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wildlife

August 15, 2019 - 1:45pm
posted by Billie Owens in alexander, news, wildlife, skunk, scanner.

A deputy advises dispatch that he used one shot to put down a diseased racoon behind 10262 Alexander Road in Alexander.

August 15, 2019 - 12:33pm
posted by Billie Owens in batavia, news, wildlife, skunk, scanner.

A possibly rabid skunk is reported at 38 Maple St. in the city. Officers are responding.

May 15, 2019 - 5:57pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, GC Park & Forest, outdoors, wildlife.

Press release:

Explore and enjoy the outdoors this Saturday, May 18th, at the Genesee County Park & Forest!

Morning Guided Dog Walk

Bring your best friend and join us for a guided dog walk through the Genesee County Park & Forest onSaturday May 18th, Saturday June 8th and Saturday July 13th from 10 to 11 a.m.!

This guided walk is great for socialization and healthy exercise! Meet at the Interpretive Nature Center. Dogs must be on a leash at all times. Current license or proof of up-to-date rabies vaccination is required.

Aggressive dogs will not be allowed to participate. Cost is $5/dog. Preregistration is required! Call (585) 344-1122 to register!

Afternoon Pond Discovery

Dive into some wild creature encounters with Pond Discovery from 1 to 3 p.m. Be prepared to get muddy and wet!

You will be using a net and sharing a bucket of water to catch animals, and then identify and learn about them from a Naturalist Guide. Meet us at the Interpretive Nature Center at Genesee County Park & Forest. All equipment is provided, just bring yourself and a camera!

Cost is $5/person, $10/family, call 585-344-1122 to register!

Evening Full Moon Owl Prowl

Explore the secret world of owls on a full moon night with our Full Moon Owl Prowl Hike from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. Listen for the sounds of nocturnal wildlife and learn about owls! Hear full moon folklore and visit owl habitats.

Anything can happen on an Owl Prowl! Meet us at the Interpretive Nature Center at Genesee County Park & Forest.

Cost is $5/person, $10/family, preregistration is required! Call 585-344-1122 to reserve your spot!

Preregistration is required for all programs. To register call (585) 344-1122.

For more information visit our website here, or email Shannon Lyaski at [email protected] or phone (585) 344-1122.

May 11, 2019 - 12:52pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in DeWitt Recreation Area, batavia, news, animals, outdoors, wildlife.

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Photo submitted by Dylan Brew.

May 4, 2019 - 2:54pm

Above, ladies from the Alabama-Basom Methodist Church held a bake sale at the Spring Into Nature event. From left are Gladys Phillips, Janice Snyder, Marian Green and Phyllis Brooks.

 

Chilly, damp weather didn’t deter conservation enthusiasts who attended the 35th annual Spring Into Nature event at the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama last Saturday.

Nearly three dozen organizations that participated were spread throughout the refuge’s shops, the Visitors’ Center on Casey Road and outside. Visitors came from across Western New York for the yearly heralding of springtime.

The purpose of the event is to connect people with nature and conservation, said Wildlife Refuge Specialist Kate Brenner.

Spring Into Nature 2019 was dedicated to Robert Schmidt, a volunteer for more than 20 years on the refuge, which primarily serves as a nesting, feeding, resting and staging area for migratory waterfowl. It is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wlidlife Service.

There was plenty of food to purchase; and numerous activities, presentations and demonstrations geared to every age took place during the day.​ These included a bald eagle watch, archery, and more.

Alabama volunteer firemen brought a fire truck and visitors were encouraged to thank a firefighter for their service.

Among the activities for children was building a toad abode, making pinecone bird feeders, face painting and animal origami (the art of Japanese paper folding).

For the Alabama-Basom Methodist Church, the day provided the opportunity to earn money to benefit the church. Nearly every year the event has taken place, the church has had a bake sale there. They offer everything from pies, cookies and cupcakes to muffin bread.

Marion Green, who will be 85 this summer, has been going to the church since she was 2. She proudly held up one of the muffin breads she made for the sale.

