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genesee county

February 12, 2015 - 10:48am
posted by Cheryl Thorley in genesee county.
Company Name: 
Genesee County
Job Type: 
Full-Time

$42,873-$47,160
For qualifications, job duties and application information: www.co.genesee.ny.us
Application Deadline: 2/27/15

January 23, 2015 - 3:53pm
posted by Jill Franclemont in batavia, genesee county, sports, Summer, softball, Girls, fast pitch, league.

          TONAWANDA VALLEY YOUNG LADIES FAST PITCH SOFTBALL

To parents and girls aged 7-16: 

We offer an instructional/recreational program that plays fast pitch softball.   We are based in Batavia but open to any young lady in and around Genesee County.  We teach the basics of pitching, hitting, and fielding and most of our coaches are parents themselves with many years of experience.  Sportsmanship and courtesy are our prime values as we try to teach self-esteem but also team play/spirit as our ladies come from many backgrounds.  Our home field is Lions Park located on Edward Street in Batavia across from the VFW Post.  Past participants have been  teams from Elba, Byron-Bergen, Pembroke, and Oakfield  as well as some ladies from Alexander, Stafford, and Leroy.

The majority of our games are played in Batavia with a few road games within 10-20 minutes of Batavia.  Our season begins on or about Memorial Day and usually is completed by mid-July.  Our age groups, 7-9 and 10-12, will begin after Memorial Day and our age group 13-16 on or about June 5.  If a young lady is 12 and in the 7th grade it is best that she play with our 13-15 age group, since this is the modified-level age group.  Many of the modified, JV, and even varsity softball plays at all our local schools have played in our league.   We are exploring a team of participants ages 16-19 with most games being played in Bergen.

If you would like to pursue registration, please call me at 585/344-0481.  We are currently registering last year’s participants and are taking new inquiries.  Open registration will be held at the Batavia City Centre FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27:  6:00 - 8:00 P.M. and SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28:  10:30 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.   However, you can apply at this time, saving you a trip to that registration.  We have no geographic limitations for participants.

Please do not hesitate to call me with any questions about our program.

Yours in softball,

John Arent, President & Commissioner

January 23, 2015 - 12:59pm
posted by Billie Owens in genesee county.

Press release from Genesee County Treasurer Scott German:

January 23, 2015

It is with very mixed feelings that I announce the resignation of James D. Stack, Deputy County Treasurer, and the appointment of Kevin J. Andrews as my next Deputy. Mr. Stack is resigning effective today to become a Monroe County Deputy Sheriff. James said becoming a deputy sheriff was a dream job of his since he was a young man. I will sincerely miss Jim, not only was he a great deputy to me, he is also a great friend. I wish Jim all the best in his new career.

Kevin J. Andrews, 26, of LeRoy, is my choice to succeed Jim as my next deputy. Andrews currently works in the Treaurer's Office as the Director of Real Property. I have worked with Kevin for four years and he has become a very valuable employee and will fit in well as Deputy Treasurer.

Kevin obtained his Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics/Statistics and Financial Economics from the University of Rochester in 2010 and has worked in the Treasurer's Office since he graduated.

Kevin and his wife, Alexandra, are expecting their first child in March.

 

Scott D. German

Genesee County Treasurer

January 20, 2015 - 8:47pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county.

The Genesee County Public Service Committee took the following actions today:

  • Authorized $19,663 paid to United Uniform Company for Sheriff's Office uniforms. UUC is based in Buffalo and was the sole bidder for the one-year uniform contract.
  • Approved a one-year lease for P&L Air for a flight training school at the Genesee County Airport. The lease will generate $2,475 in revenue for the county.
  • Approved the purchase of a 2016 model 4X2 International truck cab and chassis as part of a bid package by Onondaga County at a price of $89,747.
  • Approved the purchase of four Ford Focus sedans from Van Bortel Ford at a cost not to exceed $60,506.04. The vehicles will be available for various county departments.
  • In the next step toward replacing the River Street bridge over the Tonawanda Creek, approved a capital project fund in the amount of $211,000 with federal aid of $168,800 and a local match of $42,200.
  • Authorized the establishment of a capital project for safety improvements at the intersection of Pratt and Powers roads, Town of Batavia, with $628,200 of federal aid and $69,800 in local match.
January 8, 2015 - 6:39pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, solar energy.

