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rabies

June 13, 2018 - 2:08pm
posted by Billie Owens in rabies, Genesee County Health Department.

Press release from the GC Health Department:

Springtime is a perfect time to remind everyone about how dangerous rabies can be and what you can do to prevent exposure to you, your family and your pets.

Rabies is an infectious viral disease that can be fatal once symptoms (signs) show up. Rabies is a central nervous system disease, which attacks the brain and causes death. Rabies can be spread through bites, scratches, and saliva.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that each year, the majority of rabies cases occur in wild animals such as raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes. Though those are the most commonly reported animals with rabies, all mammals; including humans can be infected.

Therefore, it is recommended that pet owners and livestock owners get their animals vaccinated for rabies. In New York State, cats are the most often diagnosed domestic animals.

Sarah Balduf, Environmental Health director of Genesee and Orleans counties, reported that so far in 2018 there have been a total of 19 animals submitted for rabies testing between the two counties and three have tested positive for the fatal disease, complete details below.

In addition to these animals, the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has submitted one deer from Genesee County, which tested negative.

Genesee County -- Animals Tested for Rabies as of June 12:

Total Tested / Total Positive

  • Bat: 2 tested / 1 tested position 
  • Cat: 3 tested / 1 tested positive
  • Dog: 3 tested / 0 tested positive
  • Horse: 1 tested / 0 tested positive
  • Raccoon: 1 tested / 1 tested positive

One of the first signs of rabies in animals includes a change in the animal’s behavior.

Balduf said “Animals may become unusually aggressive, or may develop an unwarranted sense of fear or it may lose its fear of another animal. In wild animals, symptoms are as follows; affectionate or friendly, or it may attack anything in its path, due to excitable or irritable behavior. Other symptoms include staggering, convulsions, choking, foaming at the mouth and paralysis.”

Though rabies may take up to three months to fully develop, there are some early signs to look out for in humans.

These signs include fever, headache, sore throat, and unexplained tiredness. If an animal bite or scratch is not reported right after it happens, the disease can develop. The signs after development include, pain and tingling at the bite site, hallucinations, hydrophobia (fear of water), strong tightening of the muscles in the throat and paralysis starting at the infection site.

To protect yourself from rabies, people are encouraged to avoid feeding touching or adopting wild animals and stray domestic animals such as dogs and cats.

People are also encouraged to keep their pets (dogs, cats and ferrets), and livestock animals up-to-date on their rabies vaccination. Keeping a close eye on children who are playing outdoors and telling them the dangers of playing with wild or stray animals (alive or dead) is also highly recommended.

It is very important to make sure you are not attracting wildlife to your home. You can do this by making sure that your garbage cans are not accessible by wild life and you don’t leave pet food out unattended.

Anyone who has been bitten by any animal or who otherwise may have been exposed to rabies, needs to "Capture and Call." If you can do so safely, being careful to not damage the head/brain, capture the animal and call your local health department or a doctor to report the incident. Capturing the animal is vital in order for it to be tested for rabies.

Testing will confirm if the animal is infected with the virus or not, ensuring that only those who need treatment get it. In addition, make sure you clean any wounds immediately with soap and water.

(*If a bat is found in a room where there are unattended children, someone sleeping or someone who cannot speak for him/herself or your family pet, do not let the bat out of the house. To learn how to capture a bat safely, view a short video at www.health.ny.gov/diseases/ communicable/zoonoses/rabies/.)

A doctor or health department will determine if they need to be vaccinated with rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (RPEP). A person who is exposed and has never been vaccinated against rabies should get four doses of rabies vaccine — one dose right away, and additional doses on the third, seventh and 14th days.

People who have weakened immune systems may require a fifth dose of vaccine, as determined by their doctor.

The dosage and cost for an individual to be treated with RPEP depends on the individual’s weight. The cost to treat an individual for rabies is estimated to be about $3,750. Local health departments will work with the patient’s insurance company but what cannot be covered by insurance is paid out by the county, and ultimately you, the taxpayer.

Another reason it is important to love your own animals and leave the rest alone. So far in 2018, 20 individuals have been treated for RPEP in Genesee County and four people have been treated for RPEP in Orleans County. These numbers could be lower if animals were safely captured and submitted for testing.

To protect your pets from rabies, please visit our upcoming anti-rabies clinic in Genesee County:

  • Genesee County: 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 16: Genesee County Fair Grounds, 5031 E. Main Street Road, Batavia.

