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children

March 13, 2020 - 4:39pm
posted by Sandra Trimmer in children, relgious.
Event Date and Time: 
April 8, 2020 - 10:00am to 2:00pm
Wednesday, April 8, 2020  
March 10, 2020 - 11:14am
Event Date and Time: 
March 17, 2020 - 6:30pm to 7:30pm
Listen to stories about these magical beings, then go on a hunt for the gold! All ages. Registration is required!
March 10, 2020 - 10:41am
Event Date and Time: 
March 5, 2020 - 11:30am to 12:00pm
Join Miss Melissa for stories, songs, activities, and simple sign language with a different theme each week! Gaered towards ages 3-6, but siblings are welcome! Registration is appreciated. *Signing up for the first one each month will sign you up for the entire month* 11:30am - 12:00pm, Thursday, March 5, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm, Thursday, March 12, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm, Thursday, March 19, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm, Thursday, March 26, 2020
March 10, 2020 - 10:37am
Event Date and Time: 
March 25, 2020 - 6:30pm to 7:30pm
Wear your PJs to the Library for Springtime stories and a craft! All ages are welcome! Registration is appreciated!
January 28, 2020 - 12:35pm
Event Date and Time: 
February 27, 2020 - 3:15pm to 4:15pm
Do you love discovering new ways to be creative? Join Miss Melissa one Thursday each month to create your own unique masterpiece! This month, make your own Watercolor Snowflakes out of coffee filters.  Grades 3rd - 6th. Please register online www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org or call 585-768-8300.
January 28, 2020 - 12:26pm
Event Date and Time: 
February 23, 2020 - 3:15pm to 4:15pm
Create your own wacky vehicle using recyclables and then race against your friends! The library will provide all supplies, you just bring your imagination! Great program for those who enjoy Master Builders! Grades 3rd - 6th. Please register online www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org or call 585-768-8300.
January 28, 2020 - 11:43am
Event Date and Time: 
February 4, 2020 - 6:30pm to 7:00pm
Join Miss Melissa for stories, songs, flannel board activities, dancing, and simple sign language! Each week will have a different theme! This storytime is geared towards children up to age 6, but all are welcome! Registration is appreciated, but not required. *Signing up for the first one each month will sign you up for the entire month* (Feb. 4 - Feb. 25)
December 30, 2019 - 3:24pm
Event Date and Time: 
January 23, 2020 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Come celebrate famous author, A.A. Milne's birthday with us.  Read about the adventures of Winnie the Pooh, Christopher Robin, and all of their forest friends! After stories, join us for a themed craft! Program for All ages. Registration is required. call 585-768-8300 or online at www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org
December 7, 2017 - 4:09pm

Clean Cut Barbershop in the City of Batavia is offering $5 off a haircut from Dec. 12-16 IF you donate a new, unwrapped toy or gift suitable for a child age 6 months to 16 years old.

The donations received will benefit the nonprofit Hillside Children's Center in Batavia (located at 50 City Centre).

Bring your donation to the city's newest barbershop at 466 Ellicott St.

Co-owner Joey Williams says the guys there are "always looking to spread love in the city and do positive things for kids."

The event that starts next Tuesday will add to their list of good deeds, which also includes giving away back-to-school supplies, breast cancer awareness month events, customer appreciation days and more.

"We want to make this event as big and impactful as possible," Williams says.

November 27, 2017 - 4:46pm
posted by Billie Owens in Oakfield, Holidays, model trains, events, Family Fun, children.
Event Date and Time: 
December 2, 2017 - 9:00am to 4:00pm

The Genesee Society of Model Engineers will host the club's Annual Holiday Open House on Saturday, Dec. 2nd, at the club's facilities located at 50 Main St. (Route 63), Oakfield (above the M&T Bank). The FREE event runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The club's facilities feature operating layouts in O Gauge (Lionel), HO & N scale as well as push trains for the little ones.

Refreshments will be served and club members will be available to answer your model railroading questions. A great family-oriented event filled with photo-ops and fun for kids of all ages.

May 20, 2017 - 8:10am

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New Hope Ministries Pastor Tammy Smith (left) and Michelle Gillard from Essentials of Life (right) will be hosting a Sole Hope Care Kit Assembly Party at New Hope Life Center 8052 Bank Street Road, Batavia, at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 6th.

The public is invited to help assemble care kits to help children in Uganda heal after their "jiggers" -- parasitic fleas that burrow into the soles of feet -- are removed. The Sole Hope nurses will hand these kits out along with a washbasin, soap and clothing before the patients return home from their stay at the Sole Hope Outreach House.

Items that are needed for donation:

Each Kit will be packed in a quart-sized freezer bag and will contain:
1. One tube of triple antibiotic cream
2. Ten Band-aids (various sizes)
3. Five sturdy, large safety pins
4. One snack-size Ziplock bag of cotton balls
5. One page of children’s stickers (no holiday-themed ones please)
6. Ten alcohol wipes
7. A card/letter to the recipient (optional)
8. $2  (This helps with the washbasin, soap & clothes)

Deadline for donation of supplies is Friday, June 2nd, to give enough time to calculate and obtain any shortages of a particular item.