The idea of solar power for county government certainly brought a gleam to the eye of members of the Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday, but in the end, a proposal by Solar City didn't exactly light up their lives.

The committee voted unanimously to reject a proposal that could have saved the county more than a quarter of its $500,000 annual electricity bill. 

The short-term cost savings looked good, but the long-term and potentially unknown consequences seemed daunting.

Legislator and Committee Chairman Bob Bausch worried about Solar City going bankrupt, and without some sort of bond to protect the county's financial liability, taxpayers could be left holding the bag on a nine-acre solar farm the county had no ability to maintain.

"We would have to clean up their mess," Bausch said.

County Attorney Chuck Zambito said Bausch was essentially right.

"It would be their responsibility, but if they go bankrupt, there would be no way to enforce it," Zambito said.

Legislator Maryanne Clattenburg was concerned that 20 years was too long to lock the county into technology that looks good today but may quickly become obsolete. She said she was especially concerned because the company seems so dependent on government grants, which could dry up in a few years.

"When I think of my phone 20 years ago, or I think of my computer 20 years ago -- I just think it's too long of a time to be tied into one technology," Clattenburg said.

County Highway Superintendent Tim Hens expressed concern that the state, which would help finance the project, might eventually reduce the amount of compensation the county would get for hosting the solar farm.

He also noted that the county may yet need to build a new jail and the proposed location of the farm -- nine acres off West Main Street Road, Batavia, next to County Building #2, might be a prime location for a new jail. Putting a solar farm on that land would potentially drive up the cost of a new jail if the county had to purchase nine acres elsewhere.

Solar City would get use of the nine acres to generate electricity to sell to National Grid tax free, legislators noted.

County Manager Jay Gsell said the county also looked at land at the County Airport, but found FAA regulations would prohibit any possible configuration the county could use because of glare, glide path and safety zone issues.

Hens said other companies have contacted the county about solar power and in rejecting the Solar City deal, which the county had to act on by mid-February, the county keeps its options open.

January 5, 2015 - 4:44pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county.

While low gas prices could mean a reduction in revenue for local governments, it could also mean significant cost savings, County Highway Superintendent Tim Hens said today.

Hens wasn't available last week when The Batavian provided an exclusive report on how falling gas prices means a reduction in sales tax revenue for local governments, but he did get back to us today about the cost side of the equation.

Hens says his best guess at this point is the county could see $75,000 to $100,000 in annual fuel spending savings.

That money will allow his department to replace aging equipment that might otherwise be deferred even longer.

Hens also anticipates a 20-percent reduction in the cost of asphalt, which would result in a cost savings of about $240,000, or rather, make it possible to buy more asphalt to cover more deteriorate roadways.

"That's a few more miles of paving that we wouldn't otherwise be able to do," Hens said. "We are about 26 miles behind on maintenance due to tight budgets and limited state and federal money, so this will let us play catch up a little bit."

Hens won't know the adjusted price of asphalt until April or May and said he's only making a guess at this point.

The county budgets $1 million for the purchase of unleaded and diesel fuel for its fleet of vehicles, which includes the highway department and Sheriff's Office.

Any savings this year would only be a one-time surplus, Hens noted.

While falling gas prices could mean people drive more, Hens said an uptick in travel would buck the trend from the past decade of falling fuel consumption. Less consumption has meant less money available from gas taxes for roadway construction and repair.

December 29, 2014 - 2:28pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county.

A couple of minor discrepancies were uncovered by a state audit of county records related to court and trust funds cases and the handling of abandoned property. County officials took immediate corrective actions, according to the audit report, which the Comptroller's Office completed this month.

The state's abandoned property law requires that money that has remained unclaimed with a county treasurer for three years must be turned over to the Comptroller's Office.

The audit found $507 that had not been turned over to the Comptroller's Office.

The County Clerk is responsible for recording court orders involving surplus money from foreclosures, contract disputes and mechanic's liens, and in some circumstances, funds from estates are entrusted to the treasurer for safekeeping. The County Clerk and Surrogate's Court are required to develop procedures and processes that provide a system of internal controls to account for and safeguard these funds.

The audit examined records maintained from Jan. 1, 2011 to Jan. 1, 2014.  

