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November 23, 2015 - 4:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, UMMC, batavia, Attica.

An Attica woman who was arrested for attempting to bite an emergency room nurse and punching her several times in the stomach will spend at least a year-and-a-half in State Prison after pleading guilty this morning to attempted assault in the second degree.

In an unusual twist, she was also sentenced today.

Kerri L. Forsberg, 43, of Alexander Road, Attica, who appeared in court in a wheelchair, has medical issues that meant she couldn't be housed in any of the county jails Genesee County uses to hold female inmates. In those circumstances, the state will hold an unsentenced inmate, and at no cost to the county, said District Attorney Lawrence Friedman.

The difficulty, however, is that Forsberg was held in Bedford, and Genesee County deputies were required to take her back and forth between the prison and her court appearances.

So some of her appearances were actually waived, including her plea-cutoff. She was planning to take her case to trial, Friedman explained, but when she changed her mind and decided to take the plea offer, arrangements were made for Forsberg to enter her plea and be sentenced on the same day.

Friedman said the Probation Department was "great" for their handling of the expedited pre-sentence investigation. Investigators obtained the case file this morning, combined it with Forsberg's PSI from a previous case in Wyoming County, and were able to meet the deadline of 4 p.m. for the completed report.

Forsberg is eligible for release in one-and-a-half years, but could serve up to three years. She was sentenced as a second felony offender.

She was arrested in early July for attempting to bite a UMMC nurse and punching her in the stomach.

October 21, 2015 - 4:00pm
posted by Session Placeholder in health, UMMC.
Event Date and Time: 
October 27, 2015 -
4:00pm to 8:00pm

United Memorial Medical Center and the Cancer Services Partnership will provide free health screenings to Genesee County women between the ages of 40-64 with no insurance or high deductibles, on Tuesday, Oct. 27, from 4-8 p.m. at the Jerome Center, 16 Bank St., Batavia. Appointments are necessary for some of the screenings.

October 21, 2015 - 3:39pm
posted by Billie Owens in health, UMMC, Cancer Services Partnership.

Press release:

United Memorial Medical Center and the Cancer Services Partnership will provide free health screenings to Genesee County women between the ages of 40-64 with no insurance or high deductibles, on Tuesday, Oct. 27, from 4-8 p.m. at the Jerome Center, 16 Bank St., Batavia. Appointments are necessary for some of the screenings.

For women age 40-64, nurse midwife, Cecilia Stearns, MSN CNM will perform women’s health screenings, including pap smears, pelvic exams and clinical breast exams. Additional services available at the event include mammography, total cholesterol, blood pressure and take home colorectal cancer screening kits.

All screenings will be provided at no charge. Funds are available for follow-up care if necessary. Please call United Memorial’s Healthy Living Department to schedule an appointment at (585) 344-5331. Light refreshments, health information and free giveaways will also be available.

October 2, 2015 - 9:55am
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, batavia.


More than 300 people were at Batavia Downs last night for UMMC's annual Pink Hat dinner, which honors cancer survivors. 






September 25, 2015 - 6:13pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC.


UMMC's personnel practiced dealing with a mass casualty scenario today with area high school students filling in as patients. The scenario involved a collapse of bleachers at a sporting event. The primary purpose was for staff to practice triage and workflow in dealing with a large influx of patients into the emergency room (a hallway next to the actual emergency room was used to simulate the emergency room).



The command center.


Personnel in a staging area awaiting assignments if more patients come in.

September 25, 2015 - 2:05pm
posted by Billie Owens in UMMC, emergency preparedness.

United Memorial Medical Center will host a multi-agency mass casualty incident drill today, Sept. 25, at approximately 2:30 p.m. Visitors to the hospital at 127 North St., Batavia, during this time should expect to see several emergency vehicles, first responders, and increased activity.

This drill will test communication skills during a crisis across several agencies and caregivers. Additional staff will be brought in for the exercise and patient care will not be impacted.

