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village of le roy

May 4, 2021 - 12:09pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, notify, Clinton Crossings, Eric Biscaro, village of le roy.

The Batavia businessman and Le Roy municipal leader at the forefront of a proposed 60-unit senior residential complex off East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy on Monday afternoon responded to objections about the project -- calling the development a quality, well-thought-out venture that will benefit tenants and the community at large.

Eric Biscaro, owner of Armor Building Supply in Batavia and several other construction material-related companies in and around Western New York, and Le Roy Village Mayor Greg Rogers returned phone calls from The Batavian after the posting of a story reporting concerns from LeRoyans Tom Frew and Jim Gomborone.

Biscaro is looking to construct 30 duplex patio home rentals on a 20-acre parcel that runs east of East Avenue. The plan also calls for the development and sale of eight single-family home building lots along an extension of that street.

Frew, a member of the Le Roy Town/Village Planning Board, said he was against the idea for several reasons, primarily that the duplex units are not compatible with homes in the East Avenue, Orchard Drive and Poplar Lane (where Frew lives) area; that there would be a significant increase in traffic; and that it would cost the village considerably to extend infrastructure on East Avenue to accommodate Biscaro.

Gomborone said he is worried about water running off the development into a stream and possibly flooding his Mercy Grove and Le Roy Country Club properties on East Main Street.

Noting that he read the story with their objections, Biscaro said he wanted to set the record straight about the project, which he said will likely be a $9 million to $10 million investment.

On the zoning issue:

“One question that came up is that we’re going to change an R-1 (Residential) District to a Planned Unit Development area. We won’t change anybody’s zoning, including the eight lots that are proposed on the front of this. Those eight lots will be an R-1 District. The only thing that requires a PUD is my senior housing proposal for the 20 acres there.

On extending East Avenue and connecting to South Avenue:

“The planning board’s concerns were that nobody wants to put in dead ends anymore or cul-de-sacs because people get trapped in there if something major happens down the street. What we will do – because we want the project to go through, and yes, we will be putting more people there – is to let me recondition that South Avenue road that’s there. It’s 18-feet wide and there’s a base in there right now. You could drive down in with a pickup truck right now.”

Biscaro said he met with Le Roy highway and fire officials and went over a plan where he would clear trees and brush, and would lay crushed stone over it to make it passable.

“I’m not going to pave it – I’m not a road builder – but I will make it very nicely passable for a fire lane that’s emergency use only, so no one is ever trapped there. We’ll have a great fire exit for all of East Avenue and those two side streets (Poplar Lane and Orchard Drive). I would think the residents would look at this as a nice addition, and hopefully, they’ll never need it, but if they do, it will be there.”

On the building lots:

“There will be eight new lots for sale for single-family homes. The village is looking for more places for younger people to buy, and this gives them eight more lots to do that. I would presume that those houses, when they do build, will be the highest assessed properties in the neighborhood. I don’t see them lower than the houses currently in the R-1 District, which are nice houses but they were built in the 1960s and ‘70s.”

He said the new houses and rental units must pass current building and energy codes.

“They are great buildings that we have built. If you look at Clinton Crossings in Batavia (a similar project that he put up about 15 years ago) the quality is fabulous. We use radiant floor heating instead of forced air. That will cost me 2 ½ times (more) than what it would cost if we put in forced air heat and air conditioning – and it’s way more efficient and way more comfortable. That’s why seniors love to stay in my place.”

On the possibility of decreased property values:

“If you go down Stringham Drive and Violet Lane (in Batavia, next to Clinton Crossings), homeowners there had the same concerns. We did a study on what my project did to them and the assessments over the 10 years that we were there went up 15 to 18 percent. Nobody got hurt. You can talk to anybody who backs up to us and they’ll all say that we are wonderful neighbors and nobody got hurt one bit.”

On increased traffic in the area:

“At Clinton Crossings, we have 40 units. Five of the residents don’t drive and only three have more than one car and more than one driver in the home. I don’t even have an average of one driver and vehicle per house, and they may go out only twice or three times a week.”

On flooding of Le Roy Country Club:

“I cannot go in there and have any more water leave that property when I’m done that leaves it right now. I have to submit a plan to the DEC (Department of Environmental Conservation) and they have to approve per their stormwater retention requirements. Once we get the topography, we will be able to design this plan and get the DEC to approve it. We certainly will (have) way less leaving there but whether it will be zero or not, I can’t say at this point. I have no question that we will develop a fine stormwater plan and leave it way better than it is right now.”

