Local Matters

Recent comments

Community Sponsors

GCASA

November 28, 2021 - 12:00pm
posted by Lisa Ace in Sponsored Post, advertisement, GCASA, jobs, employment.


Click here
for more information.

Comments
October 14, 2021 - 5:33pm

james_1_a.jpg

Genesee County legislators, substance use disorder and mental health professionals have a million reasons to celebrate today after meeting New York State Attorney General Letitia James at The Recovery Station on Clinton Street Road.

James is conducting a statewide tour to recognize communities for their efforts in fighting the opioid epidemic and to distribute funds awarded to New York through a settlement with opioid manufacturers and distributors. This afternoon, she presented oversized ceremonial checks in Waterloo, Rochester and Batavia.

For Genesee County, that amount is $1,060,280.71.

“Addiction doesn’t discriminate and transcends all political boundaries and affiliations and artificial constructs,” James said. “This really is a demonstration of what government should do, and that is provide for the needs of New Yorkers and the constituents that we all serve. And to hold those individuals responsible for what they did; we hit them in the pocketbook.”

James said her office “closed down pharma … and five manufacturers and three distributors of this poison.”

Unfortunately, she said, overdosing continues to be a huge problem.

“We’re seeing more overdoses because we know that individuals who use opioids sort of walked into the use of heroin, which is now laced with poisonous fentanyl,” she advised. “So, whatever we can do in our capacity to provide you with additional services, with some medically assistance treatment to assist those who are dealing with not only with opioid use disorder but mental illness.”

Assemblyman Steven Hawley thanked James for her role in the settlement and her “attention to all folks who are having problems with addiction.”

“It doesn’t really identify geographic areas for folks who are having trouble with addiction – whether we live in an urban area or a rural area or a suburban area. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done for a living. It can get everybody …” he added.

Legislature Chair Rochelle Stein, speaking for families “that have been torn apart,” touched upon the significance of James’ tour.

Stein pointed out that Genesee is one of the few counties that operates a mental health department with its own clinics.

“We are struggling, quite frankly, in getting the clinicians. That is a real need,” she said. “If we could get some help there in getting folks into our state or even support for those positions, so that we could have more people available to us to help provide those services.”

James brought up that she has been hearing that the state agencies of the Office of Addiction Services and Supports and the Office of Mental Health do not work together and operate under regulations that often conflict with one another.

Lynda Battaglia, the county’s director of Mental Health & Community Services, said the agencies on a local level have excellent working relationships.

“We collaborate … for the greater good. As we move forward, everybody has the same mission,” she said, later adding that the COVID-19 pandemic has rippled through the industry, causing waiting lists into the hundreds for services due to the adverse effects on delivery and the strain on mental health and substance use counselors.

John Bennett, executive director of Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (which operates The Recovery Station), explained that in Genesee County, several agencies meet on a regular basis, sharing information to increase efficiency across the various sectors.

“Criminal justice, judges, services, community-based organizations, medical care workers – we’re at the table and we talk to each other,” he said. “We try not to let anybody drop through the cracks. We don’t have a ton of services but what we have, they get utilized.”

James said it’s important to not engage in “victim blaming and to be compassionate.”

She said her office is looking at this as a health crisis, reiterating Genesee County’s belief that the funds can be used only for treatment, prevention, education, outreach, etc.

“Unlike the tobacco settlement of old (where) the funds were used for roads and bridges and lights,” she said. “I don’t have anything wrong with roads and bridges and lights – they serve their purpose and hopefully that infrastructure money (federal bill) will build more of them. But these funds have to be related to the litigation and also to assist you in expanding services, and maybe, giving people some raises because they do the work of the angels.”

Bennett mentioned that GCASA is hoping to open its new detoxification center by the first of the year and is advertising for 25 positions, mostly nurses.

“It’s challenging. Right now, we’re biting our nails, going through resumes,” he said.

In closing, James said her goal was to “shine a light on what all of you do here.”

“I come from New York City and half the time the attention is on the city, but we need to focus on rural communities, rural counties because there’s a demand here -- and they cannot be ignored; they cannot be invisible.”

County Manager Matt Landers said the county’s intent is to use the money as directed by the settlement.

“We’ll have interested stakeholders come together to build a consensus on how best to tackle this problem,” he advised.

James said the Finger Lakes Region (Monroe and surrounding counties) will be receiving $53,124,938 from the settlement.

Her plan is to travel to Buffalo, part of the Western New York Region, on Friday.

james_4a.jpg

Photo at top: State Attorney General Letitia James speaks with County Legislature Chair Rochelle Stein, left; GCASA Executive Director John Bennett, and Assemblyman Steven Hawley. Photo at bottom: Presentation of a check to the county to combat the opioid epidemic.

Comments
August 26, 2021 - 1:23pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, GOW opioid task force, GCASA.

vinyard_talk_1.jpg

Over the 12 months prior to September of 2020, 90,237 in the United States – a 30 percent increase from the previous year.

In 2017, 585,000 worldwide.

In 2020, 15 in Genesee County and seven in Orleans County.

Those figures represent the number of people who have died from an opioid overdose – staggering figures that reveal the extent of the epidemic that continues to devastate society.

Healthcare and mental health professionals in Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming counties on the front lines of this scourge came together on Wednesday afternoon at Austin Park for the annual International Overdose Awareness Day observance.

Representatives of a dozen agencies plus area residents whose lives have been affected by opioid use attended the event, which was to raise awareness and to remember those who have been lost due to an overdose.

Genesee/Orleans Public Health Director Paul Pettit shared that in 2020, 58 people from Genesee County went to the emergency room and another 38 from Orleans County went to the ER due to drug overdoses – both up from 2019.

“That can be attributed to COVID; people were isolated and feeling alone,” he said.

Pettit had encouraging words about the efforts of the GOW Opioid Task Force, an organization comprised of people from various sectors of the community.

“We’ve been working together for many years and are making great strides,” he said, mentioning an increase in access to care and the amount of Narcan training being done. “We want to get more people trained. We have a medication that can save lives.”

He said that since 2018, about 3,500 people have been trained.

“We’re making gains but we still have a ways to go,” he said.

John Bennett, executive director of Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, spoke about the impact of Overdose Awareness Day throughout the world, noting that events such as the one in Batavia are taking place throughout the state and in around 40 countries.

International Overdose Awareness Day was created in 2001 by Sally J. Finn at The Salvation Army in St. Kilda, Melbourne, Australia.