United Memorial frequently performs drills to test and maintain skills needed to safely address true, large-scale emergencies. The patience and understanding of our visitors is greatly appreciated.

Please contact the Community Relations office at United Memorial at (585)344-5415 or by e-mail to [email protected] with any questions or concerns.

September 18, 2015 - 12:59pm
posted by Billie Owens in UMMC, mass casualty drill.

Press release:

United Memorial Medical Center will host a multi-agency mass casualty incident drill on Friday, Sept. 25, at approximately 2:30 p.m. Visitors to the hospital at 127 North St., Batavia, during this time should expect to see several emergency vehicles, first responders, and increased activity.

This drill will test communication skills during a crisis across several agencies and caregivers. Additional staff will be brought in for the exercise and patient care will not be impacted.

United Memorial frequently performs drills to test and maintain skills needed to safely address true, large-scale emergencies. The patience and understanding of our visitors is greatly appreciated.

Please contact the Community Relations office at United Memorial at (585)344-5415 or by e-mail to [email protected] with any questions or concerns.

July 31, 2015 - 5:09pm
posted by Traci Turner in batavia, health, UMMC, Oak Orchard Health, breastfeeding.


Dozens of families attended the first local synchronized breastfeeding event at the Jerome Center this morning.

The Big Latch On was hosted by the United Memorial Medical Center and Oak Orchard Health WIC program to commemorate World Breastfeeding Week, Aug. 1-7. The week is celebrated in 120 countries. The first Big Latch On took place in Aotearoa, New Zealand, in 2005 and was held in Portland, Ore., in 2010.

Today's Big Latch On was the first local breastfeeding event in Genesee, Livingston, Orleans and Wyoming counties. Thirty-one nursing moms and a few dads with their children attended the event to show their support for breastfeeding. Families were entered into a raffle for a Vera Bradley diaper bag and other giveaways. The City of Batavia Fire Department also offered free car seat safety checks.

Maria Dentino, Oak Orchard Health WIC breastfeeding coordinator, gave out recognition awards to businesses that support breastfeeding families. The workplaces that received awards were Genesee County Court, Lucky Ducky Daycare, Lifetime Assistance, Wegmans in Brockport, Target in Greece, and the Greater Rochester International Airport. All of the recipients were nominated by local women.

"The goal is to celebrate Global Breast Feeding Week and raise awareness for the health benefits of breastfeeding," said Colleen Flynn, director of community relations at UMMC.

Breastfeeding has many health benefits some of which include reducing the risk of infant morbidity and mortality, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

In addition to the event, UMMC's Baby Cafe is celebrating its one year anniversary. The educational support program for nursing moms and their children is held every Tuesday at 1 p.m. Moms can ask lactation counselors questions and socialize with other moms. So far, 80 moms and their children have attended the program.







July 24, 2015 - 3:45pm
posted by Billie Owens in UMMC, Oak Orchard Health, Event.
Event Date and Time: 
July 31, 2015 -
10:00am to 1:00pm

Local health care organizations United Memorial Medical Center and Oak Orchard Health will be hosting an event for breastfeeding mothers that will attempt to break international records as well as raise awareness on the important health benefits of breastfeeding. Pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers and their babies are invited to attend the event that will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Jerome Center in Batavia on Friday, July 31.

July 2, 2015 - 3:56pm
posted by Traci Turner in batavia, bergen, public market, UMMC, Foodlink.

United Memorial Medical Center is partnering with Foodlink and New York Fresh Connect Farmers' Markets to offer fresh produce to Genesee County residents on wheels.

The produce truck will make two stops in the county every Monday. The first stop will be from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at the Gillam Grant Community Center in Bergen. The second stop will be from 11:15 a.m. to noon in the United Memorial Jerome Center parking lot in Batavia. The market will run through mid-September. 

The goal of the market is to make fresh fruits and vegetables easily accessible to the community at affordable prices. Cash, debit, EBT and WIC will be accepted as forms of payment. For every $5 SNAP purchase, people will receive a $2 bonus.

