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Clinton Crossings

August 18, 2021 - 11:48pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, village of le roy, Eric Biscaro, Clinton Crossings.

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One after another over the course of an hour and forty minute public hearing tonight, residents of East Avenue, Poplar Lane, Orchard Drive and South Street in the Village of Le Roy took the microphone – letting Batavia developer Eric Biscaro know how much they love their “jewel” of a neighborhood.

Biscaro, owner of Armor Building Supply, stood his ground, though, responding that his proposal to build 30 duplex units for tenants age 50 and over on a 20-acre parcel off East Avenue and open up eight single-family home building lots by extending the street would be a good thing for the community – creating more housing opportunities for older people and adding to the tax base.

The setting for the public hearing called by Village Mayor Greg Rogers was Memorial Auditorium at Trigon Park, where about 85 people – most of them from the area where Biscaro hopes to build – showed up either to voice their opinions or to hear what others had to say.

The project has been on the table for several months, with Biscaro proposing his Le Roy version of Batavia’s Clinton Crossings Adult Community to the Genesee County Planning Board in early April.

Since then, it has encountered considerable opposition, primarily from residents near the identified location who fear a substantial increase in traffic along East Avenue – as currently that is the only way to access the proposed development – and are concerned about stormwater runoff from the complex.

Village board members heard more of the same tonight, as well as impassioned pleas from longtime homeowners to put the complex somewhere in the Town of Le Roy as to not disturb their peaceful setting.

Maurice Turner of 24 East Ave., a transplanted Rochesterian who said he and his wife purchased the home about 21 years ago, may have summed up the neighborhood feeling the best when he addressed the crowd about two-thirds of the way through the public hearing.

“When I looked at this place, I said, ‘This is a jewel … this is sweet,’” he said. “One way in, one way out, and that particular day, I didn’t see a lot of traffic. But what I did see … is anybody that can’t see this must be a fool … I’m saying that because of the passion in my heart that I have for the area that I live in.”

Turner said he thinks the Biscaro project – which would need a zoning change from Residential to Planned Unit Development – would be best suited for the town, but if it had to be in the village, he suggested that village officials “think outside of the box” by putting in an access road from Asbury Road, and leave East Avenue and the surrounding streets as is.

Mayor Rogers opened the meeting by outlining the Village Board’s reasoning for considering the project, stating that the dwellings would generate needed tax money and fill the need for housing for seniors.

He said the village was committed to spending up to $1 million on improvements to East Avenue, citing a 1988 resolution that authorizes the village to fund projects that would enhance future growth.

Biscaro followed with a quick overview of the project, using a video of the set-up at Clinton Crossings and photos featuring trees and other buffering around the Le Roy parcel.

He said each lot of the senior development would measure 100- by 150-feet, and could be accessed by a main exit off East Avenue toward the center of the parcel and, in an emergency situation, from South Avenue onto East Avenue.

Twenty-four of the 30 one-floor units would measure 1,200 square feet plus a one-car garage and six of them would measure 1,450 square feet with a two-car garage.

He stressed that the development would not be visible from the south, north and west as long as the trees are there (which he promised to make sure they are retained), and about 40 percent of it could be seen from Asbury Road to the east.

Biscaro also spoke about the success of the Clinton Crossings complex, noting that residents there and those who live along the adjacent Stringham Drive co-exist without any issues.

Although Rogers set ground rules, asking for an orderly process to accommodate those who wished to speak, the public comment session began on an emotionally-charged note when Tom Condidorio, at a high decibel level, said that the proposal to put in a PUD “is not the future of our village.”

“If anybody here thinks it is, stand up and tell me please. Any LeRoyan in this village, (if) you think this belongs here, stand up and tell me!” he shouted.

He then contended that the Fussells, who own the land to be purchased by Biscaro, will be making a lot of money (a notion later challenged by E. Robert Fussell and his daughter, Anna Sorensen, who said they have been paying taxes on that land for many years).

Condidorio, an East Avenue resident, went on for a couple minutes, mentioning that he was “passionate” about the subject, before Rogers stepped in to keep the situation from escalating.

