Local Matters

Community Sponsors

FFA

June 16, 2021 - 11:38am
posted by Press Release in news, Byron-Bergen Elementary School, FFA, 4-H, agriculture, Farm Day.

Above, an FFA member teaches a younger student about livestock.  

Submitted photos and press release:

On Friday, June 11, the Byron-Bergen FFA brought agriculture education to the Kindergarten classes. Members of the Future Farmers of America introduced the younger students to a variety of animals including cows, sheep, goats and ducks.

The outdoor event on the Elementary School grounds was a collaboration between FFA advisor Jeffrey Parnapy and Kindergarten teacher Ayn Gardner.

“We reached out to local people who own animals, a farmer brought his tractor in, and we’re also learning about different kinds of feed,” Parnapy said. “Both 4H and FFA members are presenting their animals and answering the kindergarteners’ questions.”

In some cases, the younger students were able to touch the animals.

“I like petting the lambs,” said kindergartener Evelyn Haywood.

“Looking around today, I already think that this is going to have to be a yearly event,” Parnapy said. “Everyone is having a blast and I’m so excited that we were able to provide this experience for the kindergarten students.”

Upstate Milk donated milk and cheese sticks for all the students and the FFA provided goodie bags for participating elementary students.

First three photos courtesy of Amanda Dedie. Bottom photo courtesy of Ayn Gardner.

Above, 4H member participating in Byron-Bergen Farm Day.

Above, Byron-Bergen students.

Above, students learn about farm machinery.

May 16, 2021 - 4:34pm

OAKFIELD – In spite of more than a year of coping with the COVID-19 pandemic, the Village of Oakfield is blooming, in more ways than one.

In the spring newsletter, Oakfield Mayor Dave Boyle stated, “Social and economic renewal seem to be on the horizon.”

This week, village’s Clerk Treasurer Kim Staniszewski, Bill Barber from Oakfield/Alabama Lions Club, Oakfield Historical Society President Laurie Nanni, owner of The Goose, Sue Zeliff and mayor Boyle’s wife Judy shared news of many upcoming programs.

A big new project designed to brighten the town’s Main Street is the placement last week of colorful pots of flowers. Judy Boyle said she has often driven through the neighboring villages of Medina and Albion and seen their flowering pots and wondered why Oakfield couldn’t do the same.

Staniszewski agreed to organize efforts to raise money for pots and flowers, and after a plea for donations, the Department of Public Works, volunteers and students from Oakfield/Alabama Central School Future Farners of America chapter met to fill 37 pots with dirt and flowers. The DPW will maintain them throughout the summer.

Staniszewski said they were shocked how many people and churches contributed to the flower project. 

The village also sponsored a coloring contest on Earth Day in April, and winners were posted in the village office windows.

Another project being undertaken by the village is acquiring a bike rack. The village is seeking someone to build decorative ones with the village logo on them. They are pursuing the necessary funding and hope to see the racks materialize in the near future.

“Our village is so walkable, and the sidewalks are so wide,” Judy Boyle said. “Everything is just coming alive.”

Boyle also noted the village’s Memorial Park on Main Street, behind Warner’s Flowers. Residents can buy bricks to memorialize friends and loved ones.

The park also boasts a sensory path. During the coronavirus pandemic, the village was approached by special needs staff at Oakfield/Alabama School, where they have a sensory path painted in the school. Individuals don’t touch anything as they walk along, but rather imitate the motions depicted by the paintings. The special needs department came and painted the sensory path in the park.

The Memorial Park is about an acre in size and is a nice, quiet little park, Boyle said. 

The next big event is the Oakfield Community-Wide Garage Sale, sponsored by Oakfield/Alabama Lions Club. Lions Member Bill Barber is organizing the sale scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 12. It will encompass homes on streets within the village, as well as Roberts Road, Lewiston Road, Lockport Road and Albion Road. 