Money made from the bake sale goes toward putting county water in the church, Green said.

To learn more about Iroquois National Wlidlife Refuge, click here.

Photos by Virginia Kropf.

Below, 10-year-old Melissa Outten, of Gasport, shows off the toad abode she made during Spring Into Nature. Behind her is a muskrat den, which is one of the displays in the Visitors’ Center.
April 16, 2019 - 5:56pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, scanner, wildlife, batavia.

City police are asked to respond to East Main Street in the area of North Spruce Street for a chicken reportedly running at large.

UPDATE 5:57 p.m.: "Any direction of travel on the bird?" asks an officer. The response: "In the parking lot of a doctor's office on North Spruce, heading toward East Main."

March 26, 2019 - 2:02pm

Press release:

Earth Day is your chance to give back to your community and take care of the Earth! Join us at DeWitt Recreation Area in Batavia for the 19th annual Earth Day Celebration and help with park cleanup from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 20.

Let's celebrate Earth Day early (it's actually Monday, April 22) and help keep the park beautiful and the habitat safe and healthy for wildlife.

Leanr to make cool things from recycled materials and enjoy a naturalist-guided hike to discover the natural wonders in the park.

Enjot wild ganes, free fun and more.

Service groups, students, 4-H'ers and Scouts can earn community service hours and meet badge requirements.

Don't miss a special presentation by theBuffalo Zoomobile from 2 to 3 p.m., weather permitting!

Special thanks to the Genesee Finger Lakes Cahpter of the Air & Waste Management Association for their generous support of this Earth Day celebration.

Meet at Pavilion 2 for all activities. DeWitt Recreation Area is located at 115 Cedar St. in the City of Batavia.

This event and all activities are free and open to all. Please preregister for activities by calling (585) 344-1122.

Here's the day's schedule of activities:

  • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. -- Park Cleanup Projects
  • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. -- Recycled Crafts
  • 12 to 1 p.m. -- Wild Planet Games
  • 1 to 2 p.m. -- Wild Planet Guided Hike
  • 2 to 3 p.m. (weather permitting) -- Special Guest: World Safari by the Buffalo Zoomobile -- Meet fascinating animals from all different places on planet Earth!
April 23, 2018 - 4:37pm
posted by Billie Owens in wildlife, Alabama, news, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alabama is hosting its 34th annual Spring into Nature celebration from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 28. This year a free shuttle service will be running between three parking lots and the Visitor Center to alleviate construction and parking complications.

The shuttle will begin at 8:30 a.m. leaving from the Visitor Center every 30 minutes. Iroquois NWR -- Visitors Center is located at 1101 Casey Road in Basom.

Stops include Kanyoo Trail, Cayuga Overlook, and Tonawanda WMA before returning to the Visitor Center. Full shuttle schedules can be found on the Refuge website.

Join us for a variety of nature-related exhibits, crafts, fishing demos, and games for the kids. Bird feeder/nesting platform construction, viewing of live birds of prey, archery games, and face painting are among the returning favorites. Don’t forget to meet "Puddles," the blue goose mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Food will be available for purchase and all activities are free.

Please contact Refuge staff at 585.948.5445, ext. 7037, or visit our website at http://www.fws.gov/refuge/iroquois for further information.

Iroquois NWR is located midway between Buffalo and Rochester, and is managed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact the Refuge at (585) 948-5445 or at the Federal Relay No. 1-800-877- 8339.

April 11, 2018 - 3:26pm

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) announces plans to conduct four (4) prescribed burns on the Refuge during the 2018 season. The goal this year is to burn approximately 82 acres of grasslands.

The result will be enhanced grassland nesting cover for a variety of migratory birds and other wildlife. Grassland fields will be burned in the spring or early summer (April – July). Each burn should take approximately two to six hours to complete and will pose no threat to visitors or neighbors.

Prescribed burns are conducted safely and successfully on National Wildlife Refuges and other public lands across the country. With prescribed burns, fire becomes a management tool removing accumulated fuel loads thus reducing the risk of wildfire.

