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February 20, 2018 - 2:50pm
posted by Billie Owens in events, movies. entertainment, history, Thurgood Marhsall.
Event Date and Time: 
March 15, 2018 - 6:45pm

Event:  Reel Discussions

Place:  Richmond Memorial Library

Date & Time:  Thursday, March 15th at 6 p.m.

Come view the movie and join us for a group discussion afterward. This month’s movie is “Marshall." 

February 18, 2018 - 1:11pm
posted by Genesee Chamber... in Oakfield, history, news.

The first installment of Oakfield Historical Society’s 2018 lecture series is about the Orphan Train at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 6th. This will be held at the Town of Oakfield Community & Government Center, 3219 Drake St.,  Oakfield

By the 1850s, large eastern U.S. cities had massive numbers of orphaned children. New York City alone had an estimated 30,000 children without parents, making placement with local families virtually impossible in a city of 500,000. 

The orphan trains operated between 1854 and 1929, relocating about 200,000 orphaned, abandoned or homeless children.

Perennially favorite speaker Jeff Donahue is presenting this fascinating program. As always, this event is free and open to the public.

Visit www.VisitGeneseeNY.com to learn more about Genesee County's unique attractions and local events.

February 17, 2018 - 9:06am
posted by Howard B. Owens in hlom, Holland Land Office Museum, history, news, batavia.

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David Fitzpatrick, the author of "Emory Upton: Misunderstood Reformer," spoke about his book and what he learned about the Civil War officer who was born and raised in Batavia while researching and writing the book.

At 10 a.m., Fitzpatrick will participate in a panel discussion with local historians at Genesee Community College in the Conable Technology Building, room T119.

Previously: New book corrects the record on Emory Upton's attitude toward the military and the Republic

February 7, 2018 - 5:24pm
posted by Billie Owens in history, Ely Parker, Announcements, GCC History Club.

Press release:

Genesee Community College's History Club is excited to announce the addition of Jeff Donohue's discussion on "Ely Parker: A Man of Two Worlds" to its Historical Horizon's Lecture Series.

Independent historian and former director of the Holland Land Office and Museum, Jeff Donahue will be at GCC's Batavia Campus on Wednesday, March 7, at 7 p.m. in room T102 if the Conable Technology Building.

Donohue's talk will examine the challenges Parker faced living in two worlds. During the Civil War, Ely Samuel Parker, a Seneca chief, struggled against prevailing prejudices to make his mark. He was so successful that he would become the man entrusted to copy the terms of surrender at Appomattox Court House.

February 7, 2018 - 5:22pm
posted by Billie Owens in history, GCC events.
Event Date and Time: 
March 7, 2018 - 7:00pm

Genesee Community College's history club is excited to announce the addition of Jeff Donohue's discussion on "Ely Parker: A Man of Two Worlds" to its Historical Horizon's Lecture Series.

Independent historian and former director of the Holland Land Office and Museum, Jeff Donahue will be at GCC's Batavia Campus on Wednesday, March 7, at 7 p.m. in room T102 of the Conable Technology Building.

January 5, 2018 - 5:00pm
posted by Billie Owens in history, GCC, news, batavia.

Press release:

The Genesee Community College History Club is excited to release its spring Historical Horizons Lecture Series lineup! The series provides the community with access to renowned authors and historians as they take a deep look at the events and movements that have shaped our nation's history.

"The spring series line up will provide very unique perspectives on bloody battles and war, the Trail of Tears, and immigration," says GCC's Associate Professor Derek Maxfield. "This series is sure to inform and even entertain."

All lectures in this series begin at 7 p.m. in room T102 of the Conable Technology Building. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Feb. 6  /  Medina Campus  /  Maple Ridge Road, Medina

Author Kevin R. Pawlak will discuss his book "Shepherdstown in the Civil War: One Vast Confederate Hospital." During the Civil War the small town of Shepherdstown, W.Va., was suddenly flooded with Confederate soldiers wounded in battle. Homes and churches transformed into triage centers and in all, the town, into "one vast hospital."

