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fire safety

November 4, 2019 - 2:59pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in St. Joe's, City Fire, fire safety, news, video.
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Kylie Lutey, a kindergartner at St. Joe's in Batavia got to ride a fire truck to school today as an award for winning City fire's annual fire safety poster coloring contest.

October 29, 2019 - 2:38pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in news, batavia, City Fire, fire safety, video.
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Harper Ferris, a third-grader at St. Joseph School, got to ride to school in a City of Batavia fire truck because she was one of the winners in the City Fire Department's annual Fire Prevention Poster Coloring Contest.

Over the next week, two more poster contest winners will get to ride to school in a fire truck.

February 16, 2018 - 3:51pm

Submitted photos and press release:

The Alternative Fuel Vehicles & New Technologies four-hour class was offered by the Genesee County Office of Emergency Management Services in conjunction with the NYS Office of Fire Prevention and Control on Feb. 12 at the Fire Training Center.

It was attended by 63 fire personnel from Genesee County and the surrounding area.

Information about the hazards of the new fuels such as methanol, compressed natural gas and electric power; as well as the pressures created within fuel cylinders was addressed in addition to safety information on other possible hazards related to alternative fuel vehicles. State Fire Instructor David Harrington also addressed the changing technology of the automobile. 

Genesee County participants included: 

Alabama

Aron Kehlenbeck

Gary Patnode

William Schutt

Ryan Thompson

Todd Thompson         

Town of Batavia

Josh Boyle         

Daniel Coffey         

Paul Dibble         

Gary Diegelman         

Clayton Gorski

Stephen Kowalzyk

Scott Maloy

Ian Sanfratello

Tyler Stewart

Robert Tripp

Ray Zwolinski

Corfu

Mitchell Bates         

Cyle Felski

Kristen Gaik

James Hale

Tyler Lang

Matthew Lenhard

Rob McNally

Steve Rodland

Lori Ann Santini

Brian Schollard

Daniel Smith

Jacob Stiles

Ben Trapani

Ray Zwolinski

Darien

Joe Marino

David McGreevy

Tim McGreevy

Brandon Scott

Mark Starczewski         

Elba

Jennifer Cardinali

Michael Heale

Tim Hoffarth

John Mudrzynski

Michael Pfendler

Michael Schad

Oliver Shuknecht

Megan Tabor

Nathan Tabor

George Underhill

Bob Zipfel         

Caitlin Zipfel

Conor Wilkes        

Stafford

Rodney Bobo         

Samantha Call

Ken Collins

Ronald DeMena

Tim Eckdahl

Matt Hendershott

Randal Henning

Steve Johnson

Ashley Swatzenberg

June 27, 2017 - 5:05pm
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, news, fire safety, fire prevention, Announcements.

Press release:

In recognition of the summer outdoor cooking season, City of Batavia Fire Chief Stefano Napolitano along with Fire Prevention Officer, Lieutenant Greg Ireland, and the City of Batavia Fire Department would like to remind all residents of several grilling fire safety tips.

Statistics

·       Grill fires cause an estimated $37 million dollars in property loss each year.

·       Almost half of home grill fires occur between the hours of 5 and 8 p.m.

·       57 percent of home grill fires occur during the months of May, June, July and August.

·       Patios, terraces, porches and courtyards are the leading home locations for grill fires.

·       79 percent of all home grill fires involve gas grills.

·       Mechanical failure/malfunctions is the leading cause of gas grill fires while grease buildup is the second leading cause.

General Safety

Grills must be used outdoors. Use of grills indoors or in any enclosed spaces such as tents, garages, etc., pose both a fire hazard and risk of exposure to toxic gases and potential asphyxiation.

  • Position the grill 15 feet away from siding, deck railing, other combustibles, and out from eaves or overhanging vegetation.
  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas and foot traffic.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area -- declare a 3-foot "safe zone" around the grill.
  • Put out several long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames.
  • Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below the grill so it cannot be ignited by heat.
  • Never leave grills unattended. 

Charcoal Grills

  • Only use approved charcoal lighter fluid for starting the grill.
  • Never use gasoline or flammable liquids to light charcoal.
  • Do not add lighter fluid to coals that have already been ignited.
  • Keep unused charcoal dry. Wet charcoal becomes a fire hazard as it dries out through the process of spontaneous combustion.
  • Before disposing of charcoal ashes, allow them to cool thoroughly. Keep them either in the grill or in a metal container until cool, then stir the ashes before disposal to make sure they are completely out.

Liquid Propane (LP) Gas Grills

  • Inspect the gas cylinder hose and connections for leaks before using the grill for the first time each year.
  • Apply a light soap and water solution to the hose and all connections; any leaks will be quickly revealed in the form of bubbles.
  • If you discover a leak either by smell or by the soap test and there is no flame, turn off the gas tank valve and the grill. If the leak stops, have the grill serviced by a professional before using it again. If the leak does not   stop, call the fire department.
  • Be sure to open the lid of your gas grill before lighting.
  • If you smell gas while cooking or see any fire outside the grill box, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. DO NOT attempt to move the grill.