Additionally, fire improves Refuge habitats for wildlife by removing invading plants that compete for light and nutrients and exposing the soil to sunlight so that seeds may germinate and grow. At the same time, it releases nitrogen and other nutrients into the soil to nourish the new plants.

Specific dates cannot be announced in advance, however, law enforcement and other emergency agencies will be notified on the day of the burn.

Before a burn can take place, specific weather and site conditions, including wind direction and speed, humidity, air temperature, and fuel moisture must be present. If any one of these conditions is outside the “prescription,” the burn will not take place. Refuge staff have been specially trained to plan, ignite and monitor the fire to insure public safety.

For further information contact Refuge Manager, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013, or call 948-5445, ext. 7030.

Iroquois NWR is located midway between Buffalo and Rochester, and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

April 11, 2018 - 2:16pm
posted by Billie Owens in Earth Day, east bethany, news, Announcements, wildlife, conservation.

Press release:

Earth Day Celebration at DeWitt April 21

Earth Day is your chance to take care of your planet and your wild neighbors! Join us at DeWitt Recreation Area in Batavia for our “Earth Day Celebration” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 21st.

Help clean up the park to keep the habitat safe and healthy for wildlife! Learn to make cool stuff from recycled materials. Enjoy wild games and a naturalist-guided hike to see where animals live and discover what good things you can do for them!

Scouts can earn badge requirements and service hours! Help keep the community ecologically healthy and undeniably beautiful! Meet at Pavilion 2 for all activities. Celebration is FREE and open to the public.

Please preregister for activities by calling 585-344-1122!

Earth Day Night Hike at Genesee County Park & Forest

Celebrate the magic of spring with our Earth Day Night Hike at the Genesee County Park & Forest from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Saturday April 21st!

Meet at the Interpretive Nature Center and explore the forest by moonlight as we search for animals, hear nature folklore and listen to the wild chorus of the night. Visit the headwaters of Black Creek and find out why April’s moon is called the Fish Moon.

Create a memory this Earth Day! Cost is $5/person, $10/family. All ages welcome. Preregistration is required, call 585-344-1122 to register!

For more information visit our website at http://www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/parks/, or contact Shannon Morley at [email protected] or (585) 344-1122.

March 29, 2018 - 12:25pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, wildlife, Announcements, Iroquois refuge.

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alabama is hosting its 34th annual Spring into Nature celebration from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 28.

This year we welcome back spring with the theme "Your Backyard Refuge." Join us for a variety of nature-related exhibits, crafts, fishing demos, and games for the kids.

Bird feeder/nesting platform construction, viewing of live birds of prey, archery games, and face painting are among the returning favorites. Don’t forget to meet "Puddles," the blue goose mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Food will be available for purchase and all activities are free.

Please contact Refuge staff at 585.948.5445, ext. 7037, or visit our website here for further information.

Iroquois NWR is located midway between Buffalo and Rochester, and is managed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Individuals with disabilities and any other person who may need special assistance to participate in this program should contact the Refuge at (585) 948-5445 or at the Federal Relay No. 1-800-877-8339.

December 27, 2017 - 2:00pm

Press release:

Discover secrets of the wild this winter and/or the serenity of hiking on moonlit snow with naturalist-guided hikes at Genesee County Park & Forest! 

Winter Wonderland Hikes are held on Saturdays from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Hikes begin at the Interpretive Nature Center and end with hot chocolate and snacks.

Topics:

  • Saturday, Jan. 13th: Animal Tracks
  • Saturday, Feb. 3rd: Whistle Pigs (and other squirrels)

Snowshoes may be used, weather permitting, and are available for rent or you may bring your own. Snowshoeing lesson provided, no previous experience needed! Rental is included in the price, $5/person, $15 max/family.

Moonlight Hike and Winter Walks -- for adults only -- guided by a naturalist are offered from 7 to 9 p.m. on the dates below. Meet at Pavilion B.