About 16 more people spoke after that (most, but not all against the project) before Rogers wrapped things up. He said the board would not be taking any action tonight, but would resume the public hearing at its Sept. 15 meeting.

“We want to give it proper thought and follow up ... and do our due diligence,” he said, advising that the board will provide more information about traffic patterns in the village and continue to obtain data about water runoff.

Previously, Biscaro said that he intends to ensure that no more water will run off of the property than what takes place now.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC HEARING

Updated: 8 a.m., 8/19

  • Rogers, on putting the development in the Town of Le Roy: "All of the building is going on in the town. The farmers don't want to lose that good, valuable farmland. And the biggest consideration ... of people is in the village." To which Condidorio replied, "Then, let's make those homes; let's make it residential (not rental)."
  • Biscaro, on the possibility of receiving tax incentives (from the Genesee County Economic Development Center): "I don't know yet. If we get one, it will be the first one in the county ... for residential building. And the reason is the 2018 housing study for Genesee County is begging for housing like this." To which Rogers replied, "We won't support a PILOT (Payment in Lieu of Taxes) that comes out of ... the taxpayers' pockets."
  • Sorensen, on the need for senior housing: "People need housing. These are beautiful places. I heard originally that they were horrible ... so I went out and looked at them. I disagree."
  • Rene Robinson, Poplar Lane, on demographics in Le Roy: "(Per 2018 census) over 55 is the smallest growing population, the lowest population of LeRoyans that we have. So, to focus an entire development on over 55 and then state you are going to use taxpayer money because it's earmarked for future growth of residents is really not reasonable." Biscaro's response was that older people would be able to stay in Le Roy because of this type of housing, and by selling their homes, it would open up housing for younger people.
  • Barb Anchor Elliott, East Avenue, on safety pertaining to traffic: "The only access to getting into this development is going to be East Avenue ... you can park on the east side of East Avenue, and if you park on the east side, there really isn't room for two cars to get by. So, I can not see how construction vehicles and all of that can come down East Avenue and maintain the safety." Other speakers agreed with her assessment, adding that the traffic is already heavy in the morning when school is in session. She added that if the (Great Lakes) cheese factory doesn't go through on Route 19, north of the village, that would be a good place for the development.
  • Biscaro, on traffic flow at Clinton Crossings: "There's nowhere that traffic. Out of our 40 units, five have no vehicle, and only two units that have two vehicles. Even though that place is 55 and over, the average age is 75, 76 years old."
  • Jackie Whiting, on Village Board's responsibilities: "Whether I agree or disagree is neither here nor there. Their job is to investigate opportunities for the village, looking into all possibilities. They may say yes, they may say no ... whether I agree or disagree, I thank you guys for your time and effort ..."
  • Florence Condidorio, East Avenue, asked why professional environmental studies weren't done beforehand. Rogers replied that the flood plain and stormwater plan are the developer's responsibility, and the Village Board's responsibility is to review those plans (in this case utlizing Clark Patterson Lee engineering firm). Biscaro said he contracted with an engineer "and there will be less water now than is coming off currently."
  • Dwight Kanyuk, attorney representing Condidorios, on the need to have State Environmental Quality Review Assessments: "It's up to this board under SEQR whether there may be a significant adverse impact of their project on the environment." He said it doesn't appear that the correct procedures were followed in accordance with Type 1 SEQR regulations.
  • Ron Pangrazio, East Avenue, on water problems that prohibited further development of that street: "(After investigation), they told us, 'We're not giving you any state aid to put in those streets -- it's too much money; it's too wet. They turned it down, and we went someplace else."  He said water problem needs to be corrected, and the development "is putting the cart before the horse."
  • E. Robert Fussell, property owner, in response to Pangrazio: Stating that the homes on East Avenue were developed by his father, he said, "That (water) is not the reason (more homes weren't built). The reason is the village refused, and this was decades ago, a lift station to that my father could make any money at all developing land past Pangrazio's and Condidorio's houses on East Avenue." He said he believes people should be able to live in the village, and the Biscaro proposal presents an opportunity for older people to do that. 

