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full moon

September 13, 2019 - 4:45pm
posted by James Burns in batavia, news, full moon.

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(Moon pictured above from Sept. 12. Photo by Jim Burns.)

Look up to the sky tonight to see a rare Friday the 13th full moon.

Why is a full moon on Friday the 13th a big deal? It’s not unless you are among the 10 percent of Americans who say they are superstitious.

Sometime in the Middle Ages, Friday the 13th started being considered unlucky. The origin of this is traced to the 13 Apostles and the Last Supper being on Friday. Any 13 on a Friday was considered unlucky.

The full moon has been associated with superstition and mystical happenings in many cultures. The full moon has been accused of many things like, making people crazy and turning them into warewolves.

If you are of the 10 percent claiming to be superstitious, fear not the full moon on Friday the 13th. Technically the moon will not be completely full this month until after midnight, making the official moon full in the early hours of the 14th. 

If you are in the 90 percent of Americans who do not consider themselves superstitious, check the moon out tonight anyway.

The moon rises at 6:40 p.m .and sets at 5:02 a.m.

Tonight's weather is expected to be a little breezy and mostly cloudy, but the moon will be big and bright when the clouds do part.

August 3, 2015 - 9:21am
posted by JIM NIGRO in nature, outdoors, full moon, sunrise, Tonawanda Creek.

There's plenty to be said for rising early. In the above photo, rays of sunlight permeate our yard as the sun begins its ascent.

The calm of early morning provides a mirror image on a placid surface.

Mist rises from a stretch of Tonawanda Creek. Regardless the time of day, this is always a nice spot to take photos as little light penetrates the treetop canopy.

Gathering clouds have a filtering effect and cast a pale-orange glow on the horizon.

The full moon looms large immediately after rising...........

but not until the full moon climbs high in the night sky are we bathed in soft lunar light and moon shadows.

May 5, 2012 - 10:48pm
posted by JIM NIGRO in outdoors, full moon, supermoon.

 

If the moon seemed especially big and bright Saturday night -- that's because it was.

The moon was at the point on its elliptical path called perigee, the point where passes closest to Earth. At this point, it is 31,000 miles to closer than the opposite side of its orbit, or apogee.

While the full moon appears largest just after it rises, it officially reached its closest point to Earth at 11:34 pm. Exactly one minute later, the moon, Earth and sun line up and this allows the moon to achieve its full brilliance -- 30-percent brighter and 14-percent larger than any other full moon this year. 

Here framed by spruce boughs, the brilliance of the full moon will have drowned out all but the brightest fireballs of the Aquarid meteor shower, also on tap Saturday night, according to NASA.

Officially, this year's supermoon was "eclipsed" by the supermoon of March 2011, which passed by Earth some 250 miles closer than this year's.

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