the one year anniversary of the death of the 52-year-old farmer. As a way to remember the father, brother and friend, those who knew him best revved up their tractors and made the approximately six-mile trek – from the Spring Farm on Chaddock Road to Baskin Livestock on Creek Road – in celebration of a man’s life.

“Most days are fine,” said the eldest of three boys, Doug Mess. “I still have my off days.”

Since last April, the Mess’s farm in Attica had been off limits. Within the last few months, the boys have been able to go back. 

“We aren’t operating the farm right now,” Doug said. “The cows have been gone for almost a year and now we're just getting things cleaned up.”

“It’s still a shock,” said longtime family friend Dale Spring. “Our families grew up together. Our kids were in 4-H together. He was an awesome guy. He would help you no matter what. If he couldn't talk ya through it, he'd come down and help.”

Sixteen tractors in all and double the number of friends and family met to honor the man.

“There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t think about him,” Spring said. “Every morning, after he was done milking his cows he would drive by my farm...”

As a way to remember their employee, Bill Baskin and Susan Blackburn, Baskin’s wife, had a sign made dedicating their new truck shop to Douglas.

The gathering. The ride. It was a time to remember the man and not the incident surrounding his death.

See related: Murder of Douglas Mess a big loss for Baskin Livestock Attica woman charged with murder in missing man's death 

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March 15, 2016 - 6:26pm
posted by Billie Owens in public service committee, events, genesee county.

The donation of an "old school" ice rink, the status of flooded County Building #2, construction at the airport, Albany's inflexibility regarding bid procedures, and indigent defense were all topics of discussion at Monday afternoon's Public Service Committee meeting. 

Oh yes, and no filbert trees were available for sale this year from the Soil & Water Conservation District. But more on that later.

Highway Superintendent Tim Hens recommended that the committee accept the donation of an old-fashioned ice rink -- a veritable "duck pond" with "dasher boards" -- from Oakfield-Alabama Central School District (OACSD) for use at DeWitt Recreation Area off Cedar Street in the City of Batavia.

There is an area long designated for an ice rink in the master plan for DeWitt -- which is overseen by county Parks, Recreation and Forestry -- and if approved by the county Legislature, this is where the rink would be installed.

After a brief discussion, the committee unanimously approved recommending that the "as is" donation be accepted. It was originally paid for by OACSD with a $1,000 state grant.

"This is great for the county and the city," Hens said.

The Oakfield-Alabama district used the ice rink for two years, then it became problematic to maintain. A corps of volunteers will be needed to set it up, flood it with water, and keep it maintained during the winter.

"There's no Zamboni that comes with it," Hens quipped.

County Manager Jay Gsell agreed.

"It's skating in the park," Gsell said. "It's not Rockefeller Center. There won't be a Christmas tree."

Committee Member John Deleo asked about power and lighting for the ice rink.

Hens said all the possibilities are being looked at, but they are leaning toward LED with a solar-powered "hot box."

Water and sewer lines at DeWitt will be extended for a new restroom facility under construction, and lighting will be added at that time, Hens said. 

Deleo asked about parking to access the rink and Hens said if the rink is installed, the south parking lot would be opened in winter. Currently, only the north parking lot is kept open year-round.

The committee also voted to recommend approval of two candidates for the Parks, Recreation and Forestry Advisory Committee: Tom Clark and Jerome Gentry.

And Hens asked the committee to recommend awarding a bid to buy one cargo van with a sliding door for $25,000 or less for motor-pooling, and members agreed to this.

As for the recently flooded County Building #2 on West Main Street Road in the Town of Batavia, it has been fully remediated, Hens reported.

The contractor thoroughly dried the place out after a busted pipe caused extensive water damage during the winter. Mold and mildew were eradicated, even the floorboards in the information/technology area were raised and the space vacuumed.

Drying the facility cost $30,000. Repairs/plumbing/painting/tile work on top of that are estimated at $88,000, according to Hens. When allowable depreciation is factored into the mix, the total cost drops from $118,000 to $113,000 -- below the insurer's cap of $115,000 for this incident. The county's deductible is $10,000.