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Photo at top: Maurice Turner presents his views about the proposed housing development off East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy. Behind him is Eric Biscaro. Photo at bottom: Twenty acre parcel that Biscaro is hoping to develop. Photos by Mike Pettinella.

Previously: Rogers: Housing project in the Village of Le Roy hinges on science-based stormwater retention plan

Previously: Developer, mayor address criticism; stage is set for May 19 public hearing on Le Roy senior housing development

May 4, 2021 - 12:09pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, notify, Clinton Crossings, Eric Biscaro, village of le roy.

The Batavia businessman and Le Roy municipal leader at the forefront of a proposed 60-unit senior residential complex off East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy on Monday afternoon responded to objections about the project -- calling the development a quality, well-thought-out venture that will benefit tenants and the community at large.

Eric Biscaro, owner of Armor Building Supply in Batavia and several other construction material-related companies in and around Western New York, and Le Roy Village Mayor Greg Rogers returned phone calls from The Batavian after the posting of a story reporting concerns from LeRoyans Tom Frew and Jim Gomborone.

Biscaro is looking to construct 30 duplex patio home rentals on a 20-acre parcel that runs east of East Avenue. The plan also calls for the development and sale of eight single-family home building lots along an extension of that street.

Frew, a member of the Le Roy Town/Village Planning Board, said he was against the idea for several reasons, primarily that the duplex units are not compatible with homes in the East Avenue, Orchard Drive and Poplar Lane (where Frew lives) area; that there would be a significant increase in traffic; and that it would cost the village considerably to extend infrastructure on East Avenue to accommodate Biscaro.

Gomborone said he is worried about water running off the development into a stream and possibly flooding his Mercy Grove and Le Roy Country Club properties on East Main Street.

Noting that he read the story with their objections, Biscaro said he wanted to set the record straight about the project, which he said will likely be a $9 million to $10 million investment.

On the zoning issue:

“One question that came up is that we’re going to change an R-1 (Residential) District to a Planned Unit Development area. We won’t change anybody’s zoning, including the eight lots that are proposed on the front of this. Those eight lots will be an R-1 District. The only thing that requires a PUD is my senior housing proposal for the 20 acres there.

On extending East Avenue and connecting to South Avenue:

“The planning board’s concerns were that nobody wants to put in dead ends anymore or cul-de-sacs because people get trapped in there if something major happens down the street. What we will do – because we want the project to go through, and yes, we will be putting more people there – is to let me recondition that South Avenue road that’s there. It’s 18-feet wide and there’s a base in there right now. You could drive down in with a pickup truck right now.”

Biscaro said he met with Le Roy highway and fire officials and went over a plan where he would clear trees and brush, and would lay crushed stone over it to make it passable.

“I’m not going to pave it – I’m not a road builder – but I will make it very nicely passable for a fire lane that’s emergency use only, so no one is ever trapped there. We’ll have a great fire exit for all of East Avenue and those two side streets (Poplar Lane and Orchard Drive). I would think the residents would look at this as a nice addition, and hopefully, they’ll never need it, but if they do, it will be there.”

On the building lots:

“There will be eight new lots for sale for single-family homes. The village is looking for more places for younger people to buy, and this gives them eight more lots to do that. I would presume that those houses, when they do build, will be the highest assessed properties in the neighborhood. I don’t see them lower than the houses currently in the R-1 District, which are nice houses but they were built in the 1960s and ‘70s.”

He said the new houses and rental units must pass current building and energy codes.

“They are great buildings that we have built. If you look at Clinton Crossings in Batavia (a similar project that he put up about 15 years ago) the quality is fabulous. We use radiant floor heating instead of forced air. That will cost me 2 ½ times (more) than what it would cost if we put in forced air heat and air conditioning – and it’s way more efficient and way more comfortable. That’s why seniors love to stay in my place.”

On the possibility of decreased property values:

“If you go down Stringham Drive and Violet Lane (in Batavia, next to Clinton Crossings), homeowners there had the same concerns. We did a study on what my project did to them and the assessments over the 10 years that we were there went up 15 to 18 percent. Nobody got hurt. You can talk to anybody who backs up to us and they’ll all say that we are wonderful neighbors and nobody got hurt one bit.”

