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June 3, 2021 - 2:04pm

Press release:

Standing with Rochester Finger Lakes Region business and economic development leaders on Wednesday, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer re-upped his push for the Senate to pass his bold, bipartisan initiative next week to propel American leadership in science and technology into the 21st century.

The legislation is in the debate process on the floor of the Senate.

Schumer’s plan – which includes passing the Endless Frontier Act, now part of the broader U.S. Innovation and Competition Act, provides $52 billion in federal investment to fully fund the implementation of the bipartisan semiconductor provisions he passed in last year’s defense bill.

It would dramatically increase U.S. investment in domestic advanced manufacturing and research & development of strategically important technologies like semiconductors and establish regional tech hubs across the country.

These investments could help lead to the creation of new jobs and jumpstart innovation across Rochester and Western New York.

Senator Schumer said these new investments would both supercharge work by the region’s key economic development drivers, including the University of Rochester (UR) and Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), to invest in new technological research and development that spur new jobs and businesses as well as support the region’s semiconductor manufacturers (like Akoustis Technologies in Candandaigua) and attract new semiconductor factories to the region’s STAMP business park in Alabama.

“We must immediately address several dangerous weak spots in our country’s competitiveness that threaten America’s global technological leadership. We’re in an all-out race for the jobs of the future and to protect our country’s global technological edge and it’s time to put New York’s top-tier workforce and tech community on the frontlines” Senator Schumer said.

“This legislation will enhance American competitiveness with China and other countries by building up places across Rochester and Western New York to lead in the innovation economy, creating high-tech American manufacturing jobs, strengthening R&D, and investing in workforce training capabilities.

“The stakes are enormous. If we do not invest now in the research, development, and manufacturing of technologies of the future, we risk falling behind in the race with China and other global competitors, putting at risk U.S. jobs, intellectual property, and national security.”

Today, the United States’ position as the unequivocal global leader in scientific and technological ingenuity and innovation is under pressure from China and is eroding. U.S. competitiveness and national security are being threatened by decades of U.S. underinvestment in research, manufacturing, and workforce development, coupled with foreign competitors stealing American intellectual property and aggressively investing to dominate the key technology fields of today and of the future.

Schumer said that without a significant and sustained increase in investment in research, education and training, technology transfer and entrepreneurship, manufacturing, and the broader U.S. innovation ecosystem across the nation, it is only a matter of time before America’s global competitors overtake the United States in terms of technological primacy, threatening national security and economic prosperity.

He cited a recent study authored by MIT Economists Jonathan Gruber, Ph.D., and Simon Johnson in their book, "Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream," that concluded millions of new jobs could be created through a new federal effort to boost federal funding for the sciences.

They analyzed 102 regions to determine which are best poised to become new Tech-Economy hubs if provided federal scientific research & development investment and determined that Rochester ranked No. 1 as the nation's top region ripe for technological and economic growth. The authors argued for the creation of a bold new federal investment in science and technology, such as would be created now through the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act.

Additionally, Schumer highlighted the region’s STAMP business park (Science Technology & Advanced Manufacturing Park) as a site that can be positioned to attract new semiconductor supply chain or chip fab manufacturing facilities thanks to the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act.

In recent months he has personally urged the top brass at Samsung, Intel, and Micron to look to locate their next U.S. chip production facilities in New York, said the legislation’s provisions to provide $52 billion in emergency spending to implement Federal incentives to semiconductor companies in return for building new chip fabs in the United States is already a game-changer, creating new opportunities for places like STAMP to attract new semiconductor jobs and factories and for companies like Akoustis Technologies to expand. 

Schumer’s plan is in the process of debate on the floor of the Senate and includes his "Endless Frontier Act." The plan would invest in three main areas – domestic advanced manufacturing; research, development, entrepreneurship, and workforce training in strategically important technologies like semiconductors; and establishing regional technology hubs through federal investment in economic development across the country to be global tech centers.

Schumer is also proposing $52 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations to implement the bipartisan federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D provisions he passed into law last year as part of the annual defense bill.

Details on the supplemental appropriations proposed by Senator Schumer appear below:

  • $49.5 billion allocated over five years for a CHIPS for America Fund. Funding must be used to implement the Commerce Department semiconductor incentive and R&D programs authorized by the FY21 NDAA (Sec. 9902 & 9906). Within the fund, the following appropriations are available:

                -- Incentive Program: $39 billion appropriated upfront and allocated over five years to implement the programs authorized in Sec. 9902. $2 billion is provided to solely focus on legacy chip production to advance the economic and national security interests of the United States, including helping to address the chip shortage faced by the auto industry.

                              $19 billion in FY22, including the $2 billion legacy chip production funding;

                              $5 billion each year, FY23 through FY26

  • Commerce R&D programs: $10.5 billion appropriated upfront and allocated over five years to implement programs authorized in Sec. 9906, including the National Semiconductor Technology Center (NSTC), National Advanced Packaging Manufacturing Program, and other R&D programs authorized in Sec. 9906.

                   -- $5 billion in FY22

                   -- $2.5 billion for advanced packaging

                   -- $2 billion for NSTC

                   -- $500 million for other related R&D programs

For use across the advanced packaging, NSTC, and other related R&D programs, the following would be provided:

                   -- $2 billion in FY23

                   -- $1.3 billion in FY24

                   -- $1.1 for FY25 and FY26

  • $2 billion for a CHIPS for America Defense Fund: Funding is appropriated up front and $400 million is allocated each year, over five years for the purposes of implementing programs authorized in Sec. 9903(b), providing support for R&D, testing and evaluation, workforce development, and other related activities, in coordination with the private sector, universities, and other Federal agencies to support the needs of the Department of Defense and the intelligence community.
  • $500 million for a CHIPS for America International Technology Security and Innovation Fund: Funding is appropriated upfront and $100 million each year, allocated over five years to the Department of State, in coordination with the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Export-Import Bank, and the U.S. International Development Finance Corporation, for the purposes of coordinating with foreign government partners to support international information and communications technology security and semiconductor supply chain activities, including supporting the development and adoption of secure and trusted telecommunications technologies, semiconductors, and other emerging technologies.

An additional $1.5 billion is provided for implementation of implement the USA Telecommunications Act that was also passed as part of last year’s NDAA to foster U.S. innovation in the race for 5G.

Details on the Endless Frontier Act

As reported by the Senate Commerce Committee, it seeks to maintain and build on U.S. science and technology leadership through investments in research and development and strengthening regional economic development, manufacturing, and supply chains. The legislation would authorize roughly $120 billion over five years for activities at the National Science Foundation (“NSF”), Department of Commerce (“DOC”), the Department of Energy (“DOE”), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (“NASA”).

It advances priorities including to reduce undue geographic concentration of R&D funding, encourage broader participation of populations underrepresented in STEM, and increase collaboration across federal agencies and with nongovernmental partners on innovation. Crucially, the Endless Frontier Act helps to bridge the gap of innovative technological breakthroughs happening at America’s premier research institutions by bringing those breakthrough to the applied science and commercialization space to benefit our countries growing innovative advancements.

Notable Provisions

Technology Directorate: The Endless Frontier Act would create a new Directorate of Technology and Innovation at the NSF to support research and technology development in key technology focus areas, such as artificial intelligence and quantum science, in order to strengthen the global leadership of the United States in innovation. Major activities would include funding research and development at collaborative institutes, supporting academic technology transfer and intellectual property protection, establishing technology testbeds, and awarding scholarships and fellowships to build the relevant workforce. The Directorate would be authorized at $29 billion over fiscal years 2022 to 2026, including a transfer of $2.9B to existing NSF divisions to support basic research collaboration.

NSF Research and Development Programs: The Endless Frontier Act would authorize $52 billion over fiscal years 2022 to 2026 for existing NSF activities, representing a 7-percent increase each year. The legislation would also create a Chief Diversity Officer at NSF and increase STEM education to enhance the domestic STEM workforce. The legislation also incorporates a series of new programs, including programs for precision agriculture, rural STEM education, quantum information science, skilled technical education, critical minerals, and bioeconomy R&D.

Regional Technology Hubs: The Endless Frontier Act creates a regional technology hub program at DOC to support regional economic development in innovation. Technology hubs would carry out workforce development activities, business and entrepreneur development activities, technology maturation activities, and infrastructure activities related to the technology development. The technology hubs program would be authorized at $10 billion over fiscal years 2022 to 2026.

Manufacturing: The Endless Frontier Act would authorize close to a quadrupling of the DOC Manufacturing Extension Partnership and create a new track within the program for public benefit activities like workforce development and cybersecurity services. The Manufacturing Extension Partnership would be funded at $2.4B over fiscal years 2022 to 2026. The substitute would also authorize the Manufacturing USA program, at $1.2B over fiscal years 2022 to 2026, and add workforce and coordination provisions.