Wednesday, Feb. 7  /  Batavia Campus  /  Room T102

Kevin R. Pawlak will join us again to present "The Jewels of War: Robert E. Lee, George B. McClellan, and the Battle of Antietam." Pawlak is also the director of education for the Mosby Heritage Area Association in Virginia. The Battle of Antietam is America's bloodiest single day. In totality, 12 hours of fighting on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 1862 left approximately 23,000 casualties. During this lecture, Pawlak will assess the dramatic events of the battle from the unique perspective of the commanders on the field.

Wednesday, April 4  /  Batavia Campus  /  Room T102

GCC adjunct professor Danny Hamner will present "The Removal Crisis of 1832: How Nationalism, Political Ambition and the Electoral College Shaped the Trail of Tears." Often, the "Trail of Tears" is remembered as the inevitable tragedy of an indigenous people swept aside by the rising forces of modern America. While there certainly were large historical forces transforming America in the early 19th century, the removal crises of the period were ultimately shaped by the personalities, politics and needs of the movement. The mix of personal ambitions and zealous nationalism linked the destiny of the Cherokee Nation to Henry Clay's presidential aspirations with catastrophic but not inevitable results.

Wednesday, May 2  /  Batavia Campus  /  Room T102 (Rescheduled from 12/6/17)

Orleans County Historian Matthew R. Ballard, MLS will present "Fear of the Unknown: Creating the Illegal Immigrant in 19th Century America." Immigration to the United States is a relative topic in current events; however, the establishment of the "illegal immigrant" only dates back to the turn of the 20th century. In the earliest years of immigration, Europeans were accepted without restriction, but an influx of new immigrants during the latter half of the 19th century raised concerns about political impacts on American society. Uncertainty and unfounded fears created excessive restrictions focused on limiting access to specific ethnic/ racial groups, religious groups, the disabled, the infirmed and those likely to become a "public charge."

December 16, 2017 - 3:16pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, Announcements, batavia, Emory Upton, GCC, hlom, history, civil war.

The Holland Land Office Museum will host a presentation and book signing by David Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., author of "Emory Upton Misunderstood Reformer," at 7 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 12. The museum is located at 131 W. Main St., Batavia.

Admission is $5 per person, which helps support the HLOM Speaker Series. RSVP by Jan. 10th due to limited seating.

Fitzpatrick is facility resident and professor of History at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, Mich. He attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where he was also a history instructor.

He has authored several military journal articles and published essays. His current work is one of the definitive texts on the life of Upton and his post-war contributions to reforming the Army.

In addition, a panel discussion with Fitzpatrick and local historians, will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 13th, at the new Student Success Center, Room G200, Genesee Community College, 1 College Road, Batavia.

Discussion will focus on the various aspects of General Upton’s character and life. Free to the public. Hosted by the Holland Land Office Museum and GGC History Club.

For more information about the programs or purchasing his book contact:

Holland Land Office Museum at 585-343-4727 or [email protected]

December 8, 2017 - 10:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
October 20, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

In time for Halloween, Connie Boyd will be doing readings of the more famous, and not quite so well known, darker tales of the history of Genesee County. The legends and the known facts are taken from newspaper articles and other period accounts to bring them to life to a present day audience. Tickets are $5 per person. The presentation is done in collaboration with the Historic Batavia Cemetery Society, which hosts its Cemetery Walks the following evening.
Tickets: https://www.hollandlandoffice.com.

December 8, 2017 - 10:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
November 4, 2017 - 2:30pm to 6:00pm

A luncheon event hosted by the museum at the Dibble Family Center, at 4120 W. Main St in Batavia, to bring the local community together and celebrate an aspect of the history of Genesee County. The presentation by Josh Pacino, entitled “Batavia: Yesterday & Today,” traces the transformation of Batavia through three generations of the city from the early twentieth century up to today, from the heyday of Batavia’s Main Street district to the current days of post-Urban Renewal. The schedule includes a guest speaker, lunch, and topical visuals from local sources.

December 8, 2017 - 10:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
November 9, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Suzanne Zewan, the author of a new piece of historical fiction will be giving a presentation on the book and sign copies for those interested. Shadow By the Bridge, set during the Linden Murders, is written from the perspective of an 11 year old resident, and how the terrible events change his hometown and himself. Tickets will be $3 for the event.
Tickets: https://www.hollandlandoffice.com.