As part of the day, the Oakfield Community Bible Church will have water available and will sponsor a bottle and can drive. The Oakfield Methodist Church will have a pie sale. In Triangle Park, the Lions will have a tent selling sausage, hot dogs and beverages; Pack 19 Cub Scouts will have a birdhouse sale; and the Oakfield Betterment Committee will sell tickets for their Labor Day raffle.

They are planning to have Labor Daze back this year. The Betterment Committee is also undertaking a tree-planting renewal project, under leadership of Jamie Lindsley.

Big things are happening at the Oakfield Historical Society. Because it was closed for a year during the pandemic, volunteers have been working on projects in the museum. Nanni said they are expanding the War Room, focusing on Italian immigrants, and catching up on reorganizing their files.

Because families were shut in during the pandemic, many took advantage of the time to research their ancestors. As a result, the Historical Society has received numerous calls asking for information on ancestors.

On May 22, the Historical Society will work with the town to clean up in Cary Cemetery. They alternate years between Cary and Reed cemeteries. 

The Historical Society has paid for 15 Home Town Banners to honor the town’s deceased veterans. They printed brochures, which were distributed to the village office, Historical Society, Haxton Memorial Library and the town building on Drake Street, asking residents for names of veterans.

The Historical Society decided to pay for the banners because they had money, which was previously raised, but couldn’t be used for the intended projects because of COVID-19. They also said they realized many of these veterans no longer had family in the area to pay for a banner.

In July or August, the Historical Society will sponsor a walking tour on “Main Street Ablaze.” The tour, based on the Historical Society’s book, tells of the six times Main Street in Oakfield has burned in past centuries.

Sept. 3 will be a cemetery tour titled “History Comes Alive,” sponsored by the Historical Society. 

Other books by the Historical Society are in the works. Nenni is planning one titled “More Mayhem,” a sequel to “Murder, Mysteries and Mayhem.” Several volunteers are working on a book about Oakfield’s cemeteries, and Bill Chase, who wrote “The Bone Fort,” is expanding his book on the Indian Woods, titled “Digging Deeper.”

Exciting news in the village is the repurposing of the former Yellow Goose market on Main Street. The building, which has been purchased by Peter Jr. and Sue Zeliff, has been turned into a community center.

A food pantry has been operating out of there, but on a limited basis during the pandemic. It has also become a community clothing center and Sue said they hope to have a Farmer’s Market there with a coop. Several local groups have been holding their meetings in the building.

“There are a lot of bakers in Oakfield and we’d love to see them sell their treats at a Farmer’s Market,” she said.

Sue also added the building needs a new roof and bathrooms, something they hope to accomplish soon.

During the Community Yard Sale, a local resident who started a stamping group will sell their greeting cards at The Goose. Crafters meet there.

The Lions Club managed to sponsor many of their projects during the pandemic. They packed and delivered dinners to shut-ins once a week during the winter. In November, they packed and delivered nearly 100 sunshine baskets to the elderly and those living alone.

In December, their Christmas in the Park and Breakfast with Santa were scaled down and featured a drive-by Santa visit and Santa talking and giving candy to about 75 kids.

The Lions were able to give out 95 chocolate rabbits in April at the Oakfield Town Park, during an Easter egg hunt.

In addition to the Community Garage Sale in June, the Lions will help the town with cemetery cleanup and sponsor a fishing contest in DeWitt Recreation Area in the City of Batavia. They are also planning to have a barbecued rib dinner in the Town Park in August. 

Other regular projects throughout the year include vision screening, maintaining a medical loan closet, collection of eye glasses and hearing aids (they’ve collected more than 100 pair of glasses this year), and their plastic recycling challenge has resulted in enough plastic to receive four benches.

Finally, Haxton Memorial Library will restart its Monday morning story time at 10:30 a.m., according to library manager Kim Gibson. They have also added an afternoon story time at 2 p.m. on Thursdays. Preregistration is required for both. Monday’s story time will continue to be live on Facebook. 