June 3, 2015 - 2:59pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in dairy princess, agriculture, UMMC, business.


Press release:

The Genesee County Dairy Princess honored the first baby born in Genesee County during the month of June 2015 as the Dairy Baby. Marleigh Grace Wright, a baby girl, was born to Tammy and Jeffery Wright, of Warsaw, on Monday, June 1st at 3:51 a.m. at United Memorial Medical Center. She weighed 5 pounds, 5 ounces and measured 19 inches long. She was delivered by Dr. Richard Edwards. Marleigh joins an older brother, Mason, 14, at home.

June is National Dairy Month which honors traditions and celebrates the contributions of the dairy industry by promoting nutrient-rich dairy foods.

The Genesee County Dairy Princess, Pavilion sophomore,Emily Mikel, and her mother, Sue Mikel, presented the Wright family with a basket of dairy products including yogurts, product coupons, cheeses, and a number of other infant items.

June 1, 2015 - 4:57pm
posted by Traci Turner in batavia, Zonta, UMMC.

The Zonta Club of Batavia is making birthing kits to send to Third World countries in an effort to reduce the risk of infection in pregnant women and their babies. 

On Saturday, 20 Zonta Club members and Batavia High School Z Club members spent four hours putting together 1,085 birthing kits. The kits are composed of a square meter of plastic sheet, two umbilical cord clamps, five pieces of gauze, a pair of vinyl gloves, a small bar of soap and a razor blade. All of the contents are packed into a quart-size sandwich bag and sent to a holding facility in Pittsburgh.


(Photo of Lee Cummings)

"We were talking and, here, everyone wants to get the birthing suite at the hospital and that's our biggest concern," said Lee Cummings, chairperson of the Birthing Kit Committee and Zonta Board member. "There, women literally get a plastic bag with six items in it to give birth and reduce the rate of infection in these countries."

The kits are shipped to clinics in impoverished countries to help women who don't have access to medical facilities. The kits have been sent to rural areas in Kenya, South America and there are now recent requests from Nepal. Women walk for miles to reach clinics where the kits are given out. Due to limited resources, hospitals and clinics have also started to use the kits in their facilities.

Zonta is an international organization for the advancement and empowerment of women. The Birthing Kit Project was developed by Zonta's international governor six years ago.

The Batavia club started the district project five years ago. Over the years, the local club has assembled and sent three large shipments totaling 3,700 birthing kits. Every spring, the club collects items for the kits and assembles them. They also make a smaller amount of kits every autumn as well.

"Our goal started out years ago as 500 kits, and then it was 750, and now it's 1,000," Cummings said. "We try to do a 1,000 a year."

The project is a community-wide effort. The club gets most of the supplies for the kit from United Memorial Medical Center. The hospital donated umbilical cord clamps, gauze, vinyl gloves and razor blades. Local hotels also donated bars of soap. In past years, local doctor offices have sent checks to help with the cost of shipping.

Shipping costs to send the kits to those who need them most is a significant expense for the club, approximately $400 to $500, according to Cummings. The club is also pays for the plastic sheeting, which costs hundreds of dollars as well.

By 2016, the group plans to make 1,000 more kits to fulfill their two-year goal of 2,000 kits. The club is in the process of planning a date to use the rest of the supplies they have collected and make more kits. They plan to put together another 400 kits for Fall 2016.

April 24, 2015 - 2:29pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, UMMC, healthcare, Dr. Victor Desa.

Dr. Victor Desa, a renowned surgeon who contributed his expertise and his time to the local community, has died at the age of 72.

Desa died in Rochester this morning, reports WBTA.

Funeral arrangements are pending.

Among Dr. Desa's service to the community was time spent on the boards of United Memorial Medical Center and HomeCare & Hospice.

He was also always open to sharing with local residents his knowledge of the healthcare system, making frequent public appearances to speak on the topic.