All monetary donations should be in the form of a check and should be payable to Sole Hope. Please write FUN224151 in the memo line of your check so that they know your donation is for the Care Kit-related donations.

If you are unable to attend but would like to donate supplies or are able to give a monetary donation, please contact Michelle Gillard at 585-297-0779 to arrange a pickup.

To watch jiggers being removed, watch this YouTube video here.

For more details visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/615905055266806/

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December 22, 2016 - 11:46am
posted by Howard B. Owens in health, children, news, lead contamination.

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Children being exposed to lead, leading to higher risk of learning disabilities and a risk for other health issues, has regularly been in the news ever since contaminated water was found to be flowing into the homes of Flint, Mich.

This week, the Reuters news agency released a report indicating that 3,000 neighborhoods across the nation seem to have high lead contamination levels.

No neighborhoods in Genesee County appear to be on that list, according to data available through a New York State website that tracks reports of lead poising in children.

In 2012, only four children under age 2 of the 1,036 in the county who were tested had elevated lead levels detected in their blood samples.

Paul Pettit, director of the health departments in Genesee and Orleans counties, said the relevantly few children with elevated lead levels does seem to confirm that there is no widespread contamination in the community.

That doesn't mean it's not an important issue, he said.

The likely culprit in the four cases is lead paint in homes.

Any housing unit built before 1978 may contain lead paint. The paint on older homes chips or gets ground into dust by the opening and closing of doors and windows, and lead particles can fall into carpet or onto flooring where children crawl.

The easiest way to remediate lead paint is to paint over it, which doesn't eliminate the lead paint but does stop the lead particles from spreading. Children can also be exposed to lead while visiting a friend or family member's house, or if parents work in an environment where lead is present and it attaches to clothing or shoes. 

Pettit said parents should have their children tested at age 1 and age 2, for sure, though lead continues to be a risk factor for children through at least age 6.

Typically, the test is conducted in the office of a primary health care physician. It consists of a pinprick on the child's finger and the blood can typically be tested right in the office.

If elevated levels are detected, the child is typically referred to a lab where blood can be drawn and more thoroughly tested.

Ideally, a child will have no lead detected in his or her blood.

The amount of lead is counted by micrograms per deciliter, abbreviated to mcg/dL.

Of the four children in 2012 with elevated lead levels in their blood, one fell within the 10 to 15 mcg/dL range and three were above 15.

Those levels are consistent with a child being exposed to lead paint particles, Pettit said.

When you start seeing children with counts of 50, 60 or higher, it usually means they've ingested something contaminated with lead, such as a paint chip.

In 2012, about 50 to 60 percent of the children who should have been tested for lead were tested for lead, Pettit said.

More recent data was not readily available, but Pettit said of his 20 years involved in public health in the two counties, the numbers of children with elevated lead levels has remained pretty consistent.

When a child is found to have elevated lead levels, in the range up to 15 mcg/dL, the health department works with the parents where the child lives to eliminate possible sources of lead.

When the level is over 15, the process is more involved, Pettit said.  Personnel from the health department visit the home and do a lead risk assessment and develop with the homeowner or landlord a corrective action plan. Landlords are typically cooperative, but the department can issue a "notice and demand" to remediate any problems identified. 

"At 15 and above, it is a serious health issue to the child," Pettit said. "We take intervention steps to stop it."

When levels of 50 or 60 mcg/dL, children are hospitalized so the lead can be removed from their blood.

Lead poisoning in children is associated with cognitive issues and health issues can include decreased bone and muscle growth, poor muscle coordination, damage to the nervous system, kidneys and hearing.

Petit said he welcomed the opportunity to talk about the issue because he would like to see more awareness among parents on the importance of testing. Every child should be tested.

June 24, 2015 - 2:58pm
posted by Trisha Riggi in woodward memorial library, Le Roy, children, story, preschool.
Event Date and Time: 
June 30, 2015 - 6:30pm to 7:00pm
A storytime starting Tuesday June 30, 6:30 - 7:00 p.m. for Ages 3 - 6. Listen to stories and sing songs.  Learn rhymes, fingerplays, and sign language.  Tell stories with puppets and the flannel board.  Each story time ends with coloring and bubbles. Registration is required.  Children must be at least 3 by the first session.  This program runs for 6 weeks ending August 11.  Limit of 15 children. Visit www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org or call 585-768-8300.  
June 24, 2015 - 2:41pm
Event Date and Time: 
June 29, 2015 - 10:30am to 10:50am
A special storytime starting Monday, June 29 at 10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. for children who are 2 or 3 year olds and a caring adult. Listen to stories that feature themes like shapes and colors, sing songs, dance, color, and play with bubbles. Child must be at least 2 by the first session and must be accompanied by an adult.  This is a 6 week session and runs through Monday, August 10.  Registration is required. Limit of 10 children. Visit www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org or call 585-768-8300.
June 24, 2015 - 2:19pm
Event Date and Time: 
June 29, 2015 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Monday, June 29 at 6:00 p.m. Come sign up for the Summer Reading Program and visit the Mini Ark Farms Petting Zoo! Play on the inflatable obstacle course! Get a balloon from the balloon twister! Enjoy a free ice cream sundae! Visit www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org for more info!
March 12, 2015 - 3:06pm
posted by Daniel Crofts in children, cheerleading, leukemia.

