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August 11, 2022 - 7:09pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in pets, animals, crime, batavia, news, notify.

A Batavia woman accused of allowing her dog, Oddey, access to narcotics, leading to emergency veterinarian treatment for overdoses three times, was a no-show in City Court on Thursday afternoon.

Cassandra Elmore may be in the hospital, acording to a friend who called court about four hours before Elmore's case was to be called, but City Court Judge Thomas Burns had no proof that the claim was true, so he issued a warrant for her arrest.

Elmore's court time was at 1:30 p.m., and there were several other cases then as well. Burns finally called her case at 2:40 p.m., and she was not in court. Her friend was informed that the court would require proof of Elmore's admission to a hospital -- a call an email or a fax from the hospital.  The court received no proof of the claim prior to her case being called.

According to police reports, Elmore showed up at veterinarian offices on May 21, May 25, and June 21 with Oddey unconscious.  

Investigators believe Oddey consumed cocaine on two of those occasions and either cocaine or another narcotic on the third.

Elmore, 30, a resident of River Street, Batavia, faces three counts of injuring an animal under New York Ag and Markets Law Section 353.

Previously:

August 7, 2022 - 8:05am
posted by Joanne Beck in news, animals, city council, batavia, notify.

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A suggestion from City Planning and Development Committee members may have seemed like a good idea for better controlling farm animals, but it’s on a proposed chopping block for City Council’s Monday meeting.

The planning committee was tasked last month to review city code for the keeping of farm animals within city property and make some recommendations for how to deal with specific issues on a city-wide scale.

Neighbor complaints about goats running loose on Burke Drive were, in large part, what drove council to take another look at the animal ordinance. The group wanted the planning committee also to review it since committee members -- including Code Enforcement Officer Doug Randall -- were more versed with city code details.

The committee recommended a limit of six chickens on any one property, and implementing a system — to create a paper trail and more tracking — to document what types of animal species, how many, and where they are located, for city residents.

It seemed like a good idea, and one that would let city officials know who had what at their properties, committee members had agreed.

However, after reviewing the recommendations with city staff and the attorney, “we respectfully disagree with the addition of section E,” City Manager Rachael Tabelski said in a memo to council.

“The intent of the new law was to restrict animal and fowl in the city and provide code enforcement clear and concise guidelines for citing violations,” Tabelski said. “The city does not have the staff or resources to create an animal registry, to tag, and track pre-existing animals. Therefore, and with respect to the PDC’s deliberation, I recommend that the City Council strike section E from the proposed code revision.”

If approved by council, the code revisions will revert back to City Council for consideration and to set a public heading to receive public feedback before considering a local law adoption.

That public hearing is to be set for 7 p.m. Sept. 12. Council's conference session is at 7 p.m. Monday in Council Chambers, City Hall.

File photo of Jill Turner of Batavia with some of her goats at a summer event. Neighbors have complained about the goats getting loose, and the smell of goats and chickens, prompting a City Council review of a farm animal ordinance in the city code. Photo by Joanne Beck.

July 28, 2022 - 11:06pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Deer, Pavilion, news, outdoors, animals.

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Photo submitted by Jeff Maniace.

June 14, 2022 - 8:15am
posted by Joanne Beck in news, city council, batavia, animals, code enforcement, notify.

Chickens in your backyard. Goats in the front. And donkeys? Who knows where they are.

Pretty much every living creature made it into City Council’s discussion about a restriction on certain animals and fowl during the group’s Monday meeting.

A proposed local law stems from a council meeting in January, and a request to research potential restrictions on animals and fowl in the city. Apparently some types of these creatures — chickens and goats in particular — have raised a bit of a ruckus in their neighborhoods.

