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hunting

August 14, 2019 - 11:14am

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) announces changes to the waterfowl hunt lottery application process for the 2019/2020 season. The preseason lottery will be conducted to select hunters for the first two Saturdays of the hunt season.

In order to streamline the lottery process, applications are now done online here. Follow the prompts to apply. Please note there will be a $5 application fee to cover administrative costs.

Applications can be filled out online from Aug. 15 until Sept. 15.

Winners will be notified approximately one week after the close of the application period by email if selected.

A copy of the lottery win receipt must accompany the hunter to the check station the morning of their hunt.

Please see our Waterfowl Hunting Fact Sheet for full details on the 2019/2020 waterfowl hunting season, which can be found here.

All other aspects of the Iroquois NWR waterfowl hunt will be similar as in previous years, including hunter standby, blind drawings, and non-lottery hunt days.

Youth waterfowl hunters and hunters with disabilities will apply using the same methods as in previous years. Click here for full details.

For further information contact Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013, or call 585-948-5445.

Iroquois NWR is located midway between Buffalo and Rochester and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

May 25, 2019 - 7:19pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in hunting, retrievers, outdoors, sports.

 

Video Sponsor

 

Jim Beverly, a hunting retriever trainer from Oakfield, hosted his second annual Companion Retriever Hunting Challenge at Godfrey's Pond in Byron on Saturday. The challenge is primarily for retrieving-trained dogs who are more often pets than hunting companions.

February 19, 2019 - 3:49pm

The 72nd annual Batavia Gun and Sportsman Show will be held the weekend of March 16-17 at Quality Inn & Suites in Batavia.

Times are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. The hotel is located at 8250 Park Road.

Admission is $5; children age 12 and under get in free when accompanied by adult.

More than 130 8-foot vendor and exhibitor tables will be chock full of items and there's plenty of free parking.

This event is sponsored by the Alabama Hunt Club, located on Lewiston Road in Alabama.

The show will feature collector, antique and investment firearms, swords and knives, Revolutionary War to World War II militaria, books, traps, pistols, gun parts, ammo and hunting accessories, black powder accessories, reloading equipment, archery, medals and more!

NOTE: All firearm laws MUST be obeyed.

Public participation is encouraged: bring items to sell or trade with dealers.

A National Instant Criminal Background Check MUST be completed prior to all firearm sales. The background check is free.

For more information, contact Dennis Davis at:   [email protected] or phone (585) 798-6089.

September 11, 2018 - 9:26am
posted by Lisa Ace in hunting, fishing, Godfrey's Pond!.
Event Date and Time: 
September 16, 2018 - 10:00am to 4:00pm

Hunting & Fishing Days at Godfrey's Pond!
Join us this weekend for our annual Hunting and Fishing Days!
Saturday & Sunday 10am-4pm.
Vendors Available - with music both days!

Come and try us out!
Click here to visit us online

 
September 11, 2018 - 9:24am
posted by Lisa Ace in hunting, fishing, Godfrey's Pond, batavia.
Event Date and Time: 
September 15, 2018 - 10:00am to 4:00pm

Hunting & Fishing Days at Godfrey's Pond!
Join us this weekend for our annual Hunting and Fishing Days!
Saturday & Sunday 10am-4pm.
Vendors Available - with music both days!

Come and try us out!
Click here to visit us online

September 19, 2017 - 2:49pm
posted by Billie Owens in sports, trapping, hunting, news, Announcements.

Press release:

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that the 2017-18 Western New York trapping season for fox, raccoon, coyote and other upland furbearing animals opens on Oct. 25 and closes on Feb. 15.

The start of upland trapping will be delayed until Nov. 1 at the John White Wildlife Management Area (WMA), and the trapping season for mink, muskrat and beaver at this WMA will run from Nov. 25 until Feb. 15.

The start of muskrat and mink trapping at the Oak Orchard and Tonawanda WMAs will run from Dec. 2 to Feb. 15.

Beginning Oct. 2, trapping permits will be issued for the Oak Orchard, Tonawanda, and John White WMAs for the 2017-2018 license year.

