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August 10, 2014 - 4:20pm

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

posted by Billie Owens in Announcements, immunizations.

Press release:

The Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming county health departments are encouraging residents to “Think Health.” Taking time to think about your health and taking positive health steps will lead to healthier outcomes. Learning something new every day is one way to “Think Health”…

Do you have a new baby in the house or are you preparing for one? Have you talked to your healthcare provider about making sure you are up to date on your vaccinations to protect your baby?

August is National Immunization Awareness Month. Today’s vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, whooping cough (pertussis), chicken pox and influenza (flu).

Just as it is important your babies and children are protected from these and other diseases, it is important for the parents and caregivers to be vaccinated as well. When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their family and their community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer and other health conditions.

There are many important reasons to make sure your child is vaccinated:

  • Immunizations can protect your child from 14 serious diseases;
  • Vaccination is very safe and effective;
  • Immunizations can protect others you care about;
  • Immunization can save your family time and money;
  • Immunization protects future generations.

When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their classrooms and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer or other health conditions.

School-age children need vaccines. For example, children who are 4 to 6 years old are due for boosters of four vaccines: DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis), chickenpox, MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and polio. Older children, like preteens and teens, need Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis), MenACWY (meningococcal conjugate vaccine) and HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccines when they are 11 to 12. In addition, yearly flu vaccines are recommended for all children 6 months and older.

Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/index.html, your healthcare provider or your local Health Department.

For information about health department services contact:

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