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August 2, 2016 - 4:41pm
posted by Genesee Chamber... in genesee, genesee county, history, Historical Society.

Relevant history of American life is abound in Genesee County, NY. The county is home to 12 historical museums, which are excellent ways to understand how people in these towns lived many years ago.

You don’t have to travel to The Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., to have an experience with American history. We recently visited all of the Genesee County historical locations with the hope of shedding a little light on the history and relevance of each town. See history come alive by visiting these places!
 

Alabama Museum, 2218 Judge Road, Alabama, NY (585) 948-9287

The museum itself is a neat place as it was originally an one-room schoolhouse. When you walk into the museum, you can see the big windows and high ceilings and wonder about the children and the education that went on in the building. Through the artifacts you will discover that Alabama used to have three gun manufacturers in its small town. There was a prominent citizen named Dr. Grant Neal, whose buggy is displayed at the museum. Part of the original Bason post office is also on display. Some people might find the museum’s vintage posters of “horse auctions” and old-time carnivals as interesting historical markers and how life was way back then. One small item that is still relevant today is a Christmas party invitation harking back to 1856 in regards to some soiree in Alabama. Gladly open by appointment only. Feel free to call (585) 948-9287.

Alabama Museum 22

(Alabama Museum was once a one-room schoolhouse.)

Alabama Museum 18

(Artifacts from days gone by.)

Alabama Museum 6

(Dr. Grant Neal’s buggy is on display at the Alabama Museum.)

Alexander Museum, 3350 Church St., Alexander, NY (585) 591-1204

Up on the third story of Alexander’s Town Hall (United States’ only three-story cobblestone town hall) sits the Alexander Museum. The building alone is worth the trip and makes for interesting photographs – bring your camera. A few items on display that are relevant in today’s world, include an old phone, record players and typewriter – which are all now part of our cell phones. Children these days would be baffled in the ways we use to communicate. In a section dedicated to tools, it’s interesting to look at the objects and try to guess their usage. The museum’s large open space is filled with their wide-ranging collection. From farmer’s tools to old record players, there’s a lot to absorb here. Please call to schedule a visit.

Alexander 1

(Alexander Museum is located in Alexander’s unique town hall.)

Alexander 2

(Alexander Museum is open by appointment only.)

Alexander 4

(Remembering those who served from Alexander.)

Bergen Museum,  7547 S. Lake Road, Bergen, NY (585) 494-0080

The Bergen Museum is a truly unique place. The museum resides in the former 1880 Hartford Hotels Livery Stables in downtown Bergen. It has been converted into a cozy, and well-done museum. Inside the old barn, there are a handful of interesting, life-size tableaus depicting, a blacksmith shop, a general store, school classroom and more. The goal of the exhibits are to have the artifacts tell the story. You really get an excellent sense of what it was like to shop at a store, studying in school or visit the local pharmacy. A local military exhibit includes war time posters, which capture people’s imaginations. The nicely crafted tableaux were created by museum’s volunteers.  Open every Sunday 1 to 4 p.m.

Bergen Museum 13

(The Bergen Museum is inside a converted horse stable.)

Bergen Museum 9

(Display of a blacksmith shop at Bergen Museum.)

Bergen Museum 8

(See what a General Store looked like at Bergen Museum.)

Byron Museum, 6407 Townline Road, Byron, NY  Phone: (585) 548-9008

A cool surprise is that this museum is located in an old church that is right next to an old cemetery. The sanctuary of the former German Lutheran church is packed with countless items, including a lot of clothing and textiles. People who love fashion or clothes will enjoy looking at what people were wearing a hundred years ago. South Byron High School is well-represented with photographs and yearbooks. Behind the church, there is a large annex dedicated to items typical of a farming community. There are even a few local business and community signs spread throughout. The collection is pretty deep. Open Sundays 2 to 4 p.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day. Other hours are gladly accepted with appointment.

Byron Museum 15

(Byron Museum is located inside a former church.)

Byron Museum 2

(The sanctuary of the church is filled with historical items.)

Byron Museum 9

(At the Byron Museum, there is a large area dedicated to antique tools and equipment.)

(More after the jump. Click on Read More below.)

October 8, 2011 - 7:52am
Event Date and Time: 
October 15, 2011 - 6:00pm to 10:00pm

The Historical Society Of Elba is holding their annual barn dance at Torrey's big maroon and white barn on Rt. 98 in Elba.  Look for the sign.

Adults $6.00, students under 18 $3.00

Performances by the Elba High School Jazz Ensemble and Kelly's Old Timers

Many refreshments will be available.

For more info call Ron 757-2590

April 2, 2011 - 7:47am
posted by Amy Vlack in elba, food, clors, Historical Society.

The Historical Society of Elba is holding a "Clor's Chicken Barbecue" on Sunday, April 10 at the museum on Maple Ave Extension in Elba. This is a "take-outs" only barbecue starting at 11:30 am.  Cost is $8.50 per dinner.

March 24, 2010 - 3:25pm
Event Date and Time: 
April 11, 2010 - 11:30am to 2:00pm

 

Clor’s Chicken B – B- Q, April 11, Museum, Maple Ave. Ext., Elba. Tickets $8.50 each, starting 11:30 until gone.  Tickets may be reserved by calling June C. at 344-2707  or Ann at 757-9356.

Fundraiser for the Historical Society of Elba.

 

 

 

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