The contractor detailed 44 pages of work needed as a result of the mishap, which by all accounts would've been a lot worse if an employee hadn't stopped in on his day off, over the weekend, and found the broken pipe.

Hens said a private contractor will be employed to do the repairs, such as replacing tile, drywall, appyling a vinyl basecoat and other painting. This will enable county workers to stay on task with outdoor jobs that need to be done during the warmer months.

The new offices at the county airport will be completed by March 24, with the exception of "punch list items" like giving epoxy time to dry, then the big move -- read "big hassle" -- will ensue. The committee may hold its May meeting there, and get a tour. (The April 18 meeting of the Public Service Committee is already promised to the Sheriff's Office on Park Road.)

Lastly in terms of Hens' report, was the inscrutable logic of the state Comptroller's Office as regards the award of bids for highway contruction materials.

For example, take the weighty materials used for road bulding during the summer like asphalt -- whose price has dropped 15 to 20 percent due to the lower cost of crude oil and the price of gasoline -- or quarry stone. The price of these heavy cargo items is modified to account for hauling. So, take the low bidder then factor in another 50-cents-per-mile as the cost to get the materials to the job site.

They call it awarding a "catalog of options for vendors."

"This is the way counties in the Rochester region do business," Hens said. "Otherwise, I couldn't do my job."

But it's not the way the Comptroller's Office in Albany recommends doing business.

In fact, the mathematics appeared to stupefy the representative from the Comptroller's Office, despite an hour-long phone conversation with Hens articulating current procedures and the logic for them.

"That's frightening that someone can't understand that," Committee Chair Marianne Clattenburg said.

Gsell said it's actually not that they don't get it, it's that they lack flexibility and can't think outside the confines of their specific framework, making the gesture of a big square box with his hands. He cited New York's lack of national buying cooperatives and its dearth of "piggy-backing" to boost purchasing power as examples of New York government failures.

To avoid being scapegoated with an audit for not following the Comptroller's Office's recommendations to cease using a "catalog of options" approach, resolutions are being proposed for the Genesee County Legislature to sign. They are intended to underscore and articulate the local preference for doing business the way it has long been done by counties in the region.

And speaking of Albany, Public Defender Jerry Ader told the committee on Monday that he's asking for more money to defend the poor, something which is constitutionally the state's responsibility, but which has been palmed off onto counties for the past 45 years.

A grant for $344,200 is available, at no cost to the county, to help pay for indigents' legal bills, and he asked the committee to recommend accepting the grant. They unanimously agreed.

Ader also asked committee members to pass a resolution calling on the state to increase funding for indigent defense for all New York counties, not just the five counties (unspecified) which are now being sued by the American Civil Liberties Union for their allegedly poor defense of the poor.

The five counties are to be demo sites for a proposal to gradually allow the state, through the Office of Indigent Legal Services, to: oversee reimbursement of costs; ensure standards are met; and that caseloads are properly managed. Each county would simply administer the program.

"How do you justify not doing this for all counties?" Clattenburg asked.

Exactly, Ader said, "you can't unring the bell," noting that it's Governor Cuomo's task to find a way to fund the upgrade of indigent defense across the board. Until then, Genesee County, too, is at risk for getting sued by the ACLU, Gsell said.

Even so, local representatives seem a bit blase about the issue. Ader noted that neither Senator Mike Ranzenhofer nor Assemblyman Steve Hawley have boarded the bandwagon, which to date consists of a less-than-whopping two lawmakers. State lawmakers will select bills to vote on within the next two weeks.

Meanwhile, the annual Tree & Shrub Sale of the county Soil & Water Conservation District just wrapped up. At least officially, the deadline was March 11. 

Member Robert Bausch told district Director Pamela Whitmore he usually buys something every year. We do not recall whether he specifically mentioned having bought a hazelnut tree, but Whitmore replied flatly: "We don't have any filbert trees this year."

Whitmore also reported that the district is not seeking an increase in appropriations, nor are there staff changes afoot, although there is one position open.

At present, Water & Soil is focusing on stream water quality and water bank fortification, said District Manager Greg Tessmann.

He said they are in a partnership with SUNY Brockport to monitor water quality in streams and that the results of testing samples will be available this fall.