On increased traffic in the area:

“At Clinton Crossings, we have 40 units. Five of the residents don’t drive and only three have more than one car and more than one driver in the home. I don’t even have an average of one driver and vehicle per house, and they may go out only twice or three times a week.”

On flooding of Le Roy Country Club:

“I cannot go in there and have any more water leave that property when I’m done that leaves it right now. I have to submit a plan to the DEC (Department of Environmental Conservation) and they have to approve per their stormwater retention requirements. Once we get the topography, we will be able to design this plan and get the DEC to approve it. We certainly will (have) way less leaving there but whether it will be zero or not, I can’t say at this point. I have no question that we will develop a fine stormwater plan and leave it way better than it is right now.”

On the cost to the village:

“Mr. Frew is under the impression that the village is going to put in all of the water, sewer, gas and electric in there for me. I wish that was true. Down that street, anywhere that has anything to do with the street or my project, I put the water and sewer in. On the street, itself, when I get done with it and they inspect it and it’s all done to code, I give to the village – it’s theirs. But I put it in at my expense.”

Biscaro said the village is going to start with infrastructure work extending about 500 feet, taking in the first four building lots and the entrance to the development.

“I’m doing building lots for the first time because that’s what the village is looking for, but I don’t think they’ll be that profitable. The village never developed that street because it needs a sewer pump station with a backup generator in there, which is a very expensive item (probably around $60,000 to $80,000). But by putting those eight lots in and my 60 units, now we can afford it.”

In closing, Biscaro said the vast majority of rental units will be 1,200 square feet with one and a half bathrooms and an attached garage.

“For this one, I’m going to put in a couple that are a little bigger and have a two-car garage. People have asked me to do that. And I, myself, would like one of those and I’ll probably end up living there when this project is done.”

MAYOR: NOT DONE ON A WHIM

Le Roy Mayor Rogers said the village has done its due diligence and has a plan that will save money and, ultimately, expand the village’s tax base.

“We are not hiding the fact that we are investing in this road in an attempt to broaden our tax base,” Rogers said. “It’s a dedicated village street – an extension of East Avenue around to South Avenue over to South Street. We’re not going down South Avenue at this time – that will be for somebody else. We plan on blocking it off for emergency access only.”

Rogers said the village will get help from the Town of Le Roy and Genesee County on the road, and has reached out to the Genesee County Economic Development Center to see if it could assist.

“This wasn’t something that was done on a whim. We plan on doing the work ourselves and using CHIPS (Consolidated Local Street and Highway Improvement Program) money that we have set aside for a project like this – which is over $600,000. The developer is going to take care of all the infrastructure under the ground,” he explained.

“If we were to go to the end of the street and put it out for bid, Clark Patterson Lee (engineering firm) said it would be roughly $1.8 million to do it. This is our plan to get started with our own stuff to see how far we can go. We don’t plan on borrowing any money. Yes, we are going to spend resources that we have set aside for roads; that part is true.”

PROMOTING THE BUILDING LOTS

Rogers said he doesn’t see “consistency with the neighborhood” as an issue and is convinced that the project is a good investment for the village.

“The closest that the development is going to be is 100 from the back property line of any resident. It’s going to be the same thing that is on Route 33 in Batavia – Clinton Crossings,” he said. “And the building lots are what we’re really looking to promote; getting some new, single-family homes in that thing, along the street (east side of East Avenue).”

The mayor said it likely would take 10 years for the village to get a return on its investment, but looked beyond that to the increase in the village’s assessed value that would be applied against the school tax rate.

“This is something I thought needed to be done when I started in office,” Rogers added. “In a perfect world, let’s get it started; get down the street and have the developer come in and do South Avenue. The building lots over there would be absolutely gorgeous.

“Honestly, I’ve got three years left in office and I could have sat back and made my life easy and not done a thing. But I didn’t think it was the right thing to do.”

A public hearing on the project is scheduled for 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 19 at the Le Roy Village Hall at 3 W. Main St.