The library’s six-week Summer Reading Program will kick off on June 28. Children from Pre-K to sixth grade can participate in the program by checking out books and keeping track of their reading minutes. Prizes and incentives will be given out throughout the six-week program. Children can also participate in the weekly Thursday night Craft Time sessions. Preregistration is also required for this activity. For adults and teens, check-out tickets are being offered to enter them in a basket raffle. 

The Haxton Book Club meets every six weeks on a Wednesday afternoon at the library. Anyone interested in joining or wishing more information can call the library. 

“This all is a great representation of our community and our businesses,” Staniszewski said.

Top photo: Several active citizens from the Village of Oakfield are involved in a variety of events and projects to promote interest and encourage people to get out and show their support. Discussing their projects are, from left, Bill Barber, organizer of the Oakfield/Alabama Lions Community Yard Sale; Sue Zeliff, who with her husband, Peter Jr., have purchased the former Yellow Goose on Main Street and turned it into a community center; Kim Staniszewski, village clerk/treasurer; Judy Boyle, wife of Mayor Dave Boyle; and Laurie Nanni, president of the Oakfield Historical Society (with her 3-year-old granddaughter, Emma). Photo by Virginia Kropf.

Below: Sue Zeliff stands in front of “The Goose." Photo by Virginia Kropf.

Bottom two photos: Students from Oakfield/Alabama Central School FFA chapter who recently helped fill 37 pots with dirt and flowers for display on Main Street in Downtown Oakfield, which the DPW will maintain this summer. Photos courtesy of Judy Boyle.

May 11, 2021 - 4:57pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in FFA, Oakfield, news.

oakfieldffaflowers2021-4.jpg

A total of 37 pots filled with flowering plants will be placed along Main Street in the Village of Oakfield this spring and summer, paid for by residents and business owners to help bring a little color and vibrancy to the community. 

Spearheaded by Village Clerk Kim Staniszewski and Judy Boyle, they asked people to donate $25 for each pot and then the donor will have a sign in the pot recognizing a local achievement (such as the fine seasons of the basketball teams), memorializing a loved one, or mentioning a business sponsor.

The plants and material were purchased from Pudgie's Lawn and Garden with Pudgie's staff assisting in selecting the plants so "we make sure this spring and summer they really grow and flourish and look pretty," Staniszewski said.

Today, members of Oakfield-Alabama's Future Farmers of American potted the plants.

oakfieldffaflowers2021-3.jpg

Kaden Cusmano

oakfieldffaflowers2021.jpg

Colton Yasses

oakfieldffaflowers2021-2.jpg

Karly Smith

June 13, 2018 - 11:20am
posted by Howard B. Owens in byron-bergen, news, FFA, agriculture.

image001bbffa.jpg

Press release:

On May 29, Byron-Bergen Jr./Sr. High School held their first Future Farmers of America Awards ceremony since restarting an agriculture program after an absence of almost 50 years.

The presentation honored student members and their supportive FFA parents. Certificates of Appreciation were given to many community advisors and volunteers, and district personnel.

The FFA chapter’s student officers were recognized as a cohesive leadership team who have driven the growth of the new chapter: Garrett Sando (president), Cole Carlson (vice-president), Hallie Calhoun, Isabelle Stevens, Andrew Parnapy and Seth Sharp.

Greenhand FFA degrees, for senior high school students, were given to Jacey Donahue and all six FFA officers. Garrett Sando was named the Star Greenhand for 2018. Discovery FFA degrees for Jr. High School students were given to Caleb Carlson, Madelynn Pimm, and Rachel Best. Four students received Proficiency Awards: Cole Carlson (Beef Showmanship), Sando (Employment Interview), Parnapy (Creed Speaking), and Sharp (Agricultural Sales).