“One of the issues that recently came up was, one of our neighbors has goats … and they're literally running around our neighborhood. They’ve been able to escape a number of times and might go across the street,” Councilman John Canale said during the meeting at City Hall. “Now, any animal is capable of charging someone at any time. But now we have horned animals running loose in the neighborhood. Animal control said ‘my hands are tied, there’s nothing I can do.’  A number of my neighbors are very concerned about their safety … we could have some neighbors that might possibly get hurt. That was my concern. Now it becomes kind of a safety issue.”

He asked about a clause in the law requiring that animals are properly housed. That means the animals must be penned appropriately, do not accumulate feces, cause odor or live in an unsightly or unsafe condition, Council President Eugene Jankowski said. If goats are running loose, then they are not being properly housed, Jankowski said.

Some council members wondered why anyone wants to keep goats in the city anyway. Canale said that, for example, he knows a young girl who is in 4-H and raises animals including goats.

There are rules for dogs, but not for goats, Jankowski said. Although it might be easy to come up with a laundry list of restrictions for these situations, Jankowski didn’t want to see that happen.

“I’m not for making a plethora of codes for every little thing,” he said. “But, unfortunately, it might be something we have to do … if they start to encroach on other people’s property.”

As for the goat that got loose, the animal control officer did some quick thinking on his feet. He cornered the animal at the front porch, got ahold of it and brought it back to its rightful home over a fence.

As for donkeys, and other cloven-hoofed animals, equine or fowl, those are restricted from being kept within the city limits. City Manager Rachael Tabelski’s research reviewed other cities, including Geneva, Canandaigua, Jamestown, Elmira, and Lockport. All of those areas have code restrictions “on animals in a variety of forms,” her memo to council said.

“With help from the code enforcement office and the city attorney, attached are the proposed restrictions to animals for City Council to consider,” the memo stated, including cattle, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, llamas, alpacas, ducks, turkeys, geese, feral cats, donkeys, ponies, mules and any other farm or wild animal within city limits.

Exceptions would be chickens in appropriate housing, transporting animals to and from race tracks, special events with an approved event application, and animals in transit through the city.

Council agreed to pass the law on to the City Planning Board for further discussion. Council members also hope that the public will provide feedback about the issue of atypical city occupants — primarily farm animals — living right next door.

“That’s what the planning board is for,” Jankowski said. “I think most people will see this as reasonable. I think it’s great that we have these healthy discussions.”

May 7, 2022 - 9:04pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in outdoors, animals, batavia, news, colonial boulevard.

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This little guy is a resident of Colonial Boulevard in Batavia.  One of his two-legged neighbors found him with a string around his neck so she removed it and nursed him back to health.  He's a friendly little tyke, even amenable to petting and hanging out with other neighbors.

Photo by Lisa Ace.

May 2, 2022 - 5:36pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in birds, animals, outdoors, batavia, news.

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A grackle nibbles on seeds at a backyard feeder in Batavia. 

Photo by Howard Owens

April 4, 2022 - 4:46pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in animals, outdoors, news, Alexander.

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Christine Loranty shared these photos of a fox den in a gravel pit near her house in Alexander.

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February 7, 2022 - 10:11am
posted by Howard B. Owens in pets, animals, lost pets, Oakfield, byron, news.

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Duke saw a deer near his home in Byron and decided to give chase. Owner Chriss DeValder hasn't seen her boy since.

"I just don't know what to do without him," she said.

She said he may have been spotted in Oakfield.

He's also not good with other dogs, she said.

She asks that people call or text if they see him, or "call out Duke."  She can be reached at (585) 409-9325.

February 4, 2022 - 5:54pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in birds, animals, Alexander, news.

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Christine Loranty shared these photos of cardinals and a blue jay in her backyard yesterday in Alexander.

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January 7, 2022 - 1:15pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in batavia, news, pets, animals.

A caller at a residence on Wood Street, Batavia, reports being trapped in a bathroom by two large, very aggressive dogs.

The caller told dispatchers that the owner works at a business in the City of Batavia but when dispatchers attempted to call that chain store,  a person at the store claims nobody that name works at that business.