Permit applications can be obtained weekdays from Oct. 2 to Nov. 30, by appearing in person at the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge Office on Casey Road between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., or by writing to the DEC, Bureau of Wildlife, 1101 Casey Road, Box B, Basom, NY 14013.

Trappers who obtain a permit will be required to report their harvest and trapping efforts on each area.

After last year’s extreme drought, water levels on these areas are back to normal conditions this year, but there are new areas of dense vegetation in several marshes. Wetland muskrat and mink trapping maybe limited to dike trapping in a number of marshes to allow the muskrat population to continue to recover from the drought, especially in marshes where increased muskrat numbers will benefit marsh habitat conditions. Full access for trapping will be permitted in the remaining marshes.

Additional information will be available by Oct. 2, and when trapping permits are issued.

The maximum number of traps a trapper can set for muskrat and mink in water on the three areas is 25. To accomplish this, DEC issues 25 numbered tags to each trapper that obtains a permit. A tag must be attached to each trap used on the areas. Any trap that does not have one of these tags attached is an illegal trap.

In addition, an individual trapper can only operate traps that contain tags with their assigned numbers. Traps set for upland trapping and beaver will not require numbered tags and will not be considered in the trap limit. The trap limit provides a more equitable distribution of the harvest and prevents trappers from monopolizing the better trapping areas.

Management of the muskrat population promotes prime emergent marsh habitats used by waterfowl and uncommon marsh birds such as the black tern and least bittern. The trap limit and possible additional trapping restrictions allow DEC’s Bureau of Wildlife personnel to better regulate the muskrat harvest according to water availability, habitat needs and population.

DEC reminds hunters and trappers that gas and electric motorboats are prohibited on Oak Orchard or Tonawanda WMAs.

August 12, 2017 - 1:46pm
posted by Billie Owens in hunting, news, Announcements, chronic wasting disease.

Press release:

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos recently announced the release of a draft New York State Interagency CWD Risk Minimization Plan for public comment.

The plan describes proposed regulatory changes and actions that DEC will take to minimize the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) entering or spreading in New York. It was designed to protect both wild white-tailed deer and moose, as well as captive cervids including deer and elk held at enclosed facilities.

DEC biologists worked with the State’s Department of Agriculture and Markets veterinarians and wildlife health experts at Cornell University to craft a comprehensive set of steps that are the most advanced CWD prevention strategies in the nation.

"New York is leading the way in protecting our valuable deer and moose herds," Seggos said. "Not only does this horrible disease kill animals slowly, but wild white-tailed deer hunting represents a $1.5 billion industry in the state.

"Our CWD Risk Minimization Plan is in the best interest of all of us who care about wildlife and especially about the health of our wild white-tail deer herd. Gov. (Andrew) Cuomo's commitment to high-quality hunting opportunities in New York also supports our taking action now to prevent a serious problem down the road."

Disease prevention is the only cost-effective way to keep CWD out of New York. Together with the State Department of Agriculture and Markets, New York is using cutting-edge science and common sense to ensure that everything possible is done to protect the state's herds from CWD.

"The Department's veterinarians and licensed veterinary technicians were responsible for the early detection of New York's only CWD incident and played critical roles in the response to the discovery of CWD in 2005,” said State Agriculture Commissioner Richard A. Ball.

“Our staff continue to work hard to control the risk of this serious disease and maintain our early detection system. This plan will further support these efforts to protect our wildlife."

CWD, an always fatal brain disease found in species of the deer family, was discovered in Oneida County’s wild and captive white-tailed deer in 2005. More than 47,000 deer have been tested statewide since 2002, and there has been no reoccurrence of the disease since 2005. New York is the only state to have eliminated CWD once it was found in wild populations. In North America, CWD has been found in 24 states, including neighboring Pennsylvania and Ohio, and two Canadian provinces.