The ceremony marked the end of the beginning for the Byron-Bergen agriculture program and FFA chapter. It has been an amazing year for both, with about 15 students getting involved in the hands-on approach to learning offered in the new Introduction to Agriculture Science class, along with the Living Environment class.

Students marveled at the opportunity to learn about agriculture as a science course, and to be able to explore it even more deeply through FFA.

“Students are really excited and proud to participate in FFA,” said Byron-Bergen’s Cornell Ag-certified teacher Jeff Parnapy. “They love the teamwork and leadership activities involved.

"Our kids have stepped up and taken responsibility for making the decisions and doing the work necessary for the chapter to be successful, to raise funds, and to take part in the community.

"Our group attended the recent NYS FFA Convention in Rochester and got to meet students from around the state. We’re planning to participate at the State Fair and the Genesee County Fair later this summer.”

Parnapy says the chapter will begin active competition in statewide FFA contests this fall, and take part in more state and FFA District 9 events and trips next year.

He says FFA is undergoing a renaissance, with several local school districts starting new chapters. He also credits the school’s Advisory Committee — local volunteer farmers and animal science experts — for their help and guidance.

Parnapy will be attending professional development sessions in Animal Science this summer, with the hope of offering it as an additional class in the 2019-20 school year.

"We had a great first year bringing back Ag Education and FFA for the first time in so many years,” said Jr./Sr. High School Principal Patrick McGee.

“Kudos to Mr. Parnapy and our kids for getting this back off the ground. We truly believe that this program is going to continue to grow and be a viable part of the Jr./Sr. High School."

FFA is a national organization that makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education. www.ffa.org

Top photo: Byron-Bergen’s FFA members at May’s NYS FFA Convention in Rochester. (l-r) Garrett Sando, Jacey Donahue, Isabelle Stevens, Rachel Best, Madelynn Pimm and Hallie Calhoun.

image002bbffa.jpg

FFA President Garrett Sando (right) with advisor and Ag teacher, Jeff Parnapy.

November 7, 2017 - 3:04pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in oakfield-alabama, FFA, agriculture, Oakfield, news.

faaoagavel022017.jpg

A bit of Oakfield-Alabama Future Farmers of Amercia history was returned to the current FAA chapter at the school -- now in its second year -- at the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis last month.

James Connors, Ph.D., a professor at the University of Idaho, had purchased a box of parliamentary items off of eBay and found within it a gavel inscribed with Oakfield-Alabama FFA.

When he found out O-A FFA would be at the convention, he reached out and at first members thought it was maybe a sales pitch, but after a little investigation, agreed to meet. Connors presented them with the gavel that must have belonged to the prior FFA chapter at the school.

Connors presented the gavel to OAE FFA President John Igoe, Secretary Lauren Reding, Reporter Karly Smith and Julia Uhrinek.

“We are thrilled to have a piece of Oakfield-Alabama FFA history back in our possession at school,” said FFA advisor Todd Hofheins.

Chapter members would like to learn more about the history of the gavel. If you know anything about it email [email protected] or call the school at 585.948.5211, ext. 4010.

oafaagavel2017.jpg

November 6, 2010 - 8:54pm
posted by Billie Owens in Announcements, FFA.

Three students in the Conservation Program at Genesee Valley Educational Partnership in Batavia earned a Bronze Team Award in the National FFA Forestry Event.

They are Jacob Hopcia and Phil Gorney, from Attica, and Zach Noble from Pavilion.

In addition, individual medals went to Jacob, who earned a Bronze Metal, and Zach and Phil who won silver medals.

The National FFA Forestry Career Development Event is a competitive activity that tests students’ skills and knowledge in the area of forest management.

Components include a general exam, tree and equipment identification, tree disorders identification, a chainsaw practicum, forestry issues interview, and a team activity.

Each team competed at local and state levels for the privilege of representing their
state at the national FFA convention, held in Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 20-23.

Subscribe to

Calendar

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 

Copyright © 2008-2020 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
 

blue button