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Pavilion

November 25, 2020 - 2:41pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in news, Pavilion.

State troopers have been dispatched to Pavilion Center Road in Pavilion, at the railroad crossing, for a report of a hunter standing on the railroad tracks shooting in the direction of vehicle traffic.

November 20, 2020 - 3:15pm
posted by Press Release in Genesee Valley Conservancy, art, news, bergen, Pavilion, Oakfield.

Above, "Thirty Mile Point Lighthouse" by Charles Malone, of Oakfield, who uses soils from the area to color his work.

Submitted images and press release:

This week marked the opening of the "Genesee Valley 100: A Community Painting Project" of the Genesee Valley Conservancy.

The project had only two simple directives for artists: use the provided 12X12 canvas, and paint something inspired by the Genesee Valley.

Organized by Genesee Valley Conservancy, a nonprofit celebrating 30 years of protecting habitat, open space, and farmland within the Genesee Valley, this project aims to capture the beauty and undefinable essence that the organization has been working to protect.

The Genesee Valley 100 exhibit of paintings is viewable online on the Conservancy’s website and in person during regular business hours at the Silver Lake Brewing Project in Perry (Wyoming County) through the end of the year. It is located at 14 Borden Ave.

Online is where all sales take place, which benefit both the local artist and the Conservancy.

This year, three Genesee County artists participated and one close by in Attica: Charles Malone, of Oakfield; David Burke, of Bergen; Susan Kinney, of Oakfield, and Linda Fix, of Attica.

In creating such a collection of work and exhibiting them to the public, the organization hopes to inspire people to recognize the importance of the local lands and natural resources that surround and benefit us. Lands that future generations will be grateful if we properly care for them today.

Agricultural lands provide jobs and local food, supporting a large part of our rural economy. Lakes providing drinking water depend on the open spaces and forests surrounding them to naturally filter runoff so it is clean and safe to drink. Thriving habitat provides unique places to explore, recreate and enjoy fresh air while breaking from screens and devices.

A range of diverse styles are on display and artists of all levels of experiences participated. High school students and amateurs have pieces hung next to lifelong and professional painters. This is another unique part of this show. No one is juried to get in. Everyone interested is welcome to submit their painting, no questions asked.

The goal is to see what inspires people about the Genesee Valley and, in turn, present those images to the public to inspire others to recognize what a beautiful and special place we live.

While each individual piece warrants up close inspection, hung together at the brewery the collection is an impressive mosaic that is a work of art itself.

In trying to reach a broad audience for the project, the show is intentionally hung in a nontraditional space for art, that is to say, not in a gallery. The hope is people not seeking art out will be confronted by the project and be exposed to some great local artists and to images of our beautiful landscape. 

Paintings represent locations within the Genesee Valley from the headwaters of the Genesee River in Pennsylvania all the way to the shores of Lake Ontario, and everywhere in between.  

Forty-three communities are represented by painters this year. Fifty-one artists are first-time participants in the Genesee Valley 100. Thirty-four return from 2018, the first year of the project, that also featured original paintings. Eighteen artists this year are returning from last year’s project, which was oriented just to photographers, but held the same 12x12 requirement and that the work be of the Genesee Valley.

About Genesee Valley Conservancy

It is a nationally accredited nonprofit conservation organization working to protect the habitat, open space and farmland in the Genesee River watershed. Over 21,360 acres of natural habitat and productive farm and forest land have been conserved by Genesee Valley Conservancy and private landowners. The organization also owns nature preserves open to the public year-round for recreation and education.

For more information visit www.geneseevalleyconservancy.org

Below, "Bergen Swamp Trail" by David Burke, of Bergen.

Below, "Rainy Morning at Armson Farms" by Susan Kinney, of Pavilion.

Below, "Nature's Wonder" by Linda Fix, of Attica.

Below, a portion of the 12" by 12" works in this year's "Genesee Valley 100: A Community Painting Project."

November 18, 2020 - 3:47pm
posted by Billie Owens in crime, news, notify, batavia, Grand Jury, bergen, Oakfield, Le Roy, Pavilion.