For information about Health Department services contact the Genesee County Health Department at 344-2580, ext. 5555, or visit their website at www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/health/index.html 

June 9, 2017 - 3:08pm

Public Health Column from the Genesee County Health Department:

Do you know that mammals, including humans, can contract rabies? Bats, raccoons, foxes and skunks are assumed to be infected with this deadly virus and must be avoided. In any case with animals, it is better to love your own and leave others alone!

What is rabies? How is it transmitted? What are Signs & Symptoms?

Rabies is a virus that attacks the nervous system of mammals, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. There are more than 4,000 different species of mammals, all of which are vertebrates (they have a backbone or spine), are endothermic (“warm-blooded”), have hair on their bodies, and produce milk to feed their babies.

Transmission of the rabies virus usually begins when the saliva of an infected host is passed to an uninfected mammal. The most common way rabies is transmitted is through the bite and virus-containing saliva of an infected host. Other routes include contamination of mucous membranes (i.e., eyes, nose, mouth), aerosol transmission, and organ transplantations.

The first symptoms of rabies may be very similar to those of the flu including general weakness or discomfort, fever or headache. These symptoms may last for days. There may also be discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the bite site, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral (brain) dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation.

As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations and insomnia. Common signs of rabies in animals are; nocturnal (night) animals active during daylight, foaming of the mouth, overly aggressive, or uncoordinated. The acute period of disease typically ends after 2 to 10 days.  Once clinical signs of rabies appear, the disease is nearly always fatal, and treatment is typically supportive.

What to do if potentially exposed to rabies?

“If you are bitten, or if infectious material (such as saliva) from a wild or stray animal gets into your eyes, nose, mouth, or a cut, wash the area with soap/water and call your doctor or local County Health Department immediately. Please note that bats have very tiny, razor-sharp teeth so you may not feel or see a bite mark,” said Sarah Balduf, director of Environmental Health for Genesee & Orleans Counties.

IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to safely capture the suspect animal if it has or may have been in contact with people, pets or livestock so it can be tested for rabies. Capturing the suspect animal for testing is important because unnecessary medical treatment to people and confinement of pets or livestock may be avoidable.

“To diagnosis the rabies virus in animals testing the tissue of the brain is needed. Keep this in mind when capturing the animal because damage to the head/brain can cause it to be untestable. If treatment is recommended, it consists of a series of four shots, over a period of 14 days. An additional fifth dose of rabies vaccine is given on day 28 to immunocompromised patients (less capable of battling infections),” Balduf said.

*A link to a video on how to safely capture a bat is located below.

How do you to prevent rabies?

Rabies is 100-percent preventable! Here are some ways to protect your families and animals.

·      Don't feed, touch or adopt wild animals, stray dogs or cats, including the babies.

·      Be sure your pet dogs, cats and ferrets as well as horses and valuable livestock animals are up-to-date on their rabies vaccinations. Vaccination protects pets if they are exposed to rabid animals. Pets too young to be vaccinated (under 3 months old) should be kept indoors and allowed outside only under direct observation.  Keep family pets indoors at night. Do not leave them outside unattended or let them roam free.

·      Do not attract wild animals to your home or yard. Keep your property free of stored bird seed or other foods that may attract wild animals. Feed pets indoors.  Tightly cap or put away garbage cans. Board up any openings to your attic, basement, porch or garage. Cap your chimney with screens. Bats can get in spaces as small as the width of a pencil.

·      If nuisance wild animals are living in parts of your home, consult with a nuisance wildlife control expert about having them removed. You can find wildlife control experts, who work on a fee-for-service basis, in your telephone directory under pest control.

·      Teach children not to touch any animal they do not know and to tell an adult immediately if they are bitten by any animal.

·      If a wild animal is on your property, let it wander away. Bring children and pets indoors and alert neighbors who are outside. You may contact a nuisance wildlife control expert who will remove the animal for a fee.

Upcoming Dog, Cat and Ferret Anti-Rabies Vaccination Clinics:

Clinics are free to county residents -- charges may apply for out of county residents.

Donations are appreciated -- for complete details visit the county health department’s website.

Genesee County Clinics are held on Thursdays from 4 - 7 p.m.:

  • Aug. 17th, Genesee County Fairgrounds, 5031 E. Main St., Batavia
  • Sept. 21st, Pembroke Highway Department, 1145 Main Road (Route 5), Pembroke
  • Oct. 19th, Le Roy Village Highway Garage, 58 N. Main St., Le Roy

For more information on rabies, how to catch a bat safely, and much more visit, https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/zoonoses/rabies/

For information about Health Department services contact,

June 21, 2016 - 3:24pm
posted by Billie Owens in Public Health, pets, rabies, health advisory, news, Announcements.

Press release:

Genesee, Orleans and Wyoming Public Health Advisory

Keeping Wild Animals – Unsafe, Illegal and Inhumane! 