CWD was first identified in Colorado in 1967 and is caused by infectious prions, which are misfolded proteins that cannot be broken down by the body's normal processes. They cause holes to form in the brain. Prions are found in deer parts and products including urine and feces; they can remain infectious in soil for years and even be taken up into plant tissues. It is in the same family of diseases, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, as "mad cow" disease in cattle.

Millions of cattle were destroyed because of mad cow disease in England and Europe in the 1990s and the disease also caused a fatal brain condition in some humans that ate contaminated beef products. Although there have been no known cases of CWD in humans, the Centers for Disease Control recommends that no one knowingly eat CWD-positive venison.

The proposed plan would streamline operations between DEC and the State Department of Agriculture and strengthen the state's regulations to prevent introduction of CWD.

Some examples of the proposed changes include:

    • Prohibit the importation of certain parts from any CWD-susceptible cervid taken outside of New York. Require that these animals be deboned or quartered and only the meat, raw hide or cape, and cleaned body parts, such as skull cap, antlers, jaws, and teeth, or finished taxidermy mounts be allowed for import into the state;

    • Prohibit the retail sale, possession, use, and distribution of deer or elk urine and any products from CWD-susceptible animals that may contain prions, including glands, or other excreted material while allowing New York captive cervid facilities to continue to export deer urine outside of the State;

    • Maintain and reinforce the prohibition on the feeding of wild deer and moose in New York State;

    • Provide DEC Division of Law Enforcement the necessary authority to enforce Department of Agriculture and Market's CWD regulations;

    • Explore possible penalties or charges to defray costs associated with the removal of escaped cervids from the environment or the response to disease outbreaks;

    • Require all taxidermists and deer processors (people who butcher deer for hire) to dispose of cervid waste and waste byproducts in compliance with 6 NYCRR Part 360, such as in a municipal landfill;

    • Promotion of improved fencing methods for captive cervids to further prevent contact with wild deer or moose;

    • Partner with the State Department of Agriculture and Markets to enhance captive cervid testing while continuing DEC's rigorous surveillance testing in hunter-harvested deer;

    • Improve record keeping and data sharing between departments through joint inspections of captive cervid facilities, electronic reporting, and animal marking;

    • Improve handling requirements, record keeping, and disease testing of wild white-tailed deer temporarily held in captivity for wildlife rehabilitation; and

    • Develop a communication plan and strategy to re-engage stakeholders, including captive cervid owners and the public, in CWD risk minimization measures and updates on CWD research.

The New York State Interagency CWD Risk Minimization Plan has had extensive outreach and vetting by sporting groups in the state to address the concerns of myriad stakeholders while maintaining the strength of purpose to protect the public and the environment. The plan updates reporting requirements, improves communication to stakeholders, and simplifies regulations to reduce confusion while protecting our natural resources.

The draft plan is available for public review on the DEC website

Written comments on the draft plan will be accepted through Sept. 1. Comments can be submitted via email at [email protected], subject: CWD Plan or by writing to NYSDEC, Bureau of Wildlife, 625 Broadway, Albany 12233-4754.

June 16, 2017 - 3:39pm
posted by Billie Owens in sports, hunting, news, assemblyman steve hawley.

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) is pleased to announce passage of a bill which will authorize Orleans County and Genesee County residents to hunt big game from Nov. 15 till Dec. 7. The bill allows residents to hunt using pistols, shotguns, muzzle-loaded firearms, long bows, crossbows or rifles.

“Hunting is an important part of our history, it is how our forefathers survived and provided for their families,” Hawley said. “As a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, I am proud to announce that citizens of Orleans and Genesee counties will be able to continue this centuries-old tradition that is such a huge part of our Western New York culture.

"As a proud outdoorsman myself, I will continue to work tirelessly to protect our constitutional rights from special interests attempting to restrict them. The passage of this bill is a step in the right direction toward maintaining our freedom and right to own firearms.”

June 13, 2017 - 5:26pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in michael ranzenhofer, hunting, outdoors, news.

Press release:

A bill (S5064) continuing the use of rifles for big game hunting in Genesee County indefinitely has passed the State Senate. Senator Michael H. Ranzenhofer is the author and sponsor of the measure in the State Senate.