Committee Member Shelley Stein said she has been told about the exceptional staff at Soil & Water -- how they are "aggressive, motivated, interested and committed."

Lastly, county Weights & Measures Director Don Luxon told the committee he is considering retirement, but said he would provide a few months notice once the decision is made.

September 10, 2015 - 9:58am
posted by Billie Owens in events.
Event Date and Time: 
October 24, 2015 -
7:00pm to 8:30pm

On Saturday, Oct. 24th, the Batavia Cemetery Association will host a candlelight guided ghost walk through the Historic Batavia Cemetery on Harvester Avenue in Batavia. The tours will feature the famous and infamous movers and shakers who shaped and influenced the City of Batavia.

September 8, 2015 - 4:33pm
posted by Billie Owens in Stafford, events.
Event Date and Time: 
September 23, 2015 -
7:00pm to 8:30pm

The Stafford Historical Society will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015 at 7 p.m. and the guest speaker is Michael J. Eula, Ph.D., Genesee County historian.

His presentation will be "American Culture and Cookbooks in Genesee County, New York, 1830-1920." The meeting is at the Stafford Town Hall at 8903 Route 237. All are welcome to attend the free presentation.

September 5, 2015 - 12:46pm
posted by Billie Owens in events.
Event Date and Time: 
October 3, 2015 -
4:00pm to 8:00pm

The Batavia Business Improvement District (BID) will once again hosts its 6th annual Batavia Wine Walk from 4 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 3rd.

Tickets are now available for purchase at Adam Miller Toy and Bicycle (8 Center St.; 343-0584), T-Shirts, Etc. (37 Center St.; 345-1997), Valle Jewelers (21 Jackson St.; 343-3372), and The YN Godess Shop (73 Main St. 343-3170).

September 4, 2015 - 3:08pm
posted by Billie Owens in notre dame high school class of 1965, events.
Event Date and Time: 
September 25, 2015 - 7:30pm to September 27, 2015 - 1:00pm

Notre Dame Class of 1965 is hosting its 50th Reunion the weekend of Sept. 25-27.

Planned venue includes:

Friday, Sept. 25  -- Center Street Smoke House -- 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, Sept. 26 -- Batavia Downs Grandstand Banquet Room -- 6:30 p.m.

Sunday, Sept. 27 -- All Alumni Mass at Notre Dame Chapel – 9:15 am., followed by Brunch at Terry Hills Golf Course at 10:30 a.m.

For detailed information please contact the 50th Reunion Committee at the e-mail addresses below:

[email protected]

August 23, 2015 - 1:26am
posted by Billie Owens in Batavia Downs, events, Wiener Dog Race, family fun day.
Event Date and Time: 
August 23, 2015 -
2:00pm to 4:30pm

Sunday, Aug. 23, is Family Fun Day at Batavia Downs from 2 to 4 p.m. Tthere will be pony rides, face painting, sand art and other family activities. It's also the big race for little dachsunds. Wiener Dog Races will begin shortly after 4 o'clock. Each year 80 wiener dogs vie for glory after live racing is completed on Family Fun Day.

August 20, 2015 - 12:59pm
posted by Billie Owens in events, richmond library, batavia.
Event Date and Time: 
September 2, 2015 -
6:00pm to 8:30pm

Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St., Batavia

Event:  Reel Discussions

Date & Time:  Wednesday, Sept. 2nd, at 6 p.m.

Come view the movie and join us for a group discussion afterward. This month’s movie is “Spare Parts.” It's a true-life story about four undocumented Mexican American students, two great teachers, one robot-building contest.

August 18, 2015 - 4:07pm
posted by Billie Owens in events, jazz, music, batavia.
Event Date and Time: 
August 20, 2015 -
5:00pm to 8:00pm

The DSP Jazz Trio will perform at T.F. Brown's restaurant in Batavia from 5-8 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 20. It is located at 214 E. Main St.

August 16, 2015 - 11:35am
posted by Billie Owens in Stafford, events.
Event Date and Time: 
August 26, 2015 -
7:00pm to 8:30pm

The Wednesday, Aug. 26th, meeting of the Stafford Historical Society will be at 7 p.m. at the Stafford Town Hall, located at 8903 Route 237. A presentation of our latest museum exhibit, "Herstory," will be given by the display organizer, Sue Briggs. Also the status report of the July 9th Taste of Stafford will be explained.