Supply Chain Resiliency: The Endless Frontier Act would establish a supply chain resiliency program at the Department of Commerce to work with the private sector, for the purpose of identifying and recommending opportunities to mitigate or address supply chain vulnerabilities in the United States and in allied and partner countries. It would also amend the recently enacted CHIPS Act to provide $2 billion in incentives for domestic production of mature semiconductor technologies, such as for the automotive industry.

Schumer’s plan also includes $52 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations to implement the bipartisan federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D provisions he passed into law last year as part of the annual defense bill. An additional $1.5 billion is provided for implementation of implement the USA Telecommunications Act that was also passed as part of last year’s NDAA to foster U.S. innovation in the race for 5G.

Steve Hyde, president & CEO, Genesee County Economic Development Center, said “Senate Majority Leader Schumer has long-championed Upstate New York as the ideal region for critical growth of the domestic semiconductor manufacturing and R&D investments due to our university research and talent, our established and ever-growing semiconductor supply chain, along with our considerable capacity of renewable, reliable, and competitively priced electricity. We applaud Senator Schumer for his leadership, and agree that passage of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act would be catalytic in growing the high-tech economy at the Western New York Science & Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (STAMP) and all across Upstate New York."

Schumer added, “These investments are key to preserving America’s position on the world stage as a current and future technological leader. In the coming days, I will push for final Senate passage of this legislation to ensure that the U.S.’ hand at home and abroad is as strong as possible as we compete with China on all fronts.”

June 1, 2021 - 11:02am
posted by Press Release in business, NextEra Energy Inc., solar farm, GCEDC, STAMP, Power Plug.

Press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) Board of Directors will consider approving final incentives for a $345 million solar project in the Town of Byron, and construction of a campus-wide electrical substation at the Science Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Park (STAMP). Both matters will be discussed at the agency’s June 3 board meeting.

NextEra Energy Inc. is planning a $345.55 million Excelsior Energy Center utility scale solar farm project to be located on multiple agricultural properties in Town of Byron. The project is a 280 MW (AC) solar generation system, and a 20 MW 4-hour energy storage system, that will be interconnected with the electric grid.

The project will provide enhanced property tax payments via a 20-year PILOT (Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) and host benefit agreements. The project will contribute $6,500/MWAC in total PILOT/host benefit payments annually + a 2 percent annual escalator over the 20-year term.

Resulting property tax-type benefits of the project in the Town of Byron, Byron-Bergen Central schools, and Genesee County are estimated at over $45.2 million.

NextEra Energy is seeking approximately $32.7 million in property and sales tax incentives. A public hearing on the proposed agreement was held April 19.

Plug Power Inc. is planning to invest $55 million toward a campus-wide substation at STAMP. The substation will enable 100 percent renewable, reliable electricity at less than $0.035/kwh to future tenants in partnership with the New York Power Authority and National Grid.

The proposed substation investment is in addition to the $232 million Plug Power is investing to build a green hydrogen manufacturing facility at STAMP. The facility is estimated to create 68 full-time jobs.

Plug Power is seeking approximately $2.8 million in sales tax incentives related to the substation construction. A public hearing on the proposed agreements will be held at 10 a.m. on June 3.

The GCEDC Board meeting is at 4 p.m. and because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic the meeting will be conducted via videoconference and can be viewed online at www.gcedc.com.

May 27, 2021 - 3:14pm

Press release:

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer met with Micron Technology President and CEO, Sanjay Mehrotra, to pitch Micron to locate a future plant in Upstate New York after filing the bipartisan U.S. Innovation and Competition Act* last week.

The legislation combines his Endless Frontiers Act, other bipartisan competitiveness bills, and $52 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations to implement the semiconductor-related manufacturing and R&D programs authorized in last year’s National Defense Authorization Act. It also supports a legacy chip production program that is essential to the auto industry, the military, and other critical industries.

During his meeting with Mehrotra, the senator said New York boasts several sites across Upstate ready to be home to a new Micron facility -- from the STAMP** campus in Western New York (in Genesee County's Alabama) and the White Pines campus in Central New York, to Marcy Nanocenter in the Mohawk Valley and Luther Forest in the Capitol Region.

Schumer expressed his strong support for the project coming to the Empire State. As new federal incentives are being considered, Micron is evaluating opportunities to strengthen the company’s manufacturing and R&D footprint.

“Micron’s interest in exploring options to expand its footprint in the U.S., and potentially in Upstate NY, is exciting news for the entire state and country. I made it clear to Micron that I strongly support locating a cutting-edge memory fab at one of the several shovel-ready sites across New York and reiterated that Upstate NY’s robust semiconductor industry makes it the perfect place for Micron to settle,” Senator Schumer said.

“Our world-class manufacturing workforce combined with New York’s considerable experience in semiconductor manufacturing and R&D means the state is revving and ready to welcome a new facility. I stand ready to help Micron harness all that the federal government has to offer for the U.S. to continue to lead the semiconductor industry and cement New York as a global hub for high-tech manufacturing.”

Schumer added, “When I first announced my proposal to create the first-ever new federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D incentives program, I said it could put sites across New York in contention for landing new semiconductor fabs and the thousands of new jobs that follow.

"I filed the bill to fully fund my proposal last week and am working to have the Senate pass the bill by the end of this week, but already it has sparked consideration by companies like Micron to expand domestically.

"Once we are able to pass the emergency funding into law, I will work to secure the federal investment necessary and offer my all-out support to help Upstate compete for this plant and other facilities that will help shore up our domestic semiconductor supply.”

Schumer pointed out, the United States has gone from producing 24 percent of the world’s semiconductors in 2000, to just 12 percent, while China by comparison, has gone from producing zero chips to 16 percent of the world’s supply. This is because the United States is not matching the investments that other competing nations are making in order to land new job-creating semiconductor chip fabs.

The historic U.S. Innovation and Competition Act, will provide federal incentives to semiconductor fabs in the United States, helping to reverse the trend of foreign-made semiconductors and level the playing field for companies like Micron to build new fabs in the United States.

Schumer said Micron is a strong supporter of CHIPS and passage, along with strong government support for a project, would increase their consideration of building new fabs like this one in the United States.

Micron is the only manufacturer of semiconductor memory and storage solutions in the United and the world’s fourth-largest semiconductor company. Employing more than 40,000 people in 17 countries, Micron is headquartered in Boise, Idaho, where it operates one of the world’s most advanced R&D centers, and has a strong U.S. manufacturing presence in Manassas, Va.

*U.S. Innovation and Competition Act -- section by section summary here, pdf / legislation text here, pdf

**STAMP is the acronym for Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park.

April 1, 2021 - 12:24pm

 Press release:

Following his advocacy, Schumer released the following statement regarding President Biden’s Plan to Invest in the U.S. Semiconductor Industry, that included $50 billion to fund and implement the federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D incentives, which Schumer introduced last year as part of his American Foundries Act, and that passed into law as part of the Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act: 

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer said, “I have made it a top priority to work with President Biden to prioritize the absolute necessity of making a major investment in the nation’s semiconductor domestic manufacturing and R&D, which can also fuel new high-paying jobs across Upstate New York.

"President Biden delivered on my requests with his inclusion of $50 billion to implement the new federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D programs, that I fought for and passed into law in last year’s defense authorization bill. With the industry’s top companies considering expansion and new investment at New York sites -- like STAMP in Western New York, White Pines in Central New York, Marcy Nanocenter in the Mohawk Valley, and Luther Forest in the Capital Region -- we have no time to waste.

"So I want to move quickly to pass this funding to support the semiconductor industry’s plans to invest in the United States, enhance our global competitiveness, promote our national security, and create thousands of new jobs.

"As I announced weeks ago, I am working to bring to the Senate floor this spring a competitiveness package that includes my bipartisan Endless Frontier Act to invest in American innovation and manufacturing.

"As part of this legislative effort, I am working with members of both parties and the administration to include emergency spending to fully fund the federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D programs authorized in the defense bill.”

March 30, 2021 - 1:37pm

Press release:

After announcing that a strategic partnership between Intel and IBM will bring hundreds of new semiconductor R&D jobs to New York’s Capital Region, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer followed up on his efforts to cement Upstate New York as the global hub of the semiconductor industry and pitched Intel’s recently appointed CEO Pat Gelsinger on how Intel should build on its new partnership with IBM and locate their next semiconductor fabrication (“fab”) plant in Upstate New York.

Last week, Intel shared its plans to select a second site for its next U.S. manufacturing facility within a year, following the announcement of the IBM R&D partnership.