December 8, 2017 - 9:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
August 9, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

The Holland Land Office will be hosting Toby Jewett from Fort Niagara who will be giving a presentation titled “War of 1812 on Lake Erie.” The presentation will discuss the importance and effect of Commodore O.H. Perry’s victory over the British on Lake Erie to the Great Lakes area during the War of 1812. Included in the discussion will be types of vessels, armament, and tactics used by the Navy during the War of 1812.
During the presentation there will also be a display of War of 1812 artifacts by local reenactor John Della Penna from his collection.

December 8, 2017 - 9:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
August 17, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

The Holland Land Office Museum is proud to present “Lincoln’s Secret Visit” by Joyce Thompson-Hovey. The presentation is based on a close examination of a novel written by a Batavia native about her grandmother’s life, her mansion, family history, and a supposed visit by Lincoln on his inaugural journey to Washington, D.C. in 1861. The mansion still stands today on Route 20 east of Alexander, NY.
Tickets: https://www.hollandlandoffice.com.

December 8, 2017 - 9:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
September 20, 2017 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

The Holland Land Office is proud to host Andrew Nicholls of SUNY Buffalo State as he presents, “Notes from Armageddon: Popular Propaganda, Postcards, and the Great War.” The presentation explores popular sentiments prior to and during the First World War through the medium of postcards. Drawn from a collection of more than 5,000 images, this discussion will invite the audience to consider how contemporaries viewed the greatest conflagration the world had yet witnessed.

December 8, 2017 - 7:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
April 11, 2017 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm

The Holland Land Office Museum will be holding an Opening Reception for the public to view our new World War I exhibit: “Over There to Over Here: 100 Years Later, Genesee County in the Great War. The public is inviting to view the new exhibit and learn more about local connections to WWI. Light refreshments will be served. RSVPs are encouraged, but not necessary. To RSVP please call the museum at 585-343-4727.
Tickets: http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/.

December 8, 2017 - 6:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
November 13, 2016 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Exhibits on U.S. Gypsum Company, company housing, Native American history, and Oakfield’s war time contributions.

December 8, 2017 - 3:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
April 11, 2017 (All day) to June 10, 2017 (All day)

The Holland Land Office Museum is proud to announce the upcoming unveiling of our new World War One exhibit: “Over There to Over Here: 100 Years Later Genesee County in the Great War.” The exhibit is meant to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into WWI. It will display a number of military items connected to local residents, as well as, items from the home front.
Tickets: http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/.

December 8, 2017 - 3:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in history.
Event Date and Time: 
October 10, 2017 (All day)

“A Century of Questions: The Linden Murders Still Unsolved,” reflects on the 100th anniversary of the first of the now called Linden Murders. This temporary exhibit seeks to display the items, reporting, and reflections of the string of murders over nearly two decades that gripped the small hamlet of Linden, and brought national attention to Genesee County. The lengthy investigation of all three crimes, yielded very few leads, but many more mysteries. Even after 100 years, the murder still has not been determined.

November 22, 2017 - 1:46pm
posted by Maria Pericozzi in Rudely Stamp'd, news, GCC, history.

If Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were alive today, what would they say to each other?

Genesee Community College associate professors Derek Maxfield (History) and Tracy Ford (English) are teaming up to create an imagined conversation between the two founding fathers in retirement.

The men had been close friends, but their friendship fell apart and they didn’t speak for 10 years," Maxfield said. “When they were both retired from politics, their friendship was renewed through correspondence."

Jefferson was in Monticello, Va., and Adams was in Quincy, Mass., when they began writing to each other.

“This conversation that we’re going to stage, while it physically never happened, we’re using the correspondence, to form what we say to each other,” Maxfield said, adding that the aim is to make Jefferson and Adams more human, to promote a better understanding of them both.

At 7 p.m. on March 7 at GCC, they will have an advance presentation of the program for the public. They will reading from a script at podiums, as a warm-up to work through the script.

Maxfield will be Adams; and Ford will be Jefferson in the program.

When Maxfield first read the correspondence between the historic figures, he wondered what they would say to each other now.

“If they did see each other face to face again, what would that look like?” Maxfield said. “That’s what we’re aiming for.”

The associate professors named the group after a quote from Shakespeare because they were looking for a unique name.

“We wanted it to have some history or literature flavor to it,” Maxfield said. “We came across this and it seemed perfect, because both Tracy and I are 'rudely stamp’d.' ”

"Rudely Stamp’d" has a kickstarter campaign to fund the costumes and props, located here. Maxfield said they want the most authentic-looking costumes for the program.

