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November 30, 2022 - 8:14pm

bayer_fund_photo_opt_2022.jpg

Press release:

Noblehurst Farms recently directed a $5,000 Bayer Fund America’s Farmers Grow Communities donation to Pavilion Central School. The school will use the funds to purchase mountain bikes for outdoor physical education opportunities.

“The funds from this donation will help us in our goal of providing students with opportunities and skills to support a healthy lifestyle. Mountain bikes are just the start. We are planning a walking trail around the school property that will double as a mountain bike path. We hope to create a place that supports both our students and the community of Pavilion. We are grateful that Noblehurst Farms directed this funding to the district for this project. The generosity and support in this community for our school is inspiring.” said Superintendent Kate Hoffman.

Since 2010, America’s Farmers programs have awarded more than $65 million to nonprofits, aspiring ag students, and public schools across rural America. Farmers are leaders in their communities, which is why America’s Farmers programs rely on them to help identify the most worthy causes.

Dedicated to making a difference in rural farming communities, the Grow Communities program asks farmers across the country to participate by nominating nonprofit organizations with resources to strengthen their local communities. Last August, farmers entered for the chance to direct a $5,000 Grow Communities donation to a local eligible nonprofit of their choice. Farmers have directed donations to food banks, emergency response organizations, schools, youth agriculture programs and many others that reflect the spirit and support the vibrancy of rural America.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone, including those in rural regions, and farmers play a critical role in helping communities overcome challenges, like the ones we’re currently facing,” said Al Mitchell, Bayer Fund president. “Bayer Fund is proud to work side-by-side with farmers to identify local eligible nonprofit organizations that are able to provide their residents with solutions that leave a lasting impact.”

To learn more about how America’s Farmers programs are making an impact, visit www.AmericasFarmers.com

Photo: Submitted photo.

September 16, 2022 - 8:05am
posted by Joanne Beck in news, pavilion central school, open house, Pavilion.

pav_girls.jpg

Maddasin DuBois attended her first Gophers Open House Thursday. Though she had never thought much about these events, this year seemed different.

“My teachers kept talking about it,” said the new sixth-grader.

Her cousin, Alaina Rowe, went to see “my friends,” she said. They ate from one of the four food trucks, visited school booths, watched kids try to nail the target for a dunk tank and hung out at the Middle-Senior High School on Big Tree Road, Pavilion. Crystal DuBois, who is mom to both girls, said it was a first time for them. In the past, the girls hadn’t shown any interest, she said. But this year they all went and learned a thing or two.

“They have clubs and programs I didn’t know about, and maybe I can get them interested,” Crystal said.

The Gopher Gathering is Pavilion’s third annual open house, English teacher Rachel Kress said. Food trucks, games, informal meetings with teachers and Board of Education members, visiting a petting zoo hosted by Future Farmers of America and other activities filled the late afternoon until 7 p.m.

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Ninth-grader Erin Andrews was one of several student volunteers to help out with the event. Erin had a face painting station set up for sparkle-adorned designs and temporary tattoos.

Sabrina Sanner, a newly hired music teacher, had never been to prior events and said it was a good idea. School districts often have events that bring families into the school classrooms for more formal types of interactions, she said. Pavilion's was out on the lawns, lined with tables, activities and information.

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“I think it’s nice, it’s a better way to do an open house,” the 24-year-old said.

Next to her at the table was Eric Weaver, an art teacher. After all summer, this was "kind of like a reunion," he said.

“I think it’s a way for the community to get together,” he said. “This is kind of the first opportunity we’ve had to get together … and parents turn into supportive parents for their child’s education.”

He held up sign-up sheets with several student names on them indicating interest in art class. Aside from the general theme of meeting one another, there was another one: wearing the school colors of purple and gold. 

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Groups of students sat talking on a nearby curb while others took turns trying to dunk Assistant Principal Charles Martelle in a tank of cold water. The school’s resource officer was on hand to talk to families and take photos for the bulletin board. Genesee County Sheriff’s deputies were there as well, in addition to about 75 faculty and staff, said Deb Barie, director of pupil personnel services.

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“I think it’s a great way to have the whole family involved in the school,” she said. “They’re getting to know the teachers in a comfortable, safe setting. (Parents) can enjoy a night out with the kids. The student volunteers are showing off their extracurriculars to show what they do during the school day and outside of school.”

Top Photo: Pavilion Middle-High School students relax with some treats from food trucks during the annual Gopher Gathering at the school on Big Tree Road; Erin Andrews decorates a tattoo on first-grader Caroline Mead's hand; school faculty Eric Weaver and Sabrina Sanner share their passions for art and music, respectively, during the event Thursday; students take turns whipping the yellow ball at a dunk tank target in hopes of dropping Assistant Principal Charles Martelle into the water (some were successful); and photo above, school secretary Coreena Green, substitute teacher Jonathan Holland and Deb Barie, director of Pupil Personnel Services, meet families and hand out informational flyers. Photos by Joanne Beck.

November 8, 2021 - 10:30am

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Update Nov. 9, 12:30 p.m. -- Pavilion's match on Thursday will be played at 6 p.m. at Caledonia-Mumford High School.

It wouldn’t be a stretch to say that the Pavilion varsity girls volleyball team has executed its game plan to perfection this season.

That’s because the Lady Gophers have played 23 matches and have not lost a single set en route to capturing the Section V Class D2 championship – their second straight sectional crown.

Second-seeded Pavilion claimed the trophy on Friday night with a 25-11, 25-15, 25-11 sweep of No. 1 Harley-Allendale-Columbia.

The victory advances the Lady Gophers to the Class D crossover final on Thursday against either Class D1 champion Alexander or Class D3 champion Fillmore.

Alexander – which defeated Letchworth in four sets for the title – will square off against Fillmore at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Pavilion High School, with the winner to meet Pavilion.

The survivor of the three-team Class D playoffs will move on to the Far West Regionals against Chautauqua Lake of Section VI at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at Le Roy High School.