Schumer said New York boasts several sites across Upstate ready to be home to Intel’s next Chip fab, or the supply chain Intel would require, from Alabama's STAMP campus in Western New York and the White Pines campus in Central New York, to Marcy Nanocenter in the Mohawk Valley and Luther Forest in the Capitol Region.

Plus, Upstate New York boasts a thriving semiconductor ecosystem as evidenced by the just announced IBM partnership, the state’s top notch universities and world-class workforce, and a diversity of companies across the supply chain. Typically, semiconductor fabs bring thousands of new jobs into a region, a number which Schumer said would be a win-win-win for the local economy, Upstate New York workforce, U.S. competitiveness, and Intel itself.

“Intel’s plans to invest in a second U.S. semiconductor fab offers a game-changing opportunity for Upstate New York and I made it clear to Intel all that New York has to offer to make their U.S. expansion a huge success for the company and the country,” Senator Schumer said.

“With an existing semiconductor ecosystem, including leading R&D companies, premier universities to train the next-generation workforce, a thriving supply chain, and robust utilities that can host advanced manufacturing, Upstate New York is tailor made to be the home of Intel’s new manufacturing facility.”

Schumer added, “An Intel fab in Upstate New York would not only help shore up our domestic production of chips, but it also positions the company to take even more advantage of its partnership with IBM to develop and lead in next generation semiconductor technology, a point I made to Intel’s CEO as they consider further building out their U.S. manufacturing operations in the year ahead.

"I stand ready to give my all out support in helping Intel harness all that the federal government has to offer to continue to lead the tech industry and position New York as a global hub of semiconductor manufacturing, including pushing to fully fund the federal incentives I created in last year’s defense bill so companies like Intel receive support to invest in U.S. competitiveness and create thousands of new jobs.”

Schumer has long emphasized the importance of active federal support for the semiconductor industry. This includes his push to include provisions in the FY2021 NDAA to create new federal semiconductor manufacturing, R&D, and training programs.

He notes that even though the United States revolutionized the semiconductor and broad microelectronics industries and invented nearly all of the key technology used to this day, by 2030, non-U.S. competitors are projected to control 83 percent of the global semiconductor manufacturing supply. And domestic production could be less than 10 percent, threatening U.S. reliance on foreign-made microelectronics, including from China, and posing huge risks to U.S. national and economic security.

In a meeting with then-nominee for Commerce Secretary, Gina Raimondo, Schumer raised the urgent need to fully fund and implement the new Commerce semiconductor manufacturing grant and R&D programs he passed into law as part of last year’s defense authorization. He pointed to this Intel investment as an example for why these federal incentives are such a high priority.

In February, Schumer announced that the Senate would work on a bill in the spring of this year that includes his bipartisan Endless Frontier Act, which would provide a major infusion of federal funds for federal R&D, including for semiconductors.

As part of this competitiveness package Schumer plans to bring to the Senate floor this spring, he will be pushing for emergency funding to implement the federal semiconductor programs created in last year’s defense bill so these critical programs can be implemented to help the U.S. successfully compete with other countries, including China, for new semiconductor manufacturing investment.

Schumer has led the effort to create these historic new federal investments in domestic semiconductor manufacturing and R&D. Last year, Schumer unveiled his bipartisan American Foundries Act to bolster U.S. leadership in semiconductor and broader microelectronics industries. He successfully added this bill as an amendment in July 20202 to the Senate’s Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

The new programs included in NDAA will increase federal support for semiconductor manufacturing by providing new federal incentives to conduct advanced research and development of semiconductor technology, including the creation of the NSTC, secure the supply chain, and ensure national and economic security by reducing reliance on foreign semiconductor manufacturing.

March 18, 2021 - 1:59pm
posted by Press Release in GCEDC, STAMP, Alabama, business, infrastructure.

Photo: Work on a new high-capacity water line along Route 77 is part of a $2 million infrastructure construction project at STAMP.

Submitted photo and press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) today announced that with the anticipated completion of a $2 million infrastructure project this summer, water capacity will increase to more than 1 million gallons per day at the 1,250-acre Western New York Science & Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (STAMP) mega site in Genesee County.

“Every infrastructure milestone adds to the tremendous momentum behind STAMP. Our ability to deliver low-cost, 100-percent renewable power, and utility infrastructure aligned with project timelines and capacities, is driving even greater interest from site selectors and companies looking to locate in Genesee County,” said GCEDC President and CEO Steve Hyde.

Hyde noted that STAMP’s development is advancing with significant infrastructure design, engineering, and construction milestones. The mega-site is already designed and permitted for the construction of over 6 million square feet of advanced manufacturing facility space.

The water infrastructure project includes the installation of new high-capacity water lines that will connect with previously extended infrastructure on New York State Route 77 that runs along the STAMP site.

The water line project is supported by New York State, and is aligned with investments by Genesee County and the towns of Alabama and Pembroke to expand infrastructure for economic and community growth. Morsch Pipeline in Avon serves as the lead contractor on the project.

In February, Plug Power Inc. announced it plans to begin construction of North America’s largest green hydrogen production facility at STAMP. Plug Power’s $290 million proposed facility and electric substation investment further expands access to high-capacity, flexible infrastructure on parcels ranging from 30 acres to over 650 acres, Hyde said.

“Partnering with an industry leader like Plug Power is another significant asset available at STAMP to grow the renewable and advanced manufacturing sectors, which will transform our regional economy for generations,” Hyde said.

February 24, 2021 - 1:12pm

Press release:

Yesterday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer discussed his push to direct Senate committees to craft legislation to protect American jobs and outcompete China. Below are Senator Schumer’s remarks, which can also be viewed here:

"Today on our caucus call, I directed the chairs and members of our relevant committees to start drafting a legislative package to outcompete China and create new American jobs.

"The legislation will have as its centerpiece a bicameral, bipartisan bill, the Endless Frontiers Act, which I introduced last year with (Sen.) Todd Young (R-IN), and Representatives Ro Khanna (D-CA), and Mike Gallagher (R-WI) in the House. And it will take the key cutting industries and make American investments so we will outcompete China in all of them.

"In addition, we will make serious investments in strengthening the U.S. semiconductor industry to outcompete China and stop depending on foreign sources.

"Right now, semiconductor manufacturing is a dangerous weak spot in our economy and in our national security. That has to change.

"You've all seen that auto plants throughout America are closed because they can't get the chips. We cannot rely on foreign processors for the chips. We cannot let China get ahead of us in chip production. This will be part of the proposal that we will introduce. 

"We will also talk about the build out of 5G and how America can remain number one there. And all of these have bipartisan support. The bill we will intend to introduce, and I talked to Senator Young about it, and he's eager to get it done, will be bipartisan.

"Our intention is to put this legislation on the Senate floor for a vote this spring.

"To get a little more specific, the new legislation must achieve three goals: enhance American competitiveness with China by investing in American innovation, American workers and American manufacturing; invest in strategic partners and alliances: NATO, Southeast Asia and India; and expose, curb, and end once and for all China's predatory practices which have hurt so many American jobs.

"We're looking at emergency funding to implement the bipartisan Semiconductor Program as part of this package. You all know about the chip shortage. I want this bill to address America's short term and long term plan to protect the semiconductor supply chain and to keep us number one in things like AI, 5G, quantum computing, biomedical research, storage. All of these things are part of the bill and the Endless Frontiers Act.

"So we need to get a bill like this to the president's desk quickly to protect America's long term economic and national security."

***************************************************************************

In Genesee County, the Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park -- STAMP -- in Alabama is a semiconductor fabrication (“fab”) plant.

Previously: Schumer pitches top brass at Samsung on shovel-ready STAMP site for new semiconductor plant

January 28, 2021 - 2:06pm

Press release:

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer yesterday (Jan. 27) followed up on his efforts to secure a provision in the FY2021 National Defense Authorization Act to boost American-based semiconductor manufacturing by reaching out directly to Samsung, which is interested in possibly locating their new plant in Genesee County.

He called Senior Vice President of Samsung Device Solutions Joe Herr and other top brass about the Genesee Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park -- STAMP -- in Alabama and expressed his strong support for the project coming to Western New York.

Samsung is currently considering the STAMP campus, as well as several other locations in other states, for its semiconductor fabrication (“fab”) plant – with 1,900 jobs – that the company plans to open late next year. Samsung’s Device Solutions division includes Samsung’s Global Semiconductor Foundry business. 

“This Samsung project is an exciting and a potential game changer for the region," Schumer said. "I made it clear to Samsung that I strongly support locating their planned 1,900 worker state-of-the-art semiconductor chip fab at the shovel-ready STAMP site in Genesee County. I know firsthand that STAMP is shovel-ready – and that, combined with Upstate New York’s robust semiconductor industry, make Genesee the perfect location for Samsung’s new chip fab.

