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May 20, 2015 - 3:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in hlom, history, batavia.

hlommay202015.jpg

The Holland Land Office Museum has replaced its decade-old banner with two new posters featuring Joseph Ellicott and Gen. Emory Upton.

The posters were created by Vinyl Sticks and sponsored by Ken Barrett Chevrolet and Cadillac.

Speaking of HLOM, June speakers:

Tuesday June 9th, 6 to 8 p.m., Genesee County Historian Michael Eula; Topic: Why do wars happen? Genesee County and the problems of human conflict 1775 – present

Friday June 12th, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Erica Wanecski; Topic: Health Resorts in the 19th Century

For more information call the Holland Land Office Museum, (585) 343-4727​ 

May 14, 2015 - 10:54am
Event Date and Time: 
May 16, 2015 - 11:00am to 2:00pm
This Saturday, May 16th, the Holland Land Office Museum and the Batavia International Peace Garden are celebrating a joint event! The Peace Garden's annual flag raising will take place at 11:00 am with speaker State Assemblyman Steve Hawley and the St. Joseph's Brass Ensemble providing patriotic music. At 1:00 pm, the Holland Land Office Museum will be burying its Bicentennial Time Capsule and keynote speakers include Genesee County historian Michael J. Eula and City of Batavia historian Larry Barnes.
April 19, 2015 - 4:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in history, Wiard Plow.

Photos from Albert Kurek. He isn't sure where the photos were taken. There's a sign that says "Wiard Plows" and a "Le Roy Plows" sign. The men are NYS Troopers and the photos are from 1921, Kurek said.

April 18, 2015 - 9:39am
Event Date and Time: 
April 25, 2015 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm

Presented by the Batavia Peace Garden
and the Holland Land Office Museum

EUCHRE TOURNAMENT

Saturday, April 25, 2015

1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

At the Holland Land Office Museum

$20.00 per person

Prizes for winners, payouts based on number of entrants.

Light refreshments and fun for all ages!

April 9, 2015 - 11:53am
posted by Holland Land Office in history, music, Holland Land Office Museum, civil war, live music.
Event Date and Time: 
April 10, 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

The 2015 Concert Series at the Holland Land Office Museum continues Friday, April 10th, with "A Night of Southern Music". Returning again are Dave Armitage and Dona LaValle, along with newcomer Al Capurso. Tickets are just $8.00 per person and can be purchased in advance or at the door.

 

March 21, 2015 - 10:36pm

The Daughters of the American Civil War sponsored a Civil War Ball on Friday evening at the Clarion Hotel.

The event commemorated:

  • 200th Anniversary of the War of 1812
  • 200th Anniversary of the Holland Land Purchase
  • 150th Anniversary of the End of the Civil War
  • 100th Anniversary of the City of Batavia

March 10, 2015 - 3:10pm
posted by Holland Land Office in history, music, Holland Land Office Museum, irish music.
Event Date and Time: 
March 13, 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

The Holland Land Office Museum kicks of its 2015 concert series with a night of music from the Emerald Isle.  

Local musicians Rich Conroy and Don Bouchard perform as "No Blarney", singing and strumming all of your favorite Irish ballads and drinking songs!

NOTICE: The event will be held at St. James Episcopal Church, 405 East Main Street in Batavia.  

Friday, March 13th, 2015 at 7:00 pm

Admission is $8.00 per person.  All proceeds go to the Holland Land Office Museum.  

February 14, 2015 - 10:56am
posted by Holland Land Office in history, local author, book discussion, book signing.
Event Date and Time: 
February 21, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm

Saturday, February 21st at 1:00 pm in the Holland Land Office Museum

Join local author and friend of the Holland Land Office Museum, Michael "Max" Szemplenski as he talks about his newly published (and e-published) works! Light refreshments will be provided. 

http://www.amazon.com/D-H-S-PHANTOM-TRACKS-Mission-Falls-ebook/dp/B00RR2...

January 30, 2015 - 10:30pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, history, hlom.

The Holland Land Office Museum opens a new exhibit at 1:30 p.m., Saturday, to commemorate 200th anniversary of the building it calls home.

The building was the third location built by Joseph Ellicott for the Holland Land Office, where Ellicott and his agents sold property to Western New York's first settlers.

That's why they call it the "Birthplace of Western New York."

Some of those first deeds, called indentures, will be on display in the new exhibit, along with surveying material as well as other items that made the land office a land office.

The exhibit will cover the entire period of land office history, including the War of 1812 and the impact of the Erie Canel on WNY trade.

Some of the exhibits will be affixed to panels covered with carpet (the better to hold Velcro) donated by Max Pies Furniture.

There's also information on how John Kennedy, the local educator and education reformer, saved the building for Batavia when Henry Ford tried to buy it and move it to his property in Michigan.

The exhibit kicks off a series of bicentennial events, including in May the burying of a time capsule. 

