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January 17, 2021 - 1:11pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, buffalo bills, sports.

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In case you haven't heard, the Buffalo Bills (15-3) are heading to the AFC Championship game, for the first time since 1993, next Sunday. Barber Joey Williams gave Raymond Schramm Jr a haircut that matches his team pride after yesterday's playoff win over the Baltimore Ravens 17-3.

Submitted photo.

January 17, 2021 - 1:08pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Deal of the Day, advertisement.

Reminders of how the Deal of the Day program works:

  • To make purchases, you must be registered. Deal of the Day uses a registration system that is not connected to the registration for commenting on The Batavian (the main user login in the upper left of the homepage).
  • Once re gistered you must sign in using the "sign in" link in this box.
  • You click on the orange button, which appears if the item is not sold out, and it takes you to a PayPal button. This allows you to pay either with your PayPal account or with a credit card/debit card. The login for PayPal is completely separate from our accounts.
  • The first person to successfully complete the PayPal transaction wins the gift certificate.
  • You are eligible to buy the same item only once in a four-month period. We use the registration system to track this for you so you don't have to.
  • Only one gift certificate from the same business PER HOUSEHOLD is allowed in each four-month period. We do not have a way to automatically track duplicate purchases within a household; however, if we notice such a purchase, we reserve the right to cancel the purchase and refund the purchase money. Each individual buyer must use his or her own PayPal account for purchases. It's important that participating businesses not be asked to redeem multiple gift certificates from the same person/family at the same time.
  • Gift certificates should be used within 30 days of receipt.
  • Problems, questions, concerns about the Deal of the Day? Email Billie Owens:   [email protected]
January 17, 2021 - 12:27pm
posted by Press Release in steve hawley, vaccine distribution plans, news, coronavirus.

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley joined his colleagues in the Assembly Minority on Friday in writing a letter to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker, calling on them to include local home rule authorities in the process of developing coronavirus vaccine distribution plans in order to make them more effective.

The letter was drafted in response to reports that vaccine distribution has been slow and ineffective in New York State, with some vaccine doses reportedly being wastefully disposed of due to improper storage.

“What we do in these next few weeks with vaccine distribution will determine how much tragedy we will all have to endure as a state, so we need to act now to get these vaccines to the people that need them most, as quickly as possible,” Hawley said.

“We need to give the people who know their communities better than anyone a say in planning vaccine distribution, because a singular top-down approach will not work for the varied and unique communities that make up New York State. Getting these vaccines out effectively and promptly will save lives, and we cannot afford to let even a single dose of the vaccine go to waste during this unprecedented public health crisis.”

January 16, 2021 - 12:12pm

The Batavia City School District is asking families to make a final selection of which learning model — in-person hybrid or 100-percent remote — they want for their children in preparation for the start of the second semester of the 2020–21 academic year amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

In a Jan. 13 statement from the district, Superintendent of Schools Anibal Soler Jr. requested that families submit changes to their students’ learning modalities by Jan. 22. He said that this deadline will afford the district enough time to make adjustments to academic programming and transportation services before the semester begins Feb. 1.

“It may not change our numbers a lot, but at least we know moving forward that that is the final in-person hybrid and the final remote rosters that principals could use to kind of lock in the rest of their year,” Soler said at Monday night’s Board of Education meeting.

Families that would like to select a different learning method for the semester should complete the second semester Learning Model Form for each child in their household who seeks the change. Requests for changes can also be made via phone call to students’ respective schools. Those who do not want to modify their students’ academic format do not need to take action.

This survey process aims to strengthen the teacher-student experience for both in-person hybrid learners and remote learning students. The statement said that this learning model selection will allow teachers and administrators to plan more effectively for a stable end to “a difficult and fluid” school year.

“We don't want to burn out our teachers because they've already flip-flopped so much in the way that they teach,” Board Member Tanni Bromley said. “So if they can have a consistent roster, it would be easier for them to decide how they're going to move forward.”

The district’s in-person hybrid students shift between receiving face-to-face and at-home online instruction based on the cohort they are in. All remote-only learners complete their classes entirely in a virtual setting. Board members said at Monday’s meeting that some families have switched between these models multiple times throughout the first semester.

“Consistency for the student is probably best, too, in that if a parent chooses one, then it would be best to kind of ride that out,” Board Member Shawna Murphy said. “Get them through this year and hopefully we won't even be dealing with this next year. But the flip-flopping for the kid isn't good either.”

As of Jan. 15, BCSD reported that 92 individuals, on or off campus, among its students, teachers and staff members are currently testing positive for COVID-19. The district’s statement noted that it may need to transition to 100-percent virtual instruction for all students if an issue related to COVID-19 arises during the second semester. 

BCSD previously switched to fully remote instruction from Dec. 7, 2020 to Jan. 4, 2021 because of staffing shortages related to a rise in positive COVID-19 cases among its students, teachers and staff, and throughout Genesee County. An influx of family requests to move children from hybrid to remote learning was cited as a challenge the district faced in the days leading up to this switch.

“All of our teachers are feeling burned out,” Soler said. “I mean it is tough to navigate this virtual and remote, and it's just a harder year. So our teachers are working like maniacs. They're planning. They're trying to prepare.”

Changes to instruction methods will take effect Feb. 1 and remain in place for the duration of the school year. However, according to the statement, a student’s school may contact parents and guardians at any time during the semester to suggest a modification to the child’s learning format to accommodate their academic needs.

In terms of exceptions to learning model commitments, Soler said he wants families to understand “that if there's a situation that comes about, that they would need to go through their principal first, prior to seeking approval to change, but that only extreme extenuating circumstances would be considered.”

A mandatory quarantine period does not alter the second semester learning method of an in-person hybrid student who tests positive for COVID-19 or has been in close contact with someone who receives a positive test result.

“If that child is quarantined, then he has to go out,” Board Member John Reigle said. “If they test positive, they're out for a certain period. But that person committed to in-person [instruction]. Once they're cleared, they can come back.”

Board members expressed optimism at Monday’s meeting about the sense of normalcy and ease of mind that the second semester learning model selection can potentially bring to everyone.