Carlton Burrows is indicted for the crime of reckless endangerment in the first degree, a Class D felony. It is alleged that on July 14 on Veterans Memorial Drive in the Town of Batavia that, with a depraved indifference to human life, Burrows recklessly engaged in conduct that created a grave risk of death to another person: driving a motor vehicle at a NYS Trooper. In count two, he is accused of second-degreee reckless endangerment, a Class A misdemeanor, for engaging in conduct that created a substantial risk of serious physical injury to another person: driving at a Batavia City Police patrol vehicle. In count three Burrows is accused of criminal possession of stolen property in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on that day he knowingly possessed stolen property that exceeded $100 in value: a 2008 Chevrolet Impala. In count four, Burrows is accused of unlawfully fleeing a police office in a motor vehicle, 3rd, a Class A misdemeanor. It is alleged in count four that, knowing he had been directed to stop his vehicle by a police officer or a marked police vehicle with activated lights and/or sirens, he attempted to flee at speeds of 25 mph or more. In counts five and six, he is accused of obstructing governmental administration in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor, for refusing to provide a DNA sample and fingerprints, respectively. In count seven, Burrows is accused of speeding for driving on Veterans Memorial Drive in excess of the maximum speed limit for that roadway.

Justin T. Gladney is indicted for the crime of first-degree rape, a class B violent felony. It is alleged that on June 2 or 3, in the City of Batavia that he engaged in sexual intercourse with a person by forcible compulsion. In count two, Gladney is accused of second-degree rape, a Class D violent felony. It is alleged that Gladney, being age 18 or more, engaged in sexual intercourse with a person age 15 or less on June 2 or 3 in the city. In count three, he is accused of possessing a sexual performance by a child, a Class E felony. It is alleged in count three that on June 6 he had in his possession content that included the performance of sexual conduct by a child less that 16 years old. In count four, Gladney is accused of the crime of endangering the welfare of a child, a Class A misdemeanor, for knowingly acting between June 2 and 6 in a manner likely to be injurious to the physical, mental or moral welfare of a child less than 17 years old while in the City of Batavia.

Dillen A. Merrell is indicted for the crime of driving while intoxicated as a misdemeanor. It is alleged that on June 7 at 8:33 p.m. in the Town of Pavilion that Merrell drove a 2009 Chevrolet on Transit Road while he was intoxicated. In count two, he is accused of second-degree vehicular assault, a Class  E felony, for driving while intoxicated that evening and operating the vehicle in such a manner that caused serious physical injury to another person. In count three, Merrell is accused of misdemeanor reckless driving for driving that date in a manner which unreasonably interfered with the free and proper use of a public roadway. It is alleged in count three that Merrell, while impaired by alcohol, drove in the middle of Transit Road while impaired by alcohol, narrowly missing a collision with oncoming vehicles that were operating lawfully. In count four, Merrell is accused of refusing to submit to a breath test when asked to do so by a deputy, a violation of vehicle and traffic law. In count five, the defendant is accused of consuming or possessing alcoholic beverages in a motor vehicle, a violation of vehicle and traffic law. In count six, Merrell is accused of moving from lane unsafely, another VTL violation, that evening in Pavilion.

Robin S. Brooks is indicted for the crime of first-degree assault, a Class B violent felony. It is alleged that on July 17 in the City of Batavia Brooks, acting with intent to cause serious physical injury to another person, caused such injury by means of a dangerous instrument -- a door. In count two, Brooks is accused of another account of first-degree assault, for committing the same crime by the same means -- a door -- on July 27 in the City of Batavia. In count three, Brooks is accused of second-degree assault, a Class D violent felony, for intentionally causing serious physical injury to a person on Sept. 1 in the City of Batavia. In a separate indictment, Brooks is accused of first-degree criminal nuisance, a Class E felony. It is alleged in the second indictment that between May 17 and June 30 while on Hutchins Place in the City of Batavia, that Brooks knowingly conducted or maintained a place where people came to engage in the unlawful sale of controlled substances and thereby derived the benefit of this conduct.

Andrew L. Kosiorek is indicted for the crime of first-degree assault, a Class B violent felony. It is alleged that on June 17 that with intention to cause serious physical injury to a person, he did so by means of a dangerous instrument -- footwear. In count two, he is indicted for fourth-degree criminal mischief, a Class A misdemeanor. It is alleged in count two that on that day he intentionally damaged property belonging to another person -- a surveillance camera on the first floot of a building on Highland Park in the City of Batavia.

Shane H. Zimblis is indicted for the crime of first-degree criminal contempt, a Class E felony. It is alleged that on June 10 on Bank Street in the City of Batavia that Zimblis violated an order of protection by striking, shoving or otherwise subjecting a protected party to physical contact, or threatening to do so. In count two, Zimblis is accused of second-degree criminal contempt, a Class A misdemeanor, for violating an order of protection by sending electronic messages to the protected party. In count three, the defendant is accused of attempted robbery in the third degree, a Class E violent felony, for attempting to forcibly steal property from the protected party. In count four, Zimblis is accused of second-degree harassment. It is alleged in count four that on that same day on Bank Street, that Zimblis struck, shoved, kicked or otherwise subjected the same victim to physical contact.