Law enforcement is dispatched.

September 7, 2021 - 2:20pm
posted by Joanne Beck in Calling All Dogs, Tori Ganino, dogs, pets, animals, elba, news.

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Tori Ganino isn’t afraid to admit that self-assertion is her thing.

At least when it comes to dogs. That canine characteristic of extreme self-assertion — and unwanted aggressiveness — has fueled her career and prompted the 35-year-old to continue her education.

She has recently obtained certification as a Dynamic Dog Practitioner. 

“My passion is aggression. We need to know what’s going on internally,” she said during an interview Friday.“ This certification is more helping out and spotting behavior in dogs. I can see myself applying this to the dogs I work with and to my own dog. I just want to keep learning.”

Ganino is not new to embracing knowledge when it comes to working with dogs, and the canine behavior specialist eagerly added dynamic dog practitioner to her resume. Never heard of such a thing? That’s because the rigorous four-month course is only available in the United Kingdom. Other people have enrolled in the course but Ganino said that she is the only one in the U.S. to successfully complete it. 

While dynamic dog practitioner may seem like an embellished title, it makes sense as Ganino explains it. Say your dog Rufus is a bit more surly than usual, and he has been barking at visitors, and — especially uncharacteristic of Rufus — nipped at one of them. You might think he is just being a bad boy, however, there very well might be underlying issues at play. 

“Dogs are so extremely stoic; they hide things so very well,” Ganino said at her Elba residence. 

Beneath that quiet strength might be hip pain, an achy spine or pulled muscle, she said. By thoroughly assessing the dog, she will be able to pinpoint likely sources of the pain that are causing and coming out as aggressive behavior. Contrary to popular belief that older dogs would be more prone to this occurrence, Ganino said that she has seen it in younger dogs more often. They may be working dogs that herd animals or train for agility courses, or simply playful dogs that throw their little bodies out of whack scampering on slippery floors, she said.

An online dictionary defines dynamic as “a process or system characterized by constant change, activity, or progress; relating to forces producing motion.” Just like humans often do, dogs may overcompensate an injury in one area by overusing the other, Ganino said. That can in turn create a lot of pain and/or discomfort within the dog's body, she said.

The course taught her to understand what normal movement is for the dog so that she can determine what is abnormal movement. That involves taking a history of how the dog moves, what it was like before becoming more aggressive and how it behaves now, such as biting, barking or lunging at people. 

Ganino had owned and operated Calling All Dogs daycare until the dreadful Covid-19 struck. She made the difficult decision to close in March 2020, which ended up opening up a window.

“It has given me the opportunity to do this intense four-month course,” she said. “I had to present six case studies.  There’s not a similar program in the world.”

The programme (spelled properly in England) teaches how to spot potential pain and discomfort in dogs “using specific, measurable and professional techniques from the ground up, whilst giving you an in-depth knowledge of the canine body,” the course website, allaboutthedogtherapy.co.uk, states. 

“There are so many excellent dog training and behaviour courses out there that give you the latest up to date science based techniques to make you become an expert in your chosen field,” it states. “Despite all of them teaching you about A, B, C's they are ALL missing one vital component that is key to understanding most problem dog behaviours.”

Only 14 students are admitted at a time, and they are forewarned that the course is intensive with a blueprint for how to use the material, conduct an assessment and present the findings to the client’s veterinarian. This last piece is key to a fully implemented plan, Ganino said. She will perform a two-hour assessment of the troubled canine to evaluate its activities, movement, walking, running, standing and sitting, and the overall behavior of the dog, she said. 

The finished product includes a report, video and recommended plan of action that may include prescription meds, X-rays, physical therapy and exercises. That will go to the client, behavior consultant and vet. The vet will be the one to recommend a more specific route, such as the type of medical tests or prescriptions to implement for the dog's treatment.

