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June 1, 2021 - 8:00am
posted by Press Release in news, COVID-19, Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's.

Press release:

With COVID-19 vaccines becoming more prevalent and a return to public activities, many Americans are looking forward to resuming their lives and returning to normal. This June, during Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is encouraging residents to make brain health an important part of their return to normal. 

“The past year has been extremely challenging for most Americans,” said WNY Chapter Executive Director Jill Horner. “Chronic stress, like that experienced during the pandemic, can impact memory, mood and anxiety. As local residents begin to return to normal, we encourage them to make brain health a priority.”

The WNY Chapter offers these five suggestions to promote brain health and to help residents restore their mental well-being: 

1.     Recommit to Brain-healthy Basics 

Evidence suggests that healthy behaviors took a back seat for many Americans during the pandemic. Gym memberships were put on hiatus, social engagement became more challenging and many Americans swapped out healthful eating for their favorite comfort foods, take-out meals and frequent snacking while working remotely. One study published recently found participants gained nearly 1.5 pounds per month over the past year, on average.

The Alzheimer’s Association — through its U.S. POINTER Study— is examining the role lifestyle interventions, including diet, may play in protecting cognitive function. Right now, many experts agree that people can improve their brain health and reduce the risk of cognitive decline by adopting healthy lifestyle habits, preferably in combination, including: 

  • Exercise regularly— Regular cardiovascular exercise helps increase blood flow to the body and brain, and there is strong evidence that regular physical activity is linked to better memory and thinking. 
  • Maintain a heart-healthy diet— Stick to a meal schedule full of fruits and vegetables to ensure a well-balanced diet. Some evidence suggests a healthful diet is linked to cognitive performance. The Mediterranean and DASH* diets are linked to better cognitive functioning, and help reduce risk of heart disease as well.
  • Get proper sleep— Maintaining a regular, uninterrupted sleep pattern benefits physical and psychological health, and helps clear waste from the brain. Adults should get at least seven hours of sleep each night and try to keep a routine bedtime. 
  • Stay socially and mentally active— Meaningful social engagement may support cognitive health, so stay connected with friends and family. Engage your mind by doing activities that stump you, like completing a jigsaw puzzle or playing strategy games. Or challenge yourself further by learning a new language or musical instrument.

2.     Return to Normal at Your Own Pace

Many Americans are eager for a return to normal life following the pandemic, but others are anxious. In fact, one recent survey found that nearly half of adults (49 percent) report feeling uncomfortable about returning to in-person interactions when the pandemic ends.

For those feeling anxious, the Alzheimer’s Association suggests taking small steps. It may also be important to set boundaries and communicate your preferences to others in your social circles. 

3.     Help Others 

There is evidence to suggest that helping others during the pandemic may not only make you feel better, but it may be good for you as well. Research shows that helping others in a crisis can be an effective way to alleviate stress and anxiety.

One study published during the pandemic found that adults over age 50 who volunteer for about two hours per week have a substantially reduced risk of dying, higher levels of physical activity and an improved sense of well-being.

To help others and yourself during June and throughout the year, volunteer in your community, run errands or deliver meals to a home-bound senior or donate to a favorite cause, such as supporting participants in the Alzheimer’s Association’s The Longest Day event on June 20. 

4.     Unplug and Disconnect

Technology has dominated our daily lives during the pandemic like never before. While technology has kept us connected through COVID-19, it has also created fatigue for many Americans.

Experts warn that excessive stimulation coming from our phones, computers, social media sources and news reports can add to our already heightened anxiety levels. To avoid technology overload, experts advise setting limits on your screen time, avoid carrying your phone everywhere, and disconnecting from digital devices at bedtime. 

5.     Control Your Stress Before it Controls You

In small doses, stress teaches the brain how to respond in healthy ways to the unexpected, inconvenient or unpleasant realities of daily life. Prolonged or repeated stress, however, can wear down and damage the brain, leading to serious health problems including depression, anxiety disorders, memory loss and increased risk for dementia.