While records were found to be up-to-date, the Clerk's Office was not properly recording funds into a trust fund register of the money ordered paid into a court.

"The clerk's records could not be used to verify that all court-ordered deposits had been properly received and deposited by the treasurer," the audit report reads. 

The audit indicates both issues have been addressed by the Clerk's Office and the Treasurer.

October 9, 2014 - 3:00pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, taxes.

Enough robbing Peter to pay Paul. Maybe its time to send a little cash back Peter's way, county legislators suggested during a budget session Wednesday afternoon.

County Manager Jay Gsell's early-stage draft budget calls for a reduction of the county's property tax rate from $10.04 to $9.85 per thousand.

After years of diverting sales tax revenue to balance the general fund budget, maybe the county should replenish the "1-percent fund," Legislator Bob Bausch suggested, followed by words of agreement from legislators Ed DeJaneiro and Frank Ferrando.

The 1-percent fund was created following an increase in the county's share of the sales tax in 1996 to help fund the county court complex.

From that point forward, that 1 percent cut of sales tax was supposed to go to a capital reserve fund -- money in the bank for roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

But in recent years, as a stagnant economy caused tax revenue to sag and out-of-control state mandates put unrelenting pressure on the county's ability to fund basic programs, a portion of that 1-percent fund has been diverted into the general fund.

Meanwhile, roads and bridges continue to age and deteriorate.

"If we have some more money this year, I would kind of like to see that replenished and do some more capital projects, because as the residents of the county know, between the highways, bridges and roof and general capital budget items, we have fallen somewhat behind," Bausch said. "...if at all possible, I would like to see us address some of those issues if we have some extra revenue."

Through the typical budget process, department managers from throughout the county submitted their funding requests for 2015. 

Requested spending topped $27 million, which would have required a tax rate of $9.96 per thousand of assessed property value.

Gsell made cuts and reduced the recommended levy to $26.8 million, requiring a tax rate of $9.85.

The reduction in proposed spending is possible, Gsell said, because of sound fiscal management over the past 20 years, negligible staff growth the past couple of years, and the state capping how much it expects the county to contribute each year to mandated programs.

Mandates still eat up 82 percent of the county's revenue, but at least the figure isn't growing the way it has in years past.

"The state has capped Medicaid at $9.9 million, and that's great, but in every other state but one, counties don't pay anything for Medicaid," Gsell said. "If I could take $9.9 million and tell the State of New York, 'you pay for Medicaid, you control the program, you write the rules, you tell us (what) we can't do as far as reforming a local version that doesn't exist,' then I could say our tax rate goes down by 38 percent. It's not going to happen, at least (not) the way the State of New York is thinking at this point."

With less spending pressure on the county budget, though, Bausch and other legislators are saying, let's review capital funds a little further.

"We can't keep telling people your bridges are going to fall down, but we're going to cut your taxes," Bausch said.

DeJaneiro said he knows it's not an issue in his district (a portion of the City of Batavia), but he knows there's been an issue elsewhere with school buses and fire trucks being unable to pass over bridges because of structural deficiencies. Andrew Young and Bausch both said those have been issues in their parts of the county.

"Bridges are reality and people not getting an ambulance on time or a fire truck on time because of a bridge is something we should be concerned about," DeJaneiro said.

Ferrando agreed with the general sentiment.

"We should replenish the fund when we have a year where we have an opportunity," Ferrando said. "We should consider it."

Gsell was asked to prepare a report on the fund and provide more information to the Legislature.

Also discussed during the budget session was female prisoner transport. It's an expense that is continuing to rise and also takes a deputy or two off patrol at a time.

Gsell said options including having corrections officers transport female inmates, or hiring a private contractor who can provide licensed and bonded security officers for transport.

A few years ago, the Sheriff's Office would have seven or eight female inmates housed at the jails in Orleans, Wyoming or Monroe counties. Now there are 19 or 20 women in the county's inmate population at any one time, all needing transport occasionally to and from the county for court appearances or meetings with attorneys. But adding to the cost burden is the fact that some inmates are now housed as far away as Allegheny County and Wayne County.

Because of behavioral issues, certain inmates are no longer accepted by closer, neighboring counties.

Nothing was settled Wednesday on how to resolve the issue.