RABIES ALERT! STOP! and THINK! Do NOT touch! It can kill! Any mammal is able to get rabies, it is very important to get your pets vaccinated and not to touch or handle any stray or wild animals including baby animals and bats.

“The Health Department has had several cases where people have taken in wild animals (babies) and / or played with stray cats and dogs which have led to unnecessary post exposure treatments and/or having to put the animals down (euthanize) them to be tested," stated Paul Pettit, director of Genesee and Orleans County Health Departments.

"Because rabies is in New York State ALL wild and stray animals that come in direct contact (bitten or scratched with broken skin and saliva exchange in open wounds or mucous membranes – eyes, nose, and mouth) with humans and domesticated animals are assumed to have rabies...even if they don’t.

"The only way to know is by testing the animal, which means it has to be euthanized. Whether the animal has rabies or does not, it is dead. Not only are you putting your family and friends at risk of a deadly disease, those who think they are ‘helping’ an animal could be giving it a death sentence."

Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that attacks the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Infected mammals can spread rabies virus to humans and other mammals through the saliva and spinal fluids. Rabies is almost always fatal once symptoms appear.

Pettit notes, “It is illegal to possess any wild animal that naturally lives in the state. Not only do these animals have the potential to spread rabies, but they often carry parasites, or may carry diseases that can be spread from animal to human.

"It is important to leave wild animals alone! More times than not baby animals are not orphaned but are kept hidden while the parents can hunt for food or stay away to protect them from predators. Nature will take care of nature. Wild animals have had to be put down because humans have interfered in their lives.”

The best way to keep pets safe from rabies is to vaccinate them and keep their shots up-to-date.

By avoiding contact with stray or wild animals, saving the bat / animal that may have had contact with humans / domestic animals, and reporting an incident to your local Health Department, we may be able to avoid unnecessary medical treatment that averages over $3,000 per person.

Take note of the upcoming FREE anti-rabies immunization clinics for dogs, cats and ferrets. The animal must be three months of age or older. Additional clinics can be found by checking the web sites or calling your local Health Department. Check your county web site for pre-registration instructions. Each dog, cat, and ferret must be accompanied by someone who can control it:

  • Genesee County: Thursday, Aug. 18, at the Genesee County Fairgrounds, 5031 E. Main St., Batavia. The clinic runs from 4 to 7 p.m. Dog, cat and ferret vaccinations are free for Genesee County residents. A $5 voluntary donation per dog, cat, or ferret, is appreciated to offset clinic expenses. Non-county residents must pay a mandatory $5 fee for each dog, cat, and ferret immunized. Speed up the registration process during the clinic by registering your pets ahead of time! To pre-register your pets visit: http://www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/health/click_here_to_pre-register.html
  • Wyoming County: Wednesday, July 20, at the Attica Town Highway Department, Route 98, Attica. The clinic runs from 6 to 8 p.m. (Registrations until 7:45 p.m.) This is a FREE clinic to Wyoming County residents ~ Donations are gratefully accepted! Out of county residents will be charged $10 per animal.
  • Orleans County: Saturday, Aug. 27, at the Shelby Highway Department, 4062 Shelby Basin Road, Medina. The clinic runs from 9 to 11:30 a.m. You must arrive no later than 11:30 to ensure that you will be served. Clinic staff reserves the right to decline service to late (after 11:30) arrivals. To pre-register go to https://apps.health.ny.gov/doh2/applinks/cdmspr/ this site will have an Orleans County button/link before the scheduled clinics.
  • For information on Health Department services contact,

  • Genesee County Health Department at: 344-258,0 ext. 5545 or visit their website at www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/health/index.html. Visit Facebook at Genesee County Health Department and Twitter at GeneseeCoHealthDept.

  •  Wyoming County Health Department at: 786-8890 or visit their web site at   www.wyomingco.net/health/main.html. 

  •  Orleans County Health Department at: 589-3278 or check out our website at: www.orleansny.com/publichealth.

            Visit Facebook and Twitter: the user name for both is OrleansCoHealth.

August 7, 2014 - 2:19pm
posted by David Whitcroft in rabies.
Event Date and Time: 
August 21, 2014 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

Genesee County Health Department is offering an anti-rabies immunization clinic on Thursday, August 21, 2014 from 4 pm until 7pm at the Genesee County Fairgrounds located in the Town of Batavia; at 5031 East Main Street, Batavia, NY. Vaccination will be offered to dogs, cats and ferrets. There is no charge for the residents of Genesee County, out of county pet owners will be asked for a $5.00 donation. Please bring your pets with the proper restraints; on leashes, in cages etc. Be prepared to supply pet owner information; name, address, telephone contact info, etc.