Reports indicate that Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers are especially vulnerable to physical and emotional stress. The Alzheimer’s Association offers tips to help manage caregiver stress.

Meditation, exercise, listening to music or returning to a favorite activity you have missed during the pandemic are just some ways to manage stress. Do what works best for you.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has been an overwhelming time for all of us,” Horner said. “It’s important for people to know there are steps we can take to lessen the stress and anxiety we might be feeling. It can be easy to take brain health for granted, but now more than ever, it’s a good idea to make it a priority.”

Currently, the Alzheimer’s Association and representatives from more than 40 countries are working together to study the short- and long-term consequences of COVID-19 on the brain and nervous system in people at different ages, and from different genetic backgrounds.

About Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month

Created by the Alzheimer’s Association in 2014, Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month is dedicated to encouraging a global conversation about the brain and Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia. To learn more about the Alzheimer’s Association, available resources and how you can get involved to support the cause, visit alz.org.

About the Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a worldwide voluntary health organization dedicated to Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to lead the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia®. Visitalz.orgor call 1-800-272-3900.

*DASH -- acronym for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension -- an eating plan to lower or control high blood pressure. It emphasizes foods that are lower in sodium as well as foods that are rich in potassium, magnesium and calcium — nutrients that help lower blood pressure.

September 5, 2020 - 6:24pm

The annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s Saturday Oct. 3 will have much more meaning to people in Pavilion this year.

Not only will participants be walking to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s disease and raise money to combat it, but this will be a great family event, for young and old alike, according to organizer Sam MacAllister, pastor of the Pavilion Baptist Church.

The church’s involvement came about because of Linda Starkey, a lifelong member of the church, whose mother and brother were affected by the disease.

“This is my fourth year of being involved in the Alzheimer’s Walk,” Starkey said. “I turned 80 in July, and I walk with a walker, but I still participate. It is very important to me that we find a cure.”

Last year Starkey walked in Batavia with 250 other walkers, but because of COVID-19 this year, the walk can’t be done that way.

“We are all walking in our own communities, and here in Pavilion, my pastor is coordinating everything,” Starkey said. 

“This seemed like the perfect event to get the community back together after this pandemic,” Pastor MacAllister said. “We will distribute water and snacks in a safe way.”

The pastor said he was thrilled with Starkey’s dedication and happy to support her cause.

“This is a really important cause for her,” MacAllister said. “She tries to build her strength ahead of time. She has a very youthful spirit and is highly determined. Her friends are doing everything to keep her safe and see that she succeeds.”

Starkey’s friend Pat Wolcott has committed to walk with her, and they welcome anyone to join their team. Participants may donate to the cause, but it is not necessary.

MacAllister has chosen a route through town on streets with sidewalks, so everyone will be safe. The walk will begin at 9 a.m. Oct. 3 at the gazebo in the town park.

Participants may sign up on the website at pavilionwalk.com, but it is not required.

Photo: Linda Starkey, right, and her friend Pat Wolcott will be walking Oct. 3 in an Alzheimer’s Walk in Pavilion. Starkey, who turned 80 in July, is passionate about supporting the cause, as both her mother and brother were stricken with Alzheimer’s. Photo by Virginia Kropf.

September 26, 2019 - 12:19pm

Submitted photo and press release:

Bergen -- On Saturday, Sept. 21, student athletes from Byron-Bergen and Caledonia-Mumford joined more than 400 other participants on the Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Batavia.

This year, the Byron-Bergen Varsity Football Team was joined by members of the Byron-Bergen Girls Varsity Soccer Team.

The football and soccer players’ combined efforts raised more than $900 for the Alzheimer's Association, Western New York Chapter.

Byron-Bergen’s participation in this annual event began three years ago when the combined Caledonia-Mumford/Byron-Bergen Varsity Football Team decided to take part.