Fifth-graders from throughout Genesee County are being invited to write letters to their future selves to be buried in the time capsule.  

Any local resident can include a letter or other small item in the time capsule. Call the museum at (585) 343-4727 for more information.

The museum was first dedicated Oct. 13, 1894, and it will be rededicated Oct. 13 of this year.

Photo: Jeff Donahue, museum director, Jim Owen, museum board member, Phil Pies and Steve Pies of Max Pies Furniture.

January 27, 2015 - 10:37pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, history.

Tony Mancuso shared with us another picture of old Batavia from his family archive. This shot is of a group known as the Batavia Archers. He doesn't know the year nor can he identify most of the people in the photo. He'd love to hear from anybody who can. His father, Joe Mancuso, is second from the left. The young lad looking like Robin Hood, near the center of the photo with the feather in his cap, is Jim DiSalvo, currently owner of Applied Business Systems and of the home on Fargo Road known for its annual Christmas lights display.

January 12, 2015 - 2:49pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, history.

Tony Mancuso sent in this photo of his father, Joseph Laurence Mancuso, handing out NRA junior diplomas many years ago.

Tony's father did gun safety training and started Batavia Archers.

Tony said he doesn't know the other folks in the photo, but said it would be great to find out who they are. Recognize anybody? Leave a comment, if so.

October 18, 2014 - 10:33am
posted by Holland Land Office in history, family, food, live music, fun, dancing.
Event Date and Time: 
October 19, 2014 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

The Holland Land Office Museum and the Willow Bend Inn present a Fall Family Festival at the historic stage coach stop of the 1800s on Sunday, October 19th from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm.  Events include children's games and crafts, stagecoach travelers, Civil War and 1812 reenactors, musket firing, raffles, live music by Red Creek, food including wings, chicken fingers, fries, chili, burgers, and a cash bar.  This is a fundraiser for the Holland Land Office Museum.  Admission is $5.00 for adults and free for children.  There will be a cowboy/cowgirl costume contest for children as well.  

September 22, 2014 - 9:58am
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, business, history, hlom, p.w. minor.

Jane Read and Anne Marie Starowitz were at Holland Land Office Museum on Saturday morning setting up a new exhibition about the history of local shoemaker p.w. minor. 

The grand opening of the display is Oct. 2.

Employees and retirees of p.w. minor are invited to a preview at 3 p.m. The public is invited to a ribbon cutting at 6:30 p.m.

Many of the items in the display were provided on loan from The new p.w. minor.

 

September 16, 2014 - 9:36pm
posted by Amy Vlack in history, society, Museum, historical, tour.
Event Date and Time: 
October 4, 2014 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

Crawl through local history.  Visit the Holland Land Office Museum, Historical Society of Elba Museum, DAR House in Albion, the Cobblestone Museum in Childs and the Oak Orchard Lighthouse Museum on Point Breeze (all along scenic Route 98.)

July 13, 2014 - 2:38pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in history, Oakfield.

Master Sgt. Jason Earle (retired), a former Genesee County resident, was visiting the U.S. Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio when the word "Oakfield" caught his eye.

A bag of beans labeled "George W. Haxton & Son, Inc., Oakfield, N.Y." was in a display showcasing the USAF's efforts during the Berlin Airlift following World War II.

Earle said, "I'm quite sure there was a lot of war effort going on with the numerous factories the county had at the time, but nobody really thinks of what effect our local farmers had as well."

July 9, 2014 - 2:32pm
posted by Larry Barnes in batavia, history.

This is the last in a series of articles about the other communities, located east of the Rocky Mountains, that are named “Batavia.” This one is about Batavia, Arkansas, an unincorporated collection of houses and other buildings west of Harrison in Batavia Township, Boone County. It is nestled in a beautiful area of the Ozark Mountains.

At one time, Batavia, Ark., was an incorporated community. It had a post office, stores, hotels, a canning factory, a train depot, a stockyard, mills, a blacksmith shop, a school, and churches. Today, the railroad is gone, the post office closed, and only houses, three churches, and a small repair business still exist. A convenience store and the bar and grill into which it had recently been converted, were both out of business in the spring of this year.

The local historians assert that the community was named about 1880 by Rowell Underwood who became the first postmaster and named the town after his hometown of Batavia, N.Y. They also claim that Underwood had worked for four years in Genesee County as a surveyor for the Holland Land Co. The latter claim seems improbable because the Holland Land Co. had ceased its operations in Western New York in the mid-1830s. If the claim were true, it would make Underwood at least 70 years old at the time he became postmaster in Arkansas.

July 8, 2014 - 1:07pm
posted by Larry Barnes in batavia, history.

This is the sixth in a series of articles about the other communities, located east of the Rocky Mountains, that are named “Batavia.” This one is about Batavia, Iowa, an incorporated city of around 500 people located west of Fairfield in Jefferson County. The city (no, that is not a typo) is governed by a mayor and five councilmen.