“We’re hoping to raise $6,000 before Dec. 25,” Maxfield said.

They hope to expand the group eventually, to include other programs, including an Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas debate.

Maxfield said he hopes to bring other living historians into Rudely Stamp’d.

“The idea is eventually to bring in select others,” Maxfield said.

Rudely Stamp’d is not a business.

“It’s not something we’re going to make money with,” Maxfield said. “It’s something we want to make available for anyone who is interested.”

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Associate Professor Tracy Ford (submitted photo)

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Associate Professor Derek Maxfield (submitted photo)

November 16, 2017 - 3:14pm
posted by Billie Owens in GCC, immigration, news, Announcements, history.

Press release:

Genesee Community College's History Club proudly welcomes the public to the Batavian Campus to hear Orleans County Historian Matt Ballard present, "Fear of the Unknown: Creating the Illegal Immigrant in 19th Century America." 

The theme of immigration to the United States is a relative topic in current events, but the establishment of the "illegal immigrant" only dates back to the turn of the 20th century.

In the earliest years of immigration, Europeans were accepted without restriction, but an influx of new immigrants during the latter half of the 19th century raised concerns about potential impacts on American society. Uncertainty and unfounded fears created excessive restrictions focused on limiting access to specific ethnic/racial groups, religious groups, the disabled, the infirmed, and those likely to become a "public charge." 

This lecture, the fourth one in the fall Historical Horizons Lecture Series, will take place at 7 p.m. on Dec. 6 in room T102 of the Conable Technology Building at GCC's Batavia Campus.

The lecture is FREE, open to the public and an RSVP is NOT necessary. The lecture series is sponsored by the GCC History Club and the Barnes & Noble College Bookstore.

November 11, 2017 - 3:06pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Le Roy, news, Veteran's Day, veterans, history.

leroyvetsday2017.jpg

Veterans Day was originally known as Armistice Day, the day the war to end all wars ended, Nov. 11, 1918. After more wars, Armistice Day became Veterans Day, the day we honor all of those who served to defend freedom.

Today's ceremony in Le Roy included guest speaker Ret. USN Commander Robert “Bob” Kettle, who now lives in Seattle with his wife and 2-year-old daughter.

The 1984 Le Roy High School graduate spoke about the sacrifices Le Roy residents made during The Great War.

The honor roll includes:

  • George K Botts, Private, Co G, 7th Infantry, 3rd Division. Killed in action near Fossoy, France, July 15, 1918. Age 23.
  • Cecelia J Cochran, Nurse volunteer, U.S. Public Health Service. Died of influenza and pneumonia in a military camp hospital, Huntsville, Ala., Oct. 15, 1918. Age 24.
  • Errol D Crittenden, Private, HQ Co, 312th Engineers, 87th Division. Died of pneumonia at Camp Grange-Neuve, Bordeaux, France, Oct. 15, 1918. Age 31.
  • Thomas C Illes, Private, Co G, 74th NY Infantry. Killed when struck by a trolley in Buffalo, Sept. 8, 1917. Age 22.
  • Edward L Kaine, Private, Co B, 59th Infantry, 4th Division. Died of pneumonia in a hospital at Aix-les-Bains, France, Nov. 9, 1918. Age 28.
  • Patrick Molyneaux, Private, Co A, 59th Infantry, 4th Division. Killed in action near the Bois de Brieulles, France, Sept. 30, 1918. Age 29.
  • Edgar R Murrell, Private, Btry D, 307th Field Artillery, 78th Division. Died of pneumonia and diphtheria in a military hospital near Winchester, England, March 29, 1918. Age 27.
  • George F Ripton, Private, Co C, 3rd Provisional Battalion, Engineers. Died of influenza and pneumonia at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, Oct. 10, 1918. Age 28.
  • Alvin A Smith, Private, Co A, 108th Infantry, 27th Division. Killed in action near Hindenburg Line east of Ronssoy, France, Sept. 29, 1918. Age 17.
  • John R Wilder, Sergeant, 50th Aero Squadron, U.S. Signal Corps. Died of pneumonia in an Army hospital at Baltimore, Md., Jan. 11, 1918. Age 27.

Source: The County and the Kaiser: Genesee County in World War I.

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