Coach Rex Eighmey, in his 18th year at the helm, said the “chemistry” of this year’s Pavilion team is off the charts and credits that to the experience most of the girls have gained from playing “club” and summer volleyball against larger schools in addition to their Section V high school schedule.

“A lot of the girls play club and they just love their volleyball,” he said. “And they just happen to be very good players. That’s the main reason; the players are the reason we’re doing what we’re doing.”

The team is led by what Eighmey calls his “Core Four” of senior setter Shannon Campbell, senior outside hitter and captain Adeline Milligan, junior outside hitter Karlee Zinkievich and 6-foot-1 junior middle hitter Lauren Kingsley.

All four are in their fourth year of varsity volleyball – which equates to a great deal of time on the floor together.

“They’re just so used to playing together,” Eighmey said. “Like some of our fans have said, it’s like a well-oiled machine. They just know where each other is going to be.”

Statistically, entering the sectional title game, Campbell, the squad’s vocal leader, had 483 assists in her setter role; Milligan had 193 kills and 145 digs; Kingsley had 203 kills, 38 ½ blocks and 77 digs, and Zinkievich had 100 aces, 120 kills and 132 digs.

Also playing key roles as hitters and defensive specialists in either the front or back row are Paige Landers, 5-foot-11 Shea Amberger, Sara Laurie, Abby Lemley and Samantha Sikora, Eighmey said.

The starting lineup and substitution patterns have worked to a T thus far as the Lady Gophers’ will take a 69-set winning streak into Thursday’s contest.

When asked how close they came to losing a set, Eighmey said that they trailed Warsaw 24-23 before his team rallied to take the next three points.

“That’s the only team that has come close to beating us in a set,” he said.

The Lady Gophers defeated Alexander this season but did not play against Fillmore.

Eighmey also credited assistant coach Rebecca Zinkievich for her dedication to the finer points of the sport.

“Rebecca is a big part of this. She does a lot of drills and a lot of practices and stuff,” he said.

On Sunday, the coaches (junior varsity coach Betty Worthington also is an assistant) and players watched the videotape of Chautauqua Lake’s 25-17, 25-12, 16-25, 25-13 victory over Randolph in the Section VI Class D finals. Chautauqua Lake is 17-0.

“They’re a strong team, but we’re looking forward to the challenge,” Eighmey said. “The sectionals are huge, and now, hopefully, we can win (the regionals) and make it to the four-team state tournament on November 20th and 21st in Glens Falls.”

Submitted photo: The Pavilion Lady Gophers with the Section V Class D2 trophy following Friday's victory over Harley-Allendale-Columbia. Front from left, Shannon Campbell, Sara Logsdon, Paige Landers, Abby Lemley, Lily Macaluso, Karlee Zinkievich; back, Assistant Coach Rebecca Zinkievich, Jayvee Coach Betty Worthington, Shea Amberger, Lauren Kingsley, Adeline Milligan, Sara Laurie, Samantha Sikora, Coach Rex Eighmey.

September 17, 2021 - 12:38pm

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Press release:

Noblehurst Farms recently directed a $2,500 Bayer Fund America’s Farmers Grow Communities donation to Pavilion Elementary School’s Outdoor Classroom. The elementary school will use the funds to build a bridge over one of the streams located within the classroom.

“We are grateful for organizations such as Noblehurst Farms that have shown their support for this classroom, and ultimately for our students here in Pavilion. The generosity and support in this community for our Outdoor Classroom has been outstanding, and this support continues to come in.  We’ve received different fiscal donations, as well as had volunteers come in on weekends in order to enhance this incredible learning environment for our students.” said, Jon Wilson, Elementary Principal at Pavilion.

Since 2010, America’s Farmers programs have awarded more than $59 million to nonprofits, aspiring ag students, and public schools across rural America. Farmers are leaders in their communities, which is why America’s Farmers programs rely on them to help identify the most worthy causes.

Dedicated to making a difference in rural farming communities, the Grow Communities program asks farmers across the country to participate by nominating nonprofit organizations with resources to strengthen their local communities. Last August, farmers entered for the chance to direct a $2,500 Grow Communities donation to a local eligible nonprofit of their choice. Farmers have directed donations to food banks, emergency response organizations, schools, youth agriculture programs and many others that reflect the spirit and support the vibrancy of rural America.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone, including those in rural regions, and farmers play a critical role in helping communities overcome challenges, like the ones we’re currently facing,” said Al Mitchell, Bayer Fund president. “Bayer Fund is proud to work side-by-side with farmers to identify local eligible nonprofit organizations that are able to provide their residents with solutions that leave a lasting impact.”

To learn more about how America’s Farmers programs are making an impact, visit www.AmericasFarmers.com.

About Bayer Fund

Bayer Fund is a nonprofit organization dedicated to strengthening the communities where Bayer customers and employees live and work by providing funding for food and nutrition, education and community development projects.

August 12, 2021 - 9:57am
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, notify, BOCES, pavilion central school.

“Masking is the big issue.”

In five words, Pavilion Superintendent Kate Hoffman this morning summed up what other high-level administration officials at Genesee County school districts are thinking as they contemplate their reopening plans when classes resume on Sept. 7 or 8.

The Batavian reached out to public school superintendents and Notre Dame Principal Wade Bianco to gauge their progress in articulating what restrictions, if any, will be placed on pupils and staff.

During discussions with the officials contacted, it was reported that a Zoom meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. today with Kevin MacDonald, Genesee Valley BOCES district superintendent, to communicate updates on COVID-19 case data and to try to reach a consensus regarding protocols and procedures.

School leaders also have been consulting with Paul Pettit, Genesee/Orleans public health director, for additional guidance on testing, vaccination and other health-related topics.

“We have gone over some guidance following CDC (Centers for Disease Control) recommendations,” Hoffman said. “For us, I’m still formulating our plan. A couple things that I know are likely to happen – we will move to a 3-foot social distancing and we will not be offering a remote option this year.