“There’s a lot going on when it comes to behavior and aggression; it’s not just on the outside, but a lot going on inside. Unless you’re trained, you don’t see it,” Ganino said. “We can be that team to work through these problems.”

For more information, or to find out if your dog could benefit from Ganino’s expertise, go to callingalldogsny.com, and click on Schedule a Free Consultation.

Photo by Gina Sierra, ginasierra.com

September 5, 2021 - 9:22am
posted by Howard B. Owens in Pavilion, Le Roy, news, pets, animals.

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Addie Tonzi, who is 13 years old and from Le Roy, took this photo of her grandparent's dog Molly through a soap bubble.

Submitted by her grandfather John Huenemoerder, of Pavilion.

August 8, 2021 - 7:45am
posted by Howard B. Owens in animals, batavis, news.

Police have been dispatched to Harvester Avenue where a skunk reportedly has its head stuck in a cup and is in the middle of the roadway tying up traffic.

June 14, 2021 - 3:29pm
posted by Billie Owens in pet rescue, animals, news, batavia.

A kitten was reportedly briefly caught in the motor of a black sedan parked outside Petco off Veterans Memorial Drive in Batavia. "It's doesn't appear to be injured," relays the dispatcher.

An officer was responding but the kitten has been freed and assistance is no longer needed. The sedan is hitched to a black trailer.

May 19, 2021 - 5:35pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in outdoors, animals, batavia, video.
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May 5, 2021 - 4:47pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in animals, pets, news, pembroke, notify.

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Seven dogs that once belonged to a dog breeder in Pembroke are in the process of being adopted into new homes, but the resolution of the criminal case against Lori Ann Adolf won't be settled until next month at the earliest.

The 47-year-old Adolf is charged with 26 counts of torturing or injuring animals and failure to provide proper sustenance along with one count of endangering a child.

There is a pending plea offer but her attorney, Michael Guarino, in Pembroke Town Court today said he has not yet had time to sit down with his client and go over the offer with her. He asked for an adjournment and Justice Donald O'Connor granted one until 1:30 p.m., June 9. Assistant District Attorney Kaitlynn Schmidt said she didn't oppose the adjournment but said if Adolf isn't ready to accept the plea offer at the June 9 appearance the offer will be withdrawn.

The terms of the offer were not discussed in open court.

In January Deputy Kevin McCarthy arrested Adolf after reportedly finding 13 dogs and two cats covered in feces, urine, and surrounded by garbage. The dogs were reportedly not in good health but recovered while at the animal shelter. McCarthy also reported finding 10 dead rabbits inside the house that as well as a dead dog.

At a hearing on April 14, Guarino said Adolf would sign over some of the dogs for adoption but that she wanted to keep three dogs and two cats. Three of the dogs reportedly belonged to other people.

"The situation was not the way she intended it," Guarino said in April.

He said his client would like a chance to prove to the county that she can improve her situation and take proper care of her animals.

She has no prior record of animal neglect or abuse and no other criminal record.

All seven of the dogs released by Adolf have been claimed by prospective new owners.

Previously: 

May 4, 2021 - 5:51pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in animals, outdoors, batavia, news.

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Reader Paul Barrett shared this photo of a wandering beaver waddling down East Main near Liberty in Batavia.

April 14, 2021 - 3:05pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in pets, animals, pembroke, news, crime, notify.

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A dog breeder in Pembroke who is accused of neglecting and abusing 15 animals on her Akron Road property is prepared to negotiate the future of the animals with Genesee County officials, her attorney told Justice Donald O'Connor today during her appearance in Town Court.

Lori Ann Adolf, 47, is charged with 26 counts of torturing or injuring animals and failure to provide proper sustenance along with one count of endangering a child.

Today, in her first court appearance, she entered a not guilty plea.

Her attorney, Michael Guarino, said that of the 13 dogs and two cats that were taken into the care of the Genesee County Animal Shelter, three of the dogs are the property of other people, and Adolf is ready to sign over seven of the dogs to the shelter so they can be put up for adoption. 