September 24, 2014 - 4:40pm
posted by Alecia Kaus in genesee county, drug take back day.

Press Release


This Saturday, September 27, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and almost 4,000 of its national, tribal, and community law enforcement partners will hold the ninth National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day.

Americans can take their expired, unneeded, or unwanted prescription drugs to one of over 5,200 collection sites across the country between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. local time. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

 


Local drug take back agencies and locations include:

Pembroke Town Hall Rt. 5 at Rt. 77 Pembroke, NY – received by Genesee County Sheriff’s Deputies

Batavia Police Department Headquarters, 10 W. Main St. Batavia, NY – received by Batavia Police Officers

LeRoy Police Department Headquarters, 3 W. Main St. LeRoy, NY – received by LeRoy Police Officers

 


Only pills and other solids, like patches, can be brought to the collection sites—liquids and needles or other sharps will not be accepted.

Unused medications in homes create a public health and safety concern, because they can be accidentally ingested, stolen, misused, and abused.

While the number of Americans who currently abuse prescription drugs dropped in 2013 to 6.5 million from 6.8 million in 2012, that is still more than double the number of those using heroin, cocaine, and hallucinogens like LSD and Ecstasy combined, according to the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

In addition, 22,134 Americans died in 2011 from overdoses of prescription medications, including 16,651 from narcotic painkillers, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

September 16, 2014 - 8:07am
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county.

Yes, there are still problems with the new emergency radio system, county legislators were told Monday, but the Sheriff's Office is confident all of the issues can be resolved and Rochester-based Harris RF will deliver the quality communication system it promised the county.

In the field, members of law enforcement and fire services continue to report problems, and those problems are logged with an eye toward resolving all issues, said Steve Sharpe, director of emergency communication.

Three new communication towers have been built, to go along with the three that already existed, but they're not yet fully operational and tested.

The county is paying $10.8 million for the system (about half of the money comes from state and federal grants) and legislators want to ensure Harris is fulfilling its contract.

Legislator and Public Service Committee Chairwoman Maryanne Clattenburg said for what the system cost, everybody certainly expects it work as well or better than the old system.

The change over in communication systems was mandated by Homeland Security as part of its effort to create a nationwide interoperable emergency communication network.

There's still about $1.3 million due in payments to Harris and that money is being withheld until the county is convinced the system is working right.

"There's no date specific for Genesee County to sign off and close out the project," Undersheriff William Sheron said. "Until all the work is done, there's some power with Harris in how much money hasn't been released."

The contract calls for the Harris system to provide 95 percent coverage of the county. That doesn't mean 95 percent geographically, but that 95 percent of the calls provide functional two-way communication.

There are apparently dead spots in the county and Harris is working the the Sheriff's Office to address those issues.

"The bottomline is that 95 percent technically meets the standard, but that's not going to mean we're going to say, 'OK,' if there's still issues," Sheron said. "We're going to sit down with Harris and talk about it."

Sheron said he's confident the remaining issues can be solved with Harris.

September 2, 2014 - 8:36pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, genesee county, nursing home.

So far, one potential bidder for the Genesee County Nursing Home has submitted a letter stating an intent to make an offer on the 260-bed facility.

Interested buyers have until Sept. 23 to submit a letter of intent and until Oct. 6 to submit proposals.

So far, some 25 to 30 potential buyers have expressed interest in the nursing home, County Manager Jay Gsell said, but there's still just the one written intent to submit a bid.

The nursing home has been dragging down county finances for years, and financial disclosures included in the RFP package show the facility losing $2.9 million in 2011, $3.7 in 2012 and $4.3 million in 2013.

A non-government agency (whether a not-for-profit group or for-profit company) will have greater flexibility in generating revenue than the highly regulated government-owned facility, have greater leeway in reducing expenses, and won't be facing a squeeze on funding from the State of New York, according to county officials.

The county Legislature decided to sell the home to escape the ongoing financial drain on the budget.

The RFP states the facility will be sold to the most qualified, responsible bidder who meets a range of criteria. The highest bid won't necessarily win the purchase contract.

The current assessed value of the nursing home, on Bank Street, is $10.9 million.

Of course, currently no taxes are collected on the government-owned property.

Serious bidders will be invited to pre-proposal site visits Sept. 24, 25, 26 and 29.