As always, If a resident has any questions or concerns regarding any of these tips, they can contact the City of Batavia Fire Department Headquarters at 585-345-6375.

May 4, 2017 - 6:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire safety, batavia, news, Announcements.

In recognition of May being National Electrical Safety Month, Fire Chief Stefano Napolitano and the City of Batavia Fire Department in conjunction with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) would like to remind all residents of several electrical safety tips.

  • Have all electrical work done by a qualified electrician.
  • When you are buying or remodeling a home, have it inspected by a qualified private inspector or in accordance with local requirements.
  • Only use one heat-producing appliance (such as a coffee maker, toaster, space heater, etc.) plugged into a receptacle outlet at a time.
  • Major appliances (refrigerators, dryers, washers, stoves, air conditioners, microwave ovens, etc.) should be plugged directly into a wall receptacle outlet. Extension cords and plug strips should not be used.
  • Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) shut off electricity when a dangerous condition occurs. Consider having them installed in your home.
  • Use ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) to reduce the risk of shock. GFCI’s shut off an electrical circuit when it becomes a shock hazard. They should be installed inside the home in bathrooms, kitchens, garages and basements. All outdoor receptacles should be GFCI protected.
  • Test AFCIs and GFCIs once a month according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Check electrical cords to make sure they are not running across doorways or under carpets. Extension cords are intended for temporary use. Have a qualified electrician add more receptacle outlets so you don’t have to use extension cords.
  • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or fixture. There should be a that indicates the maximum wattage light bulb to use.

Lastly, it is recommended that you call a qualified electrician or your landlord if you have:

  • Frequent problems with blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers
  • A tingling feeling when you touch an electrical appliance
  • Discolored or warm wall outlets
  • A burning or rubbery smell coming from an appliance
  • Flickering or dimming lights
  • Sparks from an outlet

If a resident has any questions or concerns regarding any of these tips, they can contact the City of Batavia Fire Headquarters at 585-345-6375.

March 10, 2016 - 3:47pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, batavia, fire safety, time change.

Press release:

The City of Batavia Fire Department is joining nearly 6,000 fire departments nationwide in promoting the annual "Change Your Clocks, Change Your Batteries" campaign on Sunday, March 13.

Fire Prevention Officer Lt. Jeff Whitcombe encourages all residents to adopt the simple, life-saving habit of changing smoke alarm and CO detector batteries when they change their clocks back from daylight savings time to standard time.

“It’s an easy, inexpensive and proven way to protect your family and your home,” Lt. Whitcombe said.

Since 1987, the International Association of Fire Chiefs has joined forces with Energizer batteries to spread the message that non-working smoke alarms are responsible for needless death and injuries. Now 25 years later, thanks to the Change Your Clocks, Change Your Batteries campaign, home fire deaths continue to decline.

Recent surveys conducted for the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the Consumer Products Safety Commission found that 96 percent of all home have at least one smoke alarm, but only 75 percent have at least one working smoke alarm. Almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. Smoke alarm failures usually result from missing or dead batteries or disconnected wires.

The peak time for home fire fatalities is between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most families are sleeping. A working smoke alarm can provide the critical extra seconds needed to get people out safely.

According to the NFPA, the maximum life cycle of a smoke alarm is 10 years from the date of manufacture, not the date of installation. Beginning in 2002, all smoke detectors must have a manufacture date marked on the outside of the smoke alarm. If your smoke alarm does not have a manufacture date, then it is older than 10 years and must be replaced. The City of Batavia Fire Department recommends purchasing smoke alarms with 10-year lithium batteries. All smoke alarms should be tested monthly.

Families should also practice "Exit Drills in the Home" (E.D.I.T.H.) and have a meeting place outside the home to quickly account for all the occupants during an emergency. The meeting place should be something that is not mobile like a tree or mailbox by the street.

A carbon monoxide detector or CO detector is a device that detects the presence of the carbon monoxide (CO) gas in order to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. CO is a colorless and odorless compound produced by incomplete combustion. It is often referred to as the “silent killer” because it is virtually undetectable without using detection technology. Elevated levels of CO can be dangerous to humans depending on the amount present and length of exposure. Smaller concentrations can be harmful over longer periods of time while increasing concentrations require diminishing exposure times to be harmful.

CO detectors are designed to measure CO levels over time and sound an alarm before dangerous levels of CO accumulate in an environment, giving people adequate warning to safely ventilate the area or evacuate. All CO detectors should also be tested monthly. Remember, if your CO detector alarms, you should evacuate the structure and dial 9-1-1. The fire department will respond and investigate the cause of the alarm.

The City of Batavia Fire Department has a free smoke alarm and battery installation program.