Danielle R. Tooley is indicted for the crime of criminal possession of stolen property in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. It is alleged on in late February while on South Main Street in the City of Batavia that she knowingly possessed stolen property with the intention of benefitting herself -- a Syrchony credit card. In counts two and three, she is accused of the same crime for allegedly possessing a Citi Simplicity credit card and a Chase credit card, respectively. In counts five and six, Tooley is accused of the same crime for allegedly possession a Discover Business credit card and a Le Roy Sports Boosters debit card, respectively. In counts seven and eight, she is accused of the same crime for allegedly possessing two Five Star Bank credit cards. In count eight, she is accused of criminal possession of stolen property in the fifth degree, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly possessing a purse and its contents that did not belong to her.

Judd A. Farewell Jr. is indicted for the crime of third-degree grand larceny, a Class D felony. It is alleged that on May 31 on Coe Avenue in the Village of Oakfield that Farewell stole property having a value exceeding $3,000 -- a 2020 Viper Red Can Am four-wheeler.

Leonard L. Henry is indicted for the crime of third-degree grand larceny, a Class D felony. It is alleged that on Oct. 19 in the Town of Batavia that Henry stole property from Kohl's department store having a value in excess of $3,000: amounting to $3,945. In count two, District Attorney Lawrence Friedman accuses Henry of fifth-degree conspiracy, a Class A misdemeanor, for agreeing with one or more persons to engage in conduct that constituted a felony.

Laura M. Lashomb is indicted for the crime of driving while intoxicated as a Class E felony. On Feb.1 in the Town of Bergen it is alleged that Lashomb drove a 2014 Nissan on Interstate 490 while intoxicated. In count two, she is accused of DWI, per se, as a Class E felony, for having a BAC of .08 or more at the time. In count three, she is accused of moving from lane unsafely, a violation of vehicle and traffic law. In Special Information filed by District Attorney Lawrence Friedman, Lashomb is accused of having been convicted of DWI, as a misdemeanor, on July 11, 2013 in Buffalo City Court and that conviction was within 10 years of the crimes alleged in the current indictment.

Richard A. Dekenipp is indicted for the crime of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. It is alleged that on July 19 at the Genesee County Jail in the City of Batavia that he knowingly and unlawfully sold a narcotic drug -- suboxone. In count two, he is accused of promoting prison contraband in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor, for allegedly knowingly and unlawfully introducing contraband -- suboxone -- into a detention facility.

November 10, 2020 - 2:12pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, news, Pavilion, Le Roy.

A trailer fire is reported at 7660 Telephone Road, Pavilion, well off the roadway. A propane tank is near the trailer. Pavilion Fire Department is responding and mutual aid from Le Roy is requested. It started after a pile of leaves was ignited. 

It's east of South Street Road, and west of Asbury Road. It's a working structure fire.

Exterior crews only are also called from Bethany and Stafford.

UPDATE 2:23 p.m.: Caledonia and York fire are also on scene. Asbury Road is closed at Telephone Road (Route 20). They have water on the blaze and are going to hook into a hydrant on South Street Road.

UPDATE 2:28 p.m.: The Le Roy fire auxiliary is being contacted to bring drinking water to the firefighters.

UPDATE 2:38 p.m.: The American Red Cross is called for the displacement at least three residents. National Grid is called to the scene.

October 27, 2020 - 12:21pm

Press release:

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Trump Administration today (Oct. 27) announced that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $891 million to modernize rural drinking water and wastewater infrastructure in 43 states.

In Genesee County, three towns will benefit: Byron, Pavilion and Stafford. Collectively, the USDA has authorized a total of $7,470,000 in loans and $6,064,000 in grants for water projects that will benefit about 3,280 residents in those three communities.

“Upgrading water infrastructure provides a path to economic growth and protects the health and safety of people who live and work in rural areas,” USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development Bette Brand said, “...because we know that when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”

Nationwide, 220 projects will help improve rural water infrastructure for 787,000 residents. The projects are being funded through the Water and Wastewater Loan and Grant Program.

Background

The Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program provides funding for clean and reliable drinking water systems, sanitary sewage disposal, sanitary solid waste disposal, and storm water drainage to households and businesses in eligible rural areas with populations of 10,000 or less.

These USDA investments are going to Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

To learn more about investment resources for rural areas, interested parties should contact their USDA Rural Development state office.

