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Chris Barons

September 3, 2010 - 12:59pm
posted by Billie Owens in politics, Chris Barons, taxation.

Here's a news release sent in today from Democrat Chris Barons, a candidate for state Assembly in the 39th District.

The cost of local government and schools is the fastest growing taxpayer burden. That burden is magnified by basing local taxes on real property value. Property tax is unfair and punitive. It establishes a recurring, non-transactional fee on ownership.

Taxes should be a measure of prosperity. Property ownership is an investment not a benchmark of prosperity. Only 54.4 percent of New Yorkers own homes. Property taxes contribute to neighborhood blight when property owners opt against upkeep to avoid increasing taxable value.

In our fragile economic climate, with as many as 17.5 percent unemployed, millions laid-off, and New York leading the nation in first-time unemployment claims, local governments cannot ignore the fact: property taxes do not adjust for fixed or reduced incomes.

My solution to New York’s tax burden is to scrap property taxes AND sales tax. Replace both with a 4 percent residential flat tax and 3.8 percent Value Added Tax (VAT) for business.

With a state GSP of $1,144,481,000,000 and personal income at $828,443,000,000, the net result would be over $74 billion in tax revenue.

With renters direct-paying local taxes, rent bills that include the cost of property tax must be adjusted. To encourage landlords to reduce rent bills, a Rent Adjustment Credit for landlords who lower rent in lieu of property tax will be built into Form IT-214, Claim for Real Property Tax Credit for Homeowners and Renters.

Value Added Tax is misunderstood by many. Essentially it taxes profits on products or services.

Example: a sump pump company buys castings at $5 apiece, tools and assembles them as a sump pump at a cost of $15. The finished pump is sold to a retailer for $40. The value added is $20, which is taxable. The retailer sells the pump to a customer for $80. The value added is $40, which is taxable.

In the case of service providers, the cost of sending a cleaner to a business for eight hours is $60. The cleaning company charges the business $75. The value added is $15, which is taxable.

For financial institutions, the banks pay a VAT on disposal of mortgaged securities, investment and financial services.

The elimination of property-based taxation would especially benefit farmers -- for whom land ownership is a critical investment.

Besides alleviating the unfair burden placed upon taxpayers, eliminating property taxes would jettison the bureaucracy necessary to administer it. A 4 percent residential tax and 3.8 percent commercial VAT would also generate sufficient revenue to accelerate satisfaction of New York State’s overwhelming debt.

September 3, 2010 - 6:39am
posted by C. M. Barons in New York state, Chris Barons, Tax Reform.

The cost of local government and schools is the fastest growing taxpayer burden.  That burden is magnified by basing local taxes on real property value.  Property tax is unfair and punitive.  It establishes a recurring, non-transactional fee on ownership.  Taxes should be a measure of prosperity.  Property ownership is an investment not a benchmark of prosperity.  Only 54.4% of New Yorkers own homes.  Property taxes contribute to neighborhood blight when property owners opt against upkeep to avoid increasing taxable value. 

 

In our fragile economic climate with as many as 17.5% unemployed, millions laid-off and New York leading the nation in first-time unemployment claims, local governments cannot ignore the fact: property taxes do not adjust for fixed or reduced incomes. 

 

My solution to New York’s tax burden is to scrap property taxes AND sales tax.  Replace both with a 4% residential flat tax and 3.8% Value Added Tax (VAT) for business.  With a state GSP of $1,144,481,000,000 and personal income at $828,443,000,000, the net result would be over $74 billion in tax revenue.  With renters direct-paying local taxes, rent bills that include the cost of property tax must be adjusted.  To encourage landlords to reduce rent bills, a Rent Adjustment Credit for landlords who lower rent in lieu of property tax will be built into Form IT-214, Claim for Real Property Tax Credit for Homeowners and Renters.

 

Value Added Tax is misunderstood by many.  Essentially it taxes profits on products or services.   Example: a sump pump company buys castings at $5.00 apiece, tools and assembles them as a sump pump at a cost of $15.00.  The finished pump is sold to a retailer for $40.00.  The value added is $20.00 which is taxable.  The retailer sells the pump to a customer for $80.00.  The value added is $40.00 which is taxable.  In the case of service providers, the cost of sending a cleaner to a business for 8 hours is $60.00.  The cleaning company charges the business $75.00.  The value added is $15.00 which is taxable.  For financial institutions, the banks pay a VAT on disposal of mortgaged securities, investment and financial services.