“To kind of know what's going to be happening for the rest of the school year in February, I think that's a good thing because it's kind of getting back to normal,” Murphy said. “Regardless of what you choose, it's going to stay the same.”

The next board meeting will be livestreamed at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 25 on the school district’s Board of Education YouTube channel.

January 16, 2021 - 11:55am
posted by Lauren Leone in batavia, Batavia City Council, news, notify.

In the coming weeks, Batavia City Council members will engage in a review process to finalize the city’s 2021–22 budget based on Interim City Manager Rachael Tabelski’s recommended cutbacks to municipal services amid COVID-19 financial challenges.

At Monday night’s City Council business meeting, Tabelski presented a proposed pathway to economic recovery that summarized city revenues and expenses. She said that despite her pride in generating a financially sound budget, it was difficult to put together a fiscal plan because of income losses related to pandemic shutdowns and the subsequent economic downturn.

“I can honestly say that none of us like this budget,” she said. “The restraints and restrictions forced upon us by reduced revenue and state aid will not allow the city to operate as business as usual. There are services that will need to be reduced or cut altogether if we are to achieve a budget within the tax cap.”

She said city budget shortfalls have been compounded by a projected 20-percent decrease -- $350,000 -- in aid and incentives for municipalities. State and federal relief measures have focused on providing businesses with loans and grants, and individuals with stimulus checks, unemployment benefits and eviction and foreclosure moratoriums.

“Within the latest stimulus bill that was passed, there was yet no aid to local governments,” she said. “There is potential for local government funding relief with the new administration, but at this time there are no guarantees and it is not reflected in the fiscal ’21–’22 budget.”

Resident service scalebacks include reduced staffing levels at the local police and fire departments, community policing, arts funding, academic development, special police details and community events. Administrative services, public works and government personnel expenditures will also experience significant cost reductions.

“Restorations of these services will ultimately depend on the economic recovery of the nation as a whole or re-examining priority services for the city,” Tabelski said.

Though cuts and hiring freezes have occurred across departments, increases in city employee wages and expenses, like Social Security and retirement costs, will leave a $1.2 million gap between revenue and expenditures in comparison to the previous fiscal year.

The prospective budget includes the layoff of an ordinance enforcement officer, a retirement incentive for a police officer and several unfilled jobs. Tabelski said the city remains committed to investment in workers compensation and health insurance, budgeted at $294,000 and $2.6 million, respectively.

The property tax rate increase is slated to be 1.38 percent, which would change the rate from $9.59 to $9.73 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value. This year, the city saw a $175,000 decrease in sales tax — its largest single source of annual revenue — and a general fund decline of approximately $800,000.

“The current conditions in the general fund are unsustainable,” Tabelski said. “Future budgets will depend on the ability of the economy ... to recover lost state aid, for us to find sources of revenue.”

Tabelski said the city should become less dependent on the fund balance, reserves and water fund revenue in budgets going forward. She suggested to council members that renovations to commercial and residential properties throughout the community could serve as valuable income streams.

“Despite these difficult economic times, the City of Batavia continues to see investment and economic development in terms of construction and building improvements,” she said. “There are many active developers looking at our city for market-rate housing projects that will draw new small businesses downtown.”

The interim city manager praised Batavia government leaders for their efforts and expressed confidence in their planning to deliver the services that city residents and employees require.

“I anticipate that our budget work sessions to follow will be extremely detailed and filled with proactive conversations so the city can achieve the budget that meets the needs of the organization, the employees and our residents,” she said.

In other action, City Council:

  • Endorsed a Batavia Business Improvement District application to the 2020 New York Main Street Anchor Grant for a multipurpose events and entertainment space. If awarded the state grant for up to $500,000, the funding would be used to renovate the external façade and interior of the Batavia Showtime movie theater at 6 Alva Place.

  • Approved a resolution that authorized Council President Eugene Jankowski Jr. to sign the amended Dwyer Stadium leasing agreement. This is a five-year agreement in which the Batavia Regional Recreation Corporation will lease the stadium to CAN-USA Sports LLC. 

  • Heard from City Attorney George Van Nest that local code enforcement deadlines are being delayed by the state legislature’s COVID-19 Emergency Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention Act. The act extends New York’s eviction moratorium until May 1 for tenants who have endured pandemic-related hardship.

The first budget work session will be held after the council’s next conference meeting at 7 p.m. Jan. 25 in the Council Board Room on the second floor of City Hall, followed by a second session Feb. 1.

January 16, 2021 - 11:50am
posted by Billie Owens in news, accidents, Alabama.

A two-vehicle accident with injury is reported at Ledge and Maple roads, Alabama. It is partially blocking traffic. Occupants are out. A child has a face laceration. Alabama Fire Department and Mercy medics are responding.

January 15, 2021 - 7:00pm


New Listing Alert: 5216 E. Main St., Batavia. Meticulous, tasteful, solid, and well done are just a few things to be said about this lovely ranch home. This three-bedroom, two full-bath home has literally just nothing for you to do but move in and enjoy. So much has been done to this home in the last five years -- roof / siding / flooring / painting throughout just to start the list!

The main bath recently remodeled and I promise you will find many reasons to shut the door and stay awhile -- so pretty and even has heated floors! Nicely finished hardwood floors, large kitchen with plenty of newer cabinetry and new stainless appliances with attached dining area with a sliding glass door to let the sunshine in!

The basement in this house adds a whole other layer of living with a great home office leading into large family room area that has small kitchenette and a second full bath. There is also large utility area and a separate storage room for all your extra stuff -- so much great usable space!

There is an extra deep attached garage which leads out to fully fenced back yard with an additional fenced in area and large utility shed! Outside is landscaped with loads of perennials so you can ease right into sunny weather -- make an appointment today! Call Lynn Bezon 585-344-HOME (4663). Click here to view this listing.

January 15, 2021 - 6:19pm
posted by Press Release in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received 55 new positive cases of COVID-19.
    • The new positive cases reside in the:
      • West Region (Alabama, Darien, Pembroke)
      • Central Region (Alexander, Batavia, Bethany, Elba, Oakfield)
      • East Region (Bergen, Byron, Le Roy, Pavilion, Stafford)
  • The individuals are in their 0-19s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.
  • Seventy-two of the previous positive individuals have recovered and have been removed from the isolation list. 
  • Nine of the positive individuals are hospitalized.