May 6, 2014 - 7:26am
posted by Howard B. Owens in health, rabies, Public Health, Insource Urgent Care.

Residents who have a run in with a potentially or known rabid animal will have another option for treatment starting June 1.

On Monday, the Human Services Committee approved a contract with Insource Urgent Care that would allow the County Public Health Department to refer clients to Insource.

The contract isn't exclusive. Patients would still be able to go to the emergency room at UMMC or the urgent care clinic at St. Jerome's if they wished.

"Insource offers a lower rate and the feedback we've been getting is it's a better experience," said David Whitcroft, environmental health director. "It's a faster in and out for the patients."

Whitcroft said Insource had sought out the contract and this was an opportunity "to enter into a contract more favorable to us.

The county pays for the initial exam and the first round of treatment, but booster shots are provided by the health department at County Building #2.

"St. Jerome's has worked out really well for us and we have a good relationship, but this is one more option," Whitcroft said.

The full County Legislature will be asked to approve the arrangement at its next meeting.

April 1, 2014 - 12:33pm
Event Date and Time: 
April 3, 2014 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

Genesee County Health Department is offering an anti-rabies immunization clinic on Thursday April 3, 2014 from 4pm until 7pm at the Pembroke Highway Department located on the NE corner of Route 77 and Route 5; at 1145 Main Road (Route 5), Pembroke, NY. Vaccination will be offered to dogs, cats and ferrets. There is no charge for the residents of Genesee County; out of county pet owners will be asked for a $5.00 donation. Please bring your pets with proper restraints; on leashes, in cages etc. Be prepared to supply pet owner information; name, address, telephone contact info, etc.

December 10, 2013 - 9:02am
posted by David Whitcroft in pets, free, rabies, Genesee County Health Department.
Event Date and Time: 
January 23, 2014 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

Genesee County Health Department is offering an anti-rabies immunization clinic on Thursday January 23, 2014 from 4 pm until 7pm at the Salvation Army Gym located in the City of Batavia; at 529 East Main Street, Batavia, NY. Vaccination will be offered to dogs, cats and ferrets. There is no charge for the residents of Genesee County, out of county pet owners will be asked for a $5.00 donation. Please bring your pets with the proper restraints; on leashes, in cages etc. Be prepared to supply pet owner information; name, address, telephone contact info, etc.

September 10, 2013 - 12:51pm
posted by David Whitcroft in pets, free, rabies.
Event Date and Time: 
September 19, 2013 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

Genesee County Health Department is offering an anti-rabies immunization clinic on Thursday September 19, 2013 from 4 pm until 7pm at the Pembroke Highway Department located in the Town of Pembroke; at 1145 Main Road (Route 5), Pembroke, NY. Vaccination will be offered to dogs, cats and ferrets. There is no charge for the residents of Genesee County, out of county pet owners will be asked for a $5.00 donation. Please bring your pets with the proper restraints; on leashes, in cages etc. Be prepared to supply pet owner information; name, address, telephone contact info, etc.

October 15, 2012 - 3:20pm
posted by David Whitcroft in cats, dogs, Le Roy, free, rabies, clinic.
Event Date and Time: 
October 18, 2012 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

Genesee County Health Department is offering an anti-rabies immunization clinic on Thursday October 18, 2012 from 4pm til 7pm at the Le Roy Village Highway Garage located at 58 North Street in the Village of Le Roy. Vaccination will be offered to dogs, cats and ferrets. There is no charge for the residents of Genesee County, out of county pet owners will be asked for a $5.00 donation. Please bring your pets with the proper restraints; on leashes, in cages etc. Be prepared to supply pet owner information; name, address, telephone contact info, etc.

May 3, 2012 - 12:29pm
posted by David Whitcroft in Le Roy, free, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
May 10, 2012 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

April 5, 2012 - 2:23pm
posted by David Whitcroft in cats, dogs, free, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
April 12, 2012 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

October 19, 2011 - 11:19am
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
October 20, 2011 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will be having its last FREE anti-rabies Immunization clinic for 2011 this Thursday, October 20th from 4-7pm at the Leroy Village Highway Garage (located at  58 North Street, Leroy).  This clinic is for dogs, cats, and ferrets.

The clinic is free for Genesee County residents.  Out-of-County residents must pay a $5.00 fee per each dog, cat, or ferret vaccinated.

We ask that each dog, cat, and ferret be accompanied by someone who can control it; along with either being on a leash or in a carrier.