 

The elimination of property based taxation would benefit especially farmers- for whom land ownership is a critical investment.   Besides alleviating the unfair burden placed upon taxpayers, eliminating property taxes would jettison the bureaucracy necessary to administer it.  A 4% residential tax and 3.8% commercial VAT would also generate sufficient revenue to accelerate satisfaction of New York State’s overwhelming debt.

August 6, 2010 - 11:28am
posted by Billie Owens in veterans, Chris Barons.

Here's a news release from Chris Barons, Democratic candidate for the 139th Assembly District.

The Returning Vet: A Tale of Two EAPs

Our state prepares to welcome home tens-of-thousands of military personnel who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Once the joy of reunion has subsided, our vets will be challenged to reintegrate into the civilian world.

Aside from the dramatic change in duty, our vets return to a highly competitive, repressed job market. Even for those with awaiting jobs, the transition to civilian life promises the strain of adaptive decision-making.

As a gloss, one might presume that veteran transitioning responsibility resides with the federal government. Limited to chronic needs and benefit administration, the Department of Veterans Affairs is the go-to agency.

However, transitioning thousands of returning veterans into an economically depressed setting demands a well-thought-out, comprehensive plan.

New York State has a highly developed Employee Assistance Program that offers a wide, a la carte array of services to participants. The public EAP program draws on public agencies to offer comprehensive support services to public employees. Private businesses typically contract EAP programs through private agencies and insurance carriers.

Their programs are Return On Investment (ROI) modeled and tend toward short-term interventions aimed at improving job performance and lowering absenteeism. Private focus is on the top three performance issues: stress, substance abuse and interpersonal relationships.

New York’s public EAPs offer participants long-term counseling and intervention opportunities. They are publicly funded and draw on public resources, though they serve the public employee workforce. The state EAPs also network with public agencies to provide accessible and diverse services.

Our returning vets will require specialized attention to successfully merge into civilian life. New York State has the existing agencies and networks to assist in that transition.

Now is the time to prepare for embracing our service men and women -- to have a mechanism in place for reintegrating them into our ranks. They have earned a proactive effort on their behalf. Adding our returning military personnel to the list of eligible NYS Employee Assistance Program service recipients is practical and deserved.

August 3, 2010 - 6:57pm
posted by C. M. Barons in Chris Barons, New York Veterans.

 

 The Returning Vet: A Tale of Two EAPs
 
Our state prepares to welcome home tens-of-thousands of military personnel who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan- once the joy of reunion has subsided, our vets will be challenged to reintegrate into the civilian world. Aside from the dramatic change in duty, our vets return to a highly competitive, repressed job market. Even for those with awaiting jobs, the transition to civilian life promises the strain of adaptive decision-making.
 
As a gloss, one might presume that veteran transitioning responsibility resides with the federal government. Limited to chronic needs and benefit administration, the Department of Veterans Affairs is the go-to agency. However, transitioning thousands of returning veterans into an economically depressed setting demands a well-thought-out, comprehensive plan. 
 
New York State has a highly developed Employee Assistance Program that offers a wide, ala carte array of services to its participants. The public EAP program draws on public agencies to offer comprehensive support services to public employees. Private businesses typically contract EAP programs through private agencies and insurance carriers. Their programs are Return On Investment (ROI) modeled and tend toward short term interventions aimed at improving job performance and lowering absenteeism. Private focus is on the top three performance issues: stress, substance abuse and inter-personal relationships. 
 
New York’s public EAPs offer participants long-term counseling and intervention opportunities. They are publicly-funded and draw on public resources, though they serve the public employee workforce. The state EAPs also network public agencies to provide accessible and diverse services.
 
Our returning vets will require specialized attention to successfully merge into civilian life. New York State has the existing agencies and networks to assist in that transition. Now is the time to prepare for embracing our service men and women- to have a mechanism in place for reintegrating them into our ranks. They have earned a proactive effort on their behalf. Adding our returning military personnel to the list of eligible NYS Employee Assistance Program service recipients is practical and deserved.  
July 31, 2010 - 2:08pm
posted by C. M. Barons in New York Budget, Chris Barons.

Share The Blame

Seventeen weeks and no budget in sight: Incumbent 139th Assembly Member Steve Hawley has leveled blame at the Democratic Majority.  He avoided mention that the Republican leadership has all their ducks in a row prepared to scuttle a state budget.  It takes two to tango; only one to stonewall.  The Republican leadership has manufactured a loggerhead, set to block budget passage.