According to Lt. Whitcombe, “We have installed hundreds of smoke alarms and batteries over the past 20 years and will continue to do so until everyone who needs them has them.”

For information about the free smoke alarm and battery installation program, City of Batavia residents should contact the City of Batavia Fire Department at (585) 345-6375.

March 7, 2014 - 12:42pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire safety.

Press release:

Remember that as you change your clocks ahead on Sunday, March 9, it’s the perfect time to change the batteries in home smoke detectors and carbon-monoxide detectors, as well.

Even “hard-wired” smoke detectors that are plugged in to the home’s electrical supply typically have a nine-volt backup battery to keep the detectors operating in case of a power outage. Often they will “chirp” when the batteries are dying – that means to change the batteries, don’t disconnect or disable the devices!

While changing the batteries in your smoke detectors, make sure to test the audible alarm by pushing the button; check that the vents are clean and not clogged with dust; and check the manufacture date. Typically, detectors should be replaced every 10 years.

At least one smoke alarm should be placed on every level of the home. The most important location is near the bedrooms to provide an early warning to all sleeping occupants. A smoke alarm should also be placed inside every bedroom. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on how to properly install a smoke alarm.

Smoke detectors, plain and simply, save lives. Every year in the United States, about 3,000 people lose their lives in residential fires. Most fire victims die from inhalation of smoke and toxic gases, not as a result of burns. Most deaths and injuries occur in fires that happen at night while the victims are asleep. Properly installed and maintained smoke alarms in the home are considered one of the best and least expensive means of providing an early warning of a potentially deadly fire.

In addition to changing your smoke alarm batteries this weekend the City of Batavia Fire Department recommends following these simple steps to protect your life, your loved ones and your home:
    •    Dust or vacuum smoke alarms when you change the batteries.
    •    Test alarms once a month using the test button.
    •    Replace the entire alarm if it’s more than 10 years old or doesn’t work properly when tested.
    •    Make sure everyone in your home understands the warning of the smoke alarm and knows how to respond.

Finally, prepare and practice an escape plan so that you and your loved ones can get out of your home safely should there be a fire. Plan to meet in a place a safe distance from the fire and where first responders can easily see you.

The City of Batavia Fire Department has a free smoke alarm and battery installation program. For information about the free smoke alarm and battery installation program, City of Batavia residents should contact the City of Batavia Fire Department at (585) 345-6375.

December 15, 2013 - 6:19pm
posted by Diane Burroughs in dinner, Service Clubs, fire safety.

Dinner will be at the Dibble Family Center, 4120 W. Main St., Batavia. Choice of Country Chicken Breast or Vegetable Lasanga. Cost is $15. Fire Safety "Let us Help You" will be the topic of discussion, led by Fire Dept. officials. Call Connie at 585-343-4603 or Pearl at 585-343-9108 for reservations, by Monday, Dec.30th. All are welcome!

October 31, 2013 - 8:11am
posted by Howard B. Owens in fire department, fire safety.

Press release:

The City of Batavia Fire Department is joining nearly 6,000 fire departments nationwide in promoting the annual Change Your Clocks, Change Your Batteries campaign on Sunday, Nov. 3.

Fire Prevention Officer Lieutenant Jeff Whitcombe encourages all residents to adopt the simple, life-saving habit of changing smoke alarm batteries when they change their clocks back from daylight savings time to standard time.

“It’s an easy, inexpensive and proven way to protect your family and your home,” Lt. Whitcombe said.

Since 1987, the International Association of Fire Chiefs has joined forces with Energizer batteries to spread the message that non-working smoke alarms are responsible for needless death and injuries. Now 25 years later, thanks to the change Your Clocks, Change Your Batteries campaign, home fire deaths continue to decline.

Recent surveys conducted for the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the Consumer Products Safety Commission found that 96 percent of all homes have at least one smoke alarm, but only 75 percent have at least one working smoke alarm. Almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. Smoke alarm failures usually result from missing or dead batteries or disconnected wires. The peak time for home fire fatalities is between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most families are sleeping. A working smoke alarm can provide the critical extra seconds needed to get people out safely.

According to the NFPA, the maximum life cycle of a smoke alarm is 10 years from the date of manufacture, not the date of installation. Beginning in 2002, all smoke detectors must have a manufacture date marked on the outside of the smoke alarm. If your smoke alarm does not have a manufacture date, then it is older than 10 years and must be replaced. The City of Batavia Fire Department recommends purchasing smoke alarms with 10-year lithium batteries. All smoke alarms should be tested monthly.

The City of Batavia Fire Department has a free smoke alarm and battery installation program. According to Lt. Whitcombe “We have installed hundreds of smoke alarms and batteries over the past 20 years and will continue to do so until everyone who needs them has them.”

For information about the free smoke alarm and battery installation program, City of Batavia residents should contact the City of Batavia Fire Department at (585) 345-6375.

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