  • Saturday, Jan. 27th
  • Saturday, Feb. 24th

Enjoy the tranquil beauty of the forest on a full moon night! 

Moonlight Hikes begin and conclude with refreshments by a warm fire! For ages 18 and over. Snowshoes may be used, weather permitting, and are available for rent or you may bring your own. Snowshoeing lesson provided, no previous experience needed! Rental is included in the price, $5/person, $15 max/family.

Pre-registration is required for ALL naturalist-guided hikes; call 585-344-1122.

Make a memory this winter with your own Private Group Snowshoe Hike! A naturalist guides your group through peaceful woodland trails and open meadows. Listen to winter’s quiet beauty and find signs of wildlife in this 431-acre park. Private hikes are available on Saturdays in January and February from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. by reservation only at the Interpretive Nature Center. No previous experience is needed; snowshoes provided or bring your own. Rental is included in the price, $5/person, minimum group fee is $75. Call 585-344-1122 to book your own adventure!

Snowshoe rentals are available at the Genesee County Park and Forest Interpretive Center 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays, 12 – 3 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays December through March, weather permitting. Rented snowshoes must be used in the park. Fee is $5/pair and all proceeds go to ACORNS, the nonprofit organization that supports the parks!

Call (585) 344-1122 to register. For more information visit our website at http://www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/parks/, or contact Shannon Morley at [email protected] or (585) 344-1122.

Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Center is located at 11095 Bethany Center Road, East Bethany.

September 6, 2017 - 5:48pm

Press release:

Monarch Butterflies -- "Masters of Migration" -- travel through New York during the month of September!

Seize the last few days of summer with a visit to a butterfly meadow and a journey into their world! Join us for "Watching Monarchs" from 1:30 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9th, at Genesee County Park & Forest.

Take part in a nationwide Monarch conservation project, see how they are tagged and released, and meet these masters of migration up close and personal Learn all about their fascinating lives and discover what you can do to help them out!

Price is $5/person, $10/family. Space is limited, preregistration is required! Call 585-344-1122 to register.

GC Park & Forest is located at 11095 Bethany Center Road in East Bethany.

For more information visit their website here or contact Shannon Morley at [email protected] or (585) 344-1122.

August 20, 2017 - 9:08pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, wildlife, Le Roy, DEC.

Some sort of injured hawk is reportedly perched on the fence at 8700 Vallance Road, Le Roy, at the Ontario Service Center. A Trooper is on scene and will handle, pending the response, in approximately an hour or so, of a representative from the State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Initially, the injured fowl was thought to be an eaglet or turkey vulture.

UPDATE 9:38 p.m.: A trooper says he's unable to locate the bird, which was reported from a passerby on the Thruway. 

June 23, 2017 - 10:05am
posted by James Burns in news, wildlife, Bald eagles, outdoors, Le Roy.

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For the second year in a row, a nesting pair of bald eagles has successfully raised a chick that has fledged. The bald eagle family featured in these pictures resides east of Le Roy along a creek.

There are an estimated five nesting pairs of bald eagles in Genesee County. Two nesting pairs make Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge their home. 

This year we were able to find out some information on the male eagle of the pair outside Le Roy. "Ed," as he has come to be known, was born 45 miles away in Allegany County in April of 2010.

I was able to get a couple pictures of the bands on his ankles. The blue band is from NYS and was put on him when, now retired, Department of Environmental Conservation eagle biologist Pete Nye tagged him and a sibling in the nest. If you look carefully at the blue band you can see it is hand engraved with the code ED. That code is entered in Pete’s notes with the information about the nest he was found in.

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This year the pair settled into the nest in March. Eagles do mate for life and frequently use the same nest every year. 

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The male eagle usually never returns to the nest with out food or materials for the nest. The eaglet is about a week old in this picture.

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When Ed does return empty-handed, it appears to be frowned upon by his mate. Female bald eagles, as well as most female raptors, are bigger than the males. 