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, click here.

In Genesee County

  • Byron -- $5,550,000 loan / grant $4,425,000

This Rural Development investment will be used to create Water Improvement Area #1 in the Town of Byron. This project will extend public water service to users in the town that currently do not have safe potable water. Water quality testing indicates a significant portion of residents' individual weels have coliform and E. coli contamination, which the health department indicates does not meet standards and are a threat to the health of residents. Approximately 600 people will benefit from this project. There are no other funding sources.

  • Pavilion -- $567,000 loan

This Rural Development investment will be used to build a 300,000-gallon water storage tank and more than one mile of supply pipeline. The new water storage tank and pipeline will serve 2,495 people in the Town of Pavilion. Currently, due to the present water tank's deteriorated condition, the town has significant water quality concerns. The current tank is located in a lower elevation so that the town does not have sufficient water pressure to fight fires in all areas. The new water tank will be located at a much higher elevation 1,280 feet and will supply plenty of water pressure and good quality water.

  • Stafford -- $1,353,000 loan / $1,639,000 grant

This Rural Development investment will be used to create Water District #12 in the Town of Stafford. This project will extend public water service to 185 residents in the town that currenrtly do not have safe potable water. Water quality testing indicates a significant portion of residents' individual sell have coliform and E. coli contamination, which health department indicates do not meet standards and are a threat to the health of residents.

October 16, 2020 - 8:49pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in crime, news, bergen, Le Roy, notify, batavia, Pavilion, byron.

Monroe County Sheriff Todd Baxter at a press conference today said a smash-and-grab burglary ring is responsible for more than 30 burglaries in six counties, including Genesee County.

On Sept. 16, GC Sheriff's deputies arrested two people who Sheriff William Sheron said are apparently part of the ring.  

Taken into custody and held on bail after allegedly being caught in the act of burglarizing the Crosby's at 6257 Clinton Street Road in Batavia were Jennifer D. Abrams and Tarus O. Fluitt.

On Sept. 28, Kristina Marble, Jose Cruz-Rosado and Eric Smith were arrested in Monroe County following a gas station burglary in Victor.

They are believed to have committed similar crimes in Genesee County, and all five individuals are suspected of being part of the same ring, Sheron said.

Their modus operandi is to smash out doors and windows and steal cigarettes and other items.

Sheron released a list of seven such burglaries in Genesee County:

  • Aug. 16, Batavia Crosby's on Clinton Street Road. Troopers handled the case and details are not available at this time;
  • Sept. 2, Bergen C-Store, 8073 Clinton Street Road, Bergen. Approximately $3,500 in cigarettes stolen, $325 in damages;
  • Sept. 13, Byron Crosby's, 6890 Byron Holley Road, Byron. Approximately $5,500 in cigarettes stolen, $180 in lighters, and $1,130 in damage;
  • Sept. 13, Bergen C-Store, a 20-pound propane tank used to smash the front door; the burglars failed to gain entry. The damage estimate is $325;
  • Sept. 16, Le Roy Kwik Fill, 7010 W. Main St., Le Roy. Attempted burglary. Front door smashed with rocks but no entry. Estimated damage: $1,000. The subjects captured on video appear to be Abrams and Fluitt;
  • Sept. 16, Batavia Crosby's, the location where Abrams and Fluitt were captured;
  • Sept. 20, Pavilion Farms, 11091 Lake St., Pavilion. Troopers also handled this case.

More from our news partner 13WHAM.

Previously:

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October 16, 2020 - 4:07pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, crime, notify, batavia, Pavilion.

Jordan Elena Rubin, 36, of Chili Avenue, Chili, is charged with fourth-degree grand larceny -- automobile with a value over $100. On Oct. 15, Rubin was arrested and is accused of stealing a motor vehicle from a residence on Hartwell Road in the Town of Pavilion at 6:38 p.m. Oct. 3. Rubin was issued an appearance ticket and is due in Pavilion Town Court on Dec. 1. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Kenneth Quackenbush, assisted by Deputy Mathew Clor.

Jacqueline Raj Garrett, 41, of Church Street, Le Roy, is charged with illegal use of toxic vapaors, a violation of NYS Public Health Law. At 10:06 a.m. on today, Oct. 16, the Genesee County Emergency Dispatch Center received a report of a female outside of a department story on Veterans Memorial Drive who was inhaling an aerosol. A deputy was dispatched and located the female allegedly in the act of consuming a hazardous inhalant while outside a store in view of the public. She wa arrested and issued an appearance ticket and is due in Town of Batavia Court on Nov. 19. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Ryan DeLong.