A "bulldawg" fighting for her life is a powerful opponent; a "bulldawg" with a team behind her is even more powerful.

Emma Harris, age 4, was diagnosed with leukemia on Jan. 17. Local cheerleaders have teamed up with the community to help Emma and her family with a cheer-a-thon dubbed "Team Emma -- We Got This."

During the afternoon cheer-a-thon this Saturday (3 to 6 p.m.), 47 girls ages 4 through 12 will learn stunts, jumps and a dance routine, which they will then perform for the public in the Batavia High School gym at 260 State St. in Batavia.

BHS cheerleaders and dancers from local studios will also perform in addition to the cheer-a-thon participants.

School doors will open at 6 p.m. The gymnasium will open at 6:30 and the performances begin at 7.

It is free and the public is invited. But of course there will be a donation table for anyone who would like to contribute to help the family with medical and travel expenses.

A Chinese auction and 50/50 raffle will be held, featuring a variety of items ranging from Sabres' tickets to food, toys, gift certificates to local restaurants and businesses, purses, framed pictures, cleaning products, etc.

A student in Jackson Primary School's pre-school program, Emma is an avid cheerleading fan and honorary mascot of the Batavia Bulldawgs, a youth football and cheerleading program. Cheer director Sherri Wahr said that while Emma was not old enough to be a cheerleader, she "put so much effort" into showing up at practices and cheering them on that they "put her in a uniform and let her be our mascot."

"She was there longer days than most of the girls that cheered," said Wahr's daughter, Alexis (15), a JV cheerleader and an assistant to her mother with the Bulldawgs.

"She knew all the cheers just as well as the older girls," Wahr said. "And if they did something wrong, she told them."

She also became very close with Wahr's two daughters, Alexis and Lydia (12), even going so far as to name two of her stuffed animals after them.

When they found out about Emma's condition, Wahr and her daughters were understandably affected.

"I got a phone call from Emma's aunt," Wahr said, "and she told me about the diagnosis. My thought initially was, 'What can I do for them?' Then I picked Alexis and Lydia up from their cheerleading practice and told them the bad news. The first thing they said to me was, 'Mom, what are we going to do?' So brainstorming in the car, all three of us came up with the idea of doing a cheer-a-thon."

On the way to visit Emma at the hospital, they bounced different ideas off each other for a team name, a theme, etc. But it wasn't until they arrived at the hospital that the right idea hit them.

"We brought Emma a megaphone for everyone to sign when they came to visit her," Wahr said. "We wrote 'Team Emma' on it. And then we thought, 'That's awesome.' "

Then Emma's mother came in and showed them a headband someone had sent to the family. Written into the headband were the words, "We got this."

Cheer-a-thon participants were able to raise money for Emma by either submitting a $25 participation fee or obtaining sponsors.

Some, according to Wahr, have done both.

"I know there's been a request for another sponsor sheet," she said, "so somebody's out there getting a lot of sponsors."

Prizes will be awarded to the top three cheerleaders who bring in the most donations.

Whether in the form of sponsoring the cheerleaders, donating items for the raffle and auction, or donating equipment for Saturday's event, Batavia businesses have really come through for Emma.

"It's absolutely amazing the outpouring of support that we've had," Wahr said. "I would say almost half of the businesses in town have donated to Emma in some way, shape or form."

For more information, call or text Wahr at 356-0639.

Photo courtesy of Sherri Wahr.

December 3, 2013 - 9:28am
posted by Holland Land Office in history, family, children, kids, Christmas.
Event Date and Time: 
December 14, 2013 - 11:00am to 2:00pm

October 21, 2013 - 8:52am

Starting today is National School Bus Safety Week from October 21-25, 2013 and this year’s motto is "At My Stop - You Stop!"    Motorist should be aware to always stop for a stopped school bus it is the law.  Everyone has to stop when a school bus displays their red lights even when they are on the other side of the road and even on divided highway.  Everyone must stop no matter where they are on the road.

At First Student, the bus company that transports our students here at the Batavia School District, comments that one of the most common driver complaint is that motorists violate the school bus stop law every day.  Motorists are required to use caution and slow down when flashing yellow lights are activated and stop for a stopped school bus that is displaying the flashing red lights.

Sometimes drivers are not fully paying close attention to their driving, they are too busy texting, talking on the phone or just are not paying attention and pass a stopped school bus.  This serious poor safety action could lead up to a $250 fine, traffic tickets and up to suspension of license for passing a stopped school bus with their reds on.  All motorists need to better understand the seriousness of this traffic law and pass the word to each other to make the roads safer for all our students. 

“Our main concern is safety” said Location Manager Tonya Thompson of First Student .  “We educate both  our drivers and our students to ensure that each stop is a safe stop for everyone, so please help us make the road safe for our students too by doing your part and stop for a stopped school bus”.

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