“As we come together today, not only think about those locally who have lost their lives, but this is a worldwide problem that’s killed over a million people,” he said.

Agencies taking part in the event included GO Health, Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Erie County Health Department, Spectrum Human Services, The Recovery Station, Wyoming County Mental Health, Fidelis Care, Rochester Regional Healthy, Cornell Cooperative Extension and Horizon Health.

GOW Opioid Task Force Coordinator Christen Ferraro said the Old County Courthouse will be lit up on Aug. 31 and signs commemorating awareness day will be placed in the front of the building.

Photo caption: Melissa Vinyard, a peer advocate at GCASA, shares her story of recovery at Wednesday’s Overdose Awareness Day. Vinyard said drugs and alcohol use nearly killed her, but she sought help and now has been sober since Dec. 30, 2017. Photo by Mike Pettinella.

Disclosure: Mike Pettinella is the GCASA publicist.

Comments
August 15, 2021 - 1:38pm
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA, GOW opioid task force.

Press release:

Join us to help raise awareness and remember the lives that have been lost due to an overdose.

Backed by that clear but hard-hitting mission statement, members of the GOW Opioid Task Force will be coming together on Aug. 25 to host their version of the International Overdose Awareness Day observation.

The event is scheduled for 4 to 7 p.m. at Austin Park in Batavia.

“We’re thankful to be able to welcome everyone to join us in recognizing the significance of the opioid epidemic upon the residents of our community,” said Christen Ferraro, project coordinator for the GOW Opioid Task Force, which is funded by the Greater Rochester Health Foundation. “Those in attendance will be able to hear first-hand from those who have experienced loss due to overdoses.”

Representatives of local human services agencies will be on hand to share information, and free Narcan training and kits will be offered, Ferraro said. Free food and refreshments will be served.

Attendees also will be offered the opportunity to leave a heart on the task force’s memory board for a deceased loved one.

International Overdose Awareness Day was created in 2001 by Sally J. Finn at The Salvation Army in St. Kilda, Melbourne, Australia, and now is held on an annual basis. Locally, it took place virtually last year due to COVID-19. In 2020, there were 602 Overdose Awareness Day events held in 37 countries.

To register for this year’s event, go to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/overdose-awareness-day-event-tickets-165953867485.

Those interested in having a vendor table are asked to contact Ferraro at [email protected].

Comments
July 15, 2021 - 11:20am

Local professionals in the field of substance use prevention and treatment are applauding the New York State Office of Addiction Services and Supports launching of a new “Connections” campaign acknowledging the significance of social relationships in the fight against addiction.

On Tuesday, OASAS announced the start of a campaign that will run through the end of August designed to encourage those affected by addiction to use their connections to friends, family members, health professionals, and other organizations as a means to find help and support in their treatment and recovery.

Partial funding of the campaign is a result of an award to the state through the federal State Opioid Response grant.

“Staff here at Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse are keenly aware that social connections with family and friends are vital for a person’s recovery,” said Shannon Ford, GCASA's director of Communications and Development. “When we had to close The Recovery Station to the public due to COVID, it was devastating.”

Ford was speaking about the facility at the former Bohn’s Restaurant on Clinton Street Road that serves as a social gathering place for those in recovery. With COVID-19 restrictions lifted, it since has reopened for programming on a regular basis.

“Now that it's open again, you can see how great of a resource it is. People are coming every day,” she said, adding that GCASA’s day-to-day support has continued at its residential treatment settings.

When talking about the prevention aspect of substance use education, Ford also mentioned the importance of family and peer connections.

“With so much isolation, people are more likely to cope by using alcohol or other drugs. Kids weren't able to see their friends or go to school. The lack of connection took its toll on the mental well-being of our community members,” she said.

Rosalie Mangino-Crandall, GCASA’s director of Project Innovation and Expansion, pointed to the summer camp in July and August being offered by the agency’s drop-in childcare center for clients.

“GCASA clients already could use the childcare center at no cost for up to three hours per day for any kind of GCASA appointment or service and with prior approval from the childcare supervisor,” she said.

Those activities, all critical to the recovery process, include mutual aid meetings, any other kind of healthcare appointment, court, accessing domestic violence or veterans services, Department of Social Services appointments and job interviews.

“During the mini-camp, clients can actually bring their kids to the center for up to three hours a day for any reason at all -- including just for the fun of attending the activities and being with other people,” Mangino-Crandall advised.

In a press release issued by OASAS, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul stated the “Connections” campaign “not only helps get the word out on lifesaving resources and services for New Yorkers who are battling addiction and substance use disorder, but is also a reminder that help is available to find a better and satisfying life.”

Campaign content will run online on social media and streaming audio. Public Service Announcements will also be seen on billboards, city buses, subways, and the Staten Island Ferry with messages addressing the importance of connections and personal well-being, in addition to focusing on opioid overdose prevention and the use of naloxone to save lives.

New Yorkers are also encouraged to focus on the value of connections and how they help to foster the best outcomes for overcoming addiction and finding a better and satisfying life.

The “Connections” campaign also raises awareness about the risks of overdoses due to the presence of fentanyl in other illicit substances. Fentanyl is a lethal opioid that has been detected in other illicit substances such as heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, and ecstasy, which can result in overdoses and fatalities.

New Yorkers struggling with an addiction, or whose loved ones are struggling, can find help and hope by calling the state’s toll-free, 24-hour, 7-day-a-week HOPEline at 1-877-8-HOPENY (1-877-846-7369), or by texting HOPENY (Short Code 467369).

Comments
July 12, 2021 - 5:55pm

paari_group_1.jpg

Having supported a loved one’s multiyear battle with addiction, Allie Hunter said she is uniquely qualified and motivated to help deliver others throughout the United States from the clutches of substance use disorders in her role as national executive director of the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative.

Hunter drove from her Cape Cod, Mass., home today to meet with leaders of the PAARI chapter in Genesee County at the Batavia Fire Department station on Evans Street in preparation of her keynote address at Tuesday’s event showcasing the local program.

The Genesee County chapter is called Public Safety Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative, a slightly altered version of the nonprofit organization’s official name due to the fact that the Batavia FD is the first fire company in New York State to join the effort to lead people to treatment and recovery without the threat of being arrested.

The Genesee County Sheriff’s Office, Batavia Police Department and Le Roy Police Department – all supported by the Genesee County Health Department – are current participants in the local PAARI.