May 3, 2021 - 11:54am

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As a member of the Town/Village of Le Roy Planning Board, Tom Frew supports the development of new housing throughout the municipality – as long as he sees the project as a good fit with the surrounding neighborhood.

When looking at a venture proposed by Batavia developer Eric Biscaro to construct 30 duplex patio home rentals for seniors on a 20-acre parcel east of East Avenue in the village, however, Frew said that he has some concerns.

“I am not against development back there, as long as they were a continuation of residences like the rest of this neighborhood,” Frew said on Saturday as he took this reporter on a tour of the area. Frew’s home on Poplar Lane is located about 500 feet north of the development site.

Frew said that others living on Poplar Lane, East Avenue and Orchard Drive agree with him, prompting him to distribute a flyer to all residents of those streets to attend a public hearing on the matter at 7 p.m. May 19 at the Village of Le Roy Hall at 3 W. Main St.

Biscaro recently said that the project would be larger than his Clinton Crossings Adult Community on Clinton Street in the Town of Batavia. The Le Roy plan also includes blocking out eight building lots along the west perimeter of the site to be made available for purchase.

In order to make this happen, the area would have to be rezoned from Residential to Planned Unit Development, action that already has been recommended for approval (with modifications) by the Genesee County Planning Board.

Frew believes that a senior housing complex near an upper-end residential neighborhood is comparing apples to oranges.

“The south end of East Avenue intersects with Poplar Lane, and then Poplar Lane intersects with Orchard Drive, and the homes on these streets are valued in the $150,000 to $250,000 range – they’re all in the same ballpark,” Frew said. “So, now we’re taking property that is zoned Residential and asking to zone it as a PUD.

“If somebody was coming in here and wanted to put a development in – let’s say 15 houses of a couple hundred thousand dollars each, I wouldn’t have an issue. But I have an issue with the effect could be on the value of my home and the additional traffic. There’s only one outlet now, although I know that the county said they’d like to see the development of South Avenue.”

Frew, who said he was the lone dissenter at a recent planning board meeting, advised that South Avenue would be a new street that would run to South Street.

“Their plan is, and this is from the mayor (Greg Rogers) himself, is for the time being, they will gravel it and put a chain link fence up, which the emergency services people will have a key to,” Frew said.

The Batavian reached out to Rogers and Biscaro for comment.

Frew also said he is uneasy about the additional traffic created by the development – predicting an increase of 70 to 100 more vehicles “in a quiet, residential area” with the only access to Route 5 via East Avenue.

He also said he believes the village is endorsing the project and is committed to installing the necessary infrastructure.

“There is 800 feet of new road, new storm sewers, new sanitary sewers, new water, new gas, all those utilities,” Frew said. “The village is committed to run down the length of East Avenue to give Eric access – and Eric will take care of backing his development – but Eric has got no skin in the game regarding the cost.”

Frew estimates the cost of those utilities plus curbing would be around $700,000.

“I’m looking at 30 buildings at let’s say $200,000 each,” he said. “They’re not fancy. The revenue that they would generate from those buildings versus the cost of that infrastructure will blow your mind. It would be an eigh-t to 10-year payback to get even, and I don’t see that as a good investment of my tax dollars.”

Contacted this morning, Le Roy entrepreneur Jim Gomborone said his “main concern” is the potential for flooding on his Mercy Grove and Le Roy Country Club properties along East Main Street from a stream that flows through the area.

“When they had a four-acre school up there, I got extremely flooded. We couldn’t handle three inches of rain. So, you saw the impact with just four acres,” he said. “Twenty acres, with roads and houses and all that other stuff, probably 70 percent of it will be buildings and roads. I’ve got a strong suspicion that I’m not going to be able to handle the water from it.”

Gomborone also said the village’s decision to fund the infrastructure is a disservice to taxpayers.

“Why are we spending village taxpayers’ money for a guy that who’s in business for himself, running rental units? He’s going to have 60 rental units back there,” he said. “As far as I’m concerned, there’s going to be a substantial amount of rent from that thing, and I don’t think the taxpayers should pay someone in private enterprise for infrastructure. I wouldn’t ask them to pave my driveway.”