On the cost to the village:

“Mr. Frew is under the impression that the village is going to put in all of the water, sewer, gas and electric in there for me. I wish that was true. Down that street, anywhere that has anything to do with the street or my project, I put the water and sewer in. On the street, itself, when I get done with it and they inspect it and it’s all done to code, I give to the village – it’s theirs. But I put it in at my expense.”

Biscaro said the village is going to start with infrastructure work extending about 500 feet, taking in the first four building lots and the entrance to the development.

“I’m doing building lots for the first time because that’s what the village is looking for, but I don’t think they’ll be that profitable. The village never developed that street because it needs a sewer pump station with a backup generator in there, which is a very expensive item (probably around $60,000 to $80,000). But by putting those eight lots in and my 60 units, now we can afford it.”

In closing, Biscaro said the vast majority of rental units will be 1,200 square feet with one and a half bathrooms and an attached garage.

“For this one, I’m going to put in a couple that are a little bigger and have a two-car garage. People have asked me to do that. And I, myself, would like one of those and I’ll probably end up living there when this project is done.”

MAYOR: NOT DONE ON A WHIM

Le Roy Mayor Rogers said the village has done its due diligence and has a plan that will save money and, ultimately, expand the village’s tax base.

“We are not hiding the fact that we are investing in this road in an attempt to broaden our tax base,” Rogers said. “It’s a dedicated village street – an extension of East Avenue around to South Avenue over to South Street. We’re not going down South Avenue at this time – that will be for somebody else. We plan on blocking it off for emergency access only.”

Rogers said the village will get help from the Town of Le Roy and Genesee County on the road, and has reached out to the Genesee County Economic Development Center to see if it could assist.

“This wasn’t something that was done on a whim. We plan on doing the work ourselves and using CHIPS (Consolidated Local Street and Highway Improvement Program) money that we have set aside for a project like this – which is over $600,000. The developer is going to take care of all the infrastructure under the ground,” he explained.

“If we were to go to the end of the street and put it out for bid, Clark Patterson Lee (engineering firm) said it would be roughly $1.8 million to do it. This is our plan to get started with our own stuff to see how far we can go. We don’t plan on borrowing any money. Yes, we are going to spend resources that we have set aside for roads; that part is true.”

PROMOTING THE BUILDING LOTS

Rogers said he doesn’t see “consistency with the neighborhood” as an issue and is convinced that the project is a good investment for the village.

“The closest that the development is going to be is 100 from the back property line of any resident. It’s going to be the same thing that is on Route 33 in Batavia – Clinton Crossings,” he said. “And the building lots are what we’re really looking to promote; getting some new, single-family homes in that thing, along the street (east side of East Avenue).”

The mayor said it likely would take 10 years for the village to get a return on its investment, but looked beyond that to the increase in the village’s assessed value that would be applied against the school tax rate.

“This is something I thought needed to be done when I started in office,” Rogers added. “In a perfect world, let’s get it started; get down the street and have the developer come in and do South Avenue. The building lots over there would be absolutely gorgeous.

“Honestly, I’ve got three years left in office and I could have sat back and made my life easy and not done a thing. But I didn’t think it was the right thing to do.”

A public hearing on the project is scheduled for 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 19 at the Le Roy Village Hall at 3 W. Main St.

May 3, 2021 - 11:54am

frew_on_lot_1.jpg

As a member of the Town/Village of Le Roy Planning Board, Tom Frew supports the development of new housing throughout the municipality – as long as he sees the project as a good fit with the surrounding neighborhood.

When looking at a venture proposed by Batavia developer Eric Biscaro to construct 30 duplex patio home rentals for seniors on a 20-acre parcel east of East Avenue in the village, however, Frew said that he has some concerns.

“I am not against development back there, as long as they were a continuation of residences like the rest of this neighborhood,” Frew said on Saturday as he took this reporter on a tour of the area. Frew’s home on Poplar Lane is located about 500 feet north of the development site.

Frew said that others living on Poplar Lane, East Avenue and Orchard Drive agree with him, prompting him to distribute a flyer to all residents of those streets to attend a public hearing on the matter at 7 p.m. May 19 at the Village of Le Roy Hall at 3 W. Main St.

Biscaro recently said that the project would be larger than his Clinton Crossings Adult Community on Clinton Street in the Town of Batavia. The Le Roy plan also includes blocking out eight building lots along the west perimeter of the site to be made available for purchase.