August 8, 2011 - 4:42pm
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, free, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
August 18, 2011 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will be having a FREE Anti-Rabies Immunization Clinic on Thursday, August 18, 2011 for Dogs, Cats, and Ferrets.  The Clinic will be located at the Genesee County Fairgrounds (5031 East Main St. Batavia) from 4-7pm.

The Clinic is FREE to Genesee County Residents.  Out of County residents MUST pay a fee of $5.00 per each Dog, Cat, and Ferret vaccinated.

We ask that each Dog, Cat, and Ferret be accompanied by someone who can control it.

May 2, 2011 - 9:53am
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
May 5, 2011 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will be having a FREE Anti-Rabies Immunization Clinic on Thursday May 5, 2011 from 4pm - 7pm for dogs, cats, and ferrets.  The Clinic will be at the LeRoy Village Highway Garage located at 58 North Street, Leroy.

The Clinic is FREE for Genesee County residents.  For non-County residents there is a fee of $5.00 per dog, cat, or ferret immunized.

We ask that each dog, cat, and ferret be accompanied by someone who can control it.

March 29, 2011 - 2:27pm
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
April 7, 2011 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will be having a FREE anti-rabies immunization clinic for dogs, cats, and ferrets on Thursday, April 7, 2011 from 4pm to 7pm.  The Clinic will be held at the Pembroke Highway Department located at 1145 Main Road (Route 5) in Pembroke.

There is no fee for Genesee County residents. Out of county residents have a fee of $5.00 per dog, cat, or ferret immunized.

Each dog, cat, or ferret MUST be accompanied by someone who can control it.

December 28, 2010 - 4:26pm
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, clinic, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
January 20, 2011 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will he having a FREE Anti-Rabies Immunization Clinic January 20, 2011 from 4-7pm.  The clinic will be held at PETCO-Batavia (4226 Veteran's Memorial Drive).

Each dog, cat, and ferret MUST be accompanied by soemone who can control it.

Vaccinations are FREE to Genesee County Residents.  Non-county residents must pay a mandatory $5.00 fee for each dog, cat, and ferret immunized.

If you have any questions or need any further information please contact the Health Department at (585)344-2580 x5569.

October 20, 2010 - 2:47pm
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, immunizations.
Event Date and Time: 
October 21, 2010 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will be having an Anti-Rabies Immunization Clinic for Dogs, Cats, and Ferrets on Thursday October 21, 2010.  The Clinic is being held at the Leroy Village Highway Garage (58 North Street) from 4pm to 7pm.

Each dog, cat, or ferret MUST be accompanied by someone who can control it.

Vaccinations are FREE for Genesee County residents.  Non-county residents must pay a Mandatory $5.00 fee for each pet immunized.  

If you have any questions please contact the Health Department @ (585)344-2580 x.5569.

 

September 10, 2010 - 11:19am
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, vaccations.
Event Date and Time: 
September 16, 2010 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department will be having an Anit-Rabies Immunization Clinic on Thursday September 16, 2010.  The clinic will be from 4pm to 7pm at the Pembroke Highway Department (1145 Route 5, Pembroke).

Each dog, cat, and ferret must be accompanied by someone who can control it.

The immunizations are FREE to Genesee County residents but there is a $5.00 fee for each dog, cat, and ferret immunized for out of county residents.

If you have any questions please contact the Health Department @ 585-344-2580 ext.5569.

 

August 16, 2010 - 11:09am
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, vaccinations.
Event Date and Time: 
August 19, 2010 - 4:00pm to 7:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department is hosting a FREE Rabies clinic for dogs, cats, and ferrets.

The Clinic will be Thursday August 19, 2010 from 4pm to 7pm at the Genesee County Fairgrounds.   5031 East Main Street Batavia

Each dog, cat, and ferret MUST be accompanied by someone who can control it.

Dog, Cat, and Ferret vaccinations are FREE for Genesee County residents.  Non-county residents must pay a mandatory $5.00 fee for each animal immunized. 

We look forward to seeing you and your pet at the Fairgrounds!!

May 21, 2010 - 10:01am
posted by Christy Stoddard in pets, rabies, clinics.
Event Date and Time: 
June 12, 2010 - 10:00am to 2:00pm

The Genesee County Health Department division of Environmental Health will be having an Anti-Rabies Immunization Clinic Saturday, June 12, 2010.  The clinic will be located at Centennial Park, Batavia from 10am to 2pm.  We will be in the corner near Park Ave and Ellicott Ave. 

Each dog, cat, or ferrett MUST be accompanied by someone who can control it.

This clinic is FREE to Genesee County Residents.  Out of county residents must pay a $5.00 fee per dog, cat, or ferrett immunized.

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