World-class WNY Workforce

"Our world-class Western New York workforce combined with New York’s considerable experience in semiconductor manufacturing and R&D means STAMP is tailor-made to be the home for Samsung’s new facility. I stand ready to help Samsung harness all that the federal government has to offer to continue to lead the tech industry and position New York as a global hub of semiconductor manufacturing.

“When I stood at STAMP in August to announce my proposal to create the first-ever new federal semiconductor manufacturing and R&D incentives program, I said it could put sites like Western New York’s STAMP in contention for landing a new semiconductor manufacturing plant and the thousands of new jobs that come with it.

"This game-changer proposal passed into law last month and already companies like Samsung are considering STAMP for a 1,900 job chip fab plant, partly because of this new federal initiative. Now, I will work to secure this federal investment and offer my all-out support and advocacy in helping STAMP compete for this multi-billion-dollar plant.” 

Schumer has long championed the Genesee site and toured STAMP in August, and knows firsthand how ideal the campus would be as home for Samsung’s new chip fab. Schumer explained to Samsung that he, alongside the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCECC), New York State, and Western New York officials, worked for a decade to help ensure that it was shovel-ready for a semiconductor facility.

WNY Offers: Low Utility Costs, Transportation Networks, Supplies Access, Brain Power

“The STAMP campus, sitting on 1,250 acres of land between Buffalo and Rochester, New York’s second and third largest metros, respectively, with a 1.2 million person world-class workforce, is specifically designed for large-scale fabs and provides maximum flexibility in layout and infrastructure connections,” Schumer said.

"Additionally, the senator pointed out many cost and infrastructure advantages to the STAMP campus location, including low utility costs, access to existing transportation networks, access to New York state’s existing chip fab supply chain ecosystem, and 62 colleges, universities, and community colleges within a two-hour drive of the site including Cornell University, University at Buffalo, Rochester Institute of Technology, University of Rochester, Genesee Community College.

Schumer said Samsung is relying on his legislation to building new fabs like this one in the United States. In fact, Schumer pointed out, the United States has gone from producing 24 percent of the world’s semiconductors in 2000, to just 12 percent while China, by comparison, has gone from producing zero chips to 16 percent of the world’s supply because the United States is not matching the investments that other competing nations are making in order to land new job-creating semiconductor chip fabs.

The senator's first-ever legislation will reverse this imbalance and level the playing field for companies like Samsung to build new chip fabs in the United States. For the first-time Schumer’s legislation will provide federal incentives to semiconductor chip fabs to build in the United States.

U.S. Reliance on Foreign-made Microelectronics Could Pose 'Huge Risks'

Upon passage of his legislation last month in the FY2021 National Defense Authorization Act Schumer said his legislation is vital. He noted that even though the United States revolutionized the microelectronic industry and invented nearly all of the key technology used to this day, by 2030, non-U.S. competitors are projected to control 83 percent of the global semiconductor manufacturing supply while domestic production could be less than 10 percent, threatening U.S. reliance on foreign-made microelectronics, which could pose huge risks to U.S. national and economic security.

In a recent meeting with the Commerce Secretary nominee, Governor Gina Raimondo, Schumer raised the urgent need to fully fund and implement the new Commerce semiconductor manufacturing grant program he passed into law as part of last year’s defense authorization, pointing to this Samsung investment as an example for why these federal incentives are such a high priority. Federal incentives are critical to the United States successfully competing with other countries, including China, for new semiconductor manufacturing investment like the proposed Samsung facility.

Schumer, in addition to paving the way for future federal incentives for investment into domestic semiconductor manufacturing previously brought STAMP to the attention of the Department of Defense, urging the agency to work with the semiconductor industry to expand the domestic supply of chips and other microelectronics.

STAMP is Made Specifically for What Samsung Needs

STAMP is specifically designed for development of large-scale semiconductor manufacturing. The 1,250 acre mega site can accommodate large advanced manufacturing operations with its expansive space for several plants.

Schumer has also previously lobbied the Board of Directors of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) to put STAMP on their map and pitched SIA’s 18 semiconductor industry CEOs to look to expand their operations in Upstate New York at sites like STAMP in Genesee County.

In 2017 Schumer helped secure Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval of Empire Pipeline Inc.’s revised and extended PILOT agreement with Genesee County, the proceeds of which were needed to finance new water infrastructure at STAMP.

In 2016 Schumer began assisting STAMP secure necessary U.S. Fish and Wildlife right-of-way permits to construct new infrastructure hook-ups to STAMP. In 2012, Schumer successfully advocated on behalf of STAMP by calling on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide necessary wetlands permit assurances so that STAMP's developers could proceed with developing the site.

September 17, 2020 - 2:07pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in gced, STAMP, business, notify.
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The total annual tax revenue from all current Genesee County Economic Development Center-backed projects -- more than 160 since 2006 -- will generate more than $8.4 million in additional property tax revenue for local governments once all the projects have matured out of their PILOT phase.

There are more than 90 projects that received a PILOT (Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) that are now completely on the tax rolls.

A PILOT waives property taxes on the increase in assessed value associated with a building expansion or new construction but requires the property owner to make payments to the local taxing jurisdictions. 

The 71 projects currently with an active PILOT generated $1.5 million in revenue for local governments, such as municipalities, the county, and school districts, in 2019.

The projects with completed PILOTs generated another $3.5 million in revenue for local governments -- revenue that would not have been realized if the property owner had not expanded or started a new project causing an increase in the assessed value of the property.

Steve Hyde, CEO of GCEDC, Jim Krencik, marketing director, and Lezlie Farrell, CFO, shared data on GCEDC's progress during an annual review presentation for the county's Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday.

Hyde and Mark Masse, vice president of operations, both said Genesee County is well-positioned to take advantage of the new thinking among manufacturers in the post-pandemic world, when many companies realize they need to tighten up their supply chains and "reshore" (bring factories back to the United States) their operations. They're looking for shovel-ready sites, and there is ample such acreage in the GCEDC-created industrial parks around the county.

"Companies are taking a serious, hard look at where there are failings in the current system, from raw materials up through shipping," Masse said.

On a recent statewide conference call with three of the nation's top site selectors, one of them, whom Hyde described as the dean of site selectors, praised Genesee County.

"We've been working on getting on his radar for 10 years," Hyde said. "When you start to get on their radar, you've got a shot."

As for STAMP -- the industrial park in Alabama being marketed to tech manufacturers -- there are five companies currently considering siting a new facility there, including a semiconductor company that Hyde indicated Sen. Charles Schumer helped swing Genesee County's way.

These are long-term projects so Hyde said it will be a while before any of these potential suitors sign a deal.

The biggest obstacle to industrial growth in Genesee County is the lack of quality housing stock. That makes it harder to attract companies who want to ensure employees who move here can find quality housing or it means well-compensated employees move to Rochester or Buffalo.

Hyde noted that the average age of a house in Batavia is 73 years, twice the national average.

August 18, 2020 - 12:40pm
posted by Press Release in GCEDC, Alabama, news, STAMP, infrastructure.

Press release:

Construction work has commenced to finish a major water line project to the Western New York Science & Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (STAMP) and bring the STAMP South Campus to 100-percent shovel-readiness for development.

The Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) announced today (Aug. 18) that the $2 million active infrastructure project enables over one million gallons per day of water capacity to STAMP. This project is supported by Genesee County to support Phase I development of the STAMP site.

The 1,250-acre STAMP site, through the 850-acre STAMP North Campus and the 400-acre STAMP South Campus, is designed and permitted for more than six million square feet of new construction supported by low-cost hydropower.

“There is a tremendous amount of momentum for STAMP right now and not just from an infrastructure investment and construction standpoint, but in interest among site selectors and representatives from advanced manufacturing companies, including semiconductor companies from across the world,” said Steve Hyde, president and CEO, GCEDC. 

The start of the construction on the latest STAMP water line comes after U.S. Senator Charles Schumer was in Batavia on July 31st to announce among other things, his support for a $1 million grant through the Northern Border Regional Commission for the construction of a new force main to serve the entire STAMP site. 

STAMP infrastructure design, engineering and construction launched in 2014 with the allocation of $33 million by New York State.

“With federal, state and local funding enabling STAMP’s infrastructure delivery, our 1,250-acre mega site will provide a significant return on investment and can be a model for economic recovery as New York State emerges from the pandemic,” Hyde said.

The infrastructure work includes the completion of the construction of a water line that was started from a connection from the Erie County Water Authority in Pembroke near the New York State Thruway. The second leg included construction of the line at a connection near the Western New York National Cemetery for veterans, and now from the cemetery to the STAMP South Campus.  

