Local Matters

Recent comments

Community Sponsors

October 20, 2008 - 7:09pm

D&C: Batavia home divided over politics

posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, politics.

The Democrat & Chronicle writes about The Clarks, of Batavia -- a home divided by the presidential race.

That's where they hatched the plan to bisect the exterior of their home with yellow caution tape from the tippy-top of the third story, through the flower bed across the lawn and to the sidewalk. On the right side of the tape is a blue-and-white sign showing support for Clark's preferred Presidential candidate: Republican John McCain. On the left side, Lexi and Katherine's pick: Democrat Barack Obama.

"Lexi is very interested in politics this year and as a parent when you see your child express an interest in something you try to expose them to more and more of it," said Clark, a driver for Golden State Foods in Rochester. He wants to encourage Lexi's interest in politics, just as he does Woody's interest in aerospace and Katherine's interest in art.

Who can argue with a parent encouraging his children to stretch their own wings? It's great that he respects his children's' choices on these issues.

But, what caught my eye was that his reasons for supporting McCain are rather spurious.

"My biggest worry as a parent is taxes," said Clark, who shares custody of his three children with ex-wife Patti Burey of Batavia. "And as a parent raising three children, I want to make sure the future is bright for them and make sure they are well off."

McCain's temperament, experience and demeanor make him the best pick for the White House, he said.

McCain "will bring great leadership to Washington," Clark said. And, he said, McCain's conservative credentials mean he's the one who will slash spending, cut taxes and put America back on solid footing again.

Taxes? As the debate over "Not-Joe Not-The Plumber" the past few days has made clear, Obama's tax plan clearly favors people like Mr. Clark far more than McCain's.

McCain's temperament? The man known for his fits of pique and floor stomping displays of rage?  Did you watch the third debate, Mr. Clark?

Conservative? McCain thinks the government should solve problems, not get out the way.  There's very little about McCain's world view -- such as it is -- that is conservative.  He's just another Big Government Republican, more interested in Empire and Plutocracy than caring about your kids.

Not that Obama is any better -- he's not. But those are thee pretty bad reasons to support John McCain. 

And neither man will be able to do much of what they say they'll do, not with $10 trillion in debt, Iraq sucking another $10 billion out of the Treasury each month, Bin Laden still uncaught, a financial system in apparent chaos, energy concerns and rising unemployment.  The pie-in-the-sky promises of either McCain or Obama will be forgotten by Jan. 21.

But let's end on a positive note:

Once the election is over, however, the family plans to heal their partisan divide.

"All of our arguments are all in good fun and whoever wins the election will have the full support of everyone in this house," said Mark Clark. "We're planning on putting out new signs then."

lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
This is cute and all but my comment will be on why would 7th graders be worried about the economy? 7th graders are not worried about the economy maybe 7th graders hear mom and dad talking about the economy Or maybe reporters on news broadcasts Or teachers Maybe they're worried about clothing, gifts and allowances But 7th graders don't have any reason to worry not ones not on the brink of homelessness/starvation anyways sooooooo makes me suspicious Are 7th graders worried about this stuff or is it just a game Are adults worried about this stuff or is it really just a big game
Timothy Paine
Timothy Paine's picture
Offline
Last seen: 10 years 5 months ago
Joined: May 14 2008 - 3:03am
I too have a yard that is split down the middle. I being a Democrat and my wife a registered Conservative. I'm glad to see when parents include their children in political discussions. My kids are always involved with it at the dinner table and are offered, obviously, multiple views on all subjects. All our friends and family get a kick out of our situation and get big laughs when they pass our house. The thing I try to explain to people is my wife and I discuss politics in our house, we don't try to impose them. My wife and I have never had an argument over politics even though they've been a daily source of topic for 16 years. My kids know that they can follow whatever path they choose with full support from both of us. They've learned that politics is a subject to debate and not to sprout hate. I did, however, find it funny that our front yard became an interest of the Chris Lee campaign. This weekend I attended a Cubscout event with my son and spent a few hours with someone who claimed to be working for Lee's campaign. He claimed he took my picture at the Republican headquarters. Ironically, I was picking up a Lee sign for my wife. This information was given to a Republican Council member (I don't even need to say his name), who then tried to make an issue of it with my party. "How can you guys let him be on comittee when he's been seen at our headquarters and also he shook hands with Joe Gerace at the last Council meeting?" Joe Gerace is a good guy and a devoted community volunteer. I'll always shake the hand of a man who's done what he's done for Batavia. I've never let politics get in the way of being a decent and polite person. Of course this attempt at trying to cause any controversy for me was laughed at by my party and friends. However, this did cause my wife to ask me to remove the Lee sign from our yard. "Any one who would try and hurt my husband over politics is a small, small man and doesn't get my support." A picture may be worth a thousand words, but in this case it may cost a vote.
Howard B. Owens
Howard B. Owens's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 3 hours ago
Joined: Apr 23 2008 - 3:05pm
Tim, your last story illustrates beautifully what I think is wrong with our current party system -- too many people put party over all other considerations, be they friendship, neighborliness, or doing what is right for the people of a community, district or state. Nothing is wrong with party membership, and even pride and identification with that party, of course, but until we can make partisanship a secondary concern, and worry less about which party wins or loses, we'll never really be able to tackle the major issues facing our region, our state or our country. IMHO.
Timothy Paine
Timothy Paine's picture
Offline
Last seen: 10 years 5 months ago
Joined: May 14 2008 - 3:03am
In my 26 years as a registered voter (24 as a Cons. and 2 as a Dem.) I've never let politics dictate a relationship within my family (compromised of R's,D's,I's and a Libertarian). I would never let it affect a friendship. Political parties should never cloud descisions or choices. Politics is about the person, not the party. I find it hard to believe Laz's parents had no affect on his adult values or views. I feel that we are a product of what we learned growing up. I feel to think otherwise is foolish. When I was 12 the economy was a big subject in our house. We weren't poor, we just had no money. Involving your kids in finances at an early age will only prove to be extremely helpful in their future. Not teaching them is irresponsible.
Charlie Mallow
Charlie Mallow's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 years 5 months ago
Joined: Apr 28 2008 - 9:05pm
Kids listen to what their parents talk about and are very observant. They might not agree with the conclusion but, their opinions are shaped by the information they overhear. Sometimes people are reluctant to tell a strange pollster what they are going to do but, their children live it every day and know. That’s why kids are such a good indicator of what their parents do in an upcoming election. The Scholastic poll hasn’t been wrong in 50 years. http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3750501
Patrick Weissend
Patrick Weissend's picture
Offline
Last seen: 9 years 3 months ago
Joined: May 23 2008 - 12:06am
The first thing I learned in my first political science class was that most first time voters (especially 18 year olds) register in the same party that their parents are registered in. My parents belonged to the same party, so I didn’t live in a “house divided.” I remember turning 18 and bringing home my voter registration card. The first thing my father said was, “make sure you register as a xxxx.” (I’ll leave you to wonder what party it was!)
Bea McManis
