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le roy police department

June 28, 2021 - 3:19pm

Genesee County’s director of mental health and community services apparently swung for the fences and hit a home run last week when she learned that the New York State Office of Mental Health approved the county’s application to participate in the Mobile Access Program with three law enforcement agencies.

The Mobile Access Program (MAP) is a pilot initiative that connects residents in distress with mental health clinicians utilizing iPads (via Zoom for Healthcare, a secure teleconferencing software program) when law enforcement officers request assistance.

Mental health staff then will conduct an evaluation remotely to help plan for an appropriate disposition.

“They (NYSOMH officials) really wanted one law enforcement agency but we kind of took a gamble and chose three. We asked for a lot,” said Lynda Battaglia, who heads up the county’s mental health department.

The three police departments that have agreed to partner with Genesee County are the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office, City of Batavia Police and Village of Le Roy Police.

Battaglia said heads of the three law enforcement agencies watched a webinar about the program and all expressed an interest in participating.

“I asked each police department to provide information specific to their line of work – how many devices they would need for each shift; bandwidth, accessibility in different areas; how many officers would need iPads and the number of calls related to mental health issues they receive,” Battaglia offered.

She then took that data and coupled it with mental health information and sent the application to the NYSOMH. Not only was Genesee County approved, but requests from all other counties as well.

“We received notice that since there was such a great response … they were able to accommodate all the applicants,” she noted.

Calling it a “telehealth program,” Battaglia said the state will give iPads to all three police departments and to the mental health clinic. The state also will provide training and support services.

She said that the objective is to increase accessibility to those having mental health issues and cut down the time it takes to deliver essential mental health consultations.

“Let’s say police receive a call to go out and talk with somebody – and it’s a mental health call,” she said. “One of the goals is to decrease unnecessary transport to the hospital, under Mental Health Law 9.41.”

Mental Health Law Section 9.41 give powers to peace officers and police officers to admit individuals in emergency situations for immediate observation, care, and treatment.

Battaglia explained that if an officer is interacting with someone who doesn’t need to be transported to a hospital (or to jail), they will ask that person if they wish to have a telehealth emergency visit with the mental health person on call.

“There will be arrangements made to have the officer connect with his or her iPad with our on-call person with their iPad, and the mental health person will conduct a telehealth session with that individual in crisis,” she said.

She did acknowledge that the program won’t work in all cases, specifically if someone is under the influence of alcohol or substances – “for clinical reasons you won’t get an accurate assessment,” she said – or if a person is extremely agitated or at very high risk.

“We’re hoping to have it where the mental health professionals make that determination (which is allowed under MHL Section 9.45 -- emergency admissions for immediate observation, care, and treatment under the authority of directors of community services or authorized designees).

Genesee County Sheriff William Sheron reported that mental health calls continue to increase.

“I would say we average at least one a day – and some days, more than others,” he said. “That’s why it’s important to get the proper treatment to these individuals in a timely fashion, and reduce the amount of police involvement in the process.”

Sheron said law enforcement is “working hand-in-hand with mental health to more directly address the needs of people who have mental health crises.”

“This will expedite that. It may not be appropriate for all cases, but I think for the majority of them, it will be very beneficial. The last thing we want to do is having law enforcement take some kind of criminal action against somebody when they really need the services of mental health professionals.”

Battaglia said she expects it to take a few months for state mental health officials to provide training and to implement the program. She said is hoping that this turns out to be a win-win situation for all.

“We have a crisis plan in place (contracting with SpectrumHealth for a mobile response team), and I think that it is a plan that has been OK. But, with this opportunity and moving into the future, we can make the crisis plan a little more connected,” she said.

“It will definitely prove how law enforcement and mental health officials can work together. It will build relationships. It will help the people in the community.”

April 26, 2021 - 5:06pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, le roy police department, crime, notify, Pavilion.

From the Village of Le Roy Police Department:

Jared S. McDonald, 27, of South Street Road, Pavilion, was arrested by the Le Roy Police Department on April 23, following the execution of a Search Warrant.

McDonald was charged with grand larceny in the second degree, a Class C felony, and coercion in the first degree, a Class D Felony.

As a result of the Search Warrant, McDonald is also facing several from the Genesee County Drug Task Force, including: multiple counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance with the intent to sell in the fifth degree; criminal possession of a controlled substance in the in the seventh degree; criminal possession of an assault weapon in the third degree; criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree; and criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree.

On April 19 the Le Roy Police Department received a complaint of property taken by means of extortion on April 14. It is alleged that the defendant placed the victim in fear of physical injury if the victim did not sign various items of property over to him. 

During the investigation, it was allegedly discovered that the stolen property was still in McDonald’s possession at his residence in Pavilion. Further investigation led officers to believe that McDonald was selling controlled substances out of his residence and was also in possession of firearms.

A Search Warrant was executed on April 23 at McDonald’s residence, due to items McDonald was believed to be possession of. The Le Roy Police Department was assisted by the New York State Police Special Operations Response Team, members of the Genesee County Drug Task Force, and members of the New York State Police Community Narcotics Enforcement Team.

McDonald was found to allegedly be in possession of a quantity suspected methamphetamine, psilocybin mushrooms ('shrooms), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), other controlled substances, drug paraphernalia, firearms, and the property that was previously reported taken from the victim.

Some of the offenses McDonald was charged with did qualify for prearraignment detention under the NYS Justice Reform Act. The District Attorney’s Office was contacted for a bail recommendation due to the level of the offenses. It was advised that McDonald should be jailed on $2,500 cash bail, $5,000 bond, or $20,000 partially secured bond.

McDonald was arraigned in court (unspecified) by Justice Randy Baker then released under supervision of Genesee Justice. He is to return to court on June 16 to answer to the charges.

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