Tuesday’s event is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and was open to the public on a preregistration basis. Christen Ferraro, program coordinator, said that about 50 people are expected to attend.

Hunter said her sister’s struggles with substance use have given her a deeper understanding of addiction – as well as treatment and recovery – and have motivated her to reach as many individuals and families as possible.

“My younger sister, Nicole, for several years struggled with addiction,” Hunter said. “She experienced several overdoses and it was really tough for my family during that period of time.”

She said she was close to her sister and “oftentimes, I was the person that she would call when she overdosed or when she got into some type of challenge and I always tried to answer my phone anytime she called to help her out.

“It’s tough as a family member. You don’t know who to talk to about it or what resources are there. I didn’t know what I know now, and that motivates me, too, to try to support family members who have been impacted by it.”

About eight years ago, Nicole decided to start the recovery process, Hunter said.

“She has been doing really well. Now 32, she works as a recovery coach at a community health center nearby; so, we kind of work in the same field now, which is pretty cool,” she said.

Hunter said that her sister now takes part in some of the PAARI trainings and has responded with a police department on calls for help on Cape Cod.

“It’s great to have her doing so well and have that inspiration of how recovery is possible even though at the time – when somebody is struggling – there feels like there’s no hope,” she said. “But there’s always hope. So, that kind of motivates me as well.”

Unfortunately, there was no PAARI program at the time of her sister’s addiction, but things have changed considerably as the program’s numbers have increased from 100 departments when Hunter took over as executive director to about 650 today.

“How amazing would it have been if eight years ago there was a police department she could have walked in to because there were so many missed opportunities where she didn’t have the right insurance or couldn’t get a bed or couldn’t get a ride?” she asked. “Even on those overdoses, thank goodness there were officers carrying Narcan that were able to revive those. But it also highlights that there is more to be done.”

The goal, Hunter said, is to have PAARI become a standard “police in practice” offering.

“That’s the vision that we’re working towards but I think in the last five years we’ve grown a lot and have gotten about 30,000 people into treatment through our law enforcement partners,” she reported. “Still, overdoses are on the rise and we know that there is so much work to do.”

Hunter, who travels extensively around the country to trainings, chapter launches and conferences, said she is excited about the program’s development in Genesee County.

“For me, it’s really rewarding to get to be a part of local program launching and thinking about the ripple effect that will have on families and individuals that have been affected by addiction,” she offered. “For me to be able to be here in person and to meet the people behind it and see how PAARI has been part of that is really rewarding and exciting.”

PAARI’s funding comes mostly through grants and a “couple of federal organizations,” Hunter said, mentioning the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Corporation for National and Community Service, a federal agency that manages the AmeriCorps program.

The Genesee County PAARI program is sponsored by the Greater Rochester Health Foundation, Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, GOW Opioid Task Force, and a grant from the health department.

For more information, contact Ferraro at [email protected].

Disclosure: Mike Pettinella is a publicist for GCASA.

Photo: Allie Hunter, executive director of PAARI, meets with public safety officials at Batavia Fire Department headquarters. From left are John Bennett, GCASA executive director; Interim Fire Chief Dan Herberger; Hunter; Fire Captain Greg Ireland; Sheriff's Sgt. Brian Frieday; Batavia PD Assistant Chief Chris Camp; Sgt. Emily McNamara of the Le Roy Police Department was also part of the discussion. Photo by Mike Pettinella.

Comments
July 10, 2021 - 12:08pm

allie_hunter_use_this_one.jpg

Submitted photo and press release:

Leaders of the Public Safety Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative in Genesee County have been informed that Allie Hunter, PAARI’s national executive director, will be coming to Batavia to speak at Tuesday’s event showcasing the participation of the City of Batavia Fire Department.

The program is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at fire headquarters at 18 Evans St.

Hunter (photo at top), in her role as executive director of the Boston, Mass.-based organization, coordinates training, technical assistance, and strategic guidance to police to help them when dealing with individuals using alcohol or drugs, or in recovery.

An authority on policing as it relates to the opioid epidemic, she was deputy director of the Nonviolent Initiative for Democracy, and has worked at several other Boston-area nonprofit agencies, including ZUMIX and Bikes Not Bombs.

In the spring of 2017, Hunter received a Nonprofit Excellence Award and was named Young Professional of the Year by the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network. In fall 2018, she accepted an AmeriCorps Excellence Award for PAARI’s first-of-its-kind program that embeds national service members in police departments to address the opioid epidemic.

PAARI, officially known as Police Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative, is designed to provide support and resources to help law enforcement agencies nationwide create non-arrest pathways to treatment and recovery.

The public is invited to attend the Tuesday's event, which will feature local public safety officials as well as representatives of the Genesee County Health Department, Greater Rochester Health Foundation, Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, and GOW Opioid Task Force.

Genesee County participants are the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office, City of Batavia Police Department, Village of Le Roy Police Department, City of Batavia Fire Department and Genesee/Orleans Health Department.

Complimentary food and beverage will be provided.  

To register for this event, click here. Once registered, individuals will be contacted for their lunch selection.

For more information, contact Christen Ferraro, GRHF project coordinator, at [email protected].

Comments
July 8, 2021 - 8:53am

Press release:

Representatives of the organizations that support the Genesee County PAARI program will be recognized next Tuesday at a midday event at the City of Batavia Fire Department headquarters at 18 Evans St.

The local Public Safety Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative has gained momentum in the county, most recently having the distinction of welcoming the Batavia FD as the first fire company in New York (and one of just a few in the nation) as a participant.

The program is designed to provide support and resources to help law enforcement and public safety agencies nationwide create non-arrest pathways to treatment and recovery.

PAARI leaders in Genesee County are highlighting the significance of this development by holding a two-hour public session, beginning at 11 a.m. on July 13.

They also have changed the name of the program slightly in this area to Public Safety Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative instead of the official name of Police Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative -- while still using the PAARI acronym.

The event will feature leaders of the four public safety agencies that have signed on to PAARI: Genesee County Sheriff’s Office, Batavia Police Department, Le Roy Police Department and Genesee County Health Department.

Officials of program sponsors Greater Rochester Health Foundation, Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, and GOW Opioid Task Force also are scheduled to speak.

The GRHF will be presented with a plaque at the event for its support and funding of necessary renovations at the fire headquarters.