October 15, 2020 - 3:50pm

Press release:

Families are invited to visit the Hollwedel Memorial Library “Trunk-or-Treat” on Halloween day for a fun drive-thru event. Kids can show off their costumes and pick up some treats as they drive through the loop in front of the library. 

Visiting “Trunk-or-Treaters” are asked to stay in their cars for the safety of all. Treats will be delivered to each car in the loop. 

The library is open for the "Trunk-or-Treat" and regular library services that day from 10 a.m. to noon

Information about this family-friendly event, as well as the other programs and services available at the library, can be found on the library’s website at www.HollwedelLibrary.org.

Residents with questions can also contact the library by phone at (585) 584-8843.

The library is located at 5 Woodrow Drive in Pavilion.

October 8, 2020 - 3:52pm
posted by Press Release in Pavilion, Milestones.

Katrina Guile, of Pavilion, who is a graduate of Pavilion Central School, is one of more than 950 students who began their college careers at SUNY Delhi in August.

Guile is pursuing a degree in Veterinary Science Technology at the college, which is located in Delhi, NY.

SUNY Delhi's hands-on approach to teaching and learning includes over 60 academic programs in specialized areas, including applied technologies, nursing, hospitality, veterinary sciences, applied sciences, business, and liberal arts and sciences. SUNY Delhi offers certificates, associate's degrees, bachelor's degrees, as well as master's degrees in a combination of on-campus and online settings.

Enrolling more than 3,000 students, SUNY Delhi is a member of the State University of New York. For more information about SUNY Delhi, call (607) 746-4000 or visit delhi.edu.

September 29, 2020 - 3:38pm
posted by Virginia Kropf in business, Pavilion, bergen, news, Nazi Germany, Pavilion Gift Company.

Photo: Klaus Kremmin, founder of the Pavilion Gift Company, poses outside the front door of the company’s modern facility, now in Bergen.

BERGEN – Klaus Kremmin knows the meaning of hard work, and at 74, he shows up for work nearly every day.

Kremmin owned an injection-molding company, which he started in Pavilion, and which evolved into the Pavilion Gift Company, now located in Bergen and where he has an office.

Risking All for a Better Life

Kremmin’s story about his family begins in the early 1930s in Nazi Germany. His father worked for the gestapo -- a secret-police organization employing underhanded and terrorist methods against persons suspected of disloyalty.

As years went by, Kremmin’s father didn’t like the direction the gestapo was taking – putting up barbed wire and land mines. He was becoming dissatisfied with their actions, and they were suspicious of him. 

“They were monitoring my father, and if they thought he didn’t agree with them, he would be sent to Moscow or Siberia for 20 years,” Kremmin said.

So his father made the decision to escape.

Kremmin was 7 the day his parents, Rudi and Frieda, each took two of the children and boarded separate trains for a day trip. 

“My father told the Border Patrol we were going for the day,” he said. “They asked where the rest of the family was, and my father said my mother was home with the other two kids, waiting for our return. My mother told them the same thing, that my father was home with the other two kids.”

The family reunited at a predetermined location in West Berlin. They escaped with only the three layers of clothing they were wearing. 

The family lived in a refugee camp for two years, waiting for someone in the United States to sponsor them. During that time, his father worked on the wharf in Bremen. In 1957, a church in Barre, Mass., agreed to sponsor them, and they arrived in the United States with $600 to their name.

Kremmin’s father had served in World War II and was captured in Tunisia while serving under Germany's General Johannes Erwin Eugen Rommel. He was held prisoner of war in Kentucky.

“He loved the United States very much,” Kremmin said. 

His father, who is now 97, wanted to move to Rochester, because he had learned a friend who had also escaped from Germany and was living there. So the family moved to Rochester, where he got a job in a day on Brooks Avenue.

Kremmin met and married his wife, Anna, who is Ukranian and with whom he has been married 52 years. They have a son and daughter.

Anna’s family were migrant workers in Germany, and they escaped and went to Brazil, later moving to Rochester.

Kremmin joined the military service here and was stationed in Frankfort, Germany. His daughter, Zina, was born there. His son, Klaus II, was also born in Germany. He got out of the service in 1971 and got a job working for Kodak research. He had gone to college on the G.I. Bill.

Then he took a job with a plastic company near the airport in Rochester.

“The company grew and grew, but the owners were gone all the time,” Kremmin said. “So I decided if I was going to run a company, it might better be my own.”