According to local records, Batavia, Iowa, was laid out in 1846 by David Switzer, a county surveyor, for William McKee, Henry Crease, and Elijah O’Bannor, proprietors. Besides the proprietors, other early settlers included Henry Punnybecker, Joseph Crease, and Benjamin Abbertson. At that time, the community was named “Creaseville (or Creeseville)."

Seven years later, in 1853, in response to a petition presented to the State by William Hambrick with the unanimous consent of the people in the town, the name of Creaseville was changed to “Batavia.” Who Hambrick was, where he came from, and how he persuaded fellow residents to change the name is lost in history.

In a later Federal census, the same apparent Hambrick shows up in Western Iowa. In this census, he is identified as a German immigrant. This leads to the speculation that William Hambrick may have been a native of Passau, Germany, a city once named “Batavia” after the Batavii, the same Germanic tribe that temporarily gave its name to the Netherlands and, thus, indirectly to Batavia, N.Y. If this is correct, it would explain why Hambrick liked the name, but it still leaves a major mystery. How did Hambrick persuade the residents of Creaseville to change the name of their town, named after two of the first settlers, to the former name of a city in Germany?

July 6, 2014 - 1:35pm
posted by Larry Barnes in batavia, history.

This is the fifth in a series of articles about the other communities, located east of the Rocky Mountains, that are named “Batavia.” This one is about Batavia, Wisconsin, an unincorporated collection of houses and other buildings southwest of Sheboygan in Sheboygan County.

Local historians regard 1851 as the year in which Batavia, Wis., was founded, although there appear to have been settlers beginning in 1846. They claim that the name originated from the many early settlers who came from near Batavia, N.Y. However, unlike other communities, the process by which this naming came about is not recorded.

Batavia, Wis., grew into a fair-sized village. By 1900, there were two dry good stores, one furniture store, one hardware store, a carriage and wagon factory, a hotel, a dance hall, two blacksmith shops, a tin shop, a boot and shoe store, two churches, two schools, a sawmill, a grist mill, a cheese factory, an undertaker, a seamstress, a cigar factory, an egg flume (egg-shaped water conduit), an ice house, and a butcher shop.

Over time, this Batavia shrunk to the status of a hamlet. The one remaining school, an elementary school, had recently closed as of 2013. Most of the businesses and other enterprises listed above are gone. Nevertheless, the homes are generally well kept and the residents, who now generally find employment in other communities, appear to be reasonably prosperous.

However, for the most part, Batavia, Wis., is one of those places where, if you blink, you’ll miss it. Although there are two or three side streets, the community mainly consists of a single main street. One descends a grade to a small creek, Batavia Creek, and then ascends another grade while leaving town.

July 6, 2014 - 1:17am
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, history, Elm Street.

Joseph Gottstine found four $1 coins in the front yard of his mother-in-law, Stacy Lynn Neureuther, Saturday afternoon. What makes them such a neat find, is three of them are silver dollars from the 1880s. One is a silver dollar from 1971.

Gottstine's metal detector tells him if the hunk of metal under the ground is likely a penny, nickel, dime, quarter or silver dollar. Neureuther's yard on Elm Street is apparently filled with coins, though Gottstine only dug out the dollars.

Neureuther is curious how the coins got there. The house was built in 1910. Could construction workers have lost them? Or did they just accumulate over time.

She looked up the value of the coins online and the 19th Century pieces may be worth about $65 apiece.  

Gottstine said he took up the hobby of metal detecting about a year ago and this is probably his most exciting find yet.

July 5, 2014 - 2:35pm
posted by Larry Barnes in batavia, history.

This is the fourth in a series of articles about the other communities, located east of the Rocky Mountains, that are named “Batavia.” This one is about Batavia, Illinois, an incorporated city of around 27,000 people located west of Chicago in Kane County.

The city is governed by a mayor and 14 aldermen. Batavia, Ill., in its very earliest days, was a small settlement known as “Head of the Big Woods.” It was renamed “Batavia” in 1841 by Judge Isaac Wilson when he became the postmaster. Wilson, who previously lived in West Middlebury, Wyoming County, N.Y., had immigrated to Illinois in 1835. Historians in Illinois believe he wanted to honor Batavia, N.Y., where he would have seen service as a judge.

Batavia, Ill., is a very prosperous outer suburb of Chicago. The median home value in 2008 was $329,800 which compares to only around $85,000 for Batavia, N.Y. The estimated median family income in 2008 was $103,445. One reason for its wealth is its proximity to the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

There is a variety of attractions for local residents and visitors alike. For example, the Fox River flows through the center of the community and there are numerous developments, including a performance center, that capitalize on this waterway. Batavia was once billed as “the windmill capital of the world” because of the number of windmill manufacturers in the city. Today, restored examples of the windmills are on display near the Government Center. Batavia also has a museum depicting local history that is situated in a restored train station.

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