Complimentary food and beverage will be provided to all in attendance. Once registered, individuals will be contacted for their lunch selection.

To register for this event, click here.

For more information, contact Christen Ferraro, GRHF project coordinator, at [email protected].

paari_team.png

Photo: Representatives of Genesee County Sheriff's Office, Batavia Fire Department, Le Roy Police Department and Batavia Police Department that support the PAARI program in Genesee County. Submitted photo.

Comments
June 22, 2021 - 4:47pm
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA, Best Companies to Work for in New York.

new_york_2021.pngPress release:

For the fourth consecutive year, Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse has been selected as one of the Best Companies to Work for in New York.

The annual listing of businesses honored through the Best Companies to Work for in New York program was created by the New York State Society for Human Resource Management and Best Companies Group.

This statewide survey and awards program is designed to identify, recognize and honor the best places of employment in New York, benefiting the state's economy, its workforce and businesses.

The 2021 Best Companies to Work for in New York list is made up of 72 companies, including the not-for-profit GCASA, which offers services in the areas of substance use prevention, treatment and recovery.

GCASA Executive Director John Bennett said he was proud to be honored for a fourth year, recognizing his staff “as amazing individuals who help people in our communities every day.”

“Our employees give back in so many ways and are deserving of having a great place to work,” he said. “We try to be family-oriented and give staff flexibility in creating their own schedule which is a highly-rated perk we offer. This year, we are improving our in-house training and education opportunities and addressing some salary inequities compared to other regional organizations in our category.”

To be considered for participation, companies had to fulfill the following eligibility requirements:

  • Be a for-profit, not-for-profit business or government entity;
  • Be a publicly or privately held business;
  • Have a facility in the state of New York;
  • Have at least 15 employees working in New York; and
  • Must be in business a minimum of 1 year.

Companies from across the state entered the two-part survey process to determine the Best Companies to Work for in New York. The first part consisted of evaluating each nominated company's policies, practices, philosophy, systems and demographics. This part was worth approximately 25 percent of the total evaluation.

The second part consisted of a survey to measure the employee experience. This part was worth approximately 75 percent of the total. The combined scores determined the top companies and the final rankings.

Best Companies Group managed the overall registration and survey process in New York and also analyzed the data and used their expertise to determine the final rankings.

Kim Corcoran, GCASA’s director of Human Resources, said the agency’s staff is committed to providing the best possible services to its communities.

“GCASA is extremely honored to be recognized once again,” she said. “Along with an employer-completed survey, 125 staff were asked to respond to a survey to include areas regarding GCASA’s leadership, corporate culture and communication, work environment, pay and benefits, supervision, and overall engagement. This is quite a tribute to our staff and reflects the positive environment fostered by our leadership.”

All honorees will be celebrated at an online event at 5:30 p.m. July 28. For more information about the event go to https://rbj.net/events/best-companies/

To learn more about attending the event or sponsoring contact [email protected].

For more information on the Best Companies to Work for in New York program, visit www.BestCompaniesNY.com.

Comments
June 21, 2021 - 3:49pm

Press release:

Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse and the Batavia Community Schools initiative are joining forces to present a “School’s Out for Summer!” informational fair from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at The Recovery Station at 5256 Clinton Sreet Road.

Shannon Ford, GCASA’s director of Communications/Development/Prevention, said the event is set up to provide available resources, such as summer activities and educational opportunities, for both parents and youth.

“GCASA’s Prevention Team is very excited to partner with Batavia Community Schools to host this event at The Recovery Station,” Ford said. “After a long, challenging school year, we want to make sure parents and youth have the resources they need to stay healthy and safe. We’re hoping families will stop by, have some fun and get some important information that we plan to share.”

Batavia Community Schools is a new program developed by the Batavia City School District. Its mission is to unite the Batavia community and schools through shared resources, working partnerships, and open, collaborative communication.

Julia Rogers, coordinator of Community Schools, said the event with GCASA “aligns nicely with our vision of building a better Batavia by promoting equitable learning activities, cultivating healthier families and establishing a stronger community.”

Thursday’s activities include Hidden Mischief (a hidden-in-plain-sight experience) for adults from 6:15-7:15 p.m. and special games for children during that time. Attendees will be able to tour the facility.

Refreshments will be available from Pub Coffee Hub.

Other participants include Blue Cross Blue Shield, Hillside Children’s Center Young Life, The ACT Program.

It isn’t too late for other community agencies or organizations to participate, Rogers said, adding that she can be reached at (585) 343-2480, ext. 1004.

CLICK HERE for more information about Batavia Community Schools.

Comments
June 2, 2021 - 11:16am
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA.

front_of_detox_1.jpg

Press release:

The executive director of Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse said he feels fortunate that the agency’s detoxification building project on its campus at 430 E. Main St. has yet to hit any major supply delays and he's excited about the prospect of opening the 20-bed facility ahead of schedule.

“It’s an 8,600-square-foot building that will house four people on the first floor and 16 on the second floor (two per unit) for short-term detox – five to seven days,” John Bennett said. “It will be connected to the back of the Atwater Home and, when finished, will continue the look of that structure.”

Javen Construction, of Penfield, is the general contractor for the venture, which broke ground in January.

Bennett said the detox center originally was scheduled to open in December, but could be moved up a couple months.

Amber Gorzynski, a construction field representative with the Dormitory Association of the State of New York’s Buffalo office, said lag time to get materials hasn’t been an issue.

“So far the lead times have been similar to we had before COVID,” she said. “We’re scheduled for December but we’re hoping to beat that.”

Gorzynski said she is looking forward to turning the building over to GCASA.

“It’s needed and I just appreciate that I am part of this,” she said.

Tim Ryan, superintendent for Javen Construction, said the outside walls are finished and inside insulation has been installed, setting the stage for fire inspection in the coming days.

Subcontracting work is being done by local companies, such as Turnbull Heating & Air and Genesee Plumbing.

The facility will be open to Western New York and Finger Lakes Region residents.

connection_1.jpg

dining_room_1.jpg

Photo at top: The front of the detoxification center under construction at Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse campus on East Main Street. Photos at bottom: The connection of the new building with the existing Atwater residential facility; the area where the first-floor dining room will be located.

Comments
April 19, 2021 - 3:33pm
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA, GOW opioid task force.

Press release:

The proper way to dispose of medications will be the focus of Thursday’s quarterly meeting of the GOW (Genesee-Orleans-Wyoming) Opioid Task Force.