  • Orleans County received 29 new positive cases of COVID-19 from Tuesday through today. 
  • The positive cases reside in the:
    • West Region (Yates, Ridgeway, Shelby)
    • Central Region (Carlton, Gaines, Albion, Barre)
    • East Region (Kendall, Murray, Clarendon)
  • The individuals are in their 0-19s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s.
  • Seven of the new positive individuals were on quarantine prior to testing positive.
  • Thirty-eight of the previous positive individuals have recovered and have been removed from the isolation.
  • Eighteen of the current positive individuals are hospitalized.
  • Two of the new positive cases are residents of Orchard Rehabilitation and Nursing Center.
  • Two of the new positive cases are inmates at the Orleans Correctional Facility
  • We are deeply saddened to report the death of two residents of Orchard Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. Both of these individuals are over 65. We do not provide any further information to protect the privacy of the individuals and their families. Our deepest condolences to the family and friends of these individuals during this very sad time.
  • We are deeply saddened to report the death of a community member. The individual is over 65. We do not provide any further information to protect the privacy of this person and their family. Our deepest condolences to the family and friends of this person during this very sad time.

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January 15, 2021 - 4:21pm
posted by Billie Owens in Grand Jury, crime, batavia, Le Roy, Stafford, news, notify.

Donna Hartman is indicted for the crime of second-degree identity theft, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on July 6 in the Town of Dalton, Livingston County, that Hartman knowingly and intentionally assumed the identity of another person in order to benefit herself monetarily in an amount exceeding $500. It is alleged in the first count that she presented herself to Livingston County Ambulance staff as a person residing on Fargo Road in Stafford, resulting in an ambulance bill for $835 to be sent to the victim. In count two, she is accused of the same crime at Noyes Memorial Hospital, resulting in a bill for hospital service to be sent to the same victim for $732.65. In counts three and four, Hartman is accused of falsifying business records in the first degree, also a Class E felony, for her actions to cause ambulance service records and also hospital business records to reflect false information regarding her name and address.

Jorge L. Rodriguez is indicted for the crime of second-degree criminal mischief, a Class D felony. It is alleged that on Aug. 22 on the Thruway that he intentionally damaged property belonging to another person -- a 2017 Chevrolet -- in an amount exceeding $1,500. In count two, Rodriguez is accused of second-degree reckless endangerment. It is alleged that he drove recklessly that day, in a manner that created substantial risk of serious physical injury. He is accused in count two of purposely ramming his vehicle into the victim's vehicle while another victim was standing between the two vehicles.

Amanda M. Webb is indicted for the crime of criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on Nov. 1 in the City of Batavia that Webb intentionally damaged property belonging to another person -- a 2009 Chevrolet -- in an amount exceeding $250. In count two she is accused of second-degree harassment. It is alleged in count two that Webb, with intent to harass, annoy or alarm another person, struck, shoved, kicked or otherwise subjected a victim to physical contact or threatened to do so.

Lawrence D. Williams is indicted for the crime of criminal possession of a forged instrument in the first degree, a Class C felony. It is alleged that on Oct. 4 while at Walmart in Batavia that he passed a counterfeit $100, knowing it was not real, with the intent to defraud.

Joshua G. Bachorski is indicted for second-degree burglary, a Class C violent felony. It is alleged that on Oct. 9 Bachorski knowingly entered or remained unlawfully in a dwelling on Pearl Street in the City of Batavia with the intent to commit a crime. In count two, he is accused of third-degree burglary, a Class D felony, for likewise entering an outbuilding at the same address on that date with the same intention. In count three, he is accused of petit larceny, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly stealing a lawnmower owned by the victim.

Taylor K. Laird is indicted for the crime of aggravated driving while intoxicated, per se, as a Class E felony. It is alleged that on May 28 in the City of Batavia that she drove a 2002 Dodge on Pearl Street while having a BAC of .08 percent or more, and while a child age 15 or less was a passenger. In count two, Laird is accused of aggravated DWI, a Class E felony, while a child age 15 or less was a passenger. In count three, Laird is accused of aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, another Class E felony, for driving that day while her license was suspended or revoked by authorities, and while she was under the influence of alcohol or a drug.

Chad M. Putney is indicted for the crime of driving while intoxicated, as a misdemeanor. It is alleged that on March 30 in the Town of Le Roy that Putney drove a 2008 Ford on Route 5 while he was intoxicated. In count two, he is accused of DWI, per se, as a misdemeanor, for having a BAC of .08 percent or more at the time. In count three, he is accused of aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree, a Class E felony, for having in effect three or more suspensions at the the time, imposed on at least three separate dates: Feb. 3, 2018; Dec. 8, 2018; and July 15, 2019 for failure to answer, appear or pay a fine.

January 15, 2021 - 3:12pm

Alabama Hotel, 1353 Lewiston Road, Basom. Menu. Wednesday 4 to 10 p.m. for bar food and pizza dine-in, and takeout. Thursday thru Saturday 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. for full menu dine-in and take out. (585) 948-9994

Alex's Place, 8322 Park Road, Batavia. Indoor dining and take out. Tuesday & Thursday 11a.m. to 8 p.m. / Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Sunday 12 to 8 p.m. Menu. Now accepting reservations for parties of 5 to 10 people. Also, call-ahead seating for parties of up to 4 people within an hour of arrival. (585) 344-2999

Angry Charlie's Smokehouse & BBQ, 341 Ellicott St., Batavia. Authentic Eastern North Carolina BBQ. Eat in / Take out / Curbside pick up / Delivery. Open Tuesday thru Saturday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. (585) 322-5260

Batavia's Original, 500 E. Main St., Batavia. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. / Sunday 12 to 8 p.m. Heated patio. Daily specials. Online ordering, curbside pick up, dine in. No-contact delivery upon request. Menu. (585) 343-3303

Bourbon & Burger Co., 9 Jackson St., Batavia. Dine in or take out Monday - Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Sundays. Free delivery of food AND alcohol on Fridays and Saturdays from 4 to 9 p.m. within Town & City of Batavia. Menu. (585) 219-4242