Bea McManis's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 1 month ago
Joined: Jul 12 2008 - 12:02pm
Dyed in the wool Democrat and have, at least, one child who is a dyed in the wool Conservative (where did I go wrong???) All kidding aside, each of the five were told to decide for themselves, with no pushing from Mom. It is a personal choice and not one that should be foisted upon a newly registered voter. What is important is to instill the belief that voting is a civic duty and not one to be taken lightly. When we vote, we exercise that civic duty and also validate our right to discuss and criticize whomever is in office and their performance.
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
I find it hard to believe Laz's parents had no affect on his adult values or views. I feel that we are a product of what we learned growing up. I feel to think otherwise is foolish. ? Children learn by imitation problems arise when people begin believing that toddlers are exceptional because they can imitate If the Scholastic poll thing is correct it supports my beliefs "Not only does [voting in the] poll give kids the experience they will need to vote in the future, but it allows them to have input on who should be the next President of the United States," she said. "It gives kids a voice" writing a name on a piece of paper is voter experience? A voice? Whose is it again? What I'm saying is that it's -7th graders feigned preoccupation with .. is not real Racism is not REAL It's a game people play If grown people play racism I'm inclined to believe grown people play politics racism does not exist unless the racist never outgrows what they've been taught It's at least 85% the same game only different words and a suit
Timothy Paine
Timothy Paine's picture
Offline
Last seen: 10 years 5 months ago
Joined: May 14 2008 - 3:03am
Laz, all I have to say is......HUH?????
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
I find it hard to believe Laz's parents had no affect on his adult values or views. I feel that we are a product of what we learned growing up. I feel to think otherwise is foolish. I said nothing of the sort I pretty much said this myself -regarding the "product of what we see/hear/learn etc The kid reporter who says it's valuable experience or whatever seems to be forgeting the most important aspect of voting filling in a name doesn't mean anything writing down what your mom and dad tell you to is not "experience" regardless of whether you know why they ell you to choosewhomever they tell you to choose The kids -those "worrying" are fake Kids can ask questions about why parents worry but to believe that they're actually the ones worrying? That's fake Because mom stubs her toe doesn't mean you hurt Racism is fake Racism is not real There is no basis for it ..or race in general for that matter Racism is so retarded the only way it can exist is if it's a "game" Racism does not last long if one makes his own judments of people Racism exists because people -those that are racist- don't work hard enough to learn why such beliefs are dumb If racism exists I'm inclined to believe that these sorts of "games" are everywhere in our society We know fakery is ever-present raise your hand if you are not prejudiced 92+% These are just games sport has the Olympics government has the Polimpics citizens get participation ribbons and nothing ever actually changes ..except someones bank-account ..and not likely yours, either
Timothy Paine
Timothy Paine's picture
Offline
Last seen: 10 years 5 months ago
Joined: May 14 2008 - 3:03am
Laz, only you could connect kids involved in family politics to racism. That's where the "Huh?" came from. How can a 7th grader doing a report jump to racism? I read your posting and I can see how even you connect the dots. Apparently one of your large breaks should have contained more info.
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
large breaks are needed because if filled those breaks in the post would be a novel and take years to write well enough I'm more interested in just keeping the ideas out there I'm not the only one with these kinds of ideas and maybe it is too bad I'm not interested in writing books but then again These books are already out there More important to keep the books afloat than to add to the crap sinking to the bottom This does leave you the responsibility of Trying to understand by filling in the breaks yourself ..whether tonight or over years Maybe it will take a lot of thought on your part Maybe there wont be any payoff in the end for you It comes down to trying to understand or not caring enough, IMO
John Roach
John Roach's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: May 29 2008 - 5:22am
Tim, For Laz to say racism is not real showed a level of stupidity not seen here before, and it says even more about him than we all thought before. He must live in a bubble. Of course racism is real and of course many times kids learn it from parents. Of course, with Laz and his inability to write and defend an idea, who knws what he was trying to say? "HUH" is an understatement. His large page breaks are just away of trying to get the attention he graves.
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