Bids must include a $100,000 refundable deposit and provide financial statements and a letter of credit indicating not only the ability to close on the final purchase price, but to operate the facility at the current level or improved level of services after the purchase is completed.

The purchaser will be prohibited from involuntarily transferring or evicting any current resident of the nursing home.

Bidders must agree that the RFP process is subjective and the Legislature has the final say on whether to accept or reject any and all bids, and the county reserves to right to enter into negotiations with a bidder to modify a proposal.

The company must provide a company history, executive bios, information and qualifications on employees, experience with similar facilities, and plan for a smooth transfer of ownership.

There will be no public bid opening and bids won't become public until after a proposal is accepted by the Legislature. It's up to the company to declare any portion of the proposal that would be exempt from public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Law.

The sale of the nursing home has generated a little public opposition. There is a "Save the Genesee County Nursing home in Batavia NY" group on Facebook with 166 members currently.

The complete RFP package is available on the county's Web site.

August 31, 2014 - 1:29pm
posted by Daniel Crofts in genesee county, family, youth.

From left: Iris Hatcher, Jessica Polk, Jessica Simmons and Kenyetta Reese.

Leave it to a group of mothers to figure out what their community needs, and then to do something about it.

Pictured are the four founding members of "Mothers Supporting Children and Families" (MSCF), a new nonprofit designed to "provide inspirational support and positive direction to children of all ages" and "empower children and families" (per their mission statement.)

Polk, the WSCF president, said she conceived the idea during a dinner party at her Batavia home.

"There were a bunch of us mothers there," she said. "We got to talking -- Jessica (Simmons) had had the idea for a long time about doing something for the youth in the community to get them off the streets and doing something productive."

Polk and her friends were concerned about what appeared to be an increase in instances of local youth getting in trouble -- "and at a younger age" -- in recent years.

In order to help address this problem, she and her fellow MSCF moms are joining forces with Care-A-Van Ministries, a local Christian street ministry.

"They were extremely instrumental in giving us spiritual guidance from the very start," Polk said.  "They've taken us under their wing, and they've given us advice on how to start a nonprofit. We ask for their advice all the time."

Elsewhere in their mission statement, they name an important aspect of how they intend to address the problem of troubled youth: "MSCF lends a helping hand to the community so there are fewer children in unhealthy home dynamics."

Ways of positive self-expression, adult role models, and trusted adults that kids can come to with their concerns if, for whatever reason, they cannot go to their parents or legal guardians, are among what they seek to offer young people.

"And I hope that we, as an organization, will be able to show them the different resources available to them that they may not know of," Hatcher said." We want to guide them into whatever they need to relieve that pressure that is causing them to get into trouble."

But their mission is not limited to kids; rather, it is founded on "the concept of parents helping parents" and "promotes positive parenting, and healthy families."

MSCF is open to all families in Genesee County. Despite the group's name, Polk wanted to make it clear that men are welcome to be involved as well (they just cannot be official members).

Hatcher said that eventually, they would like to be able to arrange for situations in which families and children can get together for fun and socialization.

"We just have to get on our feet first and get our name out there," she said.

For more information on MSCF:

Web site: www.mscfmothers.wix.com/mscf-
Twitter: www.twitter.com/MSCFMOTHERS
Facebook: M.S.C.F. Mothers
Email: [email protected]

People can also contact Polk at 300-3804.

Photo submitted by Jessica Polk.

August 27, 2014 - 6:59pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in BARNS, genesee county, photos, Le Roy, Stafford.

The morning in Batavia started out kind of gloomy, but by the afternoon, the skies had cleared a bit and it was another beautiful day in Genesee County.

Above, a tree and barn off Selden Road, Le Roy.

A barn on Thwing Road, Stafford.

The view from Clinton Street Road, Stafford.

And below, three shots of Richard Oderkirk's sunflowers in Stafford.

August 7, 2014 - 11:57am
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county.

The lowest price isn't always the best deal, but awarding public works contracts to the lowest bidder has been the law for Genesee County for some time.

The Legislature is considering a change in local law that would allow the county to consider such things as differences in warranty, materials used and quality of workmanship.

"Sometimes the better value is not just the lowest cost," County Attorney Chuck Zambito said during a meeting of the Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday. "But there is a process to go through to approve a bid. You can't just do it."