Center Street Smoke House, 20 Center St., Batavia. Open Friday and Saturday nights only, 4 to 9 p.m. Call for reservations. Menu. (585) 343-7470

Chap's Elba Diner, 5 S. Main St., Elba. Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Menu. (585) 757-5001 or (585) 797-7505

Cinquino's Pizza, 314 Ellicott St., Batavia. Dine-in, takeout, curbside pick up. Delivery within Batavia city limits. Menu. Monday thru Thursday 11a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. / Sunday 12 to 8 p.m. Order deadline is noon Friday for pick up Sunday or Monday. (585) 343-2447

Commit to Well, 301 North St., Batavia (YWCA side entry near driveway). Healthy meal prep service. Choose meals online, pick up (Sundays 10 to 11 a.m. or Mondays 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.), enjoy. Meals are $8 each, plus tax. New menu weekly. Email: [email protected]. (585) 409-5740

D & R Depot Restaurant, 63 Lake St., Le Roy. Dine in, curbside pick up, free delivery in Le Roy, $1/mile elsewhere (no minimum). Full menu! Open 7 days a week 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. (585) 768-6270. Order online, or call (585) 768-6270.

Eden Vegan Cafe & Bakeshop, 109 Main St. (inside Eli Fish), Batavia. Takeout only. Pre-order via the website for pick up. Menu temporarily reduced. Hours Tuesday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and again from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and again from 4 to 8 p.m. (585) 815-4487

Eli Fish Brewing Co., 109 Main St., Batavia. Dine-in, take out, and DoorDash delivery. Monday thru Thursday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. / Closed Sunday. Menu. (585) 343-0008

Fishtales Hideaway, 107 Evans St., Batavia. Dine in and take out available. Open Monday through Thursday 1 to 8 p.m., and Friday and Saturday 1 to 9 p.m. Full bar. Here's our website and menu. Phone (585) 219-4736.

Islands Hawaiian Grill, 60 Main St., Batavia. Delivery, curbside, pick up, dine in. Tuesday thru Thursday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. / Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Menu. (585) 483-3113

Mama Chavez's Taqueria, 7 Mill St., Le Roy. Takeout only. Tues - Fri. 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. / Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. / Closed Sunday & Monday. Daily specials. Call in your order for pick up (585) 502-5093.

Northside Deli, 162 Bank St., Batavia. Open 7 days a week. Monday thru Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Sundays 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Full menu available to take out. Order ahead of time for fast service. Website. (585) 323-2888

O'Lacy's Irish Pub, 5 School St., Batavia. "Old-fashioned Comfort Food." Facebook page. (585) 343-3270.

Oliver's Candies, 211 W. Main St. Open 7 days a week, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Inside store shopping, curbside pick up. Ice cream parlor open. (585) 343-5888

Pok-A-Dot, 229 Ellicott St., Batavia. Open 7 days a week, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Dine in, take out, order by phone, or order online for pick up at "The Dot." (585) 343-6775

Public Coffee Hub, 56 Harvester Ave., full-service cafe -- dine-in or carry out. Also food truck drive-thru at 355 W. Main St., Batavia. Free WiFi at cafe & TapGlo ping-pong available to buy. Locally roasted beans, fresh baked goods, Montreal bagels, chai lattes, hot cocoa, and more. Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cafe (716) 392-2561. Food truck (323) 484-3482. Can text to order, too.

Roman's, 59 Main St., Batavia. Patio and indoor dining. Free delivery within the City/Town of Batavia. New winter hours! Tuesday-Saturday from 4 to 9 p.m. We still have the BOGO Pizza Special every day and delivery on Friday and Saturday. Last reservation and pick up time is 8:45 / Closed Sunday & Monday. Menu. (585) 345-6788.

Settler's Restaurant, 353 W. Main St., Batavia. Dine-in. Pick up. Online ordering. DoorDash. Open Monday thru Saturday 6 a.m. - 8 p.m. / Sunday 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Menu. (585) 343-7443

Southside Deli, 300 Ellicott St. (corner of Liberty Street), Batavia. Take out only. Open 7 days a week: Sunday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Tuesday thru Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. All deli and store items are available. Menu. Call ahead for quicker service. (585) 344-2220

Subway -- two franchises: the one inside Batavia Walmart, the other one at 8394 Alleghany Road, Pembrokeoperated by Oakfield resident Doug Hendershott Jr. Open 7 days a week from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eat in or take out. Order in person, online, or by phone. Walmart Subway phone is (585) 343-3023. Pembroke phone is (585) 591-1549.

Sweet Betty's, 15 Main St., Le Roy. Menu includes Perry's hard ice cream, soft serve, floats, etc., plus burgers, sandwiches, old-time candy, adult beverages. Fish fry on Wednesdays. Closed Tuesdays. Wednesday thru Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. (585) 502-6084

T.F. Brown's, 214 E. Main St., Batavia. Delivery, curbside pick up, dine in. Monday thru Sunday from 12 to 10 p.m. Order online or phone (585) 343-1547.

The Coffee Press, 13 Jackson St., Batavia. Dine in or take out. Monday-Saturday 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Closed Sunday. Menu. (585) 483-3096

The Original Red Osier Landmark Restaurant, 6492 E. Main St., Stafford. Open for in-house dine-in service Tuesday through Sunday 4 to 8 p.m. Curbside service available those days, too. Ordering starts at 1 p.m., pick up starts at 4:15. Specials can be viewed at [email protected] or on our Facebook page.

The Yngodess Shop, 73 Main St., Batavia. Curbside pickup, and free delivery with a $20 minimum (1 - 6 p.m.), call for more details. Sunday 12 - 6 p.m., Monday & Tuesday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Wednesday thru Saturday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Visit online. Call in your order. (585) 343-3170

West Main Wine & Spirits, 341 W. Main St., Batavia. Buy in-store or offering curbside pick up. Monday thru Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Sunday 12 to 6 p.m. (585) 344-2717

Willow Bend Inn, 3489 W. Main Street Road, Batavia. Bar is open Tuesday thru Friday. Dine in or take out in restaurant from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Check our Facebook page for different specials & menu every Friday.