“We do some opportunities for our high schoolers for a BOCES-run program, but that’s has limited slots for that, so we’re really working through things and trying to see if any guidance does come down from state ed (the New York State Education Department) to see what that entails.”

Currently, superintendents are indicating that they don’t expect any executive orders or mandates coming out of Albany, but things could change if there is a reorganization at the top of the NYS Department of Health.

“It’s my understanding that everything (from the state) are recommendations this time around,” Hoffman advised. “More local decision-making.”

All superintendents said they will be sending out information to the staff and community electronically on their websites and via letters, but none have scheduled in-person meetings with parents yet.

On masking, Hoffman said she’s aware that it is the primary concern of all involved.

“We have some families that are strongly against masking and we have some that are strongly encouraging masking,” she said. “Unfortunately, I’m aware that any plan that we put out is not going to satisfy every single person. My hope is that we do the very best for our students and we approach this with a good dose of common sense and we listen to the people who know the numbers.”

Hoffman mirrored what other superintendents said when it comes to putting out a plan that is flexible in case the landscape changes in either direction.

“I believe our plan will be flexible enough to adjust if the number of COVID cases in our area go up, then we adjust to that; if they go down, then we adjust in the opposite way.”

Comments from other superintendents are as follows:

Scott Bischoping, Batavia High School:

"We’re still in the development of those regionally; still meeting with other superintendents," he said. "As you have seen from the national sort of news how this is traveling – changing very significantly, so we’ve held off on finalizing any planning until we get a further view of it."

Bischoping said Batavia plans on returning with students' in-person learning, so at this point, it's down to the masking requirements.

As far as meetings with parents, he said it may be done on a school building basis.

“We may even do those on a building level rather than a full district level because there would be nuances of those requirements and expectations for different buildings," he offered. "Most would be the same and we will communicate that electronically in letter, but with meetings we have not decided yet whether to do one with the full district or with various groups. Obviously, athletics will be different and will have their own meeting."

He said local districts have the "benefit" of seeing what other states are doing.

"We want to get a good look at that over the next couple weeks before we settle on anything," he said.

John Fisgus, Oakfield-Alabama:

Fisgus said that he anticipates releasing O-A's reopening plan by Friday afternoon, which likely will be the first document that will go out to the public. Previously, he sent out a survey to both staff and the community to gauge residents' feelings on face coverings.

"We certainly will be back five days a week in person; we were that all last year, so that's not a question at all," he said. "The big question for us is the masking."

Gretchen Rosales, Elba:

"Our goal is to develop a plan that meets academic, social, emotional and safety issues of the students and the staff. We have to carefully balance the wishing of our community with the CDC guidelines," she said. "The process is pretty intensive but it's important so it will take a little bit of time. We're working collectively to come up with something."

Rosales said she is expecting to begin the 2021-22 school year with 100 percent in-person learning, but is aware of the public's concerns over masking.

"I think that everyone is just waiting for final guidance and then we can make our plan and go from there."

Merritt Holly, Le Roy: 

Holly noted the number of "moving parts" in the process, especially considering what has happened with Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

"The interesting part is that I don't know, with the administration change in Albany, if the DOH now will put something out at the 12th hour before we start in September," he said. "So, that's always hovering and hanging. Even though they said they wouldn't, was that Governor Cuomo telling them to do that?"

At the local level, Holly said that today's meeting with MacDonald will hopefully "piece some things together and to find out what other districts are thinking about."

He said he initially thought to release his plan next week, but may wait as more and different information is disseminated.

"Really, what I think that it comes down to is that the mask requirements will be the biggest thing," he said, reiterating the common theme.

Plus, students need to be in school five days a week, he said.

"We can't go back to a remote or hybrid learning model," he said. "That's just not good for kids."

May 20, 2021 - 6:30pm

Press release:

The Board of Trustees of the Hollwedel Memorial Library in Pavilion announces that the proposition to permanently establish Hollwedel as a school district public library was approved 151 to 38 on May 18th.

In addition, all trustees were elected to terms of up to three years. They are: Deborah Davis, Sharon Fuerch, Stephen Gould, Joan Gray, Karen Kingsley, Danielle Offhaus and Timothy Wasiewicz.

"The Board gratefully acknowledges the public's support and confidence to change the library's service area to align with the Pavilion Central School District boundaries," says Board President Joan Gray. "We anticipate completing this process over the next few months.

"Once that is done, the hours will increase and more programs will be offered. We are excited about the opportunities for all in the school district."

There will be a Special Meeting of the library's Board of Trustees at 6 p.m. Monday, May 24 via Zoom to discuss and possibly vote on changes to the library's Reopening Procedures: Level 3 -- Criteria and Services.

The meeting is open to the public.

Here's the access information:

  • Zoom link
  • Meeting ID: 882 6268 5565
  • Passcode: 6vfvFk

Previously: Pavilion voters to decide May 18 if Hollwedel should become school district public library

Previously: Hollwedel board asks Pavilion board to hold vote forming school district library

May 11, 2021 - 2:40pm

Above, Adeline Offhaus enjoys a book she found at the Hollwedel Memorial Library about wearing a mask during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Submitted photos and press release:

A proposition to transition Hollwedel Memorial Library, currently chartered to serve the Town of Pavilion, to a Pavilion Central School District public library will be put to a vote May 18.

An online presentation by the Hollwedel Memorial Library Board of Trustees with details about the proposition has been available and can be viewed at www.HollwedelLibrary.org/vote. The slides used in this presentation can also be picked up at the library.

An informational flier with details about the vote was mailed to Pavilion Central School District residents in early April.

The Hollwedel Memorial Library Board of Trustees also hosted two small group sessions at the library for residents on April 24 and 26. At these meetings, Joan Gray, president, and Stephen Gould, vice president, shared information about the proposition to transition the library to a school district public library.

Voting will take place from noon to 9 p.m. Tuesday, May 18 at Pavilion High School.

If approved, the library’s service area would expand to serve the residents of the Pavilion Central School District. Currently, the library is chartered to serve the Town of Pavilion.