An Entrepreneurial Family

His first business, injection molding, was started in his father’s garage on Dean Road, off Ridge Road in Rochester.

“There were times when I only had the change in my pocket and I wondered how I was going to feed my kids,” Kremmin said. 

His business grew, and he outgrew the garage.

“In the early 1980s, I bought a building in Pavilion, which used to be DeWitt’s heliport,” Kremmin said. “My brother was working with me, and at one time, we had 20 employees.”

His company, Syntec, was very successful. He said they always tried to hire local people. Their customers included Kodak and medical companies, making very precise parts for blood analyzers and gyroscopes.

Klaus II had graduated from MIT and Zina graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Business Management.

He wondered what Zina was going to do and how he could help her.

Zina had designed a line of collectible figurines called “Zingleberries,” which she promoted at trade shows around the country. It was there she met her husband, Rich Hocker. 

Kremmin and his brother hit on an idea to make a stand on which Zina could display her figurines. Thus, was born the revolving display stand. The stand can be activated by AC batteries or solar power. 

Zina started her business in 1998 in Le Roy, where she rented space for two years. She was selling her merchandise and the display stands at trade shows and business was so good, in 2000, Kremmin sold the business in Pavilion.

They built the new modern facility in Bergen, which he and his brother designed. They added on to the building in 2007.

Today, the Pavilion Gift Company sells wholesale gift items all over the world and the Hockers run the business.

Klaus II started an injection-molding company making plastic gears, and his company is now located in part of Pavilion Gift Company.

Kremmin admits to having often worked 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

“I love to work, and I love this country,” Kremmin said. “And I count my blessings every day for the opportunities I’ve had here.”

Kremmin officially “retired” in 2000, but comes in to work almost every day. He looks after the building, fixes the faucets and the electrical if something is wrong.

Cheerfulness in Tough Times

“I cheer everybody up if I can,” he said. “I also have a hobby shop here.” 

He said the first months of the coronavirus pandemic shutdown were terrible. Orders were canceled and help was laid off.

“So Zina decided to make masks,” Kremmin said. “Things are starting to pick up.”

With his work ethic, he is disgusted, however, with the employees who refused to come back to work because they were getting government money. Many of them still haven’t come back, he said.

Photos by Virginia Kropf.

Below, this case shows some of the rotary displays invented by Klaus Kremmin, of Bergen.

Below: Klaus Kremmin invented the rotary display shown here. His invention evolved into the Pavilion Gift Company, now located in Bergen where he still has an office.

September 29, 2020 - 1:20pm

Submitted photo and press release:

Calling all creative people to dress up a pumpkin in any style they choose to compete for an Amazon Gift Card at the Hollwedel Memorial Library!

Everyone is invited to bring in a festive pumpkin anytime between now and Wednesday Oct. 28 to take part in a Pumpkin Decorating Contest. The library is located at 5 Woodrow Drive in Pavilion.

Library patrons can vote for a winner from the entries on display when they checkout any books, DVDs, or other library materials.

There are two age categories, one for children up to 12 years of age, and the other for folks that are 13 and older. Each winner in their category will receive a $25 Amazon Gift Card. 

“We already have some pretty cute entries that are getting votes,” says Library Director Josselyn Borowiec. “We’d love to have more dressed up pumpkins to choose from.”

Enter your decorated -- not carved -- pumpkin from now until Oct. 28. Get in early so people can see and vote for your creation!

Information about this contest, as well as the other programs and services available at the library, can be found on the library’s website at www.HollwedelLibrary.org.

Residents with questions can also contact the library by phone at (585) 584-8843. 

Photo: Library Director Josselyn Borowiec shows off two of the entries in the Hollwedel Memorial Library’s Pumpkin Decorating Contest. Votes can be cast at the library at checkout. 

September 13, 2020 - 1:09am
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire, news, Pavilion.

A caller reports a bridge is on fire in the area of 9963 Covell Road, Pavilion.

Pavilion fire is dispatched.

September 5, 2020 - 6:24pm

The annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s Saturday Oct. 3 will have much more meaning to people in Pavilion this year.

Not only will participants be walking to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s disease and raise money to combat it, but this will be a great family event, for young and old alike, according to organizer Sam MacAllister, pastor of the Pavilion Baptist Church.

The church’s involvement came about because of Linda Starkey, a lifelong member of the church, whose mother and brother were affected by the disease.

“This is my fourth year of being involved in the Alzheimer’s Walk,” Starkey said. “I turned 80 in July, and I walk with a walker, but I still participate. It is very important to me that we find a cure.”