The meeting will be livestreamed via Zoom, starting at 9:30 a.m. It is expected to last for an hour.

Scott Wilson, superintendent of the Orleans County Jail, has agreed to make a presentation on National Drug Take Back Day, which is scheduled for this Saturday, with locations in the three counties.

Wilson has worked closely with this event for the past few years. In his presentation, he will discuss the organization of these events, collection of medications and their proper disposal, and the impact this day has on our community.

This meeting is open to the public and the community is invited to join and share any questions they may have.

“With National Drug Take Back Day coming up on April 24th, we felt this would be a great topic to cover with the members of the Task Force and our community,” said Christen Ferraro, GOW Opioid Task Force coordinator.

Ferraro noted that prescription opioid misuse is an ongoing and escalating epidemic as 70 percent of opioid dependence, overdoses and deaths begin with leftover drugs in the medicine cabinet.

“It is important to help remove the risks that leftover medications pose to you, as well as your families and friends. With this meeting, we hope to increase awareness of safe disposal methods, as environmental studies have shown that flushed medications flow into our water supply and negatively impact the fish we eat and water we drink,” she added.

To access the meeting link, go to www.gowopioidtaskforce.org. Once registered, participants will receive a confirmation email with Zoom information and a link to join.

Comments
April 12, 2021 - 4:07pm
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA.

Press release:

Added to the list of programs offered by Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse last September, the GCASA Reentry Program continues to provide support to men and women seeking to find their place in the community after being incarcerated.

“The main goal of this program is to help reduce or remove some of the barriers that are associated with reentry,” said Christopher Budzinack, program coordinator. “As a former offender myself, I know how difficult this can be and we just want make sure our clients have an opportunity to get all the support they need in order to be successful.”

Simply put, the GCASA Reentry Program provides case management and peer recovery services to those who have been in jail or prison by connecting them to the following necessities:

  • Substance use disorder treatment;
  • Mental health treatment;
  • Housing, food and clothing;
  • Employment and/or job training;
  • Childcare;
  • Transportation;
  • Medical care.

Eligible individuals are those who have a history of substance use, who were sentenced to jail or prison for a minimum of three months and who are returning to communities in Genesee County or Orleans County.

For more information about the GCASA Reentry Program, call (585) 813-6570 or send an email to [email protected].

Comments
March 31, 2021 - 6:17pm

Gov. Andrew Cuomo today signed a bill legalizing the recreational use of marijuana for people 21 and over in New York State, action that will be the subject of much debate until and following the new law’s implementation, which is expected in about 18 months.

The Batavian reached out to local government representatives, substance use prevention professionals, hemp producers and retailers, law enforcement and the chair of the Genesee County Libertarian Party for their thoughts on New York becoming the 15th state with legal recreational marijuana.

Chris Van Dusen, president, Empire Hemp Co., Liberty Square, Batavia:

“I think it is really exciting news. The legislation that they have come up with, I think is pretty fair and it doesn’t cut out the potential for small businesses to get into the industry. I think it is a good plan, and the taxation is not too out of control on it.

“I am looking forward to expanding our business into the ‘rec’ market through another corporation that we will start – not Empire Hemp Co. – but we will plan on being involved in a processing capacity.”

Van Dusen said the facility in Liberty Square is for processing – “where we turn all of the raw hemp into CBD oil” – and he is close to opening a retail store on Main Street.

When asked about the legislation having safeguards against marijuana getting into minors’ hands, he said he believes that a new Office of Cannabis Management will implement guidelines similar to what are in place for alcohol use.

“And I think that a lot of the tax dollars will be going back into treatment programs and social programs, and that will be a benefit to the community as well,” he said.

The law, which was passed on party line voting in the Democratic Party-controlled Assembly and Senate on Tuesday, calls for a 13-percent excise tax, with 1 percent going to the county and 3 percent earmarked for the municipality (town, city, village) of the dispensary.

“The growers and the processors are going to get into it, there’s going to be an upfront investment. But as far as the end user costs at the retail level, I don’t think it’s going to be much outside what you are seeing in the other legal states as far as what you get for what price or, frankly, what you find on the black market. I think it hopefully will take more out of the black market – having it regulated like this will allow for a cleaner, safer product that’s regulated versus what’s coming off the street – imported from who knows where.

Batavia City Manager Rachael Tabelski:

“Without having a chance to read the entire bill yet, I can safely say that if there were a dispensary within the City of Batavia, it is my understanding that the city would gain 3 percent of the tax revenue related to that dispensary.

“That certainly is a brand-new revenue source … but it is all hypothetical until you have one. I want to continue to read through the legislation and we’ll be working with NYCOM (New York Conference of Mayors) – the city’s association. So, we’ll wait and see what their guidance looks like. The local level does have some decisions to make in this. We don’t have any decision-making on adult use, but we do have decision-making on whether the city allows for a dispensary and then we can regulate the times, place and manner through local zoning.

“Whether Batavia has a distribution point in the city or not, people will now be allowed to use it per the regulations and guidelines that came out. If that is the case, it might warrant a legislative choice (by City Council) to be made or the choice to do nothing, and just let it happen. I certainly will be getting information to City Council to help them understand the legislation and how communities align with the legislation.

“There’s growing, there’s retail and there’s use. No matter what happens with the growing and the retail, there is going to be use in our city. It’s going to happen, in that, if we have the ability to bring in revenue, that may be an option for us. We certainly will have some growing pains associated with legalized use and, especially, kind of the edible product that might be included in this.”

Shannon Ford, director of Prevention, Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse:

“From a Prevention perspective, I’m very concerned about this. Legalizing marijuana will have a negative impact on our youth for sure. Although youth will not be able to use marijuana legally, we know there will be an increase in access if the adults in their lives are possessing and using it.

“In addition, over the last couple of years, youth perception of harm of smoking marijuana has decreased. With more media messages and legalization/commercialization, I anticipate the perceived risk of harm will further be reduced. Both access and a decreased perception of harm will likely increase youth marijuana use.

“As it is legalized for adult use where it will be monitored for ‘purity,’ youth will still be seeking it on the streets, where we know there is a higher potential of risk.”

Mark Potwora, Genesee County Libertarian Party chair:

“My opinion -- and I would say it is the opinion of the Libertarian Party -- is that it is something that should have been legal a long time ago, and for some reason, what was not legal years ago is legal now. A lot of people suffered because of marijuana laws (on the books). A lot of families and 18-, 19-, 20-year-old kids got a marijuana charge that kind of ruined their lives for a while.