************************************************

If you send us updated information about your establishment, we will add it to this list. There is no charge.

To be added, email details, including location, hours, a link for menu, and delivery/pick up/dine-in options to:   [email protected]

January 15, 2021 - 3:08pm

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley announced today with his Assembly Minority colleagues the “Jump-Start New York” plan for economic recovery.

It's a comprehensive package of legislative proposals that would restore the power of the Legislature by reining in Gov. Cuomo’s executive powers and focus New York’s available financial resources toward economic recovery for “nonessential” small businesses that have lost income due to the governor’s pandemic restrictions through direct aid grants. 

“This package of legislation does exactly what we need to be doing right now in our state, getting the Legislature back to work for the communities they represent and helping the small businesses and families within those communities that have suffered for far too long under onerous restrictions imposed by the governor using his expanded powers,” Hawley said. 

The program’s funds would be drawn from unallocated settlement funds and capital programs such as START-UP NY, and additional stimulus would be made available by making small businesses eligible for the Film Tax Credit.

Additionally, these small businesses would be granted a 180-day grace period to remedy regulatory violations without being fined and also be granted an extra 180 days to file their sales taxes. The legislative package would assist “nonessential” businesses located within the governor’s Red and Orange Zones by prompting a reevaluation of the businesses that could open, while maintaining proper social distancing practices.

In addition, Jump-Start New York would give targeted relief to farmers and renters who have had their incomes impacted by Gov. Cuomo’s restrictions during COVID-19. Landlords who have gone without income would receive a tax credit to help offset their losses, while farmers would see regulatory expenses and requirements loosened and eligibility standards for funding broadened.

The package would also assist farmers and rural business owners in general by expanding rural broadband access, which would help them expand their markets among other benefits.

“Focusing available financial resources on our small businesses that have been struggling to remain operational is just common sense, so I’m hopeful we see ‘Jump-Start New York’ get passed for the sake of the small business owners and their employees who have had their lives upended this last year,” Hawley said.

January 15, 2021 - 3:03pm

Members of Batavia Police Advisory Collaboration Stakeholder Group are ready to keep the momentum going.

Their Gov. Andrew Cuomo-assigned task completed, members last night said they felt like some good things had been accomplished for the community and they want to keep going, if not in the group's current form, at least in focus groups and through its participation in police-related committees.

"I don't think the conversation ends here," said Victor Thomas, a member of the group and a member of the Just Kings Social Club. "Like I said earlier, with the chief and assistant chief, these are both people that want to have this conversation with or without this group. They went above and beyond, like I said, to form other groups and actually hear the community's voice. So I don't think this is something that's just going to stop here because Cuomo said we had to do this. We actually have a police chief and assistant9 chief that care about their community. So that's huge."

Chief Shawn Heubush said there is no plan for the conversation to stop.

"One of the things that we talked about is actually inviting the community to our policing community policing meeting because it's usually an internal-facing meeting where we try to come up with ways to integrate ourselves into the community," Heubusch said. "We realized, as Detective (Matthew) Wojtaszek had mentioned that we don't have any citizens on this committee. Why don't we have a citizen or two on this committee to help us in getting into the areas that we need to get into and focusing on those areas? So that would be something that I would see to try to keep this conversation going, inviting more people to talk to those types of functions.

"I really look forward to a citizens' police academy. I certainly hope we can make that happen because I think that is a perfect opportunity. You know, just looking at other communities that have done it, a perfect opportunity for us to really serve the public a lot better and have that educational piece that I think we need so, so very badly with our community, the back and forth conversation as well. And the focus group, as Victor mentioned, we're going to keep going with that. I think that's extremely important."

Interim City Manager Rachael Tabelski said she expects the city to make community and police relations part of its regular focus in the future, perhaps adding a review process as part of the budget process.

"It is up to myself and the chief to follow up with counsel on an annual basis to see how this is going and how it's evolved," Tabelski said. "The plan doesn't get finished and put on the shelf, is what I'm trying to say. I think both the chief and I are committed to making sure that we are reviewing this and trying to make this into our strategic priorities that come forward to counsel every single year at budget time as well."

The stakeholder's group was charged, by executive order, by reviewing all relevant police policies and procedures and make recommendations for changes. There were no recommended changes in the area of things like arrest procedures and use of force but committee members expressed a strong interest in improving mental health intervention as well as community-police relationships.

The written plan produced by the committee will be presented to the City Council on Jan. 25 and become available for public review at that time. There will be a public comment period and the council will be asked to approve it and send it to the governor's office, to comply with the executive order, on March 8.

Near the top of the meeting, Pastor Marty Macdonald of City Church started the discussion about how far the city has come in the area of community and police relations, especially in regards to people of color.

"Ten years ago, this meeting would have never happened," Macdonald said. "Not with the people that we have on (the committee). I am so grateful for Victor being in this group. Victor, what would you have thought five years ago if you were to be invited to this?

"I'm on the CJAC (Criminal Justice Advisory Council) committee, too," he added. "They approved Greg Monroe to be a part of the CJAC. To me, this is the essence of what this whole thing is about, that to a degree, our community has been, I'm not certain that it's been deliberate, but it's just been there's been no attention to it and we have put attention to it now. And I think we've moved in an incredibly positive way."

Victor Thomas said he was grateful to see progress made.

"I applaud the chief because, from the beginning, before the march, before any of this came down, he was there," Thomas said. "He was willing to hear concerns. He was there the day of the march and he was willing to hear his community's cry. I think that showed even more, like you saying, like this conversation needs to happen even without the governor. Yeah, the governor passed (this order) down, but we took that and we created another focus group to look deeper in once we didn't get the results that we wanted from a survey.

"It shows what's manifesting," he added. "It shows the growth in Batavia, and I'm just happy to be a part of it. I'm happy to have my thoughts and Greg's thoughts and other minority thoughts actually taken it into consideration and actually put down in this plan. Like my friend was saying in the beginning, yeah, it should stand for everybody, but I'm glad that the focus remained where the focus needed to be. And I'm happy to be a part of that. And I'm happy to continue the focus group."