“In the past, the team used to do a cancer walk, but our soccer teams do a cancer fundraiser, so we thought itwould be good to give to a different organization,” said Byron-Bergen senior and varsity football co-captain Bryce Yockel.

The team raised money, but they also raised awareness.

“We made posters in honor of different community members affected by the disease that we posted around the area," said Byron-Bergen senior and varsity football player Alex Dean. "We made one for my grandfather who has Alzheimer’s.”

“I’m proud to walk with members of our football and soccer teams,” said Byron-Bergen High School Principal Pat McGee. “They’re great kids supporting a great cause.”

“It’s really about the feel good part,” Yockel said. “It’s helping people who are struggling and can’t do anything about it. A lot of the people who are in the walk are older, a lot of them are walking for themselves, so it feels good to support them.”

All together, the day’s event raised more than $40,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association and 441 people participated.

Photo: Members of the Caledonia-Mumford/Byron-Bergen Raiders Varsity Football Team with Byron-Bergen High School Principal Pat McGee (bottom left).

August 14, 2019 - 2:32pm

From the Alzheimer's Association of WNY:

The Batavia Walk to End Alzheimer’s will take place on Saturday, Sept. 21.

It is part of the global Walk to End Alzheimer’s -- the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research.

On Saturday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to noon, approximately 750 individuals from the greater Genesee County area — family members, caregivers, employers, friends and persons living with dementia — will honor all those impacted by the disease and fight for a world without Alzheimer’s.

Premier Genesee Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation at 278 Bank St. in Batavia is hosting the event, which begins and ends there.

Proceeds from the walk ensure the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter can continue to provide supportive services and education at no cost, while raising awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and Association services all across the Genesee Valley.

While there is no fee to register or participate, we strongly encourage participants to fundraise to contribute to the cause and the Chapter offers a number of tools and materials to help with fundraising.

The Center’s outdoor park offers space to enjoy snacks and refreshments, visit with local vendors, and buy basket and 50/50 raffle tickets, while the roughly two-mile walk route offers a pleasant stroll through a lovely neighborhood.

Register today at alz.org/Walk and start fundraising to earn terrific incentives, including the 2019 purple Walk T-shirt.

Please call (716) 626-0600 or 800-272-3900 with any questions.

July 29, 2019 - 3:35pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, Seniors, dementia, aging, news, batavia, Le Roy, indian falls.

Press release:

Do you know the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia? Learn the facts during a free educational program in Batavia."Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia" is a free program that will be presented by experts with the Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 6.

The Genesee County Office of Aging at 2 Bank Street will host the class.

While Alzheimer’s disease currently cannot be prevented or slowed, there are steps to take and recommendations to follow in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise and cognitive activity that promote healthy aging.

Learn more during a free educational program offered by dementia experts at the Chapter in August. "Healthy Living for your Brain and Body" will be presented at 1 p.m. at the New York State Veterans Home at 220 Richmond Ave. in Batavia on Monday, Aug. 12.

Registration is required for both programs by calling the Chapter office during traditional business hours at (716) 626-0600, ext. 313, or 24-hours a day, 7-days a week at 800-272-3900.

Additionally, the Chapter oversees several monthly caregiver support group meetings across the county, which allow caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them:

  • 3rd Wednesday (Aug. 21) at 7 p.m. – Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St. in Batavia
  • 3rd Thursday (Aug. 22) at 1 p.m. – Genesee County Office for the Aging, 12 Bank St. in Batavia
  • 2nd Monday (Aug. 12) at 2 p.m. – The Greens of Le Roy, 1 West Ave. in Le Roy

Community social programs, or respites, are also available every month in Batavia and Corfu. This program provides relief to those who care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and offers them some time to refresh and recharge, while their loved one is engaged in social activities in a safe environment.

First Presbyterian Church of Batavia offers this free service on the fourth Monday (Aug. 26) from 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. For additional information, please call Mickey Rodak at (585) 455-5940.