“The problem I have with the legalization of the whole thing is that they’re doing it for the wrong reasons. They’re doing it because they want money. They want to raise revenue. They’re not doing it because it’s the right thing to do. That kind of bothers me, but I’m glad that they’re legalizing it.”

Potwora compared marijuana use to alcohol use.

“It’s just like alcohol. It shouldn’t be administered to young kids and there is an age limit. And, along the lines of medical marijuana -- which a lot of people have – it is not a negative. It’s probably a good thing. Whoever smokes marijuana or pot now, I don’t think they’re going to create a whole new industry of pot smokers. If you didn’t smoke it before – because it’s so easy to get – I don’t see any big problem coming up that they aren’t already addressing.

He also said the current marijuana laws give police “an in” to search people.

“They (police) say, ‘Oh you’re smoking pot. Come here, I want to pat you down.’ And they always took it farther and farther. This is one less thing for them to have a reasonable cause to mess with you, I guess.”

Nola Goodrich-Kresse, Genesee Orleans Public Health educator:

“Public Health has had a standing position in opposition of legalization of marijuana in New York State for several years. Our state association, The New York State Association of County Health Officials, officially has maintained opposition to legalized adult use of cannabis, based on the quantifiable adverse impact it will have on public health.”

She then offered the following bullet points for consideration:

  • Legalization will create a similar path to tobacco with the need to build infrastructure and systems around dealing with the downstream issues that will come.
  • Legalization does not mean safe and healthy, it creates a false sense of security and belief, especially in youth that it is safe since it is legal.
  • There has been general support for medical use of cannabis, which has been in place for over five years, and has been effective in helping those with identified medical conditions.
  • Evidence indicates that long-term cannabis use can lead to addiction. There is cannabis withdrawal syndrome, which makes cessation difficult and contributes to relapse.  Adolescents are particularly susceptible as compared to those who begin use in adulthood. Adolescence are approximately two to four times as likely to have symptoms of cannabis dependence within two years after first use.

Jeremy Almeter and Pavel Belov, co-owners, Glass Roots, 12 Center St., Batavia:

"While today is certainly a step in the right direction, we are still far from declaring this our 'milestoned' moment. We at Glass Roots have been committed to destigmatizing and normalizing cannabis for over 15 years. By building trust and serving our community, we have seen there are no applicable stereotypes for cannabis usage.

“ ’Recreational’ cannabis is a misleading term; adult-use is what we are truly achieving today. This legislation specifically addresses and builds the foundation for an infrastructure, which ensures that cannabis products will be handled in a safe and secure manner from seed to sale.

“The fight has just begun. Access to plants and the many benefits they offer us and our animal friends is a basic right. To all the people who grew up indoctrinated with lies that compare cannabis to heroin use or its ‘gateway’ -- we are here to say the light at the end of the tunnel is upon us.

“Moving forward, we plan on working closely with community leaders to cultivate a safe and educational environment for cannabis culture within Genesee County.”

Glass Roots is an on-site glass-blowing facility that sells art pieces as well as CBD oils and other hemp products.

An email and phone call to Genesee County Sheriff William Sheron Jr. were not returned at the time of the posting of this story.

More about the today’s legalization, called the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act:

  • The new law erases convictions for marijuana possession that would now be legal, and directs 40 percent of pot tax revenue to communities of color that excessively faced pot charges.
  • Possession of up to three ounces of cannabis or 24 grams of concentrated forms of the drug will be allowed for recreational use.
  • Three Senate Democrats voted against the bill, which passed 40-23, while no Democrats voted against it in the Assembly, where it passed by a 100-49 tally.
  • State officials are indicating that marijuana sales are expected to generate $350 million in revenue to the state per year, and around 50,000 jobs will be created.
Comments
January 25, 2021 - 1:34pm
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA, The Recovery Station.

Press release:

Next month’s Stand Up For Recovery Day is a virtual event this year but the question it poses reflects the reality that everyone can contribute to helping those suffering with substance use disorders.

Staff at The Recovery Station, a program of Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, are asking those who wish to support the effort to post a video or picture that answers the following:

“What do you stand up for when it comes to recovery?”

Sue Gagne, coordinator of The Recovery Station, is inviting all community members to voice their support or showcase their artistic talents for the cause.

“Whether you are an individual in recovery, family member, friend, or ally, you are an important part of our recovery community,” Gagne said. “We hope you join us in showing support for the recovery movement in Genesee and Orleans counties. You are not alone!”

Stand Up For Recovery Day is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 9, and features a full agenda of activities promoted by Friends of Recovery – New York (www.for-ny.org/surd-registration), including:

  • Networking and sponsor presentations;
  • Opening plenary session including entertainment by Katharine Pettit Creative (KPC) and George Feaster Band;
  • Inspirational message, remarks by For-NY Board President Chacku Mathai and Executive Director Angelia Smith-Wilson, Ed.D.;
  • Presentation of the group’s policy statement by statewide recovery advocates;
  • Remarks by partners from the New York state government and legislature;
  • Presentations on advocacy by Richard Buckman and Ashley Livingston;
  • Video Rally.

Optional events including a legislature chat session and virtual visits with area legislators.

Friends of Recovery – New York (FOR-NY) is a statewide Recovery Community Organization working on behalf of millions of individuals and families in New York to educate decision makers and the general public about recovery from addiction.

Leaders anticipate nearly 1,000 recovery warriors from various Recovery Community Organizations throughout the state to gather virtually in order to both celebrate recovery from addictions, but more so, to educate decision-makers and the general public about the recovery movement.

FOR-NY has identified its four priorities when it comes to help those in recovery as housing, personalized treatment and treatment on demand, recovery oriented systems of care, and transportation. It also supports racial justice as well as a public health response to COVID-19 which is inclusive of the recovery community.

For more information about the Stand Up For Recovery Day or The Recovery Station, contact Gagne at (585) 815-5248. To support recovery efforts in Orleans County, call (585) 210-8750.

Comments
January 25, 2021 - 8:14am
posted by Press Release in news, GCASA.

amy_klos_1_.jpgPress release:

Ask any of Amy Klos’ coworkers or supervisors and they’ll all say the same thing when it comes to the 21-year employee’s job performance at Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse: She’s the one that holds things together.