“Use of rifles for big game hunting has proven to be successful throughout the last two years,” Ranzenhofer said. “Many other rural communities across the state have a permanent provision, and this legislation would set it in stone for Genesee County.” 

In 2015, Senator Ranzenhofer spearheaded the effort at the State Capitol to pass a new law (Chapter 68 of the Laws of 2015) that initially allowed the use of rifles in Genesee County. The law expires Oct. 1st of this year. The Genesee County Legislature has requested that the current expiration date be removed.

“Expanding opportunities for sportsmen is important to me. Without legislative action, Genesee County residents would no longer be able to hunt big game with a rifle. I am proud to get the bill approved in the State Senate, and I am hopeful that the State Assembly will follow suit,” Ranzenhofer said.

The bill is currently on the Assembly Agenda. If enacted, the bill would take effect immediately.

In the Fall of 2014, the Genesee County Legislature and Genesee County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs requested the inaugural legislation. Prior to the enactment of the revised statute, environmental conservation law only authorized the use of pistols, shotguns, crossbows, muzzle-loading firearms or long bows when hunting deer from the first Saturday after Nov. 15 through the first Sunday after Dec. 7.

February 27, 2017 - 5:22pm
posted by Billie Owens in hunting, sports, news, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge in Genesee and Orleans counties is accepting applications for spring turkey hunting.

The refuge uses a random drawing to fill the 75 turkey hunting permits available; these permits are distributed within two sessions. Session 1 runs from May 1 through May 15 and 50 permits will be issued for this session. Session 2 runs from May 16 through May 31 and 25 permits will be issued for this session.

When applying, hunters should indicate their first and second session preferences. To be entered in the drawing, interested hunters must obtain a Big/Upland Game Hunt Application form (Form 3-2356). Applications can be requested in person, by phone, mail, or email at [email protected]. A PDF version of the application form may also be printed from our website http://www.fws.gov/refuge/iroquois. Click on the heading "Visit" and the link "Visitor Activities."

Applications, along with a $5 nonrefundable processing fee, must be received by 4 p.m., March 31. Please refer to our Turkey Hunting Fact Sheet, available at the refuge office or on our website, for additional information.

Please contact refuge staff at 585-948-5445, ext. 7036, for further information.

Iroquois NWR is located midway between Buffalo and Rochester, and is managed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact the Refuge at 585/948-5445 or at the Federal Relay No. 1-800-877-8339.

September 24, 2016 - 9:31am
posted by Howard B. Owens in outdoors, veterans, batavia, news, sports, hunting.

vethunt1bta.jpg

Photo and story by Alex Feig, with our news partner, WBTA.

Operation Injured Soldiers was hosting military veterans for the beginning of geese-hunting season at the Wounded Warrior House in Orleans County from Wednesday through Sunday this week.

OIS as it’s called by volunteers, began its presence in the Batavia area around six years ago when veteran Edward Spence got together with several other vets in the area, one of which was Floyd “Skip” Hulburt.

“Ed Spence and I and a fellow veteran, we had talked about establishing OIS in New York, and once it was established Ed Spence just took off with it.”

Skip had just gotten back from another successful hunt but his focus was on a fellow soldier, “My main focus was Jack who is a Vietnam veteran. This is his first time waterfowl hunting so I wanted to get him into it and see how he likes it, and that's a lot of why I do this. I'm not as bad (off) as some of these guys. I'm pretty mobile still.”

Jack Olson, a Vietnam vet, lives just down the road from the Warrior House and was very grateful for the opportunity.

Olson said “I had a good time, I enjoyed it.  Great people, great guides, great veterans I was with.  All good, all good, nothing bad I can say.”

Olson. like many veterans. is not just receiving help but is providing for others like himself.

“I think more people should get involved in veterans organizations and volunteering at the Batavia VA," Olson said. "I am myself a volunteer at the VA and it's a very rewarding experience and there's always stuff to do. Somebody will find something for you to do at the VA.”

