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June 8, 2014 - 12:15pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in batavia, community, parade, people, Lawn Fete, St Joseph, sunny, blue skies.

Feel free to visit my gallery at

http://studio16productions.webstarts.com/index.html for more Parade pictures

 

 

 

June 8, 2014 - 12:09pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in batavia, community, parade, people, Lawn Fete, St Joseph, sunny, blue skies.
January 15, 2014 - 2:09pm
posted by Lisa Ace in people, inc., Personal Care Aide.
Company Name: 
People, Inc.
Job Type: 
Part-Time

Personal Care Aide needed in Alden. Part-time. Duties include: personal hygiene care and little house cleaning. Please contact Amanda [email protected] for interview.

August 16, 2010 - 11:55am
posted by Joseph Langen in animals, teaching, people, relationships.

 

Barbary Apes

Barbary Apes

~Lots of people talk to animals…Not very many listen, though…That’s the problem~

Benjamin Huff, The Tao of Pooh

Recently, as Carol and I drove home at dusk, we scanned the meadows along the highway where deer usually graze. None in sight, As we neared home, we swerved to avoid a faun lying in a pool of blood. struggling to arise on its two front legs which still worked. The scene left us feeling shocked and helpless. Not at all what we expected. We could only imagine what the faun was feeling.

Earlier that day we had watched Marley and Me, a movie ending with the death of a beloved family dog and felt the emotions the family experienced in letting go of their pet. Sometimes we ignore animals and take them for granted. Sometimes animals fascinate us. Sometimes they become part of our lives and we wind up loving them.

If we look closely, we can find in animals the traits we abhor in each other.  We can also find traits which endear us to each other. Killer whales toss panicked seals into the air before eating them. Chimps groom and embrace each other fondly. Many species display the tenderness and fierce protective behavior we admire in human mothers.

Animals seem to experience pure joy. Watch sea otters slide down slippery rocks into the sea.  See rabbits chase each other around a field. Listen to birds greeting each new day. We tell ourselves that all of these animal reactions are purely instinctual. But who knows? They probably wonder what we are all about as well.

Even though we muse about how well animals understand what we say, we certainly seem to communicate with them on an emotional level. Animals can arouse our interest, curiosity, affection, concern, fear and anger. We seem to draw the same emotions from a variety of animals as well. When a puppy or kitten cuddles up with us, it is hard to know whether the animal or human feels more cozy.

While we see many parallels between human and animal lives, what can we learn from them? On the whole animals seem to be better at staying focused on what is imp0rtant. They do what is necessary for survival, their own and that of their offspring.

They eat what is healthy for them when at all possible. They don’t succumb to addictions, They don’t worry about who has more or better possessions or look down on less fortunate or merely different creatures. They don’t hold grudges, I am not suggesting that animals are any better than we are. I just think we can learn from the simplicity of their lives in contrast to the complexity with which we often surround ourselves.

Live Lab Lessons

  • Do you know what is truly important in your life?
  • Do Your daily choices reflect your values?
  • Do you put the essentials first?
  • Do you complicate your life with toys and gadgets?
  • Could you benefit from watching how animals live?

 

August 16, 2010 - 11:54am
posted by Joseph Langen in animals, teaching, people, relationships.

 

Barbary Apes

Barbary Apes

~Lots of people talk to animals…Not very many listen, though…That’s the problem~

Benjamin Huff, The Tao of Pooh

Recently, as Carol and I drove home at dusk, we scanned the meadows along the highway where deer usually graze. None in sight, As we neared home, we swerved to avoid a faun lying in a pool of blood. struggling to arise on its two front legs which still worked. The scene left us feeling shocked and helpless. Not at all what we expected. We could only imagine what the faun was feeling.

Earlier that day we had watched Marley and Me, a movie ending with the death of a beloved family dog and felt the emotions the family experienced in letting go of their pet. Sometimes we ignore animals and take them for granted. Sometimes animals fascinate us. Sometimes they become part of our lives and we wind up loving them.

If we look closely, we can find in animals the traits we abhor in each other.  We can also find traits which endear us to teach other. Killer whales toss panicked seals into the air before eating them. Chimps groom and embrace each other fondly. Many species display the tenderness and fierce protective behavior we admire in human mothers.

Animals seem to experience pure joy. Watch sea otters slide down slippery rocks into the sea.  See rabbits chase each other around a field. Listen to birds greeting each new day. We tell ourselves that all of these animal reactions are purely instinctual. But who knows? They probably wonder what we are all about as well.