I said racism exists but is not real I said kids don't learn it from their parents many times they learn it from parents all the time If kids grow up and don't change all that much in terms of their treatment of others ... I guess you're just the smartest person here why would you even bother pointing out my stupidity if it's that blatant? Wouldn't anyone smarter pick up on it? You said "..never seen here before" soooo everyone else is smarter Seems to me your comment is a huge waste of time then I'm not sure intelligent people would view the wasting of time to be a productive use of intelligence so just how intelligent can you be "it says even more about him than we all thought before" and what would that be, John? I'll be waiting ...and waiting and waiting
John Roach
John Roach's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: May 29 2008 - 5:22am
As another person stated here once, "HUH?" Are you trying to make a point? If so, try again.
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
Ever going to try answering a question, John? I answer yours which point wasn't made? You don't make it clear probably just your way of tying me up till you can unjustifiably "yawn" like your buddy Ron at my going over and over the same thing How many people are racist How many are prejudiced How many have learned this from their parents How many learn politics from their parents How many learn religion from their parents How many people really change? When you're faking by 7th grade you're pretty much setting the tone for the rest of your life How many people change in any meaningful and selfless way? 15% 8% ? You think ALL these people make their way into the positions that help shape the country Or is it likely that many shaping the country are those that have not changed and thus will do everything they can to keep it -the country- FROM changing for the better It's at a point now where most of this "stuff" is a game One side cannot play all their cards because they'll be found out you get give and take give a little retain your position take what you can take when nobody is watching give a little back when someone does
John Roach
John Roach's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: May 29 2008 - 5:22am
On October 22nd, you said racism is not real. Then, as usual, you failed to state how you came up with that gem of wisdom in a manner that could be taken seriously. I pointed out you don’t know what your talking about and you come back with silly page breaks, talk about writing a book, etc. Nobody can follow your thoughts, if there are any. Your questions show a limited ability to carry your point. You might research the net or government statics on percentages who will admit racism to anyone but close friends. Ever hear of the “Bradley effect”. It has been talked about a lot in this election. Except in your world where you say it is not real, most racism now is low key and in remarks among small groups. The colored only schools and water fountains are gone. True, there are groups like the KKK, Nation of Islam (the old Black Muslims), Skin Heads, Aryan Nation and others are still around, not that you seem to know. One US Senator, Robert Byrd, from West Virginia, was a member of the KKK and still gets caught saying racist things. Jesse Jackson’s racism against Jews is well documented to anyone who goes to the web. My point is also that you have no clue if you don’t think racism is learned at home many times. Most kids have no idea why they don’t like others, they just know they do. And most seem to outgrow it when they get older, go to work and meet people. Many do not. Your reference to a card game, “huh”? More nonsense. You really don’t answer questions; you do your regular “laz”. In fact, maybe I should call sill, useless page breaks a “laz” from now on.
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
My point wasn't so much that racism is not real -I figured I wouldn't even need to make the argument- Racism was mentioned because it shows just hot often people DO NOT change ..FROM WHAT THEIR PARENTS TAUGHT THEM I said Kids learn racism and hate FROM PARENTS ALONE Why should I believe that a 7th grader will change so dramatically "politically" -not that this is ALL about politics- when a kid learned of racism is extremely unlikely to most racism now is low key and in remarks among small groups. The colored only schools and water fountains are gone Good Why don't you answer my question of whether you're racist and/or prejudiced? I think I already know the answer but maybe you can "proove" me wrong just don't forget your proof My point here is that 75% -or very likely much higher than that- will say they are not prejudiced They emphatically ARE NOT racist the other 30% or whatever doesn't even want to answer and a small %age will be honest of themselves and admit to it Obviously a lot of lying "social desirability bias" I did not previously know the term social desirability bias But we all know what it means I did not know of the "bradley effect" to be able to tell you what it spoke of But I don't really learn keywords Keywords just save time by not having to spell out but I have no problem in spelling out I think too often people know keywords and NOT what is underneath It becomes a handy-dandy tool to prove intelligence. All you need to know in order to sound smart is a single word as opposed to meaning I made a distinction Racism is not real Racism DOES exist I'd search it and link you to people who have put it in words you'd still probably not try to understand as I had done regarding religion We see where that gets one Deny Deny Deny I could have linked to Billy Graham -not that he's jesus- but he sure as hell is more knowledgeable than most folks on the issue and since millions listen to him you'd think many people would be OK in calling him an expert or authority Deny Deny Deny FAKERY clueless as to what "playing all your cards" means Fakery "play your cards right and you may just get lucky" WTF does poker have to do with me getting laid? lol FAKERY You make examples of Robert Byrd and Jesse Jackson as though you can't make an example of anyone you know personally socially I ask questions more often than I give answers I think thats more important