For more information on Operation Injured Soldiers, you can visit www.injuredsoldiers.org or message Edward Spence on Facebook.

August 8, 2016 - 1:25pm
posted by Billie Owens in sports, hunting, news, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Basom.

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, in partnership with the Lake Plains Waterfowl Association, will host its 43rd Annual Young Waterfowlers Program.

The program will include an orientation class at the refuge headquarters and a youth only hunt day on Saturday, Oct. 1. The Young Waterfowlers Program will be open to junior hunters between 12-15 years of age. There is no charge but space is limited with preference given to first time participants. Pre-registration does not guarantee participation. Those selected will be notified by mail.

To pre-register, complete the Waterfowl Lottery Application Form and return it to the refuge headquarters at 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013 by the deadline of 4 p.m., Sept. 8. Application forms can be requested by mail, by phone, in person, or email at [email protected].  A PDF version of the form may also be downloaded and printed from the refuge website http://www.fws.gov/refuge/iroquois.

The orientation class date will be announced at a later date. The morning session of the orientation class will consist of a New York State sanctioned Waterfowl Identification Certification class from 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. The afternoon session from 12:30 – 3 p.m. will cover decoys and calls, ballistics, clothing and equipment, hunter ethics and safety, an overview of the refuge waterfowl program as well as a retriever demo and trap shoot. The afternoon session is mandatory in order to participate in the hunt, except for those who have been through the program at least twice before.

All junior hunters will be required to have a guide with them on the day of the hunt.  We strongly recommend each junior hunter secure their own guide prior to orientation in accordance with DEC Junior Hunting License Regulations.  We have a limited number of guides who can volunteer; therefore we cannot guarantee a guide for each junior hunter.

For additional information about the program, please contact Madeline Prush at 585.948.5445. Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact refuge staff at 585.948.5445 or at the Federal Relay No. 1.800.877.8339.

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge is located midway between Rochester and Buffalo, and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

August 8, 2016 - 1:19pm
posted by Billie Owens in sports, hunting, news, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, located in Alabama and Shelby, will be accepting applications for the refuge’s reserved waterfowl hunt days beginning Aug.15.  Reservations are required for opening day of the New York State regular waterfowl season on Saturday, Oct. 22 and the following Saturday, Oct. 29. These dates are tentative pending approval of the recommended waterfowl hunting season.

Interested hunters must complete the Waterfowl Lottery Application Form and return it to the refuge office at 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013. Applications will be accepted no earlier than Aug. 15 and are due by the deadline of 4 p.m., Sept. 15.

Application forms can be requested by mail, by phone, in person, or by email at [email protected]. A PDF version of the form may also be downloaded and printed by following a link on the refuge website http://www.fws.gov/refuge/iroquois/. Hunters will be selected by a lottery and notified by mail. The number of permits issued will be dependent on water levels in the hunt area. Reservations are non-transferable.

Those selected must be at the Waterfowl Permit Station, located on Route 77, between 4:30 and 5 a.m. on their appointed day to select their hunt stand and obtain their permit. Consult the refuge’s Waterfowl Hunting Fact Sheet for addition information.

Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact refuge staff at 585-948-5445 or through the Federal Relay No. 1-800-877-8339.

Iroquois NWR is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. For further information contact: 

Iroquois NWR, 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013, or call Madeline Prush at 585-948-5445.

April 24, 2016 - 12:03pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in outdoors, elba, news, hunting.

firstturkeyzambitoapril2016.jpg

Anthony Zambito, 12, of Elba, got his first turkey on his first hunt this morning in Elba with his uncle Kelly Creegan.

January 13, 2016 - 11:22am
posted by Howard B. Owens in hunting, outdoors.

A letter from a constituent about a bullet that passed through the walls of his house on Bank Street in November prompted a discussion among County legislators during the Public Service Committee meeting Tuesday afternoon about the merits of a recently enacted local law that allows long guns to be used during hunting season.

Legislator Ed DeJaneiro expressed the most concern about the law.

"This bullet passed through two windows and continued on and I think it's just a matter of time before something is going to happen and everybody's going to say, 'Oh, my God," DeJaneiro said.