Hawley proclaims, “… instead of doing the job that voters elected them to do, the Legislative majorities instead decided to gavel in and gavel out of session, leaving the budget to wait another week, if not another month.” 

Shy the necessary 32 votes for passage, up against a partisan road block; what choice?

The Republican strategy is not limited to state government; it mirrors the GOP overall strategy. In Washington Senate Republicans, voting as a bloc, mounted a filibuster to derail campaign finance reform. Oddly enough, John McCain who championed reform with his McCain Feingold Act of 2004 voted against cloture, citing, “…opposing this motion (is) very simple – this is clearly a partisan attempt by the majority to gain an advantage in the upcoming election.”   …A familiar ring?

I agree with Mr. Hawley’s closing remark- albeit painted with a wider brush: New York cannot afford this kind of incompetent leadership anymore.  A Quinnipiac University Poll reveals 83% of New Yorkers feel their state government is dysfunctional.  The partisanship has to end.

July 20, 2010 - 4:04pm
posted by Billie Owens in politics, localism, Chris Barons.

Here's a news release sent today from Chris Barons, Democratic candidate for the 139th Assembly District.

Key to restoring New York State’s economic vitality is bolstering opportunities for local products and farm produce in local markets. My program to open up local markets to local producers involves a one-two punch.

The two-part program targets both consumers and retailers -- establishing recognition of locally grown foodstuffs and manufactured goods and providing an incentive for retailers to merchandize local-origin products.

Just as branding has defined merchandizing strategies for apparel, fast food and innumerable high-profile products, "Made in New York" and "Grown in New York" will become state-licensed trademarks.

Minimum criteria would be required to qualify for the brands: Made in New York and Grown in New York. Standards would include in-state labor, local source and origin of components and/or goods. Manufactured products and agricultural produce would have to meet such requirements to be labeled with a New York brand.

In 2002, New York retail sales amounted to $178,067,530,000. Overall, U.S. retailing accounts for 8.1 percent of the GDP (Gross Domestic Product). To encourage retail participation in marketing and the sale of local products, the flip-side of the plan is to institute a Local Enterprise Credit.

This business credit would be based on the ratio of floor space allotted to local-origin products and produce. To maximize opportunities for local producers, the credit would be graduated -- the more floor space allotted to local products, the larger the credit.

The Local Enterprise Credit incentive and New York branding strategies would boost most retail products and commodities.

New York branding would guide consumers toward selecting New York’s products and produce. Thus, the marketplace would connect New York’s consumers and producers in a mutually profitable alliance, restoring New York business to Main Street, New York.

July 14, 2010 - 10:35am
posted by C. M. Barons in Candidate, Chris Barons.

Just as turned stomachs were on the verge of recovering from multi-billion dollar bonuses paid out to investment bank employees on the heels of the federal bailout, we now learn that New York State has its own version of excess in the face of empty cupboard. David Kidera, the director of the Authorities Budget Office, has released a list of off-budget authorities that have awarded $6.7 Million in bonuses despite a $9+ Billion revenue gap.

Kidera describes the list as a glimpse since many active authorities have yet to report their extra pay.

Steven Hyde, president of the Genesee County Industrial Development Agency, was awarded $60,000 beyond his salary of $153,000. Three other agency employees split another $20,500. John Andrews, Board Chairman of the Genesee County IDA described the bonuses as incentive pay and noted that no worker earned a bonus in 2009.

In Erie County, EC Medical Center Corporation, Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority and other local authorities gave just over $5 million in bonuses to their staff in 2009. Overall some 2,100 employees at six area public authorities collected bonus payments with ECMC staffers topping the list at $4.5 million paid to 1,443 staff people.

The Rochester-Genesee Regional Transportation Authority also maintains a performance-pay system. RGRTA paid approximately $209,000 in bonuses to 101 workers last year; the average payment being $2,070. Seven employees received more than $10,000. The largest bonus went to RGRTA chief financial officer, Robert Frye, who received $23,000 on top of a $135,600 salary. Authority CEO Mark Aesch received $33,377 beyond his base pay of $155,000 last year. ECMC spokesman, Tom Quatroche, accounted for much of the extra compensation as back pay earned as part of retroactive union agreements.