January 15, 2021 - 2:57pm

Press release:

The GOW Opioid Task Force will be hosting its second virtual Quarterly Meeting at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 21st.

This meeting will focus on highlights from the past year, plans for 2021, and how we have adjusted our efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, local addictions professionals will speak on how the pandemic has directly impacted their agencies, treatment services, and any trends they are seeing in our community. 

“It is important we continue the conversation surrounding the opioid crisis and discuss ways we can help amidst the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Christen Ferraro, project coordinator. “People in our community are still struggling and in need of additional support. This virtual setting of our Quarterly Meeting helps us to stay connected and reach even more people across our tri-county region.”

This meeting is open to the public and the community is invited to join and share any questions they may have.

Please visit the GOW Opioid Task Force website for more details and to register. Once registered you will receive a confirmation email with Zoom information and a link to join.

January 15, 2021 - 2:44pm

Press release:

As New York embarks on phase 1B of its COVID-19 vaccination rollout, U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer and U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand today called out the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) failure to develop and implement a comprehensive national vaccine plan, despite having months to do so, and demanded the Department take immediate action to fix the significant failures of the COVID-19 vaccine distribution process.

The senators said they have been requesting HHS work and communicate with state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, vaccine and PPE manufacturers, public health experts, and health care providers for months to develop a plan for COVID-19 vaccine distribution and administration.

“The biggest thing we want to ensure about the coronavirus vaccine is access. The vaccine must be available to whoever needs and wants it,” Senator Schumer said. “By refusing to work with local governments to implement a national vaccine plan, HHS is failing New Yorkers who are earnestly waiting their turn for a vaccine, and they must step up to address the health inequalities and distribution failures. In order to succeed in the collective goal of public health, I am demanding that HHS fix its broken distribution plan and work with municipalities to get New Yorkers vaccinated ASAP.”

Senator Gillibrand said: “New York’s health systems have been stretched to the limits and as the virus surges across the state, federal support is necessary to effectively distribute and administer vaccines. The Trump administration’s lack of leadership has hampered our nation’s vaccine distribution and resulted in doses of vaccine expiring before reaching Americans.

"Even in the final days of this administration, it’s crucial that they enact a robust federal plan to allow the incoming Biden administration to quickly reach every American in need of the vaccine. The Biden administration should not have to start from scratch to form close partnerships with state and local governments in order to deliver detailed guidance and essential resources to speed up vaccine administration.”

Schumer and Gillibrand underscored that a successful plan must include guidance and best practices on taking the vaccine from distribution to administration, provide all necessary resources to state, local, Tribal, and territorial governments and other jurisdictions, account for the significant challenges jurisdictions face in scaling up their workforces, and act to ensure vaccine distribution efforts also combat health inequities.

The senators also called for HHS to launch a massive public facing campaign to promote vaccine confidence and help people understand where, when and how to get vaccinated.

In the coming weeks, the senators emphasized that HHS must engage with states to proactively identify and address challenges to ensure COVID-19 vaccines are quickly and equitably distributed and administered across the country.

Additionally, Senator Gillibrand recently called for the passage of the Health Force, Resilience Force, and Jobs to Fight COVID-19 Act to address the nation’s lagging vaccine campaign by investing billions in local public health infrastructure and recruiting, training and employing hundreds of thousands of Americans to administer and distribute vaccines, particularly in underserved communities.

Community-based public health jobs and resources, like those created by the Health Force, are known to improve local vaccine education, outreach, and vaccination rates. The Health Force proposal would ensure the federal government has a proactive and coordinated approach to vaccine distribution and administration including delivering $40 billion a year, for the first two years, to meet the COVID-19 vaccine distribution needs and address the various public health challenges caused by the pandemic. 

Senator Schumer and Senator Gillibrand’s letter to HHS Secretary Alex Azar, signed alongside 43 other senators appears below:

Dear Secretary Azar:

We write to you with concerns about significant challenges in COVID-19 vaccine distribution and administration across the country and to outline key actions the Trump Administration should have taken—and must now take—to address these challenges. With our health system and economy in crisis, and millions of lives at stake, we cannot afford for this vaccination campaign to continue to be hindered by the lack of planning, communication, and leadership we have seen so far.

President Trump tweeted on January 3rd that “the vaccines are being delivered to the states by the Federal Government far faster than they can be administered!” That should have been an indicator of a failed vaccine roll out, not a point of pride. It is the federal government’s role to ensure states, Tribes, localities, and the public are receiving the resources and support they need, rather than requiring every jurisdiction to manage on their own without the benefit of the national resources and perspective that only the federal government can provide.

Since July, we have been calling on the Trump Administration to work with states, Tribes, and localities, vaccine and PPE manufacturers, public health experts, congregate care settings, and other health care providers to develop a comprehensive, national plan for vaccines. Since September, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Operation Warp Speed (OWS) first published their playbook and strategy for vaccine distribution, state, Tribal, and local health departments have said that they need clear communication, transparent decision-making, evidence-based guidance, and financial resources to effectively implement vaccine administration plans.

Despite months to plan, the Trump Administration has failed to meet these needs or deliver promised doses to jurisdictions, and as a result of this lack of planning, only 36 percent of distributed vaccines have been administered.

We hope the recently announced efforts to scale up vaccinations in pharmacies will help to turn this tide but it is clear much more is needed. States, Tribes, and localities, providers, and the public are being left without federal support or clear, complete information about what to expect in the future as nearly 300,000 Americans fall ill daily from this virus. 

In order to avoid these failures, the Trump Administration should have issued and implemented a comprehensive national vaccines plan, including detailed guidance and an infusion of resources to support states. Federal responsibility does not end with delivery of vaccines to states, as you have suggested. Vaccine administration must be a close partnership between the federal government and state, Tribal, and local governments, with the federal government stepping up to ensure that all needs are met.