Bill Moon reported the incident to the police and the Department of Environmental Conservation investigated and determined the bullet likely came from a .30-caliber weapon.

In his letter, Moon expressed concern that there are just too many irresponsible people out there to allow long rifles in a county like Genesee where the land is mostly flat.

"We were very fortunate not to be home at the time of the incident and so escaped possible harm or death," Moon wrote. "Every day that we got up and saw the damage reminded us how close we were to an immediate danger. Some other person or child playing in a yard may not be so lucky next time."

The local law was enacted at the request of a group of gun owners who noted Genesee County was one of the few counties in the state that didn't allow long rifles for big game hunting. The Legislature passed a resolution asking the State Legislature to change the local law, which it did last year at the urging of Senator Mike Ranzenhofer and Assemblyman Steve Hawley.

Legislator Mike Davis noted that the county can't repeal the law and can only look to the State Legislature not to renew it when the sunset provision rolls around in October 2017.

"At this point, I think we can just keep our fingers crossed and hope there isn't an incident that's going to make us all feel different about this law," DeJaneiro said.

DeJaneiro suggested the County Legislature needs to seriously reconsider the law.

"These weapons are not needed for hunting deer in a highly populated, flat area," DeJanerio said.  

Long rifles are better suited to a county like Wyoming, with hills and valleys where hunters can better take advantage of the capabilities of a long rifle to take down prey.

Committee Chair Marianne Clattenberg said she brought the letter to the meeting and put the discussion on the agenda because Moon is one of her constituents and he has a right to have his concerned heard. 

"This will come up again next year and let's hope this is an isolated incident," Clattenberg said.

December 7, 2015 - 1:53pm
posted by Raymond Coniglio in byron, hunting, black bears.

12715_black_bear.jpeg

Jimmy Worthington shot this black bear Sunday morning on his property in Byron. He estimates the bear weighed about 500 pounds.

James Worthington didn’t have much luck hunting deer last week.

No matter — some bigger game found him.

Worthington, 52, bagged an adult male black bear about 10 a.m. Sunday on his property in the town of Byron. 

“I heard something coming, and didn’t know what it was,” Worthington said.

He figured out pretty quickly that it was a bear — and it was just about 20 yards away.

“It turned and was running right at me,” Worthington said. “When it saw me it stopped, and I shot it pretty much right between the eyes.

“After I shot it, it got up and started thrashing around,” he added. “I chased it for another 10 yards and then shot it one more time.”

The bear tipped the scales at 445 lbs. gutted. He estimates it weighed about 500 lbs. when alive.

He plans to have its head mounted.

“The people I hunt with say I should get a full-body mount,” he said. “My wife isn’t too keen on that, but I might do it.”

Worthington’s hunting companions on Sunday included his son James Worthington III, and friends Jordan Charcola, Dave Stackhouse and Dave Stackhouse Sr.

Worthington lives on Swamp Road, and works in construction. He’s been hunting nearly his entire life, but had never even seen a black bear before Sunday.

This week, even the deer were discouragingly scarce.

“I hadn’t seen a deer all week,” Worthington said. “I told myself, ‘If I don’t see a deer I’m going home.’

“I just got lucky, that’s all.”

August 25, 2015 - 9:25am

Press release:

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today announced that special permits will be issued for the opening weekend of duck season to hunt waterfowl at two popular state-managed locations. The permit requirement applies to waterfowl hunting at the Oak Orchard and Tonawanda Wildlife Management areas located primarily in Genesee and Niagara counties (with small portions in Orleans and Erie counties). The intent of the special permits is to promote hunter safety and increase the quality of hunting on days when the areas receive the greatest use.

A special permit is required to hunt waterfowl at Oak Orchard and Tonawanda Wildlife Management areas on the duck season’s first Saturday and first Sunday. These days are the only times the special permits are needed. Waterfowl may be hunted without a special permit during the rest of the season. The permit system has been used successfully at both wildlife management areas in recent years. No special permits are required to hunt other game species at Oak Orchard or Tonawanda Wildlife Management areas.