August 14, 2015 - 1:56pm
posted by Billie Owens in billy goat's, music, events, batavia.
Event Date and Time: 
August 21, 2015 - 10:00pm to August 22, 2015 - 2:00am

Friday, Aug. 21, Esdee Entertainment presents "Get Down in B-Town" with music from the '80s, '90s and 2000 at Billy Goat's Bar & Grill, 345 W. Main St., in the City of Batavia.

Cover charge is $5. Time is 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Music by DJ ASID.

August 10, 2015 - 3:38pm
posted by Billie Owens in events, Le Roy, woodward library, wildlife.
Event Date and Time: 
August 12, 2015 -
6:30pm to 7:30pm

Class on identification of birds in your backyard and beyond! This free program is open to the public on Wednesday, Aug.12th, from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Woodward Memorial Library, 7 Wolcott St., Le Roy. Get out and enjoy a safari in your own backyard!

 

August 7, 2015 - 1:54pm
posted by Billie Owens in events.
Event Date and Time: 
August 7, 2015 -
5:00pm to 11:00pm

The 79th Annual Elba Fire Department Onion Festival starts this afternoon! Grounds open at 5 o'clock. The Firemen's Parade begins at 7. There will be roast beef on weck available from the Ladies Auxiliary inside the Rec Hall at  6 p.m. and Buffalo Amusements will be providing rides from 7 to 11.

At 9 o'clock the band Blood Money performs inside the Beer Tent.

Take advantage of the chance to win a 2015 Ford Mustang or $20,000 cash, courtesy of Orleans Ford.

August 4, 2015 - 1:31pm
posted by Billie Owens in events.
Event Date and Time: 
September 2, 2015 -
7:00pm to 8:00pm

 Wednesday, Sept. 2, 7 p.m. / Batavia Campus / Room T102

Tom Schobert, president of Buffalo Civil War Roundtable and Robert E. Lee impressionist, will kick off the history lecture series with "The Alamo – The Myth, the Reality...and John Wayne!" Like other high-profile events in American history, the story of the Alamo is shrouded in legends and myths. This lecture will cover the known facts as well as the legends and lore, and also how John Wayne got involved.

July 30, 2015 - 4:35pm
posted by Billie Owens in events, Pavilion, pavilion fire department.
Event Date and Time: 
August 8, 2015 -
11:00am to 11:55pm

The Third Annual Fired Up Fundraiser for the Pavilion Fire Department will be held Saturday, Aug. 8, at BW's, located at 11070 Perry Road, Pavilion.

Organizers say please come and support the men and women who volunteer their time to make our community a safer place to live and work. "Thanks for all you do!" And thanks also to all those who have so graciously donated to this great cause.

The day kicks off at 11 a.m. with an 18-hole golf tournament.

Basket raffles will take place from 2 to 5 p.m.

July 30, 2015 - 4:01pm
posted by Billie Owens in events, Batavia Players, batavia society of artists.
Event Date and Time: 
August 11, 2015 -
6:00pm to 9:00pm

The Batavia Society of Artists is partnering with Batavia Players to host a "Sketch Out / Paint Out" in Jackson Square Downtown from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 11. Everyone is welcome, so invite your friends and family.

Brings whatever utensils you would like to use to sketch or paint with.

The Players will be practicing for an upcoming theater performance as well as posing for artists and the community to sketch or paint.

Bring a chair/easel and spend the evening creating some art. 

July 22, 2015 - 11:27am
posted by Billie Owens in events, Stafford, ESATA.
Event Date and Time: 
August 1, 2015 - 9:00am to August 2, 2015 - 4:00pm

The annual Empire State Antique Truck Association (ESATA) truck, farm, and construction show is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 1 & 2.

This is our 29th annual show and is held at the Stafford Fire Department carnival grounds, with free admission and free parking.

We do suggest a donation to Camp Good Days and Special Times, which we have supported for many years.

The fire department grounds are located at 6153 Main Road, Stafford.

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Contact: Howard Owens, publisher (howard (at) the batavian dot com); (585) 250-4118

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