The work is anticipated being completed by the end this year. The design and engineering work was performed by Clark Patterson & Lee.

August 1, 2020 - 12:00pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Charles Schumer, news, video, STAMP, Alabama.
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In the video, Sen. Charles Schumer talks about the semiconductor plan, baseball, baseball trivia, his relationship with newly elected Rep. Chris Jacobs, the safety of reopening schools, and the future of the Muckdogs.

Press release:

Standing with local officials at Genesee’s STAMP* Campus, U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer today unveiled his three-pronged push to jolt the U.S. semiconductor industry and the Upstate New York economy into high gear.

First, Schumer called for swift passage by Congress of the final Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), in which the senator successfully included an amendment that will continue U.S. leadership in semiconductor manufacturing and revitalize innovation in the global microelectronics sector.

Second, the Senator announced his push for a $1M Northern Border Regional Commission grant that STAMP needs to construct a new sewer line to complete STAMP’s wastewater system infrastructure. The sewer is the final piece of infrastructure that will make the 1,250-acre STAMP campus shovel-ready for manufacturing facility construction.

Third, Schumer will urge the Department of Defense (DoD) to consider the STAMP campus as the agency looks to partner with industry to develop new domestic semiconductor fabs. Combined, the Senator’s efforts will provide unprecedented support for the U.S. semiconductor industry and create opportunities to bring hundreds of jobs to Genesee County and Upstate New York.

“The economic and national security risks posed by relying too heavily on foreign semiconductor suppliers cannot be ignored, and Upstate New York, especially the STAMP Campus here in Genesee, is the perfect place to grow this industry by leaps and bounds,” Senator Schumer said.

“We must continue to invest in our domestic semiconductor industry in order to keep good-paying, high-tech American manufacturing jobs here in Upstate New York. We need to ensure our domestic microelectronics industry can safely and securely supply our military, intelligence agencies, and other government needs. This is essential to American jobs, our national security, and to U.S. leadership in this critical industry."

Schumer noted that even though the United States revolutionized the microelectronic industry and invented nearly all of the key technology used to this day, competitors in Asia, especially China, have made huge investments into their microelectronics industries in recent years to challenge and undercut U.S. leadership.

In fact, Schumer pointed out, the United States has gone from producing 24 percent of the world’s semiconductors in 2000, to just 12 percent more recently. In contrast, China has gone from producing zero chips to 16 percent of the world’s supply in the same time frame. The senator warned that by 2030, Asia is projected to control 83 percent of the global semiconductor manufacturing supply while domestic production could be less than 10 percent, threatening U.S. reliance on foreign-made microelectronics, which could pose huge risks to U.S. national and economic security.

Therefore, Schumer argued, his three-pronged plan to revitalize the semiconductor industry and incentivize it to build new research and manufacturing facilities in the United States at sites like STAMP is vital to cement global U.S. leadership in the microelectronics industry and will ease U.S. reliance on foreign-made semiconductors, alleviating economic and national security risks.

“Senator Schumer’s leadership in the Senate’s passage of the American Foundries Act as a part of the National Defense Administrative Act will help put STAMP over the finish line as it will make available necessary funding to develop and construct the final pieces of infrastructure to stand up multiple semiconductor manufacturing fabs and along with it the creation of thousands of good-paying, family-sustaining jobs to Genesee County and the Western New York and Finger Lakes regions,” said GCEDC President and CEO Steve Hyde. Attracting semiconductor and similar industries at STAMP will result in as much as $10 billion to $15 billion of private sector investment all of which will be enabled by this game-changing legislation.”

Secondly today, Schumer announced his push to secure the Northern Border Regional Commission (NBRC) grant to construct the last missing sewer line needed for STAMP to achieve shovel-ready status. Specifically, this funding is needed to complete STAMP’s sewer and wastewater system by constructing a 14,500-square-foot force main sewer line to support new businesses that locate at STAMP. The force main is the final piece needed to make STAMP shovel-ready with the capabilities to meet any industry’s needs to construct new manufacturing operations at STAMP and create new high-quality jobs. 

Lastly, Schumer called on the Department of Defense (DoD) to consider STAMP as a location for next-generation semiconductor research and manufacturing facilities now that the DoD is in discussions with semiconductor manufactures to build new domestic chip manufacturing facilities to ensure U.S. leadership in the global microelectronics supply chain.

Last month Schumer wrote to Defense Secretary Mark Esper to draw his attention to the opportunities for new Semiconductor development at STAMP. As a result, DoD officials participated in a meeting Schumer convened with STAMP officials to help position STAMP to capitalize on new opportunities through the DoD to attract semiconductor research and manufacturing facilities to STAMP.

Following Schumer’s unveiling of his bipartisan American Foundries Act and major push to bolster U.S. leadership in the microelectronics sector, he successfully advanced his proposal as an amendment included in the Senate-passed Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The amendment:

  • Directs the Secretary of Commerce to create a grant program for constructing, expanding, or modernizing commercial semiconductor fabrication, assembly, testing, packaging, and advanced R&D facilities in the United States.
  • Directs the Secretary of Defense to create a partnership program with the private sector to encourage the development of advanced, measurably secure microelectronics for use by the Department of Defense, Intelligence Community, critical infrastructure, and other national-security applications.
  • Requires the Secretary of Commerce to commence a review within 120 days assessing the state of the U.S. semiconductor industrial base.
  • Establishes a Multilateral Microelectronics Security Fund, with which the United States, its allies, and partners will work to reach agreements promoting consistency in their policies related to microelectronics, greater transparency including supply chains, and greater alignment in export control and foreign direct investment policies.
  • Directs the President to establish a subcommittee on semiconductor technology and innovation within the National Science and Technology Council; directs the Secretary of Commerce to establish a national semiconductor technology center to conduct research, fund semiconductor startups and a Manufacturing USA Institute, create a National Advance Packaging Manufacturing Program; and encourages the Secretary of Labor to work with the private sector on workforce training and apprenticeships in semiconductor manufacturing.

This amendment, which is also cosponsored by U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, is based on the Senator’s bipartisan American Foundries Act, which has been broadly supported by key players in New York’s semiconductor industry, including GlobalFoundries, IBM, ON Semiconductor, Cree Inc., the Genesee County Economic Development Center, Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation, Mohawk Valley EDGE, Cornell University, Binghamton University, and SUNY Polytechnic Institute.

 STAMP is specifically designed for development of large-scale semiconductor manufacturing. The 1250-acre mega site is divided into an 850-acre North Campus that can accommodate clean tech advanced manufacturers including up to three semiconductor chip fabs and a 400-acre South Campus ideal to attract new food, beverage, and warehouse/distribution development.

In 2012, Schumer successfully advocated on behalf of STAMP by calling on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide necessary wetlands permit assurances so that STAMP's developers could proceed with developing the site. In 2017 Schumer helped secure Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval of Empire Pipeline Inc.’s revised and extended PILOT agreement with Genesee County, the proceeds of which were needed to finance new water infrastructure at STAMP.

*STAMP -- Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park

July 22, 2020 - 2:16pm
posted by Billie Owens in business, STAMP, Alabama, GCEDC, microelectronics.

Press release:

Following Senator Charles E. Schumer’s unveiling of his bipartisan American Foundries Act and major push to bolster U.S. leadership in the microelectronics sector, Schumer and U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand today announced the Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) includes their provision to reestablish U.S. leadership and revitalize innovation in the global microelectronics sector.

The senators explained that the bipartisan legislation increase federal investment into semiconductor manufacturing by providing new federal incentives to conduct advanced research and development of semiconductor technology, secure the supply chain, and ensure national and economic security by reducing reliance on foreign semiconductor manufacturing.

The amendment passed in the Senate 96-4 yesterday, and the legislation included in the final NDAA, which is expected to be put to a final vote in the Senate in coming days, will provide unprecedented support for the U.S. semiconductor industry.

“The economic and national security risks posed by relying too heavily on foreign semiconductor suppliers cannot be ignored, and Upstate New York, which has a robust semiconductor sector, is the perfect place to grow this industry by leaps and bounds,” Senator Schumer said.

“America must continue to invest in our domestic semiconductor industry in order to keep good-paying, high-tech American manufacturing jobs here in Upstate New York. We need to ensure our domestic microelectronics industry can safely and securely supply our military, intelligence agencies, and other government needs.

"This is essential to our national security and to U.S. leadership in this critical industry. I’m pleased to deliver this win in this year’s final NDAA for Upstate New York and the entire country."

“Our nation is in an economic crisis. Investing in microelectronics manufacturing and the semiconductor industry will create high paying manufacturing jobs for hard working Americans at a time when our country needs it most,” Senator Gillibrand said.