April 21, 2015 - 9:00am
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, UMMC, bergen, dan ireland.
Dan Ireland riding the shuttle from St. Jerome's to UMMC on a recent morning.
Jeremy Cosimeno and Dan Ireland share a cup of coffee and a laugh in the UMMC cafeteria before starting a recent workday.

From early in his career, there were people who saw something in Dan Ireland and encouraged him along his path from orderly to president of his hometown hospital.

While perhaps not a tale ripped from the pages of Horatio Alger, Ireland does stand out in an era when young people are indoctrinated to believe they must escape their smalltown roots to make something of themselves.

Ireland was born in Batavia, attended Batavia High School and started his collegiate career at Genesee Community College. While still in college, he landed a job at St. Jerome's Hospital, and outside of a brief stint with a hospital in Rochester, he has spent his entire career with St. Jerome's, Genesee Memorial or UMMC, rising from entry-level to top executive over the course of 26 years.

The climb to the pinnacle is something Dave Shaffer saw coming. He told Ireland where he was going, but Ireland didn't buy it.

Ireland said the two good friends laugh about it to this day.

"He said to me one day, 'You're going to run this hospital someday,' " Ireland said. "I said, 'No, I don't think that's ever going to happen.' He reminded me about it when I was appointed, but I never had that vision."

Ireland started out in college with the intention of going into information technology, but as a volunteer with Town of Batavia Fire Department, he was exposed to patient care. 

"Those were the days when paramedics were just coming into departments," Ireland said. "You got them in the ambulance and raced to the hospital as quickly as possible and we actually did very little out in the field for patients. As I saw more of that developing, it piqued my interest -- how do I care for patients?"

Ireland decided to become a nurse, switched majors at GCC and took a job at St. Jerome's, transferring a year later to Genesee Memorial.

Back when Batavia had a skating rink, Skate 98, Dan Ireland was a champion rollerskate performer.

"I think he's a lot like me," Shaffer said. "He's easy going. He treats people like he wants to be treated. I don't have a problem with people like that.

"I never had a doubt my prediction wouldn't come true," Shaffer added.

In those early days, Gloria Stevens also saw something in Ireland that set him apart.

She met him while working at St. Jerome's and he was working on an ambulance.

"He was always smiling, always friendly," Stevens recalled. "He always seemed to be in a good mood every time I'd see him and he just seemed like a really nice young man."

Her daughter, Amy, had also taken note of Ireland and mentioned him to her mother.

"I think she thought he was cute," Stevens said.

One evening Stevens asked Ireland if he was dating anybody.

He wasn't.

So Gloria took it upon herself to ask him on a date on behalf of her daughter, to a family wedding.

Amy and Dan have been married 22 years and have three children, Rebekah, 18, Brian, 15, and Kelly, 12.

Ireland's made a great son-in-law and father to her grandchildren, Stevens said.

"It's probably one of the best decisions I ever made," Stevens said.

Dan and Amy quickly became a team, pushing each other through their studies and making sure they got better at their jobs.

The hospital bosses noticed.

It wasn't long after Ireland became a nurse that he became a supervisor in the emergency room.

Ireland began to develop mentors who helped guide his career. Dr. Diane London was one who always made time for him, he said. She would answer any question and provide guidance on patient care.

"She was a fantastic person," Ireland said. "You could walk into ER any time and sit next to her and ask her question. That was learning clinically, that was building my knowledge -- 'What happened? What happened with this patient?' She would make time for you no matter what."

By 1997, computers were starting to work their way into patient care and suddenly Ireland's duel experience in IT and nursing opened a new opportunity for him.

The idea of using computers to help improve patient care captured Ireland's imagination and the hospital needed somebody with both a medical background and IT training.