Previous: Biscaro proposes Clinton Crossings-type adult community for East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy.

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Photo at top: Poplar Lane resident Tom Frew holds site plan as he stands on the north end of a 20-acre parcel proposed for a senior housing project off East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy. Photo at bottom: The end of East Avenue that would be expanded and paved to create a new street to connect to South Street. Photos by Mike Pettinella.

April 9, 2021 - 10:34am

Developer Eric Biscaro is looking at a 20-acre parcel on East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy to construct a bigger version of the Clinton Crossings Adult Community that his company built on Clinton Street Road in the Town of Batavia.

“If you drove around Clinton Crossings, it’s the same thing, only 50-percent bigger,” said Biscaro, owner of Classic Home Improvements and Armor Building Supply on Ellicott Street Road. “It’s in its early stages, and there’s a lot of stuff to work out before it’s definitely a go, but we’re attempting it.”

Biscaro appeared before the Genesee County Planning Board on Thursday night, requesting a zoning map change to rezone the area from Residential to Planned Unit Development and for a review of the site plan that outlines the development of 30 duplex patio home rentals for seniors.

County Planning Director Felipe Oltramari said a Planned Unit Development (or PUD) is a custom zoning district that encompasses a multiunit layout with one owner. He compared Biscaro’s project to the Royal Apartments in Le Roy in this regard.

The planning board recommended approval of Biscaro’s referral, but with several modifications, as follows:

-- The applicant include street connectivity to the west through the development of "South Avenue,” which is currently a paper street, in order to improve public safety/emergency access and to better conform with the Village's Comprehensive Plan, which calls for prohibiting the construction of cul-de-sacs;

-- The applicant work with the village to provide a pedestrian connection, such as a sidewalk extension, to the north on East Avenue and to the west on the proposed South Avenue;

-- The applicant conduct an archaeological survey and apply for 9-1-1 Address Verification to the Genesee County Sheriff's Office to ensure that the addresses of the proposed homes meet Enhanced 9-1-1 standards.*

Planning Board Member Tom Schubmehl also emphasized the necessity of having enough room for fire and emergency trucks to be able to properly navigate through the complex.

Biscaro said he is prepared to “go through all the steps (as required by the village), and hopefully we get all the way.”

“With all of the approvals and utilities and that kind of stuff, it likely will be months before we’ll be able to do any work,” he said, adding that two other attempts at a project such as this failed to materialize.

Rooftop Patios at Ellicott Place

Planners also took another look at the downtown design for Ellicott Place, the $2.3 million renovation of the Save-A-Lot building at 45 Ellicott St., in light of V.J. Gautieri Constructors Inc.’s revised plan to create rooftop patios outside of the 10 second-floor apartments.

The board is recommending approval of the installation of the 10-foot by 6-foot patios, which will be secured by protective guardrails measuring 42 inches high.

Company President Victor Gautieri said work continues on the project, which calls for the creation of seven one-bedroom and three two-bedroom apartments on the vacant, 11,600-square-foot second floor and development of 18,000 square feet of first-floor commercial/retail space.

“It’s been a tough road with the impediments that we have faced – COVID and material shortages, but we’re plugging away,” Gautieri said, adding that the wait time for appliances is between 12 and 14 weeks. “(Acquiring) paint has been an issue as well …”

Gautieri said he has moved the completion date of the apartments back a month to May 30.

“That will be a tough one to get to, but we’ll keep pushing at it,” he said.

A Drive-Thru for Chipotle

In other action, the planning board recommended approval of the following referrals:

  • A special use permit for COR Development Veterans Memorial Drive Company LLC, to add a drive-thru to the building at 4222 Veterans Memorial Drive in the Towne Center at Batavia that is slated to house a new Chipotle restaurant.

The building also is the site of the Five Guys restaurant.

Other additions to the Chipotle location, which will have indoor seating, include outdoor seating, grease trap and trash enclosure.