“This amendment will help expand our advanced manufacturing workforce in Upstate New York and invest in cutting edge research and development. I’m proud that this legislation is included in NDAA so that we can continue to strengthen our microelectronic domestic supply chain, prioritize American-owned businesses over foreign production, and keep our country safe.”  

The senators noted that even though the United States revolutionized the microelectronic industry and invented nearly all of the key technology used to this day, competitors in Asia, especially China, have made huge investments into their microelectronics industries in recent years to challenge and undercut U.S. leadership.

In fact, Schumer and Gillibrand pointed out, the United States has gone from producing 24 percent of the world’s semiconductors in 2000, to just 12 percent more recently. In contrast, China has gone from producing zero chips to 16 percent of the world’s supply in the same time frame.

The senators warned that by 2030, Asia is projected to control 83 percent of the global semiconductor manufacturing supply while domestic production could be less than 10 percent, threatening U.S. reliance on foreign-made microelectronics, which could pose huge risks to U.S. national and economic security.

Schumer has long-championed increased efforts to expand the domestic microelectronics industry, supporting companies like GlobalFoundries, which houses their most advanced "Fab 8" manufacturing facility in Malta, New York, IBM, and others.

With New York home to multiple major companies and research institutions in the semiconductor industry, the state is positioned to securely supply the U.S. government with critical technologies and maintain U.S. leadership in this technology. This is a tremendous opportunity for New York’s semiconductor companies to expand operations, create more jobs in Upstate New York, and help the U.S. reduce its reliance on foreign semiconductor manufacturing.

Specifically, supporters of the amendment include: GlobalFoundries; IBM; ON Semiconductor; Cree Inc.; the Genesee County Economic Development Center; Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation; Mohawk Valley EDGE; Cornell University; Binghamton University; and SUNY Polytechnic Institute.

“Senator Schumer has been a longtime champion of New York's 1,250-acre STAMP megasite in Genesee County and this legislation provides a tremendous opportunity to create thousands of high-quality semiconductor jobs for the Western New York and Finger Lakes regions," said Steve Hyde, president and CEO of the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC). "In short, STAMP* is a transformative economic development game-changer that will generate billions of dollars of economic activity across Upstate New York.

"We appreciate Senators Schumer and Gillibrand’s push to pass this milestone legislation that advances our site, region, and New York's readiness as we compete globally for projects of this scale.” 

*STAMP: Western New York Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park in Alabama.

Details on the NDAA Amendment are below:

  • Directs the Secretary of Commerce to create a grant program for constructing, expanding, or modernizing commercial semiconductor fabrication, assembly, testing, packaging, and advanced R&D facilities in the United States.
  • Directs the Secretary of Defense to create a partnership program with the private sector to encourage the development of advanced, measurably secure microelectronics for use by the Department of Defense, Intelligence Community, critical infrastructure, and other national-security applications.
  • Requires the Secretary of Commerce to commence a review within 120 days assessing the state of the U.S. semiconductor industrial base.
  • Establishes a Multilateral Microelectronics Security Fund, with which the United States, its allies and partners will work to reach agreements promoting consistency in their policies related to microelectronics, greater transparency including supply chains, and greater alignment in export control and foreign direct investment policies.
  • Directs the president to establish a subcommittee on semiconductor technology and innovation within the National Science and Technology Council, directs the Secretary of Commerce to establish a national semiconductor technology center to conduct research, fund semiconductor startups and a Manufacturing USA Institute, create a National Advance Packaging Manufacturing Program, and encourage the Secretary of Labor to work with the private sector on workforce training and apprenticeships in semiconductor manufacturing.
June 28, 2020 - 2:32pm

Press release:

Citing concerns that China is catching up to the United States in microelectronics production capacity, U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer today (June 28) unveiled the American Foundries Act, a bipartisan initiative that seeks to reestablish U.S. leadership and revitalize innovation in the global microelectronics sector.

Schumer explained that the bipartisan legislation would make critical investments in domestic commercial and defense-related microelectronics manufacturing and research and development, and address economic and national security concerns by decreasing U.S. dependence on foreign-made semiconductor chips.

“The economic and national security risks posed by relying too heavily on foreign semiconductor suppliers cannot be ignored, and Upstate New York, which has a robust semiconductor sector, is the perfect place to grow this industry by leaps and bounds,” Senator Schumer said. “America must continue to invest in our domestic semiconductor industry, including companies like GlobalFoundries, ON Semiconductor, IBM and Cree right here in New York, in order to keep good-paying, high-tech American manufacturing jobs here at home.

"We need to ensure our domestic microelectronics industry can safely and securely supply our military, intelligence agencies, and other government needs. This is essential to our national security and to U.S. leadership in this critical industry."

The senator noted that even though the United States revolutionized the microelectronic industry and invented much of the key technology used to this day, competitors in Asia, especially China, have made huge investments into their microelectronics industries in recent years to challenge U.S. leadership. In fact, Schumer pointed out, 78 percent of cutting-edge wafer fabrication capacity is now based in Asia, with last year being the first year that North America fell behind China.

Schumer has long-championed increased efforts to expand the domestic microelectronics industry, supporting companies like GlobalFoundries, which houses their most advanced "Fab 8" manufacturing facility in Malta, New York, IBM, and others.

With New York home to multiple major companies and research institutions in the semiconductor industry, the state is positioned to securely supply the U.S. government with critical technologies and maintain U.S. leadership in this technology, offering a tremendous opportunity for New York’s semiconductor companies to expand operations, create more jobs in Upstate New York, and help the United States reduce its reliance on foreign semiconductor manufacturing.

Specifically, supporters of the American Frontiers Act include GlobalFoundries, IBM, ON Semiconductor, Cree Inc., the Genesee County Economic Development Center, Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation, Mohawk Valley EDGE, Cornell University, Binghamton University, and SUNY Polytechnic Institute.

"We applaud the powerful American Foundries Act of 2020 co-sponsored by Senator Schumer and the impressive, bipartisan list of Senate leaders,” said Tom Caulfield, CEO of GlobalFoundries. “Senator Schumer has supported semiconductor manufacturing and GlobalFoundries for many years and this legislation seeks the quickest route to boosting chip production in the U.S. We appreciate this timely and significant contribution as Congress and the Administration work through the best approach for federal investment to restore domestic leadership in semiconductor manufacturing.”

"The U.S. semiconductor industry drives economic growth through technological breakthroughs and plays a critical role in the nation’s security,” said John E. Kelly III, Executive Vice President, IBM. “IBM strongly supports the American Foundries Act of 2020 because this important legislation would sustain American leadership in semiconductor technology and establish a national strategy to move it forward. We thank Senators Schumer and Cotton for their leadership on this bill and urge the Senate to pass it quickly."

“The American Foundries Act is a bold step to respond to the aggressive incentives available to overseas competitors and reverse the decline of semiconductor manufacturing in the United States,” said Keith Jackson, president and CEO of ON Semiconductor. “ON Semiconductor urges the Congress to quickly advance legislation to promote American semiconductor research and manufacturing.”

“Cree continues to invest aggressively in silicon carbide manufacturing and research in order to support the growing, global demand for our technologies, and we believe advanced semiconductor manufacturing is essential to leading the acceleration of critical next-generation technologies," said Gregg Lowe, president and CEO of Cree Inc. "Like many other semiconductor companies in the U.S., we believe this legislation would provide necessary investments that move our industry and economy forward and we commend its introduction."

"Senator Schumer has long recognized that our 1250-acre STAMP site in Genesee County presents a tremendous opportunity to create thousands of high quality semiconductor jobs for the Western New York and Finger Lakes regions," said Steve Hyde, president and CEO of the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC).

"Our challenge has always been the considerable cost to get the site developed and shovel ready in the global competition to land projects of this scale. This legislation though is a game changer in so many ways as it will support cutting-edge domestic semiconductor development and increases in semiconductor manufacturing capacity at a crucial time in our nation's history."

“Senator Schumer’s American Foundries Act is the type of innovative, bipartisan legislation that we need to build on our regional strengths and grow the Hudson Valley economy post-pandemic," said Mike Oates, president and CEO of Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation. "With industry leaders like IBM, GlobalFoundaries, and soon ON Semiconductor right here in the Hudson Valley, it is no secret that investing in the microelectronics manufacturing and research and development space will enhance our ability to manufacture semiconductor chips, create jobs, and reimage our economy.

"HVEDC is proud to support Senator Schumer in his push to bolster our footprint in the growing semiconductor sector and we will continue working with him to keep the Hudson Valley on the map as a global industry leader.”