Stabilizes Funding & Provides Elected Representation

The library would remain housed in the same building with the same staff. The school district would have no direct control of the library but would collect funds for the library. This transition to a School District Public Library would stabilize the funding needed to operate the library, and provide elected representation to the taxpayers as library trustees will be elected rather than appointed.

According to Board President Gray, “We hope that residents remember to vote on May 18. At our meetings and online, we have explained that library usage has increased steadily while our funding has not. With this vote, the proposed level of community-based funding would amount to 44 cents per $1,000 of assessed values on properties in the Pavilion School District.

"Without this transition, the future of the library is uncertain. We have been encouraged by the positive comments we have received from the community who believe that the library is important to all of us.”

The slide presentation along with additional information about the upcoming library vote are available online at the library’s website at www.HollwedelMemorialLibrary.org/vote. Residents with questions can also contact the library at (585) 584-8843. 

Current library hours are: Monday and Wednesday 2 to 7 p.m. / Friday 1 to 5 p.m. / Saturday 10 a.m. to noon / Closed Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

Below, Harper Offhaus and her mom, Danielle, often enjoy a book together in the Children’s Reading area at the Hollwedel Memorial Library. Danielle currently serves on the library's Board of Trustees.

Below, grandmother Lisa Schiske shows Chase Radesi, left, and Ari Schiske how to read one of their favorite children’s books online at the library.

Below, Oscar Staba uses the Hollwedel library’s computers to get his homework done, and he enjoys the free WiFi for use on his phone.

May 3, 2021 - 12:40pm

Press release:

In April, the Batavia Career and Technical Education Center National Technical Honor Society (NTHS) Chapter announced the names of 40 career and technical student inductees. These students met the rigorous criteria set forth by this national organization.

The minimum grade-point average for acceptance is a 3.0. Students are also selected based upon credit hours completed, attendance, volunteer service, and membership in other student organizations.

Due to COVID-19 event attendance restrictions, this ceremony will held be during the school day later in May. 

The 2021 Batavia Career and Technical Education Center NTHS Inductees

​Alexander Central School District

  • Norah Crawford, Metal Trades
  • Allision Kelly, Cosmetology
  • Julia Lennon, Cosmetology
  • Courtney Seymour, Criminal Justice
  • Brayden Woods, Building Trades

Attica Central School District

  • Hope Bell, Building Trades
  • Samantha Cordier, Criminal Justice
  • Matthew Parkhurst, Metal Trades
  • Olivia Rudolph, Criminal Justice
  • Katie Stockschlaeder, Health Dimensions
  • Brooke Whitton, Building Trades

Batavia Central School District

  • Jack Bruggman, Graphic Arts
  • Liliana Espinoza, Culinary Arts
  • Alaina Every, Cosmetology
  • KayLeigh Mayeu, Criminal Justice
  • Alannah Penkszyk, Animal Science
  • Robin Scroger, Animal Science
  • Kurstin Smith, Graphic Arts
  • Skarlette Tellier-Wilcox, Cosmetology

Byron-Bergen Central School District

  • Aleigha Shallenberger, Graphic Arts

Caledonia-Mumford Central School District

  • Lillias Bell, Metal Trades
  • Molly Ryan, Health Dimensions
  • Jayden Thompson, Diesel Mechanics

Le Roy Central School District

  • David Gracie, Auto Trades: Collision, Custom and Restoration
  • MaKayla Grant, Criminal Justice
  • Adam Risewick, Electro-Mechanical Trades
  • Taeya Starkey, Diesel Mechanics
  • Garrett Talbot, Building Trades
  • Zach Vanderhoof, Electro-Mechanical Trades

Oakfield-Alabama Central School District

  • Zachary Bradt, Graphic Arts

Pavilion Central School District

  • Ayrianna Hurlburt, Health Dimensions
  • Nikolai Hutchings, Animal Science
  • Savanna Kenyon, Diesel Mechanics
  • Toby Stappenbeck, Building Trades 
  • Alanso True, Building Trades
  • Alexa Wolcott, Culinary Arts

Pembroke Central School District

  • Alex Lamb, Building Trades
  • Ashley Pfalzer, Cosmetology
  • Tia Stone, Criminal Justice
  • Riley Yager, Graphic Arts
April 16, 2021 - 1:54pm

Press release:

Residents of the Pavilion Central School District are invited to attend either one of two information sessions to be held at the Hollwedel Memorial Library on its decision to pursue becoming a school district public library.

The one-on-one meetings will take place on Saturday, April 24 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and on Monday, April 26 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library, located at 5 Woodrow Drive in Pavilion. 

The meetings were announced in a mailing sent to Pavilion Central School District residents earlier this month.

They will be hosted by the Board President Joan Gray and Board Vice President Stephen Gould.

As a school district public library, the library would have a service area that aligns with the boundaries of the Pavilion Central School District.

The library’s budget and the board of trustees would be determined by a public vote. The library itself would remain housed in the same building and be staffed by the same professionals.

The school district would collect tax money for the library and turn the funds over to the Library Board. The school district would have no direct control over the operations of the library.

All recommended COVID-19 safety protocols will be followed for the meetings at the library. Please wear a mask for your visit.

Residents can find more information on the library’s website; ask questions via email at:  [email protected], or contact the library by phone at (585) 584-8843. 

Current library hours are: Monday and Wednesday 2 to 7 p.m. / Friday 1 to 5 p.m. / Saturday 10 a.m. to noon / Closed Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

March 23, 2021 - 11:26am

Press release:

The Board of Trustees of the Hollwedel Memorial Library has formally requested that the Pavilion Central School District hold a vote on creating a school district public library that would take place in May of 2021. 

In a letter sent to the Board of Education, the Trustees expressed their desire to comply with the New York State Board of Regents policy urging libraries to shift tax support from general appropriations from municipalities to a direct public vote. Currently, the Hollwedel Memorial Library receives operating funds from the Town of Pavilion, and to a lesser degree from Genesee County, the towns of Bethany and Covington, plus donations and fundraising events.