“Amy is always available to us no matter what is happening, she can multitask better than anyone and she always gets the job done well,” said Shannon Murphy, director of treatment at the Batavia clinic on East Main Street. “Amy truly cares about every staff member and our patients, and on most days, she is the glue.”

Murphy’s glowing assessment reflects the commitment and dedication that Klos (in photo at right) has provided to the agency since starting as a secretary at its former Growney building location at Bank Street and Washington Avenue in 1999.

Since then, she has taken on more responsibility and, just recently, was promoted to the position of customer relations manager for GCASA’s Batavia and Albion clinics as well as the Opioid Treatment Program facility in Batavia.

A lifelong Oakfield resident, Klos found her way to GCASA after receiving a two-year degree from Central City Business Institute in Syracuse in the mid-1980s and working at the office of Dr. Yeong Lee, a Batavia pediatrician.

“I found out about the GCASA job from women who worked there and took their children to Dr. Lee,” she said. “They told me that they were in need of a secretary at GCASA, they posed the question and checked it out.”

Klos said she and two or three others worked in the front office (located in the basement of the Growney building) checking clients in, answering the telephone and verifying health insurance.

“I worked there for about 10 years before moving to the agency’s current location on East Main Street,” she said. “John Bennett was running the outpatient clinic – he now is GCASA’s executive director – and I was his secretary and also worked in the front office at the same time.”

As time passed, Klos moved into the director of treatment secretary position while continuing to assist the support staff, and in the late 2000s, she was elevated to supervisor of the Batavia office, overseeing a half-dozen employees.

“The agency was expanding at that time – the numbers in the clinic were increasing and the opioid epidemic also hit, which increased our workload and productivity,” Klos said, “and along with that came changes to policies and procedures.”

Three years ago, Klos was promoted to supervisor of the treatment and OTP (methadone) clinics and now has added an oversight role at the Albion clinic.

She said she is tasked with getting everyone on the same page, so to speak.

“Generally, the responsibilities across the clinics are very similar, so we’re trying to make all three offices the same as far as protocols and policies,” she explained. “There are some slight differences depending upon the doctor you’re working with, the day of the week and the prescribed dosage.”

Klos is a key player in the integration of services and procedures and, when at full strength, she is supervising eight full-time and part-time secretaries.

She said the best thing about GCASA is the “teamwork” displayed by the staff, which, by the way, includes her daughter, Katie, a nurse.

“The employees here help each other out and it’s great to know that people have your back. And it’s also nice to know that you can help people,” Klos said. “Change happens frequently but no matter what, you still have the basics. You have to remember to say please and thank you. That goes a long way and too many people don’t realize that.”

Klos said she strives to make a positive impact upon clients’ lives.

“When people are struggling, giving them a helping hand really does make a difference. I say to patients all the time, 'I’m here if you want the help. If you don’t want the help, that’s up to you, but we’re here to help you 100 percent along the way.’ ”

When not on duty, Klos is keeping an eye on her mom, Ann Perfitt, who lives across the street from her in the village; joins in her husband as they “flip houses” on the weekends, enjoys outdoor activities and has fun with the family dog, Sam.

Murphy said she hopes Klos stays with the agency for another 20 years.

“Personally, I have had the pleasure of working next to Amy for over 15 years. She is diligent, smart and able to do her job while truly caring about everyone involved,” Murphy said. “I cannot imagine what I would do without her right next to me and as my friend. She truly is loved by all.”

In other GCASA news, the following employees were recognized recently for their longevity with the company:

Five years -- Brenda Post, QA/corporate compliance officer, Genesee County Clinic; Shandi Temperato, chemical dependency counselor, Orleans County Clinic.

Ten years -- Diana Fulcomer, prevention educator, Orleans Prevention Program; Cherlyne Gerould, payroll manager, Genesee County Administration.

Fifteen years -- Sherri Bensley, assistant director of prevention, Orleans Prevention Program; Nick Mardino, maintenance, Orleans County Clinic.

Twenty years -- Cyndi Mardino, secretary, Orleans County Clinic; Stephanie Nadolinski, house manager, Atwater Community Residential Program.

Thirty years -- Kim Corcoran, human resources/administrative assistant, Genesee County Administration.

Comments
November 12, 2020 - 9:19am

task_force_-_community_star_award_1.jpg

When it comes to commitment and dedication to battling opioid addiction in rural areas, the Genesee-Orleans-Wyoming Opioid Task Force shines brightly.

That’s the viewpoint of the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health, which has awarded the local collaborative organization with a 2020 Community Star.

The award is given to only one rural entity in New York State.

“We are deeply honored to be recognized by the NOSORH,” said Christen Ferraro, GOW Opioid Task Force project coordinator. “It is a tribute to the efforts of the hundreds of people in the tri-county area who volunteer their time and work together to help end opioid addiction and overdose.”

The honor is being presented in conjunction with National Rural Health Day on Nov. 19, according to the NOSORH.

Ferraro said an e-book publication featuring the GOW Opioid Task Force’s story, along with the other winners, will be released on that date on the NRHD website. The link to the story also will be posted on the GOW Opioid Task Force website – www.gowopioidtaskforce.org – and on its Facebook page.

The NOSORH singled out the local outreach for its flexibility in delivering key services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When the pandemic hit Western New York, the task force shifted its education efforts online. Virtual Narcan trainings were held and kits were mailed to participants. Since these online trainings began, more than 150 community members have been trained, and for 2020, more than 300 have received this training.

“We knew we had to make adjustments so our community could continue to have access to these needed resources," Ferraro said. “The positive response we received from the community was overwhelming, and we definitely plan to utilize this new way of education to help continue supporting our rural community in these difficult times.”

The task force, which is supported by the Greater Rochester Health Foundation and Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, currently has more than 400 members from across the tri-county region.

Members represent various sectors of the community, including public health, mental health, human services, local government, substance use disorder treatment and recovery agencies, law enforcement, EMS, faith-based groups, health systems and medical practitioners, education, businesses, concerned individuals, families, and individuals in recovery.

The NOSORH founded National Rural Health Day as a way to showcase rural America, increase awareness of rural health-related challenges and promote the efforts of NOSORH, State Offices of Rural Health and others in addressing those challenges, said Teryl Eisinger, the agency’s chief executive officer.

An estimated 57 million people – nearly one in five Americans – live in rural and frontier communities throughout the United States.