Last year Starkey walked in Batavia with 250 other walkers, but because of COVID-19 this year, the walk can’t be done that way.

“We are all walking in our own communities, and here in Pavilion, my pastor is coordinating everything,” Starkey said. 

“This seemed like the perfect event to get the community back together after this pandemic,” Pastor MacAllister said. “We will distribute water and snacks in a safe way.”

The pastor said he was thrilled with Starkey’s dedication and happy to support her cause.

“This is a really important cause for her,” MacAllister said. “She tries to build her strength ahead of time. She has a very youthful spirit and is highly determined. Her friends are doing everything to keep her safe and see that she succeeds.”

Starkey’s friend Pat Wolcott has committed to walk with her, and they welcome anyone to join their team. Participants may donate to the cause, but it is not necessary.

MacAllister has chosen a route through town on streets with sidewalks, so everyone will be safe. The walk will begin at 9 a.m. Oct. 3 at the gazebo in the town park.

Participants may sign up on the website at pavilionwalk.com, but it is not required.

Photo: Linda Starkey, right, and her friend Pat Wolcott will be walking Oct. 3 in an Alzheimer’s Walk in Pavilion. Starkey, who turned 80 in July, is passionate about supporting the cause, as both her mother and brother were stricken with Alzheimer’s. Photo by Virginia Kropf.

September 1, 2020 - 6:07pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, news, Bethany, Pavilion, Covell Secondary Trail Bridge.

A wooden bridge over a trail in the area of 9963 Covell Road, Pavilion, is on fire, according to a passerby who called dispatch. Bethany Fire Department is responding to the blaze at the "Covell Secondary Trail Bridge."

UPDATE 6:18 p.m.: A state Department of Forestry employee is on scene, investigating.

UPDATE 6:19 p.m.: A first responder is switching from heading to a Byron house fire to the bridge fire in Pavilion, which he characterized as "probably intentional."

August 24, 2020 - 2:36pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, crime, notify, batavia, Stafford, Pavilion.

Donna Lyn Hartman, 57, of Marlowe Road, Blasdell, is charged with second-degree identity theft. It is alleged that Hartman used a person's identity during a traffic stop in Livingston County. She was transported to Noyes Hospital in Dansville where she allegedly continued to use that identity. As a result, the Genesee County resident whose identity Hartman allegedly stole incurred more than $1,500 in medical expenses. Hartman was arraigned in Batavia City Court and released under supervision of Genesee Justice. An order of protection was issued for the victim, who lives in Stafford. Hartman is due to appear in Town of Stafford Court on Oct. 6. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Chad Minuto, assisted by Kevin Forsyth.

Willie Lee Williams, 34, of Laser Street, Rochester, is charged with criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, with a previous conviction. Williams was arrested July 17 following an investigation into an incident that occurred on June 29 on Hutchins Street in Batavia. He is accused of pointing a handgun, or what appeared to be a handgun, at another person's head and threatening to shoot him. He was arraigned in Batavia City Court and put in Genesee County Jail (bail status not provided). The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Jason Ivison.

David P. Grossman Sr., 37, of Maple Street, Batavia, is charged with criminal contempt. He was arrested after a domestic incident at 7:73 p.m. on Aug. 6 on West Main Street, Batavia, during which he allegedly contacted a person with a stay away order of protection against him. Grossman was issued an appearance ticket to be in Batavia City Court on Nov. 10. The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Jordan McGinnis.

Jordan R. Rose, 19, of Maple Street, Batavia, is charged with: second-degree criminal contempt -- disobeying a mandate of the court; and aggravated family offense -- more than one offense within five years. He was arrested at 9:05 a.m. on July 31 after he allegedly violated a court order by calling the protected party numerous times over the phone. He was arraigned in Batavia City Court and released on an appearance ticket. He is due to return to court Aug. 25. The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Nicole McGinnis, assisted by Officer Peter Post.

Rae Charlene Cook, 31, of Liberty Street, Batavia, is charged with second-degree criminal contempt. At 6:01 p.m. on Aug. 9, police allegedly observed Cook in the presence of an individual against whom she has an order of protection. Following her arrest, she was released with an appearance ticket to be in Batavia City Court on Nov. 17. The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Adam Tucker, assisted by Officer Wesley Rissinger.

Daniel Robert Smythe, 32, of Main Street, Caledonia, is charged with second-degree criminal contempt. At 5:44 p.m. on Aug. 22 on South Street Road in Pavilion, Smythe was arrested following a complaint of a domestic incident. Smythe was arrested, issued an appearance ticket and is due in Pavilion Town Court on Oct. 10. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Joshua Brabon, assisted by Sgt. Michael Lute.