She would like to keep three dogs and two cats.

"The situation was not the way she intended it," Guarino said. "She's now receiving mental health care."

He said his client would like a chance to prove to the county that she can improve her situation and take proper care of her animals.

She has no prior record of animal neglect or abuse and no other criminal record.

The animals have been in county care for four months and sources say are now in good health. When The Batavian visited the shelter last month, the dogs we observed seemed to be in good spirits.

Assistant District Attorney Kaitlynn Schmidt said she and she and Guarino will discuss the disposition of the animals between now and Adolf's next court appearance at 2 p.m., May 5. She said what becomes of the animals will be part of a plea agreement negotiation. She told O'Connor that the prosecution has made no plea offer at this point and has made no commitment that the county will agree to regarding the animals.

O'Connor also signed a no offensive conduct order of protection in regard to the minor who was apparently at Adolf's house while these animals were allegedly being mistreated.

Previously: Pembroke woman arrested after deputy allegedly finds 13 dogs, two cats in deplorable conditions

March 15, 2021 - 4:10pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in animals, pets, volunteers for animals, pembroke, notify.

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UPDATE 10:26 a.m. March 31: The defendant's Pembroke Town Court date was later changed to Wednesday, April 14 at 1 p.m.

Olivia looks a lot better than she did on Jan. 22 when she arrived at the Genesee County Animal Shelter.

She was among 13 dogs and two cats Deputy Kevin McCarthy reportedly found in allegedly cruel circumstances. The dogs, according to his report, were covered in feces, urine, and surrounded by garbage. 

A volunteer pointed to one of the dogs at the shelter and noted she had been washed multiple times but still had a yellow urine stain on her coat.

The dogs look healthy now, but that's not the condition they were in when they arrived at the shelter, according to volunteers. They were underweight and filthy. 

The dogs have required significant medical attention, the volunteer said, driving up veterinary bills for Volunteers for Animals.

According to McCarthy, he found the dogs locked in cages at 1071 Akron Road, Pembroke.

He also reported finding 10 deceased rabbits inside the house that as well as a dead dog.

McCarthy arrested Lori Ann Adolf, 47, of Pembroke, and charged her with 26 counts of torturing or injuring animals and failure to provide proper sustenance along with one count of endangering a child.

Adolf was issued an appearance ticket and ordered to be in Town of Pembroke Court at 1 p.m., Wednesday, March 31. The court date was later changed to April 14.

The Sheriff's Office declined our FOIL request for intake photos of the dogs when they arrived at the shelter. Since Adolf was arrested on an appearance ticket, she was not booked into jail and there is no mug shot available.

The volunteer at the shelter thinks the dogs will make good family pets. They are friendly and eager to make friends. However, they can't be adopted until Adolf surrenders custody or by court order. So far, Adolf, the volunteer said, Adolf, has refused to surrender the cats and dogs, so they remain in custody at the animal shelter while her criminal case is pending.

Housing and caring for the felines and canines have been a financial burden for the volunteers and donations are requested. The following items can be donated at the shelter, and monetary donations are also welcome:

Dog food:

  • Purina One chicken and rice 
  • Wet food: chicken-based (due to dietary restrictions for dalmatians) 
  • Chicken-based dog treats

Cat food: 

  • Purina One Indoor Advantage, dry
  • Purina One Healthy Kitten (blue bag)

Donations of gift cards from Genesee Feeds and Petco are also welcome.

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November 25, 2020 - 6:22pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in bergen, news, outdoors, animals.

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While hunting with her dad yesterday, Novalee Pocock, 14, from Bergen, had a close encounter of the raccoon kind. While in a wooded area, a raccoon came up to her and jumped in her lap. 

According to her mother, the raccoon cuddled right up to her to stay warm.

"She will never forget this encounter with the wildlife while hunting for deer with her dad," she said.

Submitted photo and information.

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