Even though we muse about how well animals understand what we say, we certainly seem to communicate with them on an emotional level. Animals can arouse our interest, curiosity, affection, concern, fear and anger. We seem to draw the same emotions from a variety of animals as well. When a puppy or kitten cuddles up with us, it is hard to know whether the animal or human feels more cozy.

While we see many parallels between human and animal lives, what can we learn from them? On the whole animals seem to be better at staying focused on what is imp0rtant. They do what is necessary for survival, their own and that of their offspring.

They eat what is healthy for them when at all possible. They don’t succumb to addictions, They don’t worry about who has more or better possessions or look down on less fortunate or merely different creatures. They don’t hold grudges, I am not suggesting that animals are any better than we are. I just think we can learn from the simplicity of their lives in contrast to the complexity with which we often surround ourselves.

Live Lab Lessons

  • Do you know what is truly important in your life?
  • Do Your daily choices reflect your values?
  • Do you put the essentials first?
  • Do you complicate your life with toys and gadgets?
  • Could you benefit from watching how animals live?

 

October 13, 2009 - 9:56am

This program is supported by the NYS Office of Children and Family Services through the Genesee County Youth Bureau There are many ways in which individuals can become more active in their community, and one of the most satisfying ways is to find an organization you care about and volunteer your time.  Genesee County CASA for Children is a non-profit organization that advocates for abused and neglected children in our community.  By becoming a volunteer advocate, you would be giving a child a powerful voice during what can be daunting court proceedings in Family Court. 

A CASA advocate monitors court orders, maintains a relationship with the child or children invovled, makes reports and reccomendations to the court about safe, permanent placement of the child or chidlren, attends court proceedings, and gathers all case information to be reported back the the family court.

On average, after training, an advocate spends between 8 and 10 hours a month on their assigned case.  It has been shown that chidlren who have a CASA are more likely to be in safe, permanent homes, and have better opportunities for success later in life.  If you think CASA might be the organization that you would fit into, please don't hesitate.  Their are hundreds of children right here in Genesee County that are in need of a CASA.

Please contact Tara Pariso at (585) 344-2550 x 2331 or [email protected] for more information and application.

This program is supported by the NYS Office of Children and Family Services through the Genesee County Youth Bureau

 

 

September 7, 2009 - 5:21pm
posted by Session Placeholder in people, Home, Local Businesses.

How far would you travel for a great meal? Five miles? 25 miles? How about 100 miles? Well that’s the premise behind the 100-mile diet.

Across the country, people are dedicating themselves to a healthier, more sustainable way of eating. If you haven’t heard of it yet…get ready…the “Locavore” movement is here and some culinary pundits think it’s here to stay.

Eating locally grown food is not only good for you, it’s good for our environment too.

Purchasing homegrown produce cuts down on “food miles,” or the distance food has to travel from farm to processing site to market, positively impacting our foods’ carbon footprint. A tomato grown in Southern California has to travel about 2,500 miles before it reaches a grocery store in Batavia. By contrast, researchers at Iowa State University found that locally grown produce travels an average of 56 miles from farm to market resulting in fresher, more nutritious choices for us and for our families.

Surprisingly, a whopping 40% of our fruit is produced overseas then hauled in freighter ships or flown across the ocean before it reaches American tables.

Buying local allows you to enjoy fruits and vegetables at their peak of freshness and flavor. There’s a reason why asparagus is at its tender-best in spring, and why blueberries are so tasty in July.

Visit a farmers market and develop a relationship with a local grower; most farmers are thrilled to share their knowledge and experience with their customers. Ask about the challenges your local farmers face and what they’re doing to address them. Ask about the weather! Any farmer will be pleased to talk about how the growing season is going and how that affects the food they grow. Get answers to questions like: When are strawberries in season? How might I use kohlrabi? What should I do with all this zucchini?

If you’re still not convinced that a Locavore lifestyle is for you …consider this: in a recent survey conducted by CNNMoney.com, 69% of respondents said that it is important to keep food dollars in their communities by buying from a farmer’s market. Buying direct from a farmer sends 90% of those food dollars back to the farm. However, although Americans spend more than $600 billion in food annually, it is most often spent at a grocery store or chain (think Super Wal-Mart, etc.) - with only about 7% of local food dollars staying in the community. The remaining 93% of the modern food dollar travels to pay processors, packagers, distributors, wholesalers, truckers and the rest of the infrastructure that a global food system demands.

More food dollars staying in the community, through buying local, translates into thriving Main Streets and local jobs. It means that more money can be spent locally by the farmer to run his/her business and home, helping to keep the local economy alive. Eating locally grown food raised by farmers who actually live in their communities. What’s not to love about that?