Among the requirements, the request for proposal must specify the criteria for awarding a bid, the contractor must specify value-added aspects of the bid and department heads and purchasing agents must review and make recommendations to the Legislature based on these specifications.

A public hearing on the proposed change to local law is set for 5:30 p.m., Sept. 10.

Two things that don't change under the proposed change -- giving preference to local vendors (barred by state law) and the county can still eliminate from considerations vendors that don't measure up to "responsible" (business reputation matters).

New York is one of the last states to change the law to allow local governments to change its own rules governing contracts and accept "best value" bids.

The specific criteria that could be considered for "best value" bids are:

  • Lowest cost of maintenance for goods or services;
  • Durability of goods or services;
  • Higher quality of goods or services;
  • Longer product life of goods or services.

"As long s you protect the interest of the taxpayer then you're going to be OK (awarding bids on these criteria)," Zambito said.

July 18, 2014 - 4:37pm
posted by Billie Owens in genesee county, SUNY Brockport, Milestones.

Press release:

BROCKPORT, NY -- The College at Brockport, State University of New York, recently honored students who excelled academically by naming them to the dean's list for the Spring 2014 semester.

Students who earn a GPA of 3.70-3.99 are named to the dean's list with honors, while students who achieve a 3.40-3.69 are named to the dean's list.

Jennifer Alexander of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Eric Wood of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Kylie Britt of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Shonta Carpenter of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Jacob Jones of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Courtney Butzbach of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Lucas Phillips of Alexander, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Robert Adams of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Benjamin Cherry of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Steven Marchese of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Gianni Zambito of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Alyson Tardy of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Alicca Vigneri of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Mathew Klein of Alexander, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Ashley Walter of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Dalton Rarick of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Ryan Gugel of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Travis Fenstermaker of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Anthony Macaluso of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Dylan Versage of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Lindsay Stumpf of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Kayla Barclay of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Elizabeth Corrado of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Adam Hughes of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Kristin Aidala of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Patrick Carr of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Kelly Hoitink of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Victoria DiStefano of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jennifer Gremer of Linwood, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Keenan Hughes of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Elias Seward of Basom, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Micah Brill of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Sydney Gallup of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Sean Hale of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Benjamin Heintz of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Meghan Bishop of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Erin Suttell of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Claire Vanderberg of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Cody Pierce of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Yangyan Dong of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

James Mangefrida of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Olivia Talley of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Kristen Gaik of corfu, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Cady Hume of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Alexander Gunther of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jason Birch of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Gena Korn of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Anthony Young of Alexander, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jacob Sojda of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Casey Herman of Corfu, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Anne Culliton of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Ainsley Dungan of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Melanie Monroe of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jeana Pfalzer of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Alissa Phillips of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Lauren Hughes of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Haley Huey of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Brittni Loewke of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Eric Kowalik of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Meg Stucko of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Lisa Halat of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Bridget Chartraw of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Darren Kwiatkowski of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Cara Ferraro of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jenna Kent of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jennifer Alexander of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Eric Wood of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Kylie Britt of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Shonta Carpenter of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Jacob Jones of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Courtney Butzbach of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Lucas Phillips of Alexander, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Robert Adams of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Benjamin Cherry of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Steven Marchese of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Gianni Zambito of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Alyson Tardy of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Alicca Vigneri of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Mathew Klein of Alexander, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Ashley Walter of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Dalton Rarick of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Ryan Gugel of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Travis Fenstermaker of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Anthony Macaluso of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Dylan Versage of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Lindsay Stumpf of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Kayla Barclay of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Elizabeth Corrado of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List with Honors.

Adam Hughes of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Kristin Aidala of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Patrick Carr of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Kelly Hoitink of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Victoria DiStefano of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jennifer Gremer of Linwood, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Keenan Hughes of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Elias Seward of Basom, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Micah Brill of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Sydney Gallup of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Sean Hale of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Benjamin Heintz of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Meghan Bishop of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Erin Suttell of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Claire Vanderberg of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Cody Pierce of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Yangyan Dong of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

James Mangefrida of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Olivia Talley of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Kristen Gaik of corfu, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Cady Hume of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Alexander Gunther of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jason Birch of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Gena Korn of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Anthony Young of Alexander, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jacob Sojda of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Casey Herman of Corfu, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Anne Culliton of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Ainsley Dungan of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Melanie Monroe of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jeana Pfalzer of Le Roy, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Alissa Phillips of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Lauren Hughes of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Haley Huey of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Brittni Loewke of Bergen, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Eric Kowalik of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Meg Stucko of Elba, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Lisa Halat of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Bridget Chartraw of Oakfield, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Darren Kwiatkowski of Byron, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Cara Ferraro of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

Jenna Kent of Batavia, NY was named to the Dean's List.