The Authorities Budget Office report marks the first time authorities and other quasi-governmental entities have released such disclosures to the public. A 2009 state law intended to rein in the otherwise intangibly complex and under-accounted financial dealings of hundreds of public authorities led to the disclosure. David Kidera, the director of the Authorities Budget Office, noted that his office intends next year to separately list overtime, collective bargaining agreements and bonuses.

Also among the six local authorities reporting, Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority bonuses included a high of $9,017 paid to Executive Director Lawrence M. Meckler, who earned $190,207 in salary.

New York Power Authority, blamed for collapsing a deal that would have brought internet giant Google to Orleans County scheduled last March to pay out $3 Million in bonuses and had requested 12.1% rate hikes over the next two years- a move that was cancelled a year ago.

The Off Budget Public Authorities are a significant factor in New York's out of control budget. These agencies act with little oversight and beyond the scope of the budget process. The borrowing that these agencies engage in has contributed to AT LEAST 40% of current state debt. Although the combined borrowing of these 900 or more agencies is the fastest growing segment of state debt, the quasi-independent nature of these entities not only obscures an accurate accounting of their numbers- their financial practices are cloaked by the same independence.

To truly restore the integrity of state finance, these agencies must be reined in and brought to bear as ON Budget Authorities. They wield the state's credit card, and it is time we deprive them of that luxury.

For a more complete view of bonus recipients:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34126170/Staff-Bonus-Payments

July 4, 2010 - 10:48am
posted by C. M. Barons in budget, debt, new york, Chris Barons.

According to a USDA study, it costs between $124,800 and $249,180 for a dual-parent family (range based on annual family incomes between $39,100 and over $65,000) to raise a child from birth to age 18.  As of 2007, the number of children in an average U. S. Family is 1.86.  27% of U. S. families are single-parented.  Single women, by far the majority of single-parent households, earn an average of $26,500 a year.  The average 3-person family in New York State has annual income of $69,421.  8.5% of adults age 55 or older were employed part-time compared to 20.3% of those ages 20 to 24 and 9.4% of adults ages 25 to 54.  Although median household income rose by about $700 between 2006 and 2007, the average income for households between the 20th and 40th percentile of the income distribution—the typical income range for low-income working families—did not grow at all, coming in at $29,442 in 2007. For households at this income level, an affordable housing payment would be $735 a month, so fair-market rents for a two-bedroom apartment would be technically unaffordable.  Government workers in blue-collar jobs earn $0.87 more per hour than private sector counterparts in the five-county Rochester region.

 

New York State Average Annual Salary by Occupation:

Legislators- $76,230

Education Administrators- $103,510

Accountants and Auditors- $84,280

Loan Officers- $77,310

Computer Software Engineers- $93,910

Computer Support Specialists- $52,570

Surveyors- $58,910

Urban and Regional Planners- $62,700

Substance Abuse Counselors- $42,460

Lawyers- $152,710

Secondary Teachers- $68,010

Teacher Assistants- $25,530

Dentists- $149,370

Veterinarians- $97,890

Landscaping, Groundskeeping- $28,700

Nursing Aides and Orderlies- $30,850

Police and Sheriff Patrol Officers- $60,180

Cooks, Fast Food- $19,480

Waiters, Waitresses- $25,660

Janitors and Cleaners- $28,100

Barbers- $22,510

Childcare Workers- $24,040

Cashiers- $19,710

Telemarketers- $27,120

Bookkeepers- $38,570

File clerks- $28,090

Farmworkers and Laborers- $22,010

Carpenters- $53,300

Roofer helpers- $25,840

Automotive Mechanics- $37,230

Machinists- $39,940

Packaging Machine Operators- $26,790

School Bus Drivers- $34,890

Stock Handlers- $26,650

Assemblers- $26,840

Retail Sales- $26,750

 

 

DSS Cash Assistance & Shelter Allowance (Family of three) - $8292

Unemployment Benefit- $21,060

 

Total New York State recorded debt: $52,100,000,000 as of March 31, 2009.  Six years ago public authority debt (increases annually) amounted to $120.4 billion. Only 30% of public authority debt is represented as recorded debt, yet amounts to more than 90 percent of total outstanding New York public debt. Current New York per capita public debt is $5,666- up from $2,420 in 2004. The state Debt Reform Act was enacted in 2000.

 

June 21, 2010 - 11:41am
posted by C. M. Barons in Candidate, Chris Barons, C. M. Barons.