As a school district public library, the library would have a service area that aligns with the boundaries of the Pavilion Central School District. The library’s budget and the board of trustees would be determined by a public vote. The library itself would remain housed in the same building and be staffed by the same professionals. The school district would collect tax money for the library and turn the funds over to the Library Board. The school district would have no direct control over the operations of the library.

The change to become a school district public library is being considered in order to provide enhanced library services to all residents of the area, to comply with the New York State Board of Regents policy, and to provide a secure and sustainable source of operating income for the library. 

The Hollwedel Memorial Library has seen steady growth in the number of borrowers and use of services by local residents while experiencing flat and/or reduced funding revenue over the past several years. In addition, the mandatory New York State Minimum Wage Laws have had a significant impact on the library’s budget.

The Board of Trustees of the Hollwedel Memorial Library will communicate the details of the library budget vote to all residents of the Pavilion Central School District before the vote. 

Communication plans include an informational mailing to district residents, an online presentation, small one-on-one sessions to be held at the library, newspaper articles and legal notices in print, as well as information that will be posted on the library’s website at www.HollwedelMemorialLibrary.org.

“This is the beginning of a process," says Board President Joan Gray. "The Hollwedel Memorial Library Board of Trustees is working to share information. It is important to us that school district residents are well informed about the future of the library. We know that many local residents use our Wi-Fi, computers, materials and services.

"Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, more people are relying on the library for internet usage, materials, services and programs. With this type of community-based funding, our library would be able to continue to provide opportunities for lifelong learning and access to the latest technologies that we have laid out in our Strategic Plan. It would also make it possible for us to keep the library open for more days and times than our current funding allows.

“While much more information about this process will be announced soon, we invite residents to visit our website or the library to read our Strategic Plan. In addition, residents with questions can contact me directly at (585) 506-5642.”

Information about the library and its programs and services can be found on the library’s website at www.HollwedelLibrary.org.

Residents can also contact the library by phone at (585) 584-8843 or stop by 5 Woodrow Drive in Pavilion.

Current library hours are: Monday and Wednesday 2 to 7 p.m. / Friday 1 to 5 p.m. / Saturday 10 a.m. to noon / Closed Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

October 16, 2020 - 3:10pm
posted by Press Release in education, news, pavilion central school, superintendent.

Submitted photo and press release:

The Pavilion Central School District’s Board of Education has selected Mary Kate Hoffman as the district’s next Superintendent. Hoffman will be appointed pending successful contract negotiations.

“The board is confident that Mary Kate Hoffman will lead our district as we work together to deliver the best education possible for our students," said Marirose Ethington, Pavilion Central School District’s Board president. "Our search process narrowed the field to three excellent candidates.

"We value all of the input from our stakeholders. With her dedication, enthusiasm, and knowledge, our board feels that Mary Kate has the educational capacity and attributes to move us forward.” 

Hoffman is the principal of York Elementary School located in Retsof, a hamlet in the Town of York in Livingston County. She has 11 years of educational leadership experience including serving as the Assistant Secondary Principal, Interim Principal and Director of Curriculum and Instruction at Pavilion Central Schools.

Hoffman began her career in education in 1995 as a second-grade teacher at Pavilion Elementary School. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Education from SUNY College at Fredonia, and a Master of Science in Education from SUNY College at Geneseo. She earned a certificate of Advanced Study in Educational Administration from SUNY College at Brockport. 

“I am honored and grateful for the opportunity to serve the Pavilion Central School District as Superintendent," Hoffman said. "I look forward to working with the students, staff, Board of Education, and community to carry on the traditions of academic excellence and community pride. I am excited to make new connections, renew old friendships, and return to the place where my career began.” 

Kevin MacDonald, district superintendent of the Genesee Valley BOCES, acted as the search consultant and noted that the search process was a true collaboration between the Board of Education and stakeholders who served on the interview committee.

About Genesee Valley BOCES

It operates as a Board of Cooperative Educational Services offering shared programs and services to 22 component school districts located in Genesee, Wyoming, Livingston and Steuben counties in New York State.

September 16, 2020 - 3:05pm
posted by Press Release in pavilion central school, news, superintendent finalists.

Press release:

The Pavilion Central School District’s Board of Education has named three finalists for the district’s next superintendent.

Marirose Ethington, Pavilion Central School District’s board president, said she is pleased with the high-quality candidate pool and enthused about the potential the three finalists have to offer. 

“Selecting the best superintendent for Pavilion Central Schools is the Board’s top priority,” Ethington said. “We are extremely pleased by the quality of the finalists. We are confident that one of these candidates will be the best Superintendent for our school district and community.”

The three finalists are Mary Kate Hoffman, Timothy McArdle and Paul Kesler.

Mary Kate Hoffman is the principal of York Elementary School located in Retsof. Hoffman has 11 years of educational leadership experience including serving as the assistant secondary principal, interim principal and director of Curriculum and Instruction at Pavilion Central Schools. Hoffman began her career in education in 1995 as a second-grade teacher at Pavilion Elementary School. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Education from SUNY College at Fredonia, and a Master of Science in Education from SUNY College at Geneseo. She earned a certificate of Advanced Study in Educational Administration from SUNY College at Brockport.

Timothy McArdle currently serves as the principal of Le Roy Junior Senior High School located in Le Roy, a position he has held since 2013. McArdle began teaching in 2003 as a Health and Physical Education teacher for grades 7-12 in the Portville Central School District. He continued his career at Honeoye Falls-Lima Central Schools serving as the Middle School dean of students. McArdle also served as an assistant principal at Batavia Middle School from 2010-2013. McArdle earned a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education and a Master of Science in Health Education from St. Bonaventure University. He holds a certificate of Advanced Study in Educational Administration from SUNY Brockport.