A vaccine allocated on a spreadsheet, or even a vaccine distributed and sitting on a shelf, is not enough to protect anyone. The metric that matters, and where we are clearly moving too slowly, is vaccines in arms. A comprehensive national plan should:

  • include robust guidance for states, Tribes, localities and health care providers including on personal protective equipment (PPE) usage, vaccine administration prioritization, and best practices for taking the vaccine from distribution to administration;
  • specify how the Federal government will support these entities with funding, supplies, information, and personnel—which thus far the Trump Administration has failed to do; and
  • account for the significant challenges jurisdictions face in scaling up their workforces while continuing other lifesaving public health work, which may include providing increased support for mass vaccination clinics and mobile testing units, as well as supplementing the vaccination workforce including vaccinators, logistical support, and more. 

In the absence of this long-overdue national plan, it is all the more important that the Trump Administration actively engage with state planning efforts in the coming days, identify challenges across distribution and administration, and proactively address problems that arise in partnership with jurisdictions.

In order to support the efforts outlined in a comprehensive, national plan, the Trump Administration must also quickly provide robust vaccine distribution funding to States, Tribes, and localities. In advance of vaccine distribution efforts commencing, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) had provided just $617 million in funding to states for vaccine efforts—this amount was woefully inadequate. In fact, the Trump Administration falsely stated as recently as November that States did not need funding for vaccine distribution.

Ultimately, Congress provided $8.75 billion for vaccine distribution efforts in the recently enacted COVID relief bill which will meaningfully help states execute their vaccine administration plans. The bill requires a portion of this funding to be sent to states within 21 days, and President Trump’s delay in signing this legislation should not further delay the distribution of these funds.

We recognize that the CDC announced the availability of $3 billion for states for vaccination activities, but we cannot afford a repeat performance of this Administration’s decision to sit on billions of dollars in testing funds when states urgently needed them.

The Trump Administration must ensure strong support reaches jurisdictions as soon as possible to support their critical work. The challenges we are seeing in vaccine distribution also underscore the need for robust and permanent investments in public health infrastructure to get us out of this cycle of crisis and response.

The Trump Administration must act to correct the lack of transparency and communication from the federal government around COVID-19 vaccine distribution and administration. Over the first two weeks of vaccine distribution, more than a dozen states found their actual vaccine allocations fell significantly below initial OWS allocation forecasts.

For several days, OWS denied these discrepancies, before ultimately admitting officials had provided states with flawed numbers. Even now, states are given just one week of advanced notice about the number of doses they will receive and have been given no information about distribution projections after February.

Local health departments are largely excluded from planning calls with OWS and CDC, even though they often ultimately receive and administer vaccines. There is no federal plan to publicly release sufficient data on vaccinations in long-term care settings, where more than 133,350 residents have died, accounting for 37 percent of all deaths from COVID-19.

The federal Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program, which states expected to rely on to support vaccination of these particularly vulnerable populations, has administered only 17 percent of the vaccines distributed to these facilities to date.

Jurisdictions and health care providers are not the only ones in the dark; members of the public do not know when, where, or how they will be able to be vaccinated. CDC already supports a national portal to provide information to the public on where they can receive flu vaccines and other vaccines; the public needs this and more information when it comes COVID-19 vaccines, which should be broadly publicized.

Furthermore, while some states are taking steps to educate providers and the public to improve communication and build trust, the Trump Administration has failed to meaningfully address vaccine confidence, after spending months directly undermining such confidence by casting doubt on our nation’s world-class scientists and scientific agencies.

The Trump Administration should launch a long-overdue, large-scale public awareness campaign and work with leaders in communities across the country to provide science-based information to promote high vaccination rates. The federal government must play a proactive role in improving transparency and communication with public health departments and the American people.

Finally, the Trump Administration must also act to ensure vaccine distribution efforts combat rather than exacerbate the health inequities that have been laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic. A failure to plan strategically and proactively for vaccine distribution means communities of color, residents of congregate care facilities, rural communities, and other populations disproportionately at-risk will remain neglected in our pandemic response.

This is especially true for the millions of health care workers of color who provide the daily care and support for residents of congregate care settings and who provide home health care. We have seen the toll this pandemic has taken on vulnerable communities, and the egregious health disparities that have resulted from this pandemic, and we must act to combat these inequities.

Since FDA granted the first emergency use authorization for a COVID-19 vaccine, only 2 percent of Americans have been vaccinated. In that same time, the United States passed 20 million cumulative cases of COVID-19 and saw a new record in daily deaths from COVID-19 when over 4,085 Americans died on January 7.

Of the 20 million doses promised by the end of 2020, only 4 million doses were administered before the end of the year. In light of this failed vaccine rollout amidst a surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths, we urge you to finally take the steps necessary to ensure COVID-19 vaccines are quickly and equitably distributed and administered across the country.

January 15, 2021 - 11:55am

Press release:

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer announced Thursday that after numerous discussions with President-elect Joe Biden and his team, his incoming administration’s FEMA will deliver roughly $2 billion MORE to New York State for COVID-19 relief.

Schumer said that while these funds are meant to help alleviate the mounting local costs associated with the pandemic, they will ultimately help New York State tackle COVID-related budget gaps.

The money, Schumer explained, is tied to the March 2020 FEMA Disaster Declaration declared by the Trump administration. Under that declaration and current policy, 75 percent of NYS COVID-related expenses are covered by a Disaster Relief Fund (DRF.) Now, the expenses covered will be 100 percent -- and this will deliver roughly $2 billion more to New York within the next several months.

“President-elect Biden is laser-focused on America’s economic recovery, and this recovery begins with tackling the costs states and local governments have incurred in managing the pandemic,” Senator Schumer said.

“For New York, the costs have been huge and will take years to overcome entirely, but achieving my goal of 100-percent FEMA cost share to New York will mean a sigh of relief for all New Yorkers because these critical dollars will help protect essential services and workers while we deal with badly burdened budgets that have been gut-punched by COVID. I am glad we could get this done even before the President-elect is sworn in because it shows how we will be hitting the ground running come January 20th.” 

Schumer has been pushing for 100-percent FEMA cost share since the crisis began.

Early on, in March 2020, Schumer wrote FEMA saying, “I write today to urge the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to wave the 25 percent state cost share associated with any coronavirus disease (COVID-19) work under the March 13 Emergency Declaration. As New York has become the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., I urge the FEMA to request this waiver from the President as soon as possible.”