This weekend was particularly rewarding.  I had the opportunity to meet voters in three counties, folks attending the Stafford Fireman's Parade, a group of voters in the Town of Murray and attendees at the St. John Lutheran Church hosted Hamlin Strawberry Festival.  Not only did I walk away with a fulfilled sense of voter sentiment, I purchased a delicious bowl of shortcake while at the Strawberry Festival.

As much as the 139th is diverse in its four-county membership and the unique communities that comprise the district, voters seem to share the same sense of urgency.  The state is in dire need of responsible leadership.  The most discerning question that was often repeated, "Are you the incumbent?"

Incumbency may be a focus, and "Throw the bums out," has been a rallying cry for some time; I do not intend to invest my time exploiting that single itch.  The voters deserve a comprehensive action plan for righting state government.  I do not intend to rely on slogans, generalities and gladhanding to engage district voters.  My approach to the campaign is my approach to the business of state: ideas, study, dialogue, study, alliances, concensus.  I don't mean to oversimplify the legislative process.  I have a long history conducting negotiations, and I know the dynamics well.  Please anticipate a detailed look at my policies.

I hope everyone had time to celebrate Father's Day.  I did so vicariously.  The weather was spot-on!  See you along the campaign trail...

Chris

June 18, 2010 - 10:28am
posted by C. M. Barons in Chris Barons, C. M. Barons, N. Y. Assembly Candidate.

“When will CM post here on his own.” “…Baron's having an email is not the same as his posting at least a statement on this site.” “Mr. Barons is starting to look like a very 'handled' candidate.” “It seems like the very forum that gave C.M. his voice has seen him go completely silent since announcing his desire to run.” “I have sent an e-mail and received a response from Mr. Barons, however that does not change the fact that he seems to have come under the control of the Democratic party.” “It would be nice to have an un-handled dialogue with all the candidates not just Mr. Barons.” “If you are reading this C.M., please return to our forum, and share with us. Don't be just another candidate, or a puupet (sic) on a string. Do what you do best, BE YOURSELF!” “Bottom line, Barons is now being ‘handled.’” “I looked back at previous posts to see how CM felt on some issues and was dismayed to find that he edited his posts after he announced his decision to run.” 

The area defined by the 139th Assembly district covers four counties and 23 townships. They are served by numerous, unique and varied-format news organs not limited to The Daily News, The Batavian, The Medina Journal-Register, WBTA, Time Warner’s YNN, The Suburban News, The Buffalo News, The Democrat and Chronicle, Pennysavers, other radio & television stations and blogs. Blogging on The Batavian has been a personal choice that I exercised frequently with little concern for favoritism. Since becoming a candidate, I am no longer reacting to news; I am news. I am competing in a milieu dependent on equal access to all available news organs. Consequently, I have re-evaluated my relationship to ALL media, aiming at a wider base with intent to avoid perception that my candidacy is derivative of or proprietary to any faction. 

Part and parcel to developing my media presence, I encouraged my Genesee County Campaign Manager, Chris Charvella to excite local news outlets with unique and format-optimizing approaches to bi-lateral engagement during this race for the 139th Assembly seat. To instill a level playing field, I limited my media contacts to press releases. This was my practical response to a situation that I deemed in need of adjustment. Any assumption that my hiatus was the result of “handling” or re-packaging is ill-informed. 

I have spent the last few weeks cementing endorsement, drafting position papers and developing comprehensive plans for intended action once elected. The respite from blogging has allowed me to distill my own ideas into coherent action plans. I do not take my role lightly. I’ve dedicated all available time to establishing a candidacy that models my commitment to best represent my district. Although heartened by urgings I resume blogging on The Batavian, I trust that those who have embraced the spirit and relevancy of my past posts will afford me the opportunity to not only fashion a corpus worthy of the people I have chosen to represent in Albany. I ask that they measure the need of district residents in Niagara, Orleans and Monroe County who have yet to become familiar with my views.    

I promise no unveiling of a new, improved or beta version of me. The Democratic Committees representing the four-county area have accepted me, unadulterated. I respect them for their generous and unqualified support. Any suggestion that I have been influenced remains unfounded and erroneous. My ideas are my own; my press releases are penned by me.  As much as I reserve the right to change my mind in the presence of new data or circumstances, suggestions that I have engaged in Orwellian revisionism are inaccurate. My editing tendencies can be blamed on Gladys Walker, Sixth Grade English teacher who imposed grammatic structure as if the eleventh commandment.