Note: Patricia Hawley is the market manager of the Genesee Country Farmer’s Market. The Market is open on Tuesdays & Fridays from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the Batavia Downs parking lot (through October 30).

Lets Be A Voice

Becoming a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) advocate can make the difference in the life of a abused or neglected child.  Don't be afraid to stand up for change and for what is best for a child, they need you to be their strength. 

To learn more about CASA and for volunteer advocate application please contact Tara Pariso @ [email protected] or (585) 344-2550 EXT. 2331

July 29, 2009 - 3:56pm
posted by Patricia Hawley in Announcements, people, Home.

The Genesee Country Farmer’s Market is pleased to announce the winners of its weekly drawings:
Winner of the $50.00 Oliver’s Candies Gift Card – Nick Dillabough, Newfane, NY
Winner of the Farmer’s Market Bag o’Produce – Bernard Hoerbelt, Batavia, NY

Vendors at the market contribute produce from their stand each week throughout the season. Items are placed in a large, reusable tote bag. To sign up, visit the EBT/Food Stamp table at the Genesee Country Farmer’s Market on Tuesday and/or Friday from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.    
 

July 2, 2009 - 4:16pm
posted by Patricia Hawley in Announcements, people, Home.

Basket donations are being sought for the Andrew McLaughlin Benefit, a fundraising event to benefit Andrew McLaughlin, who is currently undergoing treatment for non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Andrew is scheduled to undergo a bone marrow transplant in August. The benefit will be held at Pearl Street Grill & Brewery, 76 Pearl St., Buffalo, NY on August 20 from 6 p.m. – 9p.m. $20 donation includes a Chinese auction, music, & snacks. Andrew is the son-in-law of Jeff and Carol Boshart, owners of Boshart Enterprises & Aircraft Services, Inc. located in the town of Batavia.  To donate an item, or for more information about this event, contact Carol Boshart at 585 344-1749 or [email protected]  or Susie Boyce [email protected]

June 12, 2009 - 7:36am
posted by Joseph Langen in writing, people, website.

 

 Meeting the Neighbors

(Meeting the Neighbors)

JOE: Good morning Calliope.
CALLIOPE: Good morning Joe. How are you today?
JOE: Relieved?
CALLIOPE: On what account?
JOE: My new website design is completed and apparently functioning normally although I will do some more testing yesterday.
CALLIOPE: Did you spend your whole day at it again?
JOE: Not entirely. Our neighbors suffered the loss of a family member. Carol baked some brownies and I took them over.
CALLIOPE: Did you know the neighbors?
JOE: Just a nodding acquaintance. I had never had a conversation with them.
CALLIOPE: And yesterday?
JOE: They invited me to sit with them on their veranda and we spent quite a bit of pleasant time together.
CALLIOPE: Was there a lesson there for you?
JOE: Yes. I realized that the whole point of working on my website was to communicate with people. I became lost in the technology for a while and lost sight of the purpose.
CALLIOPE: Good realization.
JOE: I think so. Talk with you tomorrow.

 

 

 

July 12, 2008 - 8:47am
posted by Joseph Langen in writing, observation, people.

JOE: Good morning Calliope.
CALLIOPE: Good morning Joe. How are you today.
JOE: So far, so good. Carol and I had a delightful breakfast and are ready for the day's events.
CALLIOPE: Which are?
JOE: Her first gig in a parade as Fuzzy the Clown. She's a little concerned about the predicted heat but we have water planned along the way just in case.
CALLIOPE: What else?
JOE: Pat and Dick invited us to their pool later to refresh ourselves after the parade.
CALLIOPE: Any literary adventures planned today.
JOE: Not particularly. I don't think I'll have time for any formal activities. I plan to take my camera to the parade to see if I can spot any characters or incidents worthy of note for future reference. That's about it.
CALLIOPE: So, a little break from writing?
JOE: Indeed. I think it helps every once in a while to step back and look around to see what is happening. I noted several unusual characters at concerts the past two nights. Unfortunately I forgot my camera last night to record the most unusual.
CALLIOPE: What do you mean by unusual?
JOE: Very strange body types as if a person were constructed by committee using spare parts. Also combinations of clothing left over from the show, What Not to Wear.
CALLIOPE: What do you plan to do with these observations?
JOE: I would like to use them as characters in my short stories and perhaps as minor characters in my novels. Time to start observing again. Talk with you on Monday.
(Oatka Festival Parade- Leroy, NY)

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