Paul Kesler is the principal of Batavia High School, where he has served since 2018. Kesler has 23 years of experience in the educational field. He has been employed by the Batavia City School District since 2005, when he began as a principal of John Kennedy Elementary School. He began his career in education in 1997 as a kindergarten/second grade teacher at Dr. Louis Cerulli School #34, an elementary school in the Rochester City School District. Kesler holds a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education from SUNY College at Geneseo and a Master of Science in Education from SUNY College at Brockport. He also holds a Master of Science in Educational Administration from St. John Fisher College. Kesler is certified as a New York State School Administrator/Supervisor. 

Stakeholder groups and the BOE will conduct the final round of interviews with the three candidates on Sept. 29 and 30 at the Pavilion Central School District. The BOE hopes to appoint the final candidate by early November.

Kevin MacDonald, district superintendent of the Genesee Valley BOCES, who is acting as search consultant, said the Board has developed and implemented a process that will help determine the best candidate.

“This is a rigorous search process,” MacDonald said. “Finalists are interviewed by several stakeholder groups, and concludes with a board meeting to make a final decision.”

July 31, 2020 - 1:40pm

Genesee County central school districts have sent their reopening proposals to the Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office and to the New York State Education Department.

It must be noted that the governor ultimately will determine whether or not schools may reopen. He is expected to announce his decision sometime next week.

Complete reopening plans can be found on the schools’ websites. All plans must comply with guidelines set forth by the state Education Department, Center for Disease Control, Genesee County Health Department and the governor’s executive orders.

The Batavian posted the Batavia City School District’s hybrid reopening plan on Tuesday.

ALEXANDER

Superintendent Catherine Huber said the district is proposing a hybrid reopening plan, based on the building capacity and in alignment with the aforementioned guidelines.

It includes designating Wednesdays as a virtual day for all students “to allow us to engage in scheduled deep cleaning on a weekly basis in addition to our regular daily cleaning routine.”

  • Prekindergarten through fifth grade – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday in school.
  • BOCES CTE – Monday and Tuesday at BOCES, Thursday and Friday in school.
  • Sixth through eighth grade – Monday and Tuesday in school, Thursday and Friday virtual.
  • Ninth through 12th grade – Monday and Tuesday virtual, Thursday and Friday in school.
  • Special education/English language learning – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday in school.

BYRON-BERGEN

Superintendent Mickey Edwards released the B-B plan, which (like Alexander’s plan) divides students into five groups – one with 100-percent in-school learning, three with a combination of in-school and remote learning and one with 100-percent remote learning.

  • Universal Prekindergarten through fifth grade (elementary school) – All students in school.
  • Cohort 1, sixth through 12th grade – Students with last name A-L – Monday and Tuesday in school; Wednesday through Friday remote learning.
  • Cohort 2, sixth through 12th grade – Students with last name M-Z, Monday through Wednesday remote learning; Thursday and Friday in school.
  • Cohort 3, sixth through 12th grade students with special considerations – Every day except Wednesday in school.
  • Virtual Cohort, K-12th grade – 100-percent remote learning for students whose parents have opted not to send their children back to school.

ELBA

Superintendent Ned Dale said his committee “collectively agreed that the safest plan would be to have 50 percent of the students come every other day.”

He said the goal is to review the wellness of our students and staff on Oct. 1 and then every two weeks after that to increase capacity.

Two groups of students, Maroon and White, have been established based on last names to “allow them to sit on the bus together, possibly sit at a cafeteria table together, as social distancing is not required with members of the same household.”

Dale said that a 50-percent model will allow students to not wear a mask when they are seated in the classroom. He also noted that districts are required to accommodate students and families that choose to do distance learning and that students with special needs may be required to attend more often.

LE ROY

Superintendent Merritt Holly advised that the district has formulated a hybrid plan model, dividing the students from kindergarten to 12th grade into two groups – Team Jell-O, which will be in school on Monday and Tuesday, and Team Oatka, which will be in school on Thursday and Friday.

Wednesday has been set aside as a full remote or virtual learning day for all students.

  • Team Jell-O – Monday and Tuesday in school; Wednesday through Friday, remote learning.
  • Team Oatka -- Thursday and Friday in school; Monday through Wednesday, remote learning.

“This allows us to have half our student population (in school) on Monday/Tuesday and Thursday/Friday,” he said, adding that if parents don't feel comfortable sending their child back to school, the district is offering remote learning five days a week.

He said parents can choose one option for their child, either in-person instruction on two days, remote three days OR full remote five days.

The reopening plan is divided into the following categories as recommended by the state Education Department and Department of Health -- communications, operations, health & safety, transportation, food service, facilities/building procedures, academics/schedule, social emotional learning, athletics/extracurriculars.

OAKFIELD-ALABAMA

Superintendent John Fisgus said the plan is to have 100-percent in-person learning and teaching for the fall.

The start of classes is delayed until Sept. 11 for extra training and guidance for staff. Fisgus said that this is made possible by utilizing two additional superintendent conference days at the beginning of the year.

“We are in a lucky spot that we can social distance our students while in the classrooms so students can remove their masks during instruction time,” he reported.

The O-A reopening plan is divided into seven categories – communications, operations, health/safety protocols, building procedures, academics, athletics, social/emotional supports.

PAVILION

Superintendent Kenneth Ellison said the school’s reopening committee hasn’t reached a final decision on which of the three options submitted to the state – in-school, remote learning or a mix of the two – will be set into motion at the outset of the school year.

“We will continue to work on what school will look like in September once Governor Cuomo makes his final decision on school reopening on August 7th,” he said. “Despite the scope of the state Education Department document, we still have many logistics to sort out to strike the balance between offering a program that is both educationally strong and meets the numerous health and safety requirements dictated by the state.

Ellison noted that the state Education Department defines these plans as “living documents” so changes will be made as new information becomes available.

PEMBROKE

Superintendent Matthew Calderon reported that the district is giving all K-12 parents the option for 100-percent online/remote learning or in-person learning, with the district set to send parents a summary of the details in an automated message before the plan is posted to its website.