DEC has announced tentative 2015-2016 duck hunting season dates. Western New York’s tentative opening day/weekend dates for duck hunting are Oct. 24 and 25. This year goose season will be open during the opening weekend of duck season, and goose hunters are also required to obtain the special permit. These dates will not be finalized until the federal regulations are adopted in late summer. Hunters are advised to confirm the final dates before hunting any waterfowl.

Opening weekend waterfowl hunting permits for the two wildlife management areas will be distributed by a random lottery. For each of the two days, DEC will issue 100 permits for Tonawanda Wildlife Management Area and 50 permits for Oak Orchard Wildlife Management Area. Hunters must choose from four options: Oak Orchard first Saturday; Oak Orchard first Sunday; Tonawanda first Saturday; and Tonawanda first Sunday.

To apply for the lottery, hunters must send in a postcard with their name, address and their first three choices, in order of preference, clearly indicated. Applicants must also have completed a Waterfowl Identification Course, and their course certificate number must be indicated on the postcard.

Applications will be accepted through Sept. 15 and must be mailed to the New York State Bureau of Wildlife, 1101 Casey Road, Box B, Basom, NY 14013. Each permittee will be allowed to bring one companion over the age of 18 and an additional companion 18 years old or younger.

Duplicate permits will not be issued to hunters who have already been issued a permit to hunt on the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge. Any cards submitted by hunters who have been selected to hunt on Iroquois on the first Saturday will be excluded from the lottery for that day at both Oak Orchard and Tonawanda.

Issued permits are nontransferable and are not valid for companion(s) unless the permittee is present and hunting within 50 yards. The permittee is responsible for completing and returning the questionnaire portion of the permit to the New York State Bureau of Wildlife by Nov. 15. If the completed questionnaire is not received by Nov. 15, the permittee will be ineligible for next year's (2016) lottery.

NYSDEC is also currently planning the annual Waterfowl Information meeting, which is held at the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters on Casey Road in Alabama, Genesee County. This year the meeting will take place on the evening of Sept. 2 from 7 – 9 p.m. Wildlife biologists from Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge and NYSDEC will discuss items of interest to waterfowl hunters in an informational and interactive forum.

Topics to be covered include:

--    Highlights of waterfowl management and research programs at Iroquois NWR, Tonawanda, Oak Orchard and Braddock Bay Wildlife Management areas, including drawdown schedules and hunt program news;

-    Regional and statewide waterfowl news and updates, including waterfowl banding results;

-    Atlantic Flyway news, including Avian Influenza update, and waterfowl population status surveys; and,

-    Tentative NY 2015-16 duck and goose hunting seasons.

Directions:

From the NYS Thruway, take Exit 48A (Pembroke) and travel north on Route 77 to Alabama Center. Continue north on Route 63 for approximately 1 mile, turn left on Casey Road. The office is about a mile down the road on the right.

August 13, 2015 - 9:06pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Genesee County Park, outdoors, sports, hunting.

Press release:

Genesee County Parks Deer Management Permit Applications will be accepted for the Archery Hunting Program at the Genesee County Park & Forest beginning Aug. 17 through Sept. 11.

The Deer Management Program Terms & Conditions packet (including permit) can be downloaded from the Genesee County Parks Web site at http://www.co.genesee.ny.us/docs/GCPF_DeerMgmt_TermsCond_w_Permit_Final2... or picked up at the Park office located at 153 Cedar St., Batavia, between the hours of 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday thru Friday.

The permit is a non-refundable $25 fee (check or money order due with permit application). Check or money order must be written out to the GENESEE COUNTY TREASURER and must accompany the permit when submitted. A copy of your NYS DEC License is required to be submitted with the permit application also. Applications will not be accepted after Sept. 11.

A lottery drawing will be held on Sept. 15 where permits and vehicle tags will be administered at a mandatory information meeting held on Oct. 3. The Deer Management Program is a four-week program that runs from Oct. 19 through Nov. 15. Genesee County residents, including youth, and disabled veterans will be given priority over nonresident applications.

