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Vinyl Record Revival

September 11, 2016 - 3:20pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Vinyl Record Revival, GSO, music, entertaiment, batavia, news, Asteria Quartet.

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The Genesee Symphony Orchestra hosted a special performance in Batavia Saturday night at Vinyl Record Revival of the Asteria Quartet.

The quartet includes Shade Zajac, the GSO's new conductor and musical director, along with Evie Boughton on the viola, Kiram Rajamani and Leah McCarthy on violin.

The quartet performed Mozart’s 8th Quartet K. 168, Stostakovich’s 8th Quartet, and Zajac’s own composition, “Willard.”

Between each piece, the members took questions from the audiences about the pieces, the performance and the history of the music.

The evening including a wine tasting hosted by Chris Crocker, owner of the YNGodess Shop.

September 1, 2016 - 11:13am
posted by Genesee Chamber... in Vinyl Record Revival, genesee.

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The advent of digital music has had a rough effect on record stores the past 10-15 years. For music lovers, it was always pure joy to cruise the aisles of their local record store getting lost in exploring music. Once music became available to purchase with a few clicks on the computer mouse or from a phone, record stores started to disappear. Thankfully for many music enthusiasts, the trend has subsided with vinyl record stores making a comeback.

Vinyl Record Revival, 220 East Main Street in Batavia, NY is leading the resurgence locally with a wonderful record store. Owner Rich Mistretta has turned his hobby into a business a few months ago with a nice storefront in downtown. The store is filled with sections of new and used record albums to peruse. The large Beatles mural in the store signifies that the owner’s favorite band are well represented here. There are a few turntables available that can be used as listening stations for customers to check out the albums.

Many music lovers are not fond of the compressed sound of CDs or MP3s and are returning to purchasing vinyl for it’s superior sound qualities. It’s a trend that started gaining momentum a decade ago. All of today’s major artists release vinyl albums – therefore you might see a Taylor Swift or Justin Timberlake album next to some vintage Rolling Stones or Blondie.

While records is the focus of the shop, there are also used CDs, DVDs, books, and much more. Vinyl Record Revival also has used turntable and stereo equipment available for sale. If you enjoy good music and the freedom of moving about a record store this is your place.

Vinyl Record Revival is open Tuesday through Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturdays 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Visit www.VisitGeneseeNY.com to learn more...

April 29, 2016 - 4:47pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Vinyl Record Revival, business, batavia, downtown, news.

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The sale of vinyl records has reached its highest level in 28 years and Batavia resident Richard Mistretta is betting that trend continues.

His own research and experience tells him vinyl, once considered a relic of history, has achieved its own kind of staying power.

"Last year, I first had a thought of opening a brick and mortar store," Mistretta said. "I wasn't sure what I'd be selling, but I started selling online and I noticed albums were selling well. I was selling a lot of vinyl, so with my online business, I switched over to exclusively selling vinyl and the sales numbers continued to go up."

Tomorrow he opens Vinyl Record Revival at 220 E. Main St., Batavia.

He's spent the past couple of weeks building bins for records, CDs, reel-to-reel, and he even has a couple of boxes of 8-track tapes, but vinyl is clearly where the action is. It attracts collectors of all ages these days.

"The big age group right now is young people, teenagers are getting into it," Mistretta said. "I've been hearing about it from a lot of people. They find it fascinating. They find it is something interesting to collect, and, also, the sound is different. That's the big thing, but, also, it's tangible. You can hold it, you can look at it, the artwork; it's easy to read. When something is digital, you don't get all that."

Clearly, vinyl records can't beat digital, especially in the age of cloud storage and streaming services, for convenience, but beside of the tactile and aesthetic appeal, most connoisseurs tip in favor of vinyl for the superior audio performance of analog, which doesn't suffer from the loss of dynamic range found in compressed sound files.

It might be surprising, but as Mistretta noted, when teenagers take an interest in The Beatles, they seek out vinyl, some becoming die-hard collectors.

That works out well for Mistretta, who is a lifelong fan of The Beatles and is stocking a full range of Beatles records, books and memorabilia. 

But the Beatles aren't the only hot seller from previous generations. There's also The Who, Queen, the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin, and, Mistretta noted, even before he died, he couldn't keep Prince in stock. When he put Prince records up for sale online, they would often be gone within hours.

Record stores in WNY are now few and far between, so he's hoping to draw clientele from throughout the GLOW region as well as Rochester and Buffalo. One of his goals is to get to know his customers, know what they're looking for and work with his wholesalers to find it for them.

Mistretta is 60 and recently retired after 20 years at the University of Rochester. He lived in Rochester when he met his wife, Michelle, and fell in love with her and fell in love with her hometown, Batavia. He's lived here for three years.

When he decided vinyl would be the speciality of his retail store, he started buying boxes and boxes of records, including one large collection from a seller in Pennsylvania. He said he's found some real gems among these big collections.

"The poor UPS drivers," he said. "Those poor delivery people probably have sore backs from carrying in boxes."

He's found the type of customers range from young to old, from those looking for just specific artists, to those who buy everything in a genre and those who are more interested in album covers or just exploring.

He has set up several listening stations in the store so customers can sample before they buy.

Right now, the store is strictly used records, tapes and CDs, but with most top current recording artists releasing their albums on vinyl again, he is hoping to find the right distributor so he can carry new inventory as well.

He also sees a need to supply area audiophiles with turntables, receivers and speakers.

"Manufacturers are starting to get back into making a nice receiver, making a nice phonograph and the big speakers, because everything did switch over to something that was more portable," Mistretta said.

Store hours will be from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. He's not settled yet on what his Saturday hours will be, but he will be closed Sundays and Mondays.

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