Local residents now have a second Batavia location for this service. On the second Monday of each month (Aug. 12) St. James Episcopal Church at 405 E. Main St. will offer a four-hour program, starting at 10:30 a.m. Those interested in this respite should call Barbara King at (585) 343-6802.

Indian Falls United Methodist Church at 7908 Allegany Road offers a respite program on the third Wednesday (Aug. 21) from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call Celinda McQuiston at (585) 762-9105.

To learn more about other Alzheimer’s Association programs and services, contact the WNY Chapter office at 800-272-3900.

You can also access dementia care programs and resources by calling the Genesee County Office for the Aging at (585) 343-1611.

March 2, 2019 - 1:54pm

Press release:

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter is offering a number of free programs and supportive services across Genesee County in March.

Chapter dementia educators will present "Effective Communication Strategies" at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 13, at The Manor House at 427 E. Main St. in Batavia.

This program is ideal for care partners of those living with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia, as it offers verbal and nonverbal strategies for caregivers to more effectively understand and communicate. Dinner will also be served, so preregistration is required by calling 1.800.272.3900 or 716.626.0600.

Additionally, the Chapter trains facilitators to lead several monthly caregiver support groups across the county, which allow caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them:

  • Third Wednesday (March 20) at 7 p.m. – Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St. in Batavia
  • Third Thursday (March 21) at 1 p.m. – Genesee County Office for the Aging, 12 Bank St. in Batavia
  • Second Monday (March 11) at 2 p.m. – The Greens of Le Roy, 1 West Ave. in Le Roy

Community social programs, or respites, are also available every month in Batavia and Corfu. This program provides relief to those who care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and offers them some time to refresh and re-charge, while their loved one is engaged in social activities in a safe environment.

First Presbyterian Church of Batavia offers this free service on the fourth Monday (March 25) from 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. For additional information, please call Mickey Rodak at (585) 455-5940.

Indian Falls United Methodist Church at 7908 Allegany Road offers a respite program on the third Wednesday (March 20) from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call Celinda McQuiston at (585) 762-9105. 

To learn more about other Alzheimer’s Association programs and services, contact the WNY Chapter office at 1.800.272.3900.

You can also access dementia care programs and resources by calling the Genesee County Office for the Aging at 585.343.1611.

November 21, 2018 - 12:55pm

Press release:

Holiday visits to older loved ones may raise questions about a person’s physical and cognitive health, especially if it’s been a while since the last visit. Although some change in cognitive ability can occur with age, memory problems that impact daily living are not a part of typical aging.

Recognizing the difference between typical aging and potentially more serious problems can help identify when it may be time to see a doctor.

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter is an excellent resource for those with questions about typical age-related memory lapses and indications of more serious cognitive impairment.

The Chapter offers free educational programs that include a discussion of the 10 Warning Signs:

  • memory loss that disrupts daily life -- forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events;
  • challenges in planning or solving problems, such as trouble following a familiar recipe; 
  • difficulty completing familiar tasks, such as a budget or playing a favorite game;
  • confusion with time or place, including losing track of the seasons;
  • trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships, including trouble reading or recognizing the face in the mirror;
  • new problems with words in speaking or writing, including repetitive conversations;
  • misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps, or accusing others of stealing items they can’t find;
  • decreased or poor judgment, such as giving large amounts of money to telemarketers;
  • withdrawal from work or social activities, or lack of interest in sports;
  • changes in mood and personality that can include confusion, suspicion, depression, fear or anxiety.

Every year around the 2017 Thanksgiving holiday, the Alzheimer’s Association sees increases in calls to its 24-hour Helpline (800.272.3900), as people visit with friends and family they may not see as frequently during the year. That phone line is always staffed by trained experts, who provide confidential consultations around-the-clock, andthis holiday season will be no different.