Herbert B. Gennis, 26, of Raymond Avenue, Batavia, is charged with failure to appear in Batavia City Court July 23 on a charge of endangering the welfare of a child. He was arrested on Aug. 17 and arraigned in city court via Skype. Gennis was released and is due back in court on Sept. 3. The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer John Gombos, assisted by Felicia DeGroot.

Mark Theodore Helm, 39, of State Street, Batavia, is charged with: possession of a hypodermic instrument; operating a motor vehicle without insurance; operating an unregistered motor vehicle; operating a motor vehicle with improper plates; failure to use turn signal. Helm was arrested at 6:03 p.m. on Aug. 15 following a traffic stop on West Main Street in Batavia. He was processed, issued an appearance ticket and released. He is due in Batavia City Court on Nov. 17. The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Wesley Rissinger, assisted by Officer Sean Wilson.

Jamar Andrew Malana, 23, of Culver Road, Rochester, is charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree and unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. At 1:25 a.m. on Aug. 22, Malana was arrested on Clinton Street Road in Stafford after Genesee County Sheriff's deputies investigated a vehicle parked on Route 33 in Stafford. The defendant and a male passenger were allegedly found in possession of a controlled substance. Malana was also allegedly operating the vehicle without a valid NYS driver's license. Malana was released with an appearance ticket to be in Town of Stafford Court on Oct. 6. The case was handled by Deputy Jordan Alejandro, assisted by Deputy James Stack.

Mark Davonne Edwards, 23, of Ontario Street, Rochester, is charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. At 1:25 a.m. on Aug. 22, Edwards was arrested after Genesee County Sheriff's deputies investigated a vehicle parked on Route 33 in Stafford. He was released on appearance tickets and is due in Town of Stafford Court on Oct. 6. The case was handled by Deputy Jordan Alejandro, assisted by Deputy James Stack.

Justin M. Ferrin, 43, of Albro Road, Bliss, is charged with issuing a bad check. Ferrin was arrested on a Batavia City Court warrant after turning himself in on Aug. 18. He was arraigned in city court and released on his own recognizance. He is due to return to city court on Aug. 10. The  case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Stephen Cronmiller.

Phillip D. Byford, 29, of Brockport Spencerport Road, Brockport, was arrested Aug. 16 on a bench warrant out of Batavia City Court (charge(s) against him unspecified). He was arraigned in city court at 9:35 p.m. and released on his own recognizance. He is due to return to court on Oct. 1. The case was handled by Batavia Police Officer Adam Tucker.

August 20, 2020 - 3:00pm


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August 12, 2020 - 2:18pm
posted by Billie Owens in crime, news, notify, Pavilion, batavia, pembroke.

Edward George Ruckdeschel, 58, of Liberty Street, Batavia, is charged with third-degree grand larceny, a Class D felony. The defendant was arrested after an investigation into the theft of a vehicle at 8:54 p.m. on Jan. 13 on Genesee Street in Pembroke. He was arraigned in Pembroke Town Court at 11 a.m. Aug. 11 and ordered held on cash bail (unspecified) and put in jail "where he is currently residing." He is due in Genesee County Court at a later date. The case was investigated by Genesee County Sheriff's Investigator Howard Carlson.

Edward George Ruckdeschel, 58, of Liberty Street, Batavia is charged with fourth-degree grand larceny, and third-degree criminal trespass. On Aug. 10, the defendant was arrested after an investigation into the theft of a vehicle at 1:05 a.m. on Dec. 10 from West Main Street Road in Batavia. He was released on an appearance ticket and is due in Town of Batavia Court on Sept. 24. The case was investigated by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Kevin Forsyth.

Brian L. Dutton, 62, of Pavilion, is charged with unlawfully growing cannabis (marijuana) and unlawful possession of marijuana in the second degree. He was arrested Aug. 12 following a joint investigation by the U.S. Border Patrol and the Wyoming County Sheriff's Office. A U.S. Border Patrol helicopter allegedly located cannabis growing inside a metal enclosure behind Dutton's residence on Aug. 7, and the pilot led deputies to the location. The plants, allegedly grown by Dutton, were seized and destroyed. Dutton was issued an appearance ticket and is due in Town of Covington Court on Aug. 31. The case was handled by Wyoming County Sheriff's Sgt. Colin Reagan, Deputy John Button, and Investigator Aaron Anderson.

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