John Roach
John Roach's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: May 29 2008 - 5:22am
The problem is nobody can follow you. What is your point? On top of that, you ask the question of am I a racist and for proof one way or the other. “Huh”. How would any “prove” anything on a blog? Are you for real or just silly? I you probably thought you were posing some deep questions into the mind of man. Problem is you don’t know how to make a statement, follow through with it to make you case and then resort to your distorted page breaks. Hard to take you seriously. As for examples of people I know, what good would that do? The odds of you knowing them, or most people on this blog knowing them, are slim, so that would not be valid. For that matter, using your thought process, I could just make up a name and you would not know it. That is why I used Sen. Byrd and Mr. Jackson. The odds are in my favor people have heard of them and their racist statements can be checked on the web easily.
lazario Ladou
lazario Ladou's picture
Offline
Last seen: 13 years 5 months ago
Joined: Aug 20 2008 - 5:52am
I put it out there for people to think about People have written books and books on those books and yet people are still writing the same books Proof of how racism isn't real and yet can still exist? Like that doesn't need a hundred pages for you to even begin giving it the time of day Why not not write the book and just float it out there since the book isn't changing any (many) minds anyway It's not the book nor the "proof" within it that changes minds It's your acceptance of the possibility that leads to the searching for proof and the acceptance of that proof is you changing First you have to accept "it's" possible before proof will do anything for you A person wanting truth would pour over both sides weighing them A single book is almost always biased so you'd likely have to read a number of books Why not just float it out there so that a person can go get a book or two already published If we all have to give proof for everything we say where does it end? How do we trust or believe ANYTHING we hear when what we mostly hear is mere sound bites? I do agree that proof for everything would make the world better but our life is not built around proof as much as it is perception I give my perceptions and try to make a case Even when I have given "evidence" to be taken into account -not necessarily "proof" of truth- I get YAWNS What you want me to show you, I believe, is that my ideas are worth listening to and I don't help myself ANY by giving only my thoughts I need to not only actually, MY thoughts are essentially worthless to you You want other people with the same thoughts to give you evidence //that my thoughts may have something to them - you don't care about what I say at all really you care about what "other" people have to say.. In other words you'll likely never Truly care about what "I" (a singular person) has to say Then you need proof that they themselves know anything You need them to be known by others knowing something and those others known by others knowing something I just learned these keyword terms "social proof" "informational social influence" or Peer Pressure, if you ask me Since I face a huge uphill battle in attempting to do that maybe I'm just as well off merely floating it out there like an advertisment for you to "click on" **I just noticed "prove" in my mind THANKS for pointing that out to me. A simple mistake As soon as I "noticed" it I knew to look back to see if I had misspelled it figured it was something you'd make a big deal over Next time instead of the "" why not just HEY IDIOT YOU SPELLED THIS INCORRECTLY You made some mistakes here, too. As for what good it would do to highlight a friends -or yours- discriminatory sayings/beliefs etc It makes it real to people ..average, common man. Why do wish to keep racism and all those hateful things AS FAR AWAY FROM YOU AS POSSIBLE? Maybe trying to hide something? Something that if nothing else might make you LOOK guilty by association? Social Proof and it's relatives once again rears its head ...possibly I nor you know Jesse Jackson personally You -a person- DO KNOW people you're social with well enough to KNOW whether they're truly ____ or not That's better "proof" than one, couple or handful of remarks that could have been taken wrongly whether "on the net" or not Whatever happened to Don't believe everything you read?
John Roach
John Roach's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: May 29 2008 - 5:22am
I was with you on your first paragraph, even the 2nd and 3rd ones. Good points. Then back to “Huh” and silly page breaks Here is a simple question, like you asked me, “Are you, Laz, a racist?” Yes or No? Can you proof it one way or the other? How would you do that on a blog? Would anybody really care if you are or not? Since the majority of us do not know you personally, how could we take what you say as either evidence or proof? That’s why I used those examples that can be easily verified.

Post new comment

Log in or register to post comments

Copyright © 2008-2022 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
 

blue button

News Break