Those with questions or concerns about memory lapses or behavioral changes in their loved ones will find compassionate people who can answer questions or listen to concerns at any time of the day or night through the long holiday weekend. Information can also be found online at www.alz.org/wny.

Experts from the WNY Chapter are also available to arrange private, in-person consultations via that same toll-free number: 800.272.3900.

About the Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

About the Western New York Chapter
The local Chapter provides programs, services and other resources for those living with dementia, their care partners, healthcare professionals and the public across eight counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming. You can learn more by calling (716) 626.0600 during traditional business hours or 24/7 at 1.800.272.3900 or visiting online at alz.org/WNY

September 15, 2018 - 8:00am
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, dementia, Seniors, Le Roy, corfu, batavia, indian falls, news.

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter is partnership with Le Roy Village Green in Le Roy to offer a series of free educational programs this fall.

All classes will begin at 7 p.m. in The Greens facility at 10 Munson St. in Le Roy.

"Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia" kicks off the three-part series on Oct. 2. This educational program covers the basics about the disease and related dementias.

On Nov. 6, the second program, "Effective Communication Strategies," will help care partners of those living with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia identify verbal and non-verbal strategies to more effectively understand and communicate.

The final program, "Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behaviors," is set for Dec. 4. The program helps care partners recognize that behavior is a powerful form of communication and is one of the primary ways for people with Alzheimer’s disease to communicate their needs and feelings as the ability to use language is lost. However, some behaviors can present realchallenges for caregivers to manage. It will cover some common struggles and offer sound strategies to address them.

Additionally, the Chapter trains facilitators to lead several monthly caregiver support groups across the county, which allow caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them:

  • 3rd Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. – Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St. in Batavia
  • 3rd Thursday at 1 p.m. – Genesee County Office for the Aging, 12 Bank St. in Batavia
  • 2nd Monday at 2 p.m. – The Greens of Le Roy, 1 West Ave. in Le Roy

Telephone Support Group:

  • 2nd Wednesday from 12:10-12:55 p.m. – For more information, call the Genesee County Office for the Aging at (585) 343-1611.

Respite Available for Caregivers:

A community social program, or respite, is also available every month in Corfu. This program provides relief to those who care for individuals with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia and offers them some time to refresh and recharge, while their loved one is engaged in social activities in a safe environment.

Indian Falls United Methodist Church at 7908 Allegany Road offers a respite service on the third Wednesday of every month. For more information, call Celinda McQuiston at (585) 762-9105.

To learn more about other Alzheimer’s Association programs and services, contact the WNY Chapter office at 1.800.272.3900.

July 28, 2018 - 3:49pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, Seniors, Health Care, respite, news, batavia, Le Roy, corfu, Oakfield.

Press release:

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter is offering a number of programs and services across Genesee County in August. These programs are free and open to the public.

Haxton Memorial Library at 3 North Pearl Street in Oakfield will host "Know the Ten Warning Signs: Early Detection Matters" at 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 29.

This program will focus on recognizing potential warning signs of memory problems because early diagnosis is critical to ensure that families can plan for the future together, take advantage of available resources and take part in social engagement programs where they can interact and connect with others facing similar challenges.

Additionally, the Chapter trains facilitators to lead several monthly caregiver support groups across the county, which allow caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them:

Batavia:

  • 3rd  Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. – Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St.
  • 3rd Thursday at 1 p.m. – Genesee County Office for the Aging, 12 Bank St.

Le Roy:

  • 2nd Monday at 2 p.m. – The Greens of Le Roy, 1 West Ave.

Telephone Support Group:

  • 2nd Wednesday from 12:10-12:55 p.m. – For more information, call the Genesee County Office for the Aging at (585) 343-1611

A community social program, or respite, is also available every month in Corfu. This program provides relief to those who care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and offers them some time to refresh and recharge, while their loved one is engaged in social activities in a safe environment.