The College at Brockport is a comprehensive four-year public college, located in Brockport, NY. The College offers 50 undergraduate majors, more than 50 graduate programs as well as 24 teacher certification programs. The College has been rated among a "Best Regional University" by US News & World Report and a "Best Value" by Kiplinger's Personal Finance.
 

July 17, 2014 - 9:45am
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, nursing home.

New York will finally pay off some of their IOUs to the county.

County Treasurer Scott German learned Tuesday that $4.1 million in funds meant to cover 2013 Nursing Home expenses will be transferred to the county Aug. 13.

That's the good news. We'll get to the bad news shortly.

The $4.1 million is what is known as an Inter-Governmental Transfer. It's money that originates with the federal government and sent to the states so the states can transfer it to county governments that run nursing homes. The money is meant to help offset the difference in reimbursement fees between Medicaid and Medicare (it's more complicated than that, but that's the easy explanation).

In June, the county received $4.3 million in back IGT payments from 2012.

Of the $8.4 million IGT received, the taxpayers of Genesee County paid an amount equal to 50 percent, or $4.2 million, as a local match.

But that isn't all of the bad news.

County Manager Jay Gsell said the feds are phasing out the IGT program. The Aug. 13 payment is probably one of the last two or three the county will ever receive.

No program has been announced to replace it.

Once there's no IGT -- and if there's no program to replace it -- the local share cost of running the Genesee County Nursing Home will likely be at least $3 million a year, and that figure is growing each year, German said. The operating deficit will need to be funded by local taxpayers.

Of the $4.3 million received in June, $2 million went into the general fund to pay off money the Nursing Home borrowed from the general fund.

Some of that IGT money will be used to pay off a $5.8 million Revenue Anticipation Note (RAN -- a short-term loan based on the promise of anticipated revenue).

The $4.1 million the county receives Aug. 13 should pay off the rest of the RAN, a loan that must be retired by November.

If for some reason, there is a shortfall, the county will either need money from the general fund or another loan, German said, to pay off this RAN.

But it's anticipated there will be a $200,000 surplus from the IGT payment, which will be gobbled up by Nursing Home expenses in short order. The county will then need to borrow more money to cover Nursing Home expenses with no guarantee the feds or the state will help with the expense at a later date.

The County Legislature met with an attorney today who is helping them explore options for dealing with the Nursing Home. The meeting was held in close session and was purely informational for the legislators, Gsell said.

April 8, 2014 - 12:44pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county.

A story in today's Buffalo News begins:

The decades-long brain drain among young people in the Buffalo Niagara region is turning into a brain gain.

There's some truth in the statement, according to data compiled by the University of Michigan, which created an online database tracking net migration rates on a county-by-county basis throughout the nation.

Erie County has been losing population in nearly all age groups going back to the 1960s, but Niagara County has had some success gaining population among adults 1990s and 2000s.

For us, the good news -- exploding a commonly held "brain drain" myth locally -- is that Genesee County has traditionally done well drawing in workers who are 25 years old and older, at least until people hit about 40 years old.

The chart below (larger version here) shows that for every decade since the 1950s, Genesee County has lost population in the teenage age group and college-age adults, but consistently seen gains in population for people in their 30s. Genesee County starts losing mid-career workers in their 40s (along with, apparently, their teenage children), suggesting -- if we can speculate on the point -- that there are insufficient job opportunities locally as people advance in their careers. In the past two decades, it looks like there is a trend toward retirees coming to Genesee County.

The chart reflects a gain or loss in an age bracket compared to that cohort a decade earlier. What it doesn't tell us is whether it's the same people coming or going from one decade to the next. For example, the thirtysomethings migrating to Genesee County may not have lived here in their younger years. Just as the data doesn't tell us where people are coming from, it also doesn't tell us where they're going to.