A Genesee County Parks Deer Management issued permit is required to legally archery or crossbow hunt at the Genesee County Park & Forest. Hunters must possess a valid NYS DEC big game license and respective deer tags before applying for a Genesee County Parks Deer Archery Hunting Permit. Crossbow hunters must ALSO possess a valid muzzleloader hunting privilege as defined by the NYS DEC along with respective deer tags.

The Genesee County Parks Deer Management Permit is specific to the hunter, and may not be used by or assigned to any other individual. Genesee County reserves the right to revoke this permit at any time.

For more information, please visit the Genesee County Parks Web site at http://www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/parks/forestmanagement.html or contact Paul Osborn via e-mail at [email protected] or call (585) 344-8508.

August 5, 2015 - 2:08pm
posted by Billie Owens in hunting, sports, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, located in Alabama and Shelby, will be accepting applications for the refuge’s reserved waterfowl hunt days beginning Aug. 15. Reservations are required for opening day of the New York State regular waterfowl season on Saturday, Oct. 24 and the following Saturday, Oct. 31.

These dates are tentative pending approval of the recommended waterfowl hunting season.

Interested hunters must complete the Waterfowl Lottery Application Form and return it to the refuge office at 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013. Applications will be accepted no earlier than Aug. 15 and due by the deadline of 4 p.m., Sept. 15. Application forms can be requested by mail, by phone, in person, or by email at [email protected]

A PDF version of the form may also be downloaded and printed by following a link on the refuge Web site http://www.fws.gov/refuge/iroquois/.

Hunters will be selected by a lottery and notified by mail. The number of permits issued will be dependent on water levels in the hunt area. Reservations are non-transferable.

Those selected must be at the Waterfowl Permit Station, located on Route 77, between 4:30 and 5 a.m. on their appointed day to select their hunt stand and obtain their permit. Consult the refuge’s Waterfowl Hunting Fact Sheet for addition information.

Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact refuge staff at 585-948-5445 or through the Federal Relay No. 1-800-877-8339. Iroquois NWR is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

For further information contact: Iroquois NWR, 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013, or call Madeline Prush at 585-948-5445.

August 5, 2015 - 2:03pm

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, in partnership with the Lake Plains Waterfowl Association, will host its 42nd Annual Young Waterfowlers Program. The program will include an orientation class at the refuge headquarters and a youth-only hunt day on Saturday, Oct. 3.

This date is tentative pending approval of the recommended New York State youth waterfowl hunting dates. The Young Waterfowlers Program will be open to junior hunters between 12-15 years of age. There is no charge but space is limited with preference given to first time participants. Pre-registration does not guarantee participation. Those selected will be notified by mail.

To pre-register, complete the Waterfowl Lottery Application Form and return it to the refuge headquarters at 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013 by the deadline of 4 p.m., Sept. 8.

Application forms can be requested by mail, by phone, in person, or email at [email protected]. A PDF version of the form may also be downloaded and printed from the refuge Web site http://www.fws.gov/refuge/iroquois.

The orientation class date will be announced at later date. The morning session of the orientation class will consist of a New York State sanctioned Waterfowl Identification Certification class from 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

The afternoon session from 12:30 – 3 p.m. will cover decoys and calls, ballistics, clothing and equipment, hunter ethics and safety, an overview of the refuge waterfowl program as well as a retriever demo and trap shoot. The afternoon session is mandatory in order to participate in the hunt, except for those who have been through the program at least twice before.

All junior hunters will be required to have a guide with them on the day of the hunt. We strongly recommend each junior hunter secure their own guide prior to orientation in accordance with DEC Junior Hunting License Regulations. We have a limited number of guides who can volunteer; therefore we cannot guarantee a guide for each junior hunter.

For additional information about the program, please contact Madeline Prush at 585.948.5445. Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact refuge staff at 585.948.5445 or at the Federal Relay No. 1.800.877.8339.

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge is located midway between Rochester and Buffalo and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

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