In order to make this happen, the area would have to be rezoned from Residential to Planned Unit Development, action that already has been recommended for approval (with modifications) by the Genesee County Planning Board.

Frew believes that a senior housing complex near an upper-end residential neighborhood is comparing apples to oranges.

“The south end of East Avenue intersects with Poplar Lane, and then Poplar Lane intersects with Orchard Drive, and the homes on these streets are valued in the $150,000 to $250,000 range – they’re all in the same ballpark,” Frew said. “So, now we’re taking property that is zoned Residential and asking to zone it as a PUD.

“If somebody was coming in here and wanted to put a development in – let’s say 15 houses of a couple hundred thousand dollars each, I wouldn’t have an issue. But I have an issue with the effect could be on the value of my home and the additional traffic. There’s only one outlet now, although I know that the county said they’d like to see the development of South Avenue.”

Frew, who said he was the lone dissenter at a recent planning board meeting, advised that South Avenue would be a new street that would run to South Street.

“Their plan is, and this is from the mayor (Greg Rogers) himself, is for the time being, they will gravel it and put a chain link fence up, which the emergency services people will have a key to,” Frew said.

The Batavian reached out to Rogers and Biscaro for comment.

Frew also said he is uneasy about the additional traffic created by the development – predicting an increase of 70 to 100 more vehicles “in a quiet, residential area” with the only access to Route 5 via East Avenue.

He also said he believes the village is endorsing the project and is committed to installing the necessary infrastructure.

“There is 800 feet of new road, new storm sewers, new sanitary sewers, new water, new gas, all those utilities,” Frew said. “The village is committed to run down the length of East Avenue to give Eric access – and Eric will take care of backing his development – but Eric has got no skin in the game regarding the cost.”

Frew estimates the cost of those utilities plus curbing would be around $700,000.

“I’m looking at 30 buildings at let’s say $200,000 each,” he said. “They’re not fancy. The revenue that they would generate from those buildings versus the cost of that infrastructure will blow your mind. It would be an eigh-t to 10-year payback to get even, and I don’t see that as a good investment of my tax dollars.”

Contacted this morning, Le Roy entrepreneur Jim Gomborone said his “main concern” is the potential for flooding on his Mercy Grove and Le Roy Country Club properties along East Main Street from a stream that flows through the area.

“When they had a four-acre school up there, I got extremely flooded. We couldn’t handle three inches of rain. So, you saw the impact with just four acres,” he said. “Twenty acres, with roads and houses and all that other stuff, probably 70 percent of it will be buildings and roads. I’ve got a strong suspicion that I’m not going to be able to handle the water from it.”

Gomborone also said the village’s decision to fund the infrastructure is a disservice to taxpayers.

“Why are we spending village taxpayers’ money for a guy that who’s in business for himself, running rental units? He’s going to have 60 rental units back there,” he said. “As far as I’m concerned, there’s going to be a substantial amount of rent from that thing, and I don’t think the taxpayers should pay someone in private enterprise for infrastructure. I wouldn’t ask them to pave my driveway.”

Previous: Biscaro proposes Clinton Crossings-type adult community for East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy.

east_avenue_le_roy_1.jpg

Photo at top: Poplar Lane resident Tom Frew holds site plan as he stands on the north end of a 20-acre parcel proposed for a senior housing project off East Avenue in the Village of Le Roy. Photo at bottom: The end of East Avenue that would be expanded and paved to create a new street to connect to South Street. Photos by Mike Pettinella.

March 20, 2020 - 5:26pm
posted by Billie Owens in State of Emergency, village of le roy, news.

Public Notice

Greg Rogers, Village of Le Roy mayor, declared a State of Emergency at on March 19, 2020 and issued an Emergency Order effective March 19, 2020 beginning at 1 p.m.

Village of Le Roy Office and DPW Garage are closed to the public effective March 19, 2020 for fivedays unless rescinded earlier or renewed in five-day increments.

The Village will conduct business with the public remotely through the use of phones, computers, mail, or other means.

Sewer bills will be received by mail, and may be dropped off in the drop box located on the west side of Village Hall. They will be processed during regular business hours. You may email the Clerk-Treasurer to inquire about other services.

Village Clerk-Treasurer:  [email protected]

Phone number (585)768-2527, ext. 2216

March 17, 2020 - 11:38am
posted by Billie Owens in covid-19, news, village of le roy, election.