The chart for Erie County (larger version here) shows a much grimmer picture. Our neighbors to the west have been suffering population loss in all cohorts decade after decade since the close of the 1950s.

Niagara County (larger version here) has shown less decline than Erie County and some gains among people 35 to 50 in the 1990s and 2000s.

Wyoming and Orleans counties show migration patterns very similar to Genesee County.

April 1, 2014 - 12:33pm
Event Date and Time: 
April 3, 2014 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

Genesee County Health Department is offering an anti-rabies immunization clinic on Thursday April 3, 2014 from 4pm until 7pm at the Pembroke Highway Department located on the NE corner of Route 77 and Route 5; at 1145 Main Road (Route 5), Pembroke, NY. Vaccination will be offered to dogs, cats and ferrets. There is no charge for the residents of Genesee County; out of county pet owners will be asked for a $5.00 donation. Please bring your pets with proper restraints; on leashes, in cages etc. Be prepared to supply pet owner information; name, address, telephone contact info, etc.

March 20, 2014 - 11:08am
posted by Bea McManis in genesee county, poverty, cropwalk.

A recent article in the Batavia Daily News telling about an upcoming fundraiser and awareness program gave some very disturbing statistics about Genesee County.  7114 people live below the poverty level.  6259 receive food stamps.  40% of our children qualify for free or reduced lunches.  6000 residents were helped by the food pantry.  Over 9000 meals were served by Stephen's table.  The numbers are alarming.  What I found more alarming was the one comment to the article, "Don't feed the animals.  They become dependent.".  That statement made me physically ill.  Have we, as a society, become that callous?  

March 17, 2014 - 2:54pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in genesee county, tax liens.

Below are the results of the auction Saturday at Bontrager's of properties seized by Genesee County for non-payment of property taxes. Treasurer Scott German said the amount of taxes owed has been calculated not to include accrued interest, but the figure is still preliminary. The list of city properties sold is not yet available.

Address Type Acres Assessed Taxes Sale Price
6550 Alleghany Road, Alabama Single Fam. .48 $73,300 $14,773 $30,000
2725 Attica Road, Alexander Single Fam. .48 $72,800 $10,721 $23,000
3366 Dodgeson Road, Alexander Single Fam. 1.3 $69,000 $17,611 $44,000
3457 West Main Street Road, Batavia Single Fam. 3.8 $90,600 $11,643 $70,000
East Main Street Road, Batavia Vacant .4545 $100 0 $300
7573 South Lake Road, Bergen Single Fam. .4386 $70,000 $11,799 $51,000
5785 E. Bethany-Le Roy Rd, Bethany Single Fam. .5 $111,600 $15,136 $47,000
10474 Bethany Center Road, Bethany Single Fam. .28 $75,700 $12,661 $64,000
County Line Road Vacant Lot 4.5 $20,300 $3,320 $12,500
6920 Transit Road, Elba Vacant Lot 2.08 $4,400 $1,400 $8,000
6616 Snyder Road, Elba Single Fam. 1.11 $15,000 $5,799 $9,000
4973 Barrville Road, Elba Single Fam. .4 $29,000 $3,390 $18,000
East Main Road, Le Roy Vacant Lot .54 $800 $1,036 $300
Meiser Road, Pembroke Vacant Lot .45 $20,000 $3,284 $4,000
Sliker Road, Pembroke Vacant Lot 1 $34,000 $4,977 $10,000
866 Gabbey Road, Pembroke Single Fam. .41 $55,200 $5,867 $15,000
Angling Road, Pembroke Vacant Lot 1 $15,000 $2,517 $3,100
5762 Route 5, Stafford Restaurant 4.36 $284,000 $42,263 $70,000
3321 Church St., Alexander 3 Fam. .99 $124,800 $20,769 $48,000
West Main Street, Le Roy Vacant Lot 44.4 $50,000 $938 $42,500
106 Lake St., Le Roy 2 Fam. .53 $87,200 $25,604 $35,000
86 Wolcott St., Le Roy Single Fam. .24 $39,000 $6,576 $18,000
21 Lathrop, Le Roy Single Fam. .1894 $68,200 $11,109 $41,000
12 Maple Ave., Oakfield Vacant Lot .2055 $15,300 $21,552 $1,800

 

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