 “These small towns, farming communities and frontier areas are wonderful places to live and work; they are places where neighbors know each other and work together,” Eisinger said. “The hospitals and providers serving these rural communities not only provide quality patient care, but they also help keep good jobs in rural America.”

These communities also face unique healthcare needs.

“Today more than ever, rural communities must tackle accessibility issues, a lack of healthcare providers, the needs of an aging population suffering from a greater number of chronic conditions, and larger percentages of un- and underinsured citizens,” she said. “Meanwhile, rural hospitals are threatened with declining reimbursement rates and disproportionate funding levels that makes it challenging to serve their residents.”

All 50 states maintain a State Office of Rural Health, each of which shares a similar mission to foster relationships, disseminate information and provide technical assistance that improves access to, and the quality of, health care for its rural citizens.

Photo: The GOW Opioid Task Force has been honored with the 2020 Community Star from the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health. From left are Charlotte Crawford, chief executive officer, Lake Plains Community Care Network; Julie Gutowski, vice president of Clinical Operations and Services, Spectrum Health & Human Services; John Bennett, executive director of Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse; Christen Ferraro, task force project coordinator, and Paul Pettit, public health director for Genesee/Orleans County Health Departments.

Disclosure: Story by Mike Pettinella, GCASA publicist.

Comments
October 19, 2020 - 2:49pm

Although a local drug treatment professional has yet to see any signs of Carfentanil surfacing in this area, she said news that the powerful man-made opioid has appeared in test results in Oneida County is deeply concerning.

“Yes, I am aware of Carfentanil and the extreme toxicity of it,” said Kathy S. Hodgins, chief clinical officer at Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse. “Currently, we haven't seen or heard of any cases in Genesee or Orleans counties.”

Hodgins said her agency does have the capabilities “of testing if we suspect any use of it.”

Published reports earlier this week indicated that government and health officials in the Utica area issued a warning about the synthetic drug, which is considered to be 10,000 times more powerful than morphine and 100 times stronger than fentanyl.

According to a story from WKTV, Utica, dealers mix Carfentanil -- an odorless, white powder -- with other drugs to make them stronger and cheaper.

Carfentanil is used as a tranquilizer for large animals such as elephants.

Oneida County officials said the dose the size of a “single grain of salt can quickly lead to an overdose or death.”

Oneida County Executive Anthony J. Picente Jr. issued a press release, stating that he didn’t know the full extent of the presence of Carfentanil in the local drug supply, but, “because it is so lethal even to handle, we want to make sure that people who use drugs, first responders and other providers are alerted immediately so they can take precautions to protect themselves.”

“Carfentanil is so potent that it causes a rapid overdose, which may not be reversible even with multiple doses of Narcan or treatment,” he said.

Christen Ferraro, coordinator of GOW Opioid Task Force that covers Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming counties, sent out an email bulletin to the group’s 300-plus members, and the state’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports has put the word out to local opioid overdose prevention programs (OOPPs), drug user health hubs, and syringe exchange programs.

Disclosure: Story by Mike Pettinella, GCASA publicist.

Comments
October 19, 2020 - 10:40am

Press release:

The GOW Opioid Task Force, in conjunction with the Genesee & Orleans County Health Departments, has released a new “Linkage to Care” online application to help citizens connect with support centers for opioid rehabilitation and training in Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming counties.

“We are pleased to be a part of the development of this valuable application,” said Paul Pettit, director of the Genesee & Orleans County Health Departments (GO Health). “Our region has been working collaboratively over the last several years to provide resources and access to services for those who are struggling with substance use issues.”

Pettit said the app provides locations and contact information for the GOW Opioid Task Force region’s programs and local services that are available in a user-friendly platform to access anytime on a person’s smart phone.

Brenden Bedard, director of Community Health Services for GO Health, encouraged those who are having issues with drug use and addiction and/or their family members to utilize the services provided on the informational app.

“This is a much-needed tool to find services, but, of course, if there is a life-threatening emergency or crisis, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest emergency department for assistance,” he advised.

GOW Opioid Task Force coordinator Christen Ferraro said the group is “committed to finding new ways to make it easier for our residents to tap into community resources.”

Ferraro said the app includes a variety of services in the tri-county area, which can all be found in one place with just one click.

“This truly is a simple way to find help for those that may be struggling,” she said.

The app provides links to 24-hour assistance call lines, detox services, the PAARI (Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative) Program, Naloxone (Narcan) training, self-help meetings, medication and sharps drop box locations, as well as inpatient and outpatient services in the three counties.

Ferraro noted that the app is now live and free to download, and can be found at both the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. To access and download it, search “GOW Opioid Linkage to Care App.”

Comments
October 12, 2020 - 9:01am
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, GCASA.

Parents of children from the ages of 5 to 12 are invited to take part in Active Parenting, an evidence-based, video and discussion program sponsored by the prevention department at Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse.

The six-session program will begin on Oct. 26 and continue each Monday through Nov. 30 via the Zoom videoconferencing platform. Sessions will run from 1 to 3 p.m.

“Active Parenting provides the skills necessary to achieve a fuller, more satisfying family life, and will help your children gain an increased measure of happiness and success,” said Sherri Bensley, assistant director of prevention.

It was written by Michael Popkin, who earned a Doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the Georgia State University and is one of the nation’s foremost experts on parenting education. Course materials tout a proven and effective approach to parenting that will lead to more harmony and happiness for parents and children.

The curriculum includes seven strategies for school success, along with positive discipline and communication techniques to help families run more smoothly.

Since 1983, more than three million parents have learned program. Topics of discussion include effective ways to:

  • Use nonviolent discipline that really works;
  • Open up lines of communication—before they get clogged;
  • Teach responsibility, courage, and other important character traits;
  • Encourage school success in seven steps;
  • Prevent future problems with drugs, alcohol, and sex;
  • Defuse power struggles with your children;
  • Stimulate independence as your child grows older;
  • Stop scolding and start smiling with your kids again!

To register, contact Diane Klos in Genesee County at [email protected], or Diana Fulcomer in Orleans County at [email protected]sa.org.

Participants are asked to provide their name, telephone number, email address, and number of children and their ages. Each participant will receive a book, workbook and a certificate upon completion.

Disclosure: Story by Mike Pettinella, GCASA publicist.

Comments
Subscribe to The Batavian - Local Matters

Calendar

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
 
 

Upcoming

Copyright © 2008-2022 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
 

blue button