"All of the sudden, this new idea of helping people with computers and, wow, we're going into this new era of documentation and clinical results and getting things to bedside quicker, and I sat back and realized, 'I can do the best of both worlds,' " Ireland said. " 'I can make this happen. I can teach nurses how to do it and still be a nurse and still use that clinical experience.' "

Not that bringing the nursing staff into the Digital Era was always a smooth transition.

Ireland recalled one nurse who was very upset with him.

"She was livid," he said. "She said, 'You've taken my time with patients from here to here and I'm spending all this time on the computer. It's a horrible thing.' "

About three months later, Ireland said, she was upset for a different reason. The system went off-line for maintenance.

"I got a phone call from her and she said, 'Why did you take my computer system away from me? It's been perfect,' " Ireland recalled.

He added, "It was a validation that the transition of technology really made a difference."

In 2001, Ireland took a position with the University of Rochester that he thought would advance his IT background, but within six months, Charlie Kenney, then CEO of the Batavia hospital, wanted him back.

The hospital needed somebody to do some high-level analytics, tracking population trends, and after a couple of meetings, Ireland realized this was a good job for him.

In 2003, he was promoted to director of Quality Management and created a case management program.

At this point, Karen Peters became one of his mentors.

When she passed in 2005, then CEO Mark Schoell appointed him to her former job, VP of Clinical Services.

Ireland lost two mentors, London and Peters, and gained a new one in Schoell.

"I was quite happy working for her (Peters) as director of Quality Management and suddenly she was gone," Ireland said. "She was a key part of my development. When you lose mentors, you miss them, but then you've got to find your own way."

Under Schoell, Ireland began to move up the executive ladder, taking on bigger titles and the greater responsibilities that went with them. He was VP of Support Services and then COO.  

He oversaw multiple departments and services, and supervised remodeling the Jerome Center and addition of the new surgical wing, including securing financing.

Schoell was a great mentor, Ireland said, giving him a job, even a big job, and letting him do it with minimal interference, but always there for guidence and to answer questions.

While Schoell may have been grooming an eventual successor, that wasn't necessarily Ireland's ambition.

"The ambition was doing a project and doing it successfully," Ireland said. "It was getting a project and saying 'How do I get it done? What do I need to know about that?' So that's where the ambition kicked in. I have this desire to do the right things and to get them done. Sometimes that's a lot of extra work you put in to make that happen. I think that's where the ambition was, but not for the position."

As Ireland moved into higher-profile roles, he became more interested in learning about leadership. He has his favorite books on leadership, his favorite speakers, he's attended seminars and workshops, and he's also found serving on community boards a great way to observe and learn about leaders.

The Bergen resident is on the Gillam-Grant Community Center Board and the Byron-Bergen Central School District Board of Education. He's also been through Leadership Genesee.

"Sitting on boards has helped educate myself," Ireland said. "Sitting on the school board, especially, you learn a lot about the different ways people lead. (Byron-Bergen schools Superintendent) Casey Kosiorek is a phenomenal leader. I've learned a lot just by watching him, how he interacts with his staff. I've transferred some that in how I do things."

From all appearances, Dan Ireland, the guy who rose through the ranks and was mentored by so many people in his home community, has been embraced as a leader by the UMMC staff. 

Ireland makes it a point to be accessible to as many of the hospitals more than 700 employees as possible. He often rides the shuttle from the St. Jerome's parking lot -- where employees are encouraged to park -- and frequently takes his meals in the cafeteria. He also regularly visits all of the departments of the hospital. It's impossible for him to know everybody's name, but Colleen Flynn, director of public relations for UMMC, offered during an interview in his office that to those who have worked with Ireland, his presidency seems like a natural fit. 

"I think we all saw leadership potential in him," Flynn said. "I don't think there is a single employee, manager, director in the organization who was surprised when Dan was named president. It was a natural progression."

Now that he's the leader, the mentor himself, and the guy from his own community leading one of the most important institutions in that community, Ireland takes seriously the responsibility to ensure UMMC delivers quality care.

He's also well aware that isn't the reputation UMMC necessarily enjoys locally.