“Construction of new microelectronics and semiconductor fabrication facilities have the ability to change the economic landscape of a region and the proposed American Foundries Act proposed by Senator Schumer is a strategic investment to secure the United States’ position as a global  leader in microelectronics and semiconductor R&D,” said Steven J. DiMeo, president, Mohawk Valley EDGE.

“As our economy shifts away from the long-standing model of industrialism coupled with the uncertainty of a global pandemic, we now more than ever need the federal government to continue its support of game-changing industries like semiconductors and microelectronics. The construction of Cree’s state-of-the-art 200 mm enabled SiC semiconductor facility at the Marcy Nanocenter in Upstate NY, is a pivotal example of what can be done when all stakeholders are working together to advance our high-tech ecosystem and regional economy and maintain the United States’ global competitiveness.”

Emmanuel P. Gianellis, vice provost for Research and Vice President for Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property and Research Policy at Cornell University, said, “Senator Schumer has long recognized that the best way to keep America at the forefront of the technology revolution is to invest in research and development here at home.

"Not only does the American Foundries Act of 2020 direct critical resources into expanding the domestic production of microelectronics, it also points the way to the future with substantial funding for research and innovation. Cornell University is pleased to support this legislation and commends Senator Schumer for his leadership.”

"Whether we are talking about technology that enables advancement in AI for autonomous vehicles, smart energy for a greener environment or flexible wearable devices for human health and industrial monitoring, the United States government must remain on the frontlines, supporting industrial and academic innovations in advanced electronics manufacturing," said Harvey Stenger, president of Binghamton University.

"We once again acknowledge all that Sen. Schumer has done and continues to do to emphasize the importance of research and development efforts in private labs as well as at research institutions like Binghamton University. We thank the senator for this latest effort to apply resources to enhance the bridge from early R&D to at-scale manufacturing that will lead to breakthroughs in next-generation semi-conductor research and keep the United States competitive and a leader in the global economy."

“Leadership in the microelectronics industry is critical for America’s continued economic and strategic competitiveness on the global stage," said SUNY Polytechnic Institute Interim President Grace Wang, Ph.D. "The American Foundries Act of 2020 will provide a more strategic national approach in advancing  microelectronics capabilities, R&D, and workforce development and ensure our nation remains at the forefront of impactful innovation.

"This bill takes a bold approach to facilitate chip fab modernization efforts and investment in key areas such as fabrication, assembly, test, and advanced packaging to strengthen our nation’s technological independence and agility for years to come.”

Schumer said he will aim to include the legislation as an amendment in this year’s National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Senator Schumer introduced the American Foundries Act of 2020 in the Senate, along with Senators Cotton (R-Arkansas), Reed (D-Rhode Island), Hawley (R-Missouri), Gillibrand (D-New York), Risch (R-Idaho), Jones (D-Alabama), Collins (R-Maine), King (I-Maine), and Rubio (R-Florida), and details of the bill can be found below:

Support for Commercial Microelectronics Projects: Authorizes the Department of Commerce to award $15 billion in grants to states to assist in the construction, expansion, or modernization of microelectronics fabrication, assembly, test, advanced packaging, or advanced research and development facilities.

Support for Secure Microelectronics Projects: Authorizes the Department of Defense to award $5 billion in grants for the creation, expansion, or modernization of one or more commercially competitive and sustainable microelectronics manufacturing or advanced research and development facilities capable of producing measurably secure and specialized microelectronic for defense and intelligence purposes. This funding may go to primarily commercial facilities capable of producing secure microelectronics.

R&D Funding: Authorizes $5 billion in R&D spending to secure U.S. leadership in microelectronics. Requires agencies that receive this funding to develop policies to require domestic production, to the extent possible, for any intellectual property resulting from microelectronics research and development as a result of these funds.

The new R&D funding would be broken up as follows:

  • $2 billion for DARPA’s Electronics Resurgence Initiative
  • $1.5 billion for the National Science Foundation
  • $1.25 billion for the Department of Energy
  • $250 million for the National Institute of Standards and Technology

National Microelectronics Research Plan: Establishes a subcommittee of the President’s Council on Science and Technology to produce a report each year to guide and coordinate funding for breakthroughs in next-generation microelectronics research and technology, strengthen the domestic microelectronics workforce, and encourage collaboration between government, industry, and academia.

Safeguards: Prohibits firms owned, controlled or otherwise influence by the Chinese government from accessing funds provided by the legislation.

November 27, 2019 - 1:46pm
posted by Billie Owens in business, Alabama, GCEDC, STAMP.

Press release:

The Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) recently participated in Semicon Europa, the largest European semiconductor industry event connecting leaders across the advanced manufacturing world and related supply chains. 

Director of Marketing and Communications Jim Krencik represented the GCEDC and the Western New York Science & Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (WNY STAMP) at the event, which was held in Munich, Germany Nov. 12th through Nov. 15th.

More than 8,000 industry professionals participated in the conference. Krencik participated in the event as part of the New York Love Nanotech pavilion, which included representatives from Empire State Development’s Strategic Business Division, SUNY POLY/NY CREATES, AIM Photonics, site developers, and New York-based supply chain companies, with the support of National Grid.

While connecting with representatives of semiconductor industry companies from North America, Europe, and Asia, Krencik was able to tout many of WNY STAMP’s assets, such as low-cost hydropower, site infrastructure development, and the availability of top-end talent in the region.

“New York State has proven to be an ideal location for the industries represented at Semicon Europa,” Krencik said. “The assets available at Western New York Science & Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park provide a ready source for the growth of the semiconductor industry and advanced manufacturing in our region.”

Located in Alabama, Genesee County, WNY STAMP is a 1,250-acre campus connecting New York’s second- and third-largest metropolitan areas, and developed to best serve the needs of advanced manufacturing projects. Ongoing site development will enable WNY STAMP to achieve full capabilities of 485-megawatts electric capacity and 11-million gallons per day of water capacity.

September 6, 2019 - 12:04pm

Press release:

The Board of Directors of the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) adopted their 2020 budget at a board meeting today, projecting expenditures of $29.7 million.

The budget includes $25.5 million in grants for the development of infrastructure at the Western New York Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (WNY STAMP).

Of that total, $20.2 million is dedicated to the advancement of Phase I infrastructure at the campus (remaining funds from the original $33 million state allocation); and $5.3 million is dedicated to the advancement of Phase II infrastructure (initial funds from the $8 million Empire State Development grant).

The 1,250-acre WNY STAMP campus in the Town of Alabama is the largest high-tech greenfield site in New York, and connects low-cost hydropower, large-scale infrastructure, and the Buffalo-Rochester Metro Corridor’s workforce talent.

“The GCEDC is building WNY STAMP to be a market-ready site, and a catalyst for the success of the people of Genesee County and companies that will create a stronger future for our region,” said Paul Battaglia, chairman of the GCEDC.

As a public benefit corporation, the GCEDC generates fees from economic development projects and other sources to run the agency’s operations, programs and services.

The GCEDC anticipates $375,000 in revenues from project origination fees and $3,800 in revenues from revolving loan fund interest; $300,000 in annuities from projects approved in previous years.

Revenues also include $300,000 that will be received from the Genesee Gateway Local Development Corporation (GGLDC), and $50,000 anticipated from the Genesee County Funding Corporation, to support the agency’s overall Economic Development Program.

“There is a large body of work that occurs at this agency each year, and I am pleased that we continue to find resourceful ways to serve the businesses and citizens of Genesee County,” said Lezlie Farrell, CFO of the GCEDC.

“Operating expenditures have been controlled and reduced wherever possible.”

The GCEDC budget anticipates a $233,000 allocation by Genesee County to support economic development and a growing return on investments to the county.

In 2018, the last full year of data available, GCEDC projects (current and expired) produced more than $4.4 million in combined PILOT -- Payment In Lieu Of Taxes -- payments and property taxes to local taxing jurisdictions.

“Genesee County is a vital partner in our efforts to bring new business and growth to our region," Battaglia said. "We rely on the Genesee County Legislature to support our budget and operations so we can continue to enable business and community success.

"In 2018, Genesee County benefited from $19 returned on every one dollar allocated to GCEDC operations.”

July 19, 2019 - 3:45pm
posted by Billie Owens in business, news, GCEDC, STAMP, Alabama.

Submitted photo and press release:

Officials from the Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) once again made the annual trip to the New York Loves Nanotech Summit at Semicon West at the Moscone Center in San Francisco July 8-11.

GCEDC Vice President of Business and Workforce Development Chris Suozzi participated in a panel discussion with other economic development professionals about how infrastructure investments are advancing New York’s impact on the development and commercialization of emerging and existing technologies.