He issued the following information:

  • Students who participate in 100-percent online/remote learning must commit to do so at least on a quarterly basis, and will use the Google Classroom Suite and ClassTag to participate in lessons and receive information about learning expectations.
  • Students who participate in-person will follow a normal schedule. Teachers will use the Google Classroom Suite and ClassTag to enhance the learning experience for students who attend in person. The district will rearrange classroom spaces and use clear desk shields to maximize social distancing and reduce the need to wear masks.
  • By using the Google Classroom Suite and ClassTag, the district will be prepared to quickly transition to a hybrid/alternating-day schedule and/or 100-percent online/remote learning for all, if needed. In such cases, students with disabilities and students with extenuating circumstances would be prioritized to continue with in-person learning to the fullest extent possible, if permitted.
June 16, 2020 - 10:54pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, notify, pavilion central school.

Voting on Pavilion Central School District's $17,684,182 budget, board of education election and board seat modification:

Proposition #1 – Budget
Yes – 417
No – 106

School Board (Two spots – incumbents running)
Margaret "Peg" Gaston – Elected to a five-year term
Callin Ayers-Tillotson – Elected to a five-year term

Board seat modification (Change length of term from three to five years)
Passed

May 20, 2020 - 1:42pm

As Genesee County school districts gear up for 2020-21 budget voting and school board elections, The Batavian is providing the following capsule summaries to keep residents informed about key dates, propositions and candidates.

Per Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s order, all school districts in New York State will hold annual budget voting and board elections on June 9 through absentee balloting.

Absentee ballots will be mailed to eligible voters and must be returned to the district offices by 5 p.m. on June 9 or they will not be considered or counted – no exceptions.

It is essential to remember that additional state aid cuts could be coming and would affect districts’ budgets going forward.

Details about the schools’ budgets and candidates as well as contact information can be found on their respective websites.

ALEXANDER CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers -- The proposed budget is $18,540,258, an increase of $315,497 from the 2019-20 plan, with no increase in the tax levy. The budget (virtual) hearing is set for 7 p.m. on May 26 via Zoom using the log-in details posted on the district website, and will be available for viewing on the website’s BOE link starting on May 27.

School board election – One position is up for election for a term of five years commencing July 1, 2020 and expiring on June 30, 2025 to succeed Richard Guarino, whose term expires on June 30, 2020. Candidates are Christopher Mullen and Diane Steel.

Websitewww.alexandercsd.org

BATAVIA CITY SCHOOLS

Budget by the numbers – The board approved a $51,470,725 spending plan with cuts in staffing and other items but no property tax increase. The public hearing on the budget is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on June 2.

Additional propositions – Richmond Memorial Library trustee voting, with Kristi Evans the only candidate at this time for a five-year term starting on July 1, 2020. As two seats are open, the other will be filled via the write-in candidate process. Jackson Primary playground, a $618,000 capital project to construct an age-appropriate playground at Jackson Primary School.

School board election – Incumbents Barbara Bowman and Tanni Bromley along with recent appointee Alice Ann Benedict are running for three board seats. The candidates receiving the most votes will serve from July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2023, while the third-place candidate’s term will be June 9, 2020 through June 30, 2021.

Website – www.bataviacsd.org

BYRON-BERGEN CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers – The board adopted a proposed budget of $24,599,800, including a tax levy of $9,024,961 – an increase in the property tax rate of 1.99 percent. The public hearing on the budget is set for 5 p.m. on May 28, and will be recorded and placed on the district website.

Additional propositionsBus purchase, proposal is for two 70-passenger school buses at a maximum cost of $246,000, with 90 percent covered by state aid. The tax income is estimated at $2 per year on a house assessed at $100,000, according to Superintendent Mickey Edwards.

School board election – Three people are running for two open trustee positions – incumbents Tammy Menzie and Amy Phillips and challenger Lynn Smith. The terms are for three years, beginning on July 1.

Websitewww.bbschools.org

ELBA CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers – The board is meeting tonight via Zoom to consider the $10,269,322 spending plan that calls for a slight tax increase that equates to an increase of $39 for the entire year based on a house assessed at $150,000. The public hearing is set for 6:30 p.m. on May 27, also via Zoom.

Additional propositionRe-establish a vehicle and transportation reserve and school bus purchase. Superintendent Ned Dale reporting that the district wishes use existing reserve funds to purchase a 65-passenger bus and a 24-passenger bus with a handicap lift.

School board election – Incumbent Michael Riner is the only slated candidate for his seat, which expires this year.

Website www.elbacsd.org

LE ROY CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers – The board approved a $26,334,488 budget that includes a 1.99 percent property tax increase (which is below the district’s tax cap of 2.8 percent) and does not add new positions or programs. The budget hearing presentation will be posted on the district's website at www.leroycsd.org on June 2.

School board election – Incumbents Richard Lawrence and Jacalyn Whiting are running for the two three-year terms.

Website – www.leroycsd.org

OAKFIELD-ALABAMA CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers – The board approved a $21,123,746 budget, up 1.4 percent from last year, with a zero percent property tax increase. Superintendent John Fisgus reported that the budget preserves all educational programs and extracurricular activities, adding that tiered plans are in place if the state makes additional cuts in aid. The public hearing on the budget is set for 10 a.m. on June 1 and will be considered “adjourned” as it will be conducted remotely.

Additional propositions – Capital improvement project, $15.3 million, with no impact upon taxpayers. Major goals of the project include safety/security measures, code and handicap accessible updates, building repairs, infrastructure upgrades and landscaping. School bus purchase, $135,000, to be financed.

School board election – Five candidates are running for three open positions – Jackie Yunker Davis, Daniel N. Groth, Douglas Russo, Shanda Spink and Pete Zeliff. The candidate receiving the most votes will begin serving on June 10 with the term ending on June 30, 2023. The terms of the two candidates with the second and third most votes will be July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2023.

Website – www.oahornets.org

PAVILION CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers – The board adopted a $17,684,182 budget with no change in the tax levy and no major changes beyond contractual increases and expected costs related to the coronavirus. The public hearing is scheduled for 7 p.m. on May 26 via Zoom. Links will be provided in the district newsletter and on our web page once they are created. 