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Feeding an eaglet growing that quickly is a full-time job. Fish seem to be the staple with an occasional rabbit. This year they managed to get a fawn into the nest. Look closely and you can see the hoofs. This fawn may have been a stillborn. Eagles are well known for hunting live prey but do scavenge for food as well.

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This is the eaglet at about 8 weeks old waiting for breakfast.

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Video of eaglet beginning to learn to fly 

May 16, 2017 - 3:25pm
posted by Billie Owens in Iroquois National Wildlife Service, bosom, news, wildlife.

Press release:

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) announces plans to conduct three prescribed burns on the Refuge during the 2017 season. The goal this year is to burn approximately 100 acres within three (3) grassland fields.

The result will be enhanced grassland nesting cover for a variety of migratory birds and other wildlife. Grassland fields will be burned in the spring or early summer (May – July). Each burn should take approximately two to six hours to complete and will pose no threat to visitors or neighbors.

Prescribed burns are conducted safely and successfully on National Wildlife Refuges and other public lands across the country. With prescribed burns, fire becomes a management tool removing accumulated fuel loads thus reducing the risk of wildfire. Additionally, fire improves Refuge habitats for wildlife by removing invading plants that compete for light and nutrients and exposing the soil to sunlight so that seeds may germinate and grow. At the same time, it releases nitrogen and other nutrients into the soil to nourish the new plants.

Specific dates cannot be announced in advance, however, law enforcement and other emergency agencies will be notified on the day of the burn.

Before a burn can take place, specific weather and site conditions, including wind direction and speed, humidity, air temperature, and fuel moisture must be present. If any one of these conditions is outside the “prescription,” the burn will not take place. Refuge staff have been specially trained to plan, ignite and monitor the fire to insure public safety.

For further information contact Refuge Manager, Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, 1101 Casey Road, Basom, NY 14013 or call 585-948-5445, ext.7030.

Iroquois NWR is located midway between Buffalo and Rochester, and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

November 12, 2016 - 1:26pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in animals, outdoors, news, corfu, wildlife.

img_4047.jpg

Jessica Havens submitted this photo of a pair of bald eagles she spotted in her backyard on Pratt Road, Corfu.

September 29, 2016 - 2:37pm

Submitted photo and press release:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed the eastern massasauga rattlesnake as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The Service also determined that designating critical habitat for the eastern massasauga is not prudent.

Eastern massasaugas are currently found in scattered locations in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Ontario, Canada. In New York, this snake is found in two counties: Genesee and Onondaga.

The species, a candidate for listing since 1999, has been declining over the past few decades due to loss and fragmentation of its wetland habitat. Nearly 40 percent of the historical populations are now extirpated and an additional 15 percent are of uncertain status. Of those known remaining populations, most are experiencing ongoing threats, meaning additional population losses are anticipated in the future.

Under the Endangered Species Act, threatened species are plants and animals that may become endangered in the foreseeable future. While the Act protects listed species from take, which includes harming, harassing, injuring or killing, the law allows exceptions for take through permits, and all forms of take, including lethal take, are permitted if there is an imminent threat to human safety. Steps can be taken to keep snakes away from homes and outbuildings.

Habitat loss is the primary threat driving declines of eastern massasaugas, but as their numbers decline, other threats such as direct mortality or collection play a more significant role. Snakes may be killed while crossing roads as they travel between wetlands or after they emerge from hibernation; people intentionally kill or collect them; and they can be killed by prescribed fires and mowing when those activities are conducted after snakes have emerged from hibernation.

“Eastern massasauga rattlensnakes play an important role in the ecosystem, serving as both predator and prey,” said Tom Melius, the Service’s Midwest Regional director. “Conserving the massasauga means we are conserving natural areas that serve as habitat for many other plant and wildlife species.”