Sitting in his president's office, when asked about the issue, he talked about it at length.

"We can't expect the people of Genesee County to just look at the hospital and say 'That's the hospital,' " Ireland said. "We have to work to earn the trust of every member of the community because that's what they expect. They expect us to continuously improve, so we have to continue to improve.

"There have been people who have had less than a desirable experience with the hospital. They've come here and sometimes it's been bad for people. You have to understand the human form. People don't forget easily and some people forgive and forget easier, and others don't. We will always run into people who say, 'I'll never go back to that hospital because this happened to me.' What I ask people is 'Are we different today than we were yesterday?' We have the ability to change. If we've done something wrong, and they tell us, we'll work to create change to make it better. We're in a human world, so we will not always do exactly what we want to do."

Yes, staff members have bad days, but personal bad days shouldn't translate into bad experiences for patients and their families, said Ireland, who reads every patient experience report and when he comes across a negative review, he doesn't see it as just a rant. 

"We don't see it as an angry or dissatisfied patient," Ireland said. "We see it as an opportunity for us to make a change and hopefully keep that from happening again and to make it better."

It's not just an issue of UMMC looking good or making more money. Quality customer care and a solid reputation with the local community are about providing advantageous health care.

"I don't just want to see the numbers get better," Ireland said. "When sombody sayd they don't want to go to United Memorial, that usually means they have to travel further for health care in a lot of cases and that's not good for them. That's not healthy, especially if they're ill. That's not a good experience. Either way, it's about their health. It's not necessarily about us having good scores up on the wall. It's about the fact that when patients have a good experience here, they're getting good health care and hopefully improving health."

The Ireland Family (photo submitted by Dan Ireland). Dan Ireland might be one of the only hospital presidents in the nation who rises early in the morning to feed the family's goats (22 of them, along with three sheep and a half dozen chickens and rabbits). The family farm started four or five years ago when his son said he wanted a horse. "I said, 'Horses are a lot of responsibility' and I said, 'Tell you what, I'll get you a goat. If you raise that goat all by yourself for a year, I'll get you a horse.' " The Irelands still don't have a horse, but their livestock has become a hobby for the whole family and led to involvement in 4-H.

April 17, 2015 - 12:00pm

You and your family will receive:
  • 8 week program 
  • Fun ways to exercise
Nutrition Education

  • Guidelines and support to maintain a healthy lifestyle

  • Resources to encourage family physical activity

  • Weekly incentives and a chance to win a grand prize 
Take advantage of the YMCA while you are enrolled in the Get Fit Program. Health and Wellness Center, fun fitness classes, swimming, etc... 
Give us a call today 585-344-5420 OR visit our Web site: 
Sponsored by: Batavia Rotary Club, UMMC, United Way of Genesee County, YMCA, Batavia City Schools, Genesee County Health Department, City of Batavia Youth Bureau.
April 3, 2015 - 8:47am
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, UMMC.

Press release:

The Summit Street Entrance at United Memorial Medical Center will close on Monday, April 6, as construction begins for the new comprehensive cancer center. Fencing will be placed around the wedge-shaped parking area and there will no longer be an entrance to the facility off of Summit Street.

Visitors and patients should use the Main Entrance of the Hospital off of North Street or the Emergency Department Entrance at the rear of the building. Required employee parking at the Bank Street Campus was recently expanded to increase the number of available parking spaces for patients and visitors to the Hospital.

Previously closed on weekends, the Main Entrance will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. United Memorial will assess the need for transport services, additional wheelchairs and alternate weekend hours to best serve patients.

A sidewalk will be installed on the east side of Summit Street leading to the Main Entrance, along the side of the Hospital so that pedestrians can more easily access the front entrance.

Beginning on April 6th, visitors and patients should expect to see greater activity at the North Street facility as the construction begins. Cranes, earth-moving equipment and other construction vehicles will be brought on site. Every effort has been made to create and maintain a safe environment for our neighbors, employees, patients and visitors.