Schumer spent the next month’s making more calls, speaking with President Trump and hammering home the critical need for 100-percent relief. His advocacy continued for months thereafter and included many meetings, calls, and additional letters.  

New York State has been responding to COVID since last March, spending limited funds on masks, extra nurses and doctors, temporary hospitals, and so much more. Because of Schumer’s earlier pushes, FEMA told the state that many of these expenses are covered, similar to insurance, under the COVID declarations.

Over time the state has submitted to FEMA a log of these expenses and FEMA has assessed those expenses. For every dollar spent, FEMA and federal government currently cover 75 cents and the state provides the remaining 25 cents. Now, after Schumer’s push, the incoming Biden administration’s FEMA will cover 100-percent of eligible expenses, delivering roughly $2 billion more to the State of New York.

January 15, 2021 - 11:45am
posted by Press Release in news, city of batavia, christmas tree pickup.

Press release:

The City of Batavia has been picking up Christmas trees for the month January and will continue through the end of the month as weather and operations permit.

Important information regarding Christmas tree removal:

  • We can only pick up real trees. No artificial trees.
  • Residents are to place trees in the parkway near the curb. Keep trees out of the roadway and clear of sidewalks.
  • Residents placing trees out will need to strip the trees of all decorations, lights, stands and bags. These items damage chipping equipment. Contact your waste disposal company for information on the proper disposal of these items.
  • If high winds are forecasted, delay putting trees out until after winds have subsided. Trees in the road and across sidewalks are a hazards to motorists and pedestrians.
  • Keep trees free of snow and ice so they are visible and do not become frozen to the ground.
  • Please, have trees out for pickup before Jan. 31. (Last day of pickup is Feb. 1.)
January 15, 2021 - 11:36am

Press release:

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today issued a statement applauding the Department of Labor’s final rule modernizing the H-2A visa program:

“This final rule streamlining and modernizing the H-2A visa process will go a long way in ensuring American farmers have access to a stable and skilled workforce, all while removing unnecessary bureaucratic processes," Secretary Perdue said.

"USDA’s goal is to help farmers navigate the complex H-2A program that is administered by Department of Labor, Department of Homeland Security, and the State Department so hiring a farm worker is an easier process. These modernizations make the Federal government more responsive to our customers, ensuring American agriculture continues to lead the world for years to come.”

Background

The final rule will streamline the H-2A application process by mandating electronic filing of job orders and applications. These elements are designed to bring the H-2A application process into the digital era, by harnessing the power of the FLAG electronic filing system to share information with other federal agencies like the Department of Homeland Security while also sharing information with the State Workforce systems and domestic farmworkers.

Additionally, the final rule will provide additional flexibilities to cut down on unnecessary burdens on the agricultural employers that use the program. These flexibilities include the ability to stagger the entry of workers into the country over a 120-day period and allowing agricultural employers the flexibility to file a single application for different dates of need instead of multiple applications. 

January 14, 2021 - 8:09pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, coronavirus, news.

Press release:

  • Genesee County received 49 new positive cases of COVID-19.
    • The new positive cases reside in the:
      • West Region (Alabama, Darien, Pembroke)
      • Central Region (Alexander, Batavia, Bethany, Elba, Oakfield)
      • East Region (Bergen, Byron, Le Roy, Pavilion, Stafford)
  • The individuals are in their 0-19s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.
  • Sixty-six of the previous positive individuals have recovered and have been removed from the isolation list. Please note there was a miscount for reporting the number of people recovered yesterday. There were 2,517 people recovered from COVID-19 yesterday in Genesee County, not 2,515.
  • Ten of the positive individuals are hospitalized.
  • We are saddened to report the loss of two residents who resided at Premier Genesee Center for Nursing & Rehabilitation. The individuals were both over 65. We do not provide any further information to protect the privacy of the individuals and their families. Our deepest condolences to the families and friends during this very difficult time.
  • Orleans County received 50 new positive cases of COVID-19 from Tuesday through today. 
  • The positive cases reside in the:
    • West Region (Yates, Ridgeway, Shelby)
    • Central Region (Carlton, Gaines, Albion, Barre)
    • East Region (Kendall, Murray, Clarendon)
  • The individuals are in their 0-19s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s.
  • Two of the new positive individuals were on quarantine prior to testing positive.
  • Thirty-four of the previous positive individuals have recovered and have been removed from the isolation.
  • Seventeen of the current positive individuals are hospitalized.
  • Two of the new positive cases is a resident of Orchard Rehabilitation and Nursing Center.

dailydata011421.jpg

NYS-run Vaccination Sites:  Updated 01/14/21 – The "Am I Eligible" website has changed this afternoon to only show the NYS-run vaccination sites. The COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline is for scheduling vaccination appointments for eligible New Yorkers at the New York State-run vaccination sites only: 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829). Use their online tool to find a location. Appointments are required. If you visit a location without an appointment you will not receive a vaccine. We apologize for any confusion, the State just updated this information late this afternoon.

Top Items on Batavia's List

The Genesee County Agricultural Society is seeking competitive bids from competent, licensed contractors, including MWBEs, for both, high-voltage and low-voltage electrical services, to be performed at the Genesee County Fairgrounds in Batavia, New York.

Fairgrounds Electrical Infrastructure Competitive Bid Request Batavia, N.Y. NOTICE: The Genesee County Agricultural Society is seeking competitive bids from competent, licensed contractors, including MWBEs, for both, high-voltage and low-voltage electrical services, to be performed at the Genesee County Fairgrounds in Batavia, New York. The work will entail replacing a main-gang switch with pole, replacing wiring, boxes, and lighting with high efficiency LED fixtures, and adding specialized ventilation equipment.

2 Open Positions: Treatment/Marketing Coordinator and Administrative Assistant

Two positions available: Treatment/Marketing Coordinator and Administrative Assistant for our Salmon Orthodontics team! Work experience in a dental environment is a plus as is a Marketing or Communications degree or work experience. The ideal candidate must be highly motivated, have a positive attitude and engaging personality. Excitement to help us create beautiful and confident smiles is a must. We are proud to offer highly competitive pay and benefits.

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