The timid eastern massasauga is a small snake with a thick body, heart-shaped head and vertical pupils. The average length of an adult is about 2 feet. The snake’s tail has several dark brown rings and is tipped by gray-yellow rattles. Massasaugas eat small rodents such as mice and voles, but they will sometimes eat frogs and other snakes. People’s fear of the massasauga and the species’ resultant persecution are largely unwarranted. Eastern massasaugas are docile, secretive snakes that will try to escape first rather than defend themselves or fight.

Massasaugas live in wet prairies, marshes and low-lying areas along rivers and lakes. Massasaugas also use adjacent uplands during part of the year. They often hibernate in crayfish burrows, but they may also be found under logs and tree roots or in small mammal burrows. Massasaugas use a mix of wetland and upland habitat that is important to many other species of wildlife as well as to humans. Wetland habitats provide wildlife habitat, recharge groundwater resources and improve water quality.

The eastern massasauga is currently state - or provincially listed as endangered, threatened or a species of concern in every state and province in which it lives. The Service and partners have been working together to conserve eastern massasauga populations since the species was named a candidate in 1999.

The Service determined that designating critical habitat for the eastern massasauga rattlesnake is not prudent because doing so would increase the threat from persecution, unauthorized collection, and trade. The final rule listing the eastern massasauga appeared in the Sept. 30, Federal Register. The rule has an effective date Oct. 31.

For more information about the eastern massasauga and the Service’s final rule to list the snake under the Endangered Species Act, visit http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/reptiles/eama/

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visitwww.fws.gov.

December 13, 2015 - 12:27pm
posted by Billie Owens in Le Roy, wildlife, foxes.

Press release:

The Village of Le Roy Police Department has been receiving increased complaints about a fox or foxes, which have been seen in multiple locations inside the Village. The Police have responded but have yet to find a fox acting sick, injured or aggressive this year.

The Le Roy Police have consulted the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation which advises that the foxes are present in the area due to three specific reasons: 1) they have located a food source nearby, possibly garbage or available dog/cat dishes, 2) they feel safe due to a lack of predators, and 3) they may have located a safe place to den or hide.

The DEC further stated that if a fox is not posing a danger to society such as acting sick/injured/aggressive or chasing a domestic animal, it is illegal to kill or trap them without the proper trapping permit. If a homeowner would like a fox trapped, there are several trappers who can be hired for a fee to the homeowner and a list can be found on the DEC Web site listed under NWCO.

Further more information can be obtained from the Internet including “www.wildlifehelp.org

Le Roy Police ask that if a citizen sees a fox acting dangerous, sick or injured, please call 9-1-1, so that a police officer can respond and check on the fox.

UPDATE: Jeremiah Russell submitted this picture of a fox on North Street, Le Roy.

foxinleroydec132015.jpg

September 17, 2015 - 12:48pm
posted by Billie Owens in genesee county park & forest, wildlife.

Press release:

Adventure awaits in the forest this fall with nocturnal hikes, flying mammals, and untamed creations!

Owls are amazing, helpful birds of prey! Join us for an Owl Prowl on Saturday, Sept. 26th from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Discover the habits of your nocturnal neighbors and explore the forest at night. Listen for the calls of winged wildlife and the footsteps of stealthy critters. Anything can happen on an owl prowl! Recommended for ages 4 and up.

What animal can fly 60 miles per hour, eliminate up to 1,200 mosquitoes in an hour, and live to be 30 years old? Bats! Explore the world of your local and exotic furry flying friends with Bats in Your Backyard on Saturday, Oct. 17th from 7 to 9 p.m. See awesome pictures and hear about the lives of bats from a local researcher, and venture out on a creatures of the night hike!

Let your imagination run wild at Create-A-Critter on Saturday, Nov. 14th from 1:30 – 2:45 pm. Meet us in the activity room of the Nature Center for an eclectic spread of craft materials gathered from nature. Hot glue and your creativity will put it all together. Your own creation will make the perfect gift!

Pre-registration is required for all programs. Cost is $5/person, $10/family. To register call 344-1122.

To register call (585) 344-1122. For more information visit our website at http://www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/parks/, or contact Shannon Morley at [email protected] or (585) 344-1122.

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