The new cancer center is a $6.5-million project, which will bring comprehensive cancer services to the Genesee County region and provide a new high-tech, fully integrated and comfortable home for life-saving oncology services.

These include: a state-of-the-art linear accelerator to deliver radiation therapy; the ability to use the hospital’s existing technology to plan customized radiation therapy treatment plans; chemotherapy infusion services; medical oncology for diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring; navigator services to guide patients through their individualized treatment process; and surgical oncology.

Architectural services are provided by Clark Patterson Lee and construction management is being provided by Manning Squires Hennig.

March 2, 2015 - 4:00pm
posted by Billie Owens in UMMC, Milestones.

Press release:

We are pleased to congratulate Arnold Facklam III, NP, FHM, a hospitalist at United Memorial Medical Center, on his designation as Fellow in Hospital Medicine (FHM) from the Society of Hospital Medicine.

To earn the FHM designation, a candidate must meet a set of diverse criteria including: working as a hospitalist for five years, demonstration of dedication to quality and process improvement, illustrating commitment to organizational teamwork and leadership, and active engagement in lifelong learning and education.

Facklam is one of 167 FHM to be in the elite class of 2015, which will be inducted on March 31, 2015 at HM15 in National Harbor, Md. The FHM designation gives hospitalists the opportunity to be recognized for their work and commitment to the practice of hospital medicine and the patients they serve.

Hospitalists are healthcare providers that specialize in the treatment of patients in the acute care (hospital) setting.

February 9, 2015 - 6:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, UMMC.

A proposed new cancer center at UMMC will help the hospital treat more patients in Genesee County and provide those patients with a comprehensive, one-stop location, according to spokeswoman Colleen Flynn.

New new $6.5 million addition to the hospital will be fitted in the triangle area on the west side of the hospital known as the Summit Street entrance.

The wing will handle chemotherapy, radiology, infusion and include a linear accelerator. The staff will include a board-certified oncologist and a radiation oncologist.

"This has been in planning for a long time," Flynn said. "It will help save some patients that 45-minute drive each way to Rochester. One of our goals was to keep care in Genesee County for those who are our most vulnerable."

The proposed expansion will be reviewed this week by the Genesee County Planning Board and the City of Batavia Planning Board.

The new building will be 9,850 square feet and while it is currently planned as a one-story addition, the construction engineering will allow for a second floor to be added if needed, Flynn said.

UMMC, already expanded to 800 employees since the affiliation with Rochester General, will add more employees as a result of the addition, Flynn said.

Plans for the cancer center were started many months ago, before the affiliation with Rochester General was finalized, but the affiliation is helping the process along.

A license is required for a linear accelerator and Rochester General happened to have obtained a license it had no immediate plans to use. The NYS Department of Health has approved the transfer of the license to the UMMC location.

Among the issues planners will consider with the addition is the loss of parking outside the Summit Street entrance.

There are currently 15 spaces. The expansion will require 20 spaces, creating a deficit of 35 spaces. 

Officials plan to draw on the 71 spaces in the existing parking lot on the west side of Summit Street, which is shared with 207 Summit St. and 215 Summit St.

Employees will park at St. Jerome's on Bank Street, which currently has 50 to 60 extra spaces available and is already served by a shuttle for hospital employees.

The shared parking lot will have signs and markings to ensure the spaces closest to the cancer center are reserved for cancer center patients.

Officials hope to break ground on the new facility in the Spring with completion and opening for patient treatment in January.

The County Planning Board meets at 7:30 p.m., Thursday.

Also on the agenda is a plan by Darien Lake Theme Park to add a new ride called the Turbo Twister. The slide, which covers an area that is 191 feet by 76 feet, features an 80-degree drop angle to start, an inclosed tube, and it propels people at an average speed of 35 feet per second.

Plus, the agenda includes plans by East Pembroke Fire District for a new, voter-approved fire hall.




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