I have returned to The Batavian, albeit a return defined by the reciprocal presence of my opponent and the discipline of fair-access. I consider The Batavian, family. As much as family roles are changed by circumstances, the elasticity of family bonds are only tested- not broken by distance. I will be making regular blog-posts detailing my positions and answering voter questions. I hope we can share some time as I take my campaign to the streets.  

Chris Barons

June 10, 2010 - 12:45pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Elections, Chris Barons, polictics.

Genesee County Democrats have agreed to line up behind local author and Bergen resident Chris Barons, better known on The Batavian by his pen name, C.M. Barons.

The Democrats picked Barons to face off against popular Republican incumbent Steve Hawley in the 139th Assembly District.

Mike Ranzenhofer, a first-term Republican who represents Genesee County in the Senate, will face a committee-endorsed challenger.

The Democrats announced that Marc Coppola will get their support. Coppola has held a State Senate seat previously.

From the Democrat's release:

Barons met with the committee at their May meeting. In an open letter to county Democrats Barons said, "My bottom line is dialogue -- dialogue with local governments, constituents and ultimately with fellow assembly members. It is time to put aside blame and get down to the business of making New York State government function again. I am committed to that task."

County Chairwoman Lorie Longhany said, "We’re very excited to have the opportunity to give voters a real choice. We’re fielding excellent candidates and I think people are going to be proud to vote the Democratic line from top to bottom this November."

Both candidates were endorsed unanimously.

June 2, 2010 - 12:46pm
posted by Billie Owens in steve hawley, parks, state budget, Chris Barons.

Here's a media release from Chris Barons, Assemblyman Steve Hawley’s possible opponent this November, in response to Hawley’s ‘No’ vote on re-opening state parks:

Although I deplore the backroom politics and pretentious raiding of the Environmental Protection Fund, Mr. Hawley's assessment is short-sighted.

In March 2009, a study prepared for Parks & Trails New York by the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) (Heintz et.al., 2009), University of Massachusetts-Amherst, found that the combination of annual state and visitor spending at all New York State Parks supports up to $1.9 billion in economic output and business sales and up to 20,000 jobs throughout the state.

In February, the Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) released a list of closures and service reductions in order to meet the budget reduction, part of a comprehensive plan to close an $8.2 billion deficit.

The OPRHP’s list of closures included 41 parks and 14 historic sites, and service reductions at 23 parks and 1 historic site. Included in the closure list was Allegany State Park, which provides $62 million in revenue and 860 jobs to its three-county area.

Park visitor expenditures within the Allegany Region were estimated to be between $33.7 million and $69.3 million annually with 87% of its visitors from outside the tri-county area.

Clearly the nine Finger Lakes Region Parks and three Genesee Region Parks would generate more local revenue than the $14.9 million outlay to keep them open. Allegheny Park alone generates nearly five-times the outlay, and there are eight other regions across the state.

May 13, 2010 - 2:17pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, politics, steve hawley, Chris Barons.

Chris Barons, known to readers of The Batavian, as C.M. Barons, and a frequent critic of Assemblyman Steve Hawley, is exploring a possible run against Hawley this fall.

Barons, a Bergen resident and registered Green, met with the Genesee County Democrat Committee this week in Corfu -- a presentation that went well, according to Chairwoman Lorie Longhany.

For his part, Barons said his possible candidacy springs from the fact that people have been asking him to run, but he's not sure how viable a run would be with out Democratic support.

"Let’s just say anybody who was going to make a serious run for that office is going to have to be in one of two conduits and apparently there’s only one available," Barons said.

Barons has yet to meet with Democrats from Orleans County. He said he has also not yet been in contact with Greens.

Longhany said Barons made an impressive showing when he spoke with the Democratic Committee, giving thoughtful answers on a broad range of issues, but whether he will get the backing of the committee is unclear at this time.

He may have to switch parties to gain the backing of Democrats, but Barons said that at least in his first meeting with local Democrats, the subject didn't come up.

Longhany described Barons as a liberal libertarian with a sense of localism.

Barons, who has frequently referred to the incumbent assemblyman as "Hypocrite Hawley" for not doing more to address the serious issues in New York, said it would be a big step for him to enter a political race.

"I work and function as an average citizen and to do anything else obviously is a radical change," Barons said this morning. "But if there is an interest demonstrated in my candidacy I have made the decision to embrace that."

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