Suozzi highlighted investments at the Western New York Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park (WNYSTAMP), the 1,250-acre high-tech greenfield developed in Alabama.

“Semicon West is a great event for us to not only talk about all the great economic development initiatives occurring in Genesee County, but across New York State,” Suozzi said. “New York is continuing to make investments in semiconductor infrastructure and the Buffalo-Rochester Metro Corridor stands out as an area that is providing the best workforce and STEM education in the country.”

New York State is at the forefront of advancing AI, quantum computing, power electronics, and neuromorphic computing capabilities through their advancements in process, equipment, materials and device technology-related research. 

Suozzi and GCEDC Director of Marketing and Communications Jim Krencik also led discussions with representatives of semiconductor and advanced manufacturing businesses seeking to invest in Genesee County and the talent-rich Buffalo-Rochester Metro Corridor.

Suozzi and Krencik were joined at Semicon West by New York Loves Nanotech, a statewide group led by economic development organizations, academic institutions, and technology companies. NYLN promotes WNY STAMP and the state’s assets to high-tech companies.

“Through our presence at this annual event and the relationships with have established with officials from advanced manufacturing companies, Genesee County’s assets will be well received as these officials are discussing ideal locations for their operations,” Krencik said.

For the 22nd year, NY Loves Nanotech had a large delegation of more than 60 officials attending the industry conference. NY Loves Nanotech, Empire State Development (ESD) and National Grid hosted a pavilion at the industry leading conference, which they co-exhibited with several other companies and organizations.

So far, New York has attracted more than $20 billion in nano-optics, photonics, and semiconductor investments. New York State’s world-class workforce and research and development capacities are huge asset, as are the infrastructure capacities at WNY STAMP.

March 7, 2019 - 1:57pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in GCEDC, news, notify, STAMP.

Since 2004, the Genesee Economic Development Center has assisted companies in adding 12.6 million square feet in commercial space in Genesee County, GCEDC CEO Steve Hyde told the Ways and Means Committee during an annual department review Wednesday.

That's a 37-percent increase in commercial space in the county, Hyde said.

There are 30 companies operating in the seven industrial parks developed by GCEDC.

The big park with the biggest vacant area, of course, is the 1,200-acre Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park or STAMP project in Alabama.

The project lost a chance to land direct-wafer solar pioneer 1366 Technologies a year ago and has yet to land a new company for the park but Hyde said there is one big project pending that may yet sign and another in early-stage discussions.

The state has already invested about $10.9 in STAMP for initial infrastructure development. Those funds were approved in the 2014 state budget but released until 1366 signed on as the site's first tenant. The infrastructure work was started before 1366 withdrew from the project because of its inability to reach terms with the Department of Energy on a loan guarantee. Last week, 1366 announced the anticipated opening of its production facility in Malaysia.

At Wednesday's meeting, Hyde announced that the Empire State Development has just authorized another $8 million for major infrastructure -- sewer and water -- for STAMP. The upgrades in infrastructure plans are necessary, Hyde said, because the companies exploring the site now are going to need more infrastructure capacity. 

The state is also providing another $2 million grant for the Corfu/Pembroke sewer project.

During Wednesday's meeting, Hyde expressed some concern about the future of the economy, with some economists warning that tariffs and the trade war with China is taking its toll on growth both here and aboard.

GCEDC is forecasting IDA-backed projects in 2019 will create only 90 new jobs. That's a conservative number because companies have become more conservative in their job creation estimates for incentive-backed expansions because of clawback provisions initiated in state law a couple of years ago.

A clawback is a requirement for a company to return some incentive money if they fail to meet job creation guarantees.

"Companies are unwilling to be as aggressive in forecasted jobs so they tend to under-promise and over deliver," Hyde said.

A clawback is at the local IDA's discretion and Hyde said the GCEDC's board is hesitant to initiate a clawback if there is a reason outside of a company's control for not reaching job projection numbers, such as a slowing economy.

"We don't like to kick a company when it's down," Hyde said. 

He said the board has canceled incentives when companies have failed to perform but only when there is a sound reason to believe the company has failed at its obligations absent of external business cycle factors.

"That's not anything we're afraid to do," Hyde said.

Much of what Hyde presented will be part of GCEDC's annual meeting at 11:30 a.m., tomorrow, at Batavia Downs.

February 27, 2019 - 1:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in news, STAMP, Alabama, GCEDC, 1366 Technologies.

cuomo1366_oct72015.jpg

The advanced manufacturing plant that could have been in Genesee County with a little more political support will open soon in Cyberjaya, Malaysia.

Bedford, Mass.-based 1366 Technologies has been building a plant with the support of one of the companies that have invested in the startup, Hanwha Q CELLS, and announced this week the plant will open soon.

Until this week, 1366 had been unwilling to release the location of its new factory.

It will be the world's first direct wafer factory. The direct wafer process was invented at MIT and patented by 1366. It makes solar wafers much like glass is made, with silicon being poured on a flat surface. The company has claimed the process is more energy efficient and produces less waste.

In 2015, Gov. Andrew Cuomo came to Batavia to announce 1366 as the first tech company to agree to open a plant in STAMP, the advanced manufacturing project in Alabama, that would bring 1,000 mostly high-paying jobs to Genesee County.

The plan was for 1366 to invest $700 million in the plant. GCEDC and Empire State Development and other state agencies would provide $53 million in tax abatements and grants, based on certain incentives being met over 10 years.

The Department of Energy, in 2009, also promised 1366 a $150 million loan guarantee based on 1366 meeting two criteria: selecting a site for their factory and raising $100 million in private investment.

That deal fell apart on claims by Department of Energy officials that 1366 failed to select a site for its factory and had failed to raise the $100 million.  

The company had raised $80 million in private equity but the DOE would not renegotiate the terms of the loan.

Rep. Chris Collins, based on a conversation with a member of his staff, was not hugely supportive of his staff and it's not clear he did much to help the process along. After 1366 announced plans to pull out of the STAMP deal, Collins questioned the company's credibility. He said at the time that 1366's announcement was evidence that the company was never serious about building a plant in Genesee County.

Based on the expectation that 1366 was coming to STAMP, with the help of Sen. Michael Ranzenhofer, the state released $33 million for development of shovel-ready infrastructure at the Alabama location. 

Since 1366 pulled out of the deal nearly a year ago, GCEDC Steve Hyde has said on multiple occasions that GCEDC is talking with several prospective tenants for STAMP but so far no new deals have been announced. 

As of May 1366 and the DOE were locked in a dispute over ownership of patents because of the assistance the DOE had given to 1366 early in the process of developing its technology. The Batavian is not aware of any change in the status of that dispute.

UPDATE 4:16 p.m.: In this story, and previously, we reported that 1366 withdrew from plans to build in STAMP in March. Shortly after this story published we received documents, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request, from the Department of Energy, that revealed that STAMP informed DOE of its request to withdraw its loan application on Jan. 31, 2018.  There was no other new information in the set of documents.

For all of The Batavian's previous coverage of 1366, click here.

Top photo: Frank van Mierlo, CEO, 1366 Technologies, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo at the October 2015 announcement at GCC of 1366's plans to build a plant at STAMP.

direct_wafer_factory.jpg

Photo released by 1366 of its nearly completed plant in Cyberjaya, Malaysia.

February 15, 2019 - 4:32pm
posted by Billie Owens in steve hawley, news, STAMP, business.

A statement from Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) on the decision of Amazon to axe their HQ in New York City:

“Talk about making ‘Open for Business’ a punchline – the governor and New York City politicians have failed to close the deal with Amazon but there is hope for Mr. Bezos: Western New York is truly open for business and we would gladly accept Amazon’s Headquarters to be located at our STAMP site.

“I have already been in contact with the Orleans County IDA and Economic Development Center in Genesee County to make this a reality and I’m confident our 57 local colleges and universities educating more than 300,000 students could easily accommodate their labor needs.”

August 31, 2018 - 3:19pm
posted by Virginia Kropf in Alabama, business, news, STAMP.

ALABAMA – A new solar-powered sign, which has just been erected on Route 63/77, is indication the Genesee County Economic Development Center is moving ahead with plans to develop the Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park in the Town of Alabama.

The STAMP sign stands near the new road, which was built last year from Route 63/77 to Crosby Road to divert traffic around Alabama Center.

Also, a new row of power poles is being installed by National Grid by the STAMP grounds, so existing poles can be moved to allow for widening of Route 63/77 and to create a turning lane, said Mark Masse, vice president of operations at GCEDC.

Masse said the county continues to actively search for a tenant for the site and has companies with various levels of interest in locating here.

He also said they have been working on the final piece of archeological work and are moving forward with infrastructure work.

Photos by Virginia Kropf.

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