Additional propositions – Change of board of education term, with the proposal calling for making all seven seats five-year terms – an increase of two years from the current term.

School board election -- Incumbents Margaret Gaston and Callin Ayers-Tillotson are running for re-election.

Website – www.pavilioncsd.org

PEMBROKE CENTRAL

Budget by the numbers – The board adopted a $23,679,522 budget with a zero percent tax levy increase and no property tax increase. The budget hearing will be held remotely on May 26, and the adjourned budget hearing will be available to view on the district website BoardDocs link beginning on May 27. The district's Dragon Tales publication will be mailed next week with all the details.

Additional propositions – Purchase of buses, with no impact upon taxes.

School board election – Dan Lang is running for a one-year unexpired term and Heather Wood is running for a new five-year term. Additionally, an election to fill three seats on the Corfu Public Library is scheduled. Kristie Miller, Julie Hengenius and Tony Kutter are up for election for three-year terms.

Websitewww.pembrokecsd.org

January 17, 2020 - 12:07pm
posted by Billie Owens in pavilion central school, Business, education, agriculture.

Press release:

The Pavilion Central School District is proud to announce that we are now able to offer students a Career and Technical Endorsement in both Agriculture and Business.

This new endorsement will encourage students to enhance their skill sets in agriculture or business.

These new programs allow students to study in a focused career pathway, partake focused internships, and attain college credits at associated colleges.

Upon completion of the Business Career Program, the students can receive college credits at GCC in Introduction to Business, Introduction to Computers, and Microcomputer Applications.

The students are also able to achieve credits in Programming and Problem Solving, and Computer Programming after passing the Advanced Placement Computer Science Placement Exam.

The students enrolled in the Agriculture program will be able to receive credit in Agriculture Business at Morrisville State University, and Animal or Plant Science at Alfred State University.

January 3, 2020 - 12:43pm

Submitted photo and press release:

The Ferdinand DiBartolo NYS Distinguished Foreign Language Leadership Award was presented this year to Elizabeth Slocum (inset photo, right).

The award is presented annually to the president of New York State Association of Foreign Language Teachers in recognition of his/her dedication and service to that organization and the profession.

Slocum is a teacher of French and Spanish at the middle, high school and undergraduate levels.

Slocum holds permanent New York State Certification in French and Spanish, as well as certification as a School District Administrator and Supervisor.

She currently is employed by the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership as a seventh- and eighth-grade Spanish teacher and serves both the Wyoming and Pavilion Central School districts.

Slocum also works with the Genesee Region Teachers’ Center as a member of the Policy Board and coordinator of the regional World Language Teachers’ Network.

“Serving on the executive board of New York State Association of Foreign Language Teachers has been an incredible experience," Slocum said. "It has been an honor to represent New York State teachers and students of World Languages at the local, state and national levels.

"I teach because I believe that languages are at the heart of the human experience. Languages will open doors and make connections for our students at home and abroad.”  

As a 25-plus year member of NYSAFLT, Slocum has been an active member of the association through her participation on various committees as well as serving on the Board of Directors. She holds the distinction of chairing not one but two Annual Conferences, including the 100th Annual Conference and Gala.

She was selected to represent NYSAFLT at American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages’s (ACTFL) inaugural Leadership Initiative for Language Learning (LILL) and remains an active member of LILL Cohort 1. She will participate in a LILL panel at ACTFL 2019 in Washington, D.C., on the topic of Growing Our Leadership.

In 2017, Slocum was honored by Genesee Community College with the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence as an adjunct instructor of World Languages.

About the Ferdinand DiBartolo NYS Distinguished Foreign Language Leadership Award

Ferdinand DiBartolo was a pioneer in the establishment of what was then called “The New York State Federation of Foreign Language Teachers.” He was a foreign language leader and an officer of the federation. In l967, he received the "50th Anniversary Award" of the organization.

He was at the forefront of the effort to ensure the continuance of the Modern Language Journal when ACTFL was formed.

The study of world languages fosters an appreciation and understanding of other cultures, promotes a better understanding of one’s own language and culture, supports learning and improves performance in other content areas, and cultivates the qualities of global citizens who are well-educated and prepared to compete professionally in an increasingly interconnected world.

Research has shown that early language instruction not only facilitates the language learning process, but results in more native-like pronunciation and fluency in the second language. In addition, early language instruction has been shown to strengthen students’ performance in their first language as well as in other content areas.

About the New York State Association of Foreign Language Teachers

NYSAFLT is a professional organization dedicated to providing the foreign language teachers of New York State with professional development opportunities and promoting the study of foreign languages and cultures.

For more information about NYSAFLT, please visit the website.

February 25, 2019 - 1:06pm
posted by Billie Owens in pavilion central school, Pavilion, news, weather.

Pavilion Central Schools board meeting scheduled this evening has been canceled due to the weather. The district's schools are closed today; an alert went out this morning.

November 5, 2018 - 10:58am
posted by Sharon Smith in Community Theatre, pavilion central school.
Event Date and Time: 
November 10, 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Pavilion Central School is proud to participate in the RBTL’s Stars of Tomorrow program. These talented students will present My Fair Lady in the High School Auditorium on Friday & Saturday November 9 &10 at 7:00pm. Enjoy an evening of musical theater while supporting our Schools Performing Arts program. Adults: $8.00 Students/Sr Citizen: $6.00
October 26, 2018 - 8:07am
posted by Sharon Smith in pavilion central school.
Event Date and Time: 
November 9, 2018 - 7:00pm
Pavilion Central School is proud to participate in the RBTL’s Stars of Tomorrow program. These talented students will present My Fair Lady in the High School Auditorium on Friday & Saturday November 9 & 10 at 7:00pm. Enjoy an evening of musical theater while supporting our Schools Performing Arts program. Adults: $8.00. Students/Sr. Citizens: $6.00
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