Public Notice

Village of Le Roy -- Postponement of Election

In an effort to keep New Yorkers safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today (March 17) issued an executive order delaying Village Elections statewide until April 28th.

Therefore, the Village of Le Roy Election has been postponed from March 18, 2020 to April 28, 2020.

October 14, 2011 - 5:41pm

I would have to say that I was a little late joining the bandwagon of getting the pool back open.  But as they say better late than never.  I would first like to thank Mr. Spadaro and Mr. McGinnis for faithfully going to the meetings and being persistent  for getting them to listen to the offer.  They have acquired funding from private donors and been hard at work to keep this topic alive.  In this process the Village of LeRoy has officially rescinded the vote of the pool to close.  This leaves it not officially closed, but not open yet.  

They have worked very closely with both boards of Village and Town of LeRoy.  They started a Pool Committee.  They have had the Health Dept. out there to do a walk through inspection that was a bearer of great news.  The pool did not need many of those repairs to reopen.  In fact most things were cosmetic. Nothing a little time and elbow grease from volunteers could not fix.  Not saying other issues may not arise in the future.  

The funding that was acquired from private donors can be put in an account by the Town as a separate line item to be used as needed.  They also can add to that with any other donations that people collect or raise to be used for the upkeep and maintenance to help offset costs to the taxpayers.  

The Town Council is working on an agreement with the Village to lease the pool for a 5 year term. The Town will run the Summer Pool program just as it always has in the past.  Ideas for ways to work with other communities to bring kids in and different things were addressed in discussions.  They were going to weigh all options as to how to get pool up and running for next Summer.  They may have to start with just open pool hours and add the lessons back later on.  They want to get it back at the least cost to taxpayers.  

The Village had put an offer out to a non-existent group to purchase the pool for $1 and lease the land.  They voted on an option to a group that did not exist. They offered to still contribute the $11,000 they always had.  

As of last night at the Town meeting, the Town was going to work with Reed Whiting to tweak the details of an agreement that will make all happy.

Things are looking up for our Pool.  The kids in this Town and Village will have a safe place to swim and we will not have to worry about drownings or injuries from the creek.  

In a time when industry, jobs, and the future of LeRoy are all in question, there is vision.  Vision of what we have here, what can be, and the first steps to revitalizing Le Roy to the great community we are.  Here's to good things to come. 

Hopefully our Town and Village complete this agreement with out anymore detours in the road.  Next Village meeting is October 26th at 7pm.  Please come in support of the pool.  The kids of this community need it.

June 21, 2011 - 10:45pm

Here’s a brief update on the village pool in Le Roy.

This item is on the agenda for tomorrow night’s regular village board meeting at 7 p.m. at the village hall! A community proposal will be outlined that includes generous donations of time, labor and money to get the pool up to code and open. Currently, these generous community members are willing to get it open, but have put the responsibility back on the village and town to continue to run it together as they were before.

I would like to encourage you to please attend tomorrow night’s meeting to hear this proposal and decide for yourself if you are in support of this. It is no secret that I am in support of opening it and running it, but the village board needs to hear from you -- the taxpayers and consumers of the village and town (the village maintains it, but the town participates).

Until the pool is filled in, it is not too late to save it, if that is what the people of Le Roy want. Please attend the meeting tomorrow night.

Thank you.

Jennifer Keys

April 14, 2011 - 11:14am
posted by Brittany Baker in budget, village of le roy, tax rate.

The Village of Le Roy managed to cut taxes with the budget the board approved unanimously Wednesday evening.

Mayor George Brady said the village is benefiting from higher PILOT (Payment in Lieu of Taxes) revenue kicking in, which enabled the village to cut the tax rate for property owners.

Among the businesses covered by PILOT that are seeing their payments increase are Le Roy Village Green and Lapp Insulator.

The approved tax rate went from $10.87 to $10.59 per $1,000 of assessed value -- a decrease of 28 cents. If a village resident owns a house assessed at $80,000, his or her taxes will decrease by $22.40.

The village tax levy from all sources was about $20,000. The approved budget totals $1,670,620.

As far as major changes from last year, equipment expenses for the police department increased by about $32,000.

Residents questioned an increase of about $25,000 earmarked for police department overtime and Brady explained that officers were asked to help as crossing guards for schoolchildren.

Generally, residents seemed pleased with the new budget.

One man said, “You’ve done a great job I think...for what you’ve got to work with.”

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