  • An area variance for Dickinson’s Auto at 4028 W. Main Street Road (Route 5) to construct a new truck storage building that will be 10 feet from the lot line – 20 feet less than the minimum required. The business is in a Commercial District.
  •  A site plan and area variance for Carolina Eastern-Crocker LLC, to build a new 60-foot by 200-foot pole barn to replace the current 45-foot by 113-foot structure at its main location, 8610 Route 237, Stafford. The variance was needed because the building will be 30 feet from the side lot line – 10 feet less than what the ordinance mandates.

Carolina Eastern-Crocker’s products include dry and liquid fertilizers, "Pop Up" fertilizers, organic fertilizer, crop protection products, ag lime, gypsum, seeds, custom application and spraying, variable rate application, fine ground corn meal, and corn purchasing.

  • Placement of a sign for a new liquor store – Liberty’s Liquor Cabinet – at 10594 Main St., Alexander. The store, owned by Jennifer Wall, replaces a dog grooming business that previously operated out of that location.
  • Zoning text amendments from the Town of Alexander and Town of Bethany to regulate solar energy systems.

*Enhanced 911, E-911 or E911 is a system used in North America to automatically provide caller's location to 9-1-1 dispatchers. 911 is the universal emergency telephone number in the region.

patio_ellicott_place_.jpg

Early layout of an enclosed patio at the Ellicott Place apartments above the Save-A-Lot store (from Genesee County Planning Department renderings).

November 29, 2018 - 3:00pm


OPEN HOUSE -- SATURDAY Dec. 1st • 10 a.m. -- 1 p.m. Whether you’re newly retired, considering retiring or just looking for maintenance-free living, then Clinton Crossings is the place for you. Our new homes let you continue living independently with no steps or stairs to climb, plus it’s a relaxing community with friendly neighbors.

All of our 1,200-square-foot homes come complete with two bedroom, one and a half baths, fully equipped kitchen, full-size washer and dryer, attached garage, beautiful vinyl deck, ceramic tile and elegant carpets in the living room and bedrooms.

Join us for the open house and see for yourself, all that Clinton Crossings has to offer.

November 20, 2018 - 12:00pm


OPEN HOUSE -- SATURDAY Dec. 1st • 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Whether you’re newly retired, considering retiring or just looking for maintenance free living, then Clinton Crossings is the place for you. Our new homes let you continue living independently with no steps or stairs to climb, plus it’s a relaxing community with friendly neighbors.

All of our 1,200-square-foot homes come complete with two bedroom, one and a half baths, fully equipped kitchen, full-size washer and dryer, attached garage, beautiful vinyl deck, ceramic tile and elegant carpets in the living room and bedrooms.

Join us for the open house and see for yourself, all that Clinton Crossings has to offer.

March 8, 2018 - 3:00pm

OPEN HOUSE - SATURDAY March 10th! Whether you’re newly retired, considering retiring or just looking for maintenance free living, then Clinton Crossing is the place for you.

Our new homes let you continue living independently with no steps or stairs to climb, plus it’s a relaxing community with friendly neighbors.

All of our 1,200-square-foot homes come complete with two bedroom, one and a half baths, fully equipped kitchen, full size washer and dryer, attached garage, beautiful vinyl deck, ceramic tile and elegant carpets in the living room and bedrooms.

Join us for the open house and see for yourself, all that Clinton Crossings has to offer.

March 5, 2018 - 3:00pm


OPEN HOUSE - SATURDAY March 10th! Whether you’re newly retired, considering retiring or just looking for maintenance free living, then Clinton Crossing is the place for you.

Our new homes let you continue living independently with no steps or stairs to climb, plus it’s a relaxing community with friendly neighbors.

All of our 1,200-square-foot homes come complete with two bedroom, one and a half baths, fully equipped kitchen, full-size washer and dryer, attached garage, beautiful vinyl deck, ceramic tile and elegant carpets in the living room and bedrooms.

Join us for the open house and see for yourself, all that Clinton Crossings has to offer.

October 1, 2015 - 12:00pm


Don't miss this open house! Come see our brand new, spacious and luxurious apartments with laminate floors & stainless steel appliances! Click here for more information.

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