Indian Falls United Methodist Church at 7908 Allegany Road offers a respite service on the 3rd Wednesday of every month. For more information, call Celinda McQuiston at (585) 762-9105.

To learn more about other Alzheimer’s Association programs and services, contact the WNY Chapter office at 1.800.272.3900.

June 5, 2018 - 1:57pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, Announcements, The Manor House, Alzheimer's.

Press release:

A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease makes planning for the future a very important task for families. Concerns about care planning and programs that can help offset costs mean that families need accurate information about legal and financial matters specific to the disease.

"Legal and Financial Planning for Alzheimer’s Disease" is an opportunity to learn about important legal and financial issues to consider, how to put plans in place and how to access legal and financial resources in the community.

The Alzheimer’s Association WNY Chapter is offering the program at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 13, at the The Manor House at 427 E. Main St. in Batavia, which is also providing an American Sign Language interpreter and a light meal.

Topics to be discussed during the 90-minute program include:

  • Making legal plans that fit individual and family needs;
  • Legal documents and what they mean;
  • How to find legal and financial assistance;
  • Practical strategies for making a long-term plan of care;
  • Government programs that can help pay for care.

The program is free and open to the public, but seating reservations are requested by calling 1-800-272-3900.

May 24, 2018 - 12:58pm

Press release:

During the month of June, designated by the Alzheimer’s Association® as Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, you can take advantage of a free educational program being offered by the Association’s Western New York Chapter.

A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease makes planning for the future a very important task for families. Concerns about care planning and programs that can help offset costs mean that families need accurate information about legal and financial matters specific to the disease.

"Legal and Financial Planning for Alzheimer’s Disease" is an opportunity to learn about important legal and financial issues to consider, how to put plans in place and how to access legal and financial resources in the community.

The Alzheimer’s Association WNY Chapter is offering the program on Wednesday, June 13, at 4:30 p.m. in The Manor House at 427 E. Main St. in Batavia. A light meal will also be provided.

Topics to be discussed include:

• Making legal plans that fit individual and family needs;

• Legal documents and what they mean;

• How to find legal and financial assistance;

• Practical strategies for making a long-term plan of care;

• Government programs that can help pay for care;

The program is free and open to the public, but seating reservations are requested by calling 1-800-272-3900.

March 28, 2018 - 1:45pm
posted by Billie Owens in Oakfield, dementia, Alzheimer's, Announcements, aging.

Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It is a progressive and fatal brain disease that is the most common form of dementia.

“The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease” is a free class presented by the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter for anyone who would like to know more about the disease and related dementias. In Genesee County, the program will be offered in April in Oakfield.

  • April 4 at 5:30 p.m. at Haxton Memorial Library, 3 N. Pearl St., Oakfield

Attendees will learn:  

  • Symptoms and effects of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia;
  • How Alzheimer’s affects the brain;
  • Causes and risk factors;
  • How to find out if it’s Alzheimer’s disease;
  • The benefits of early detection;
  • Treatment;
  • Resources in your community, including the Alzheimer’s Association WNY Chapter.  

There is no cost to attend this public presentation, but registration is encouraged by calling 1.800.272.3900.

January 6, 2018 - 2:06pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, dementia, mental health, batavia, news, Announcements.

Press release:

Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It is a progressive and fatal brain disease that is the most common form of dementia.

“The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease” is a free class presented by the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter for anyone who would like to know more about the disease and related dementias.

The program will be offered at The Manor House (427 E. Main St.) in Batavia at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 10.

Attendees will learn:  

  • Symptoms and effects of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia
  • How Alzheimer’s affects the brain
  • Causes and risk factors
  • How to find out if it’s Alzheimer’s disease 
  • The benefits of early detection
  • Treatment
  • Resources in your community, including the Alzheimer’s Association WNY Chapter  

There is no cost to attend this public presentation, but registration is encouraged by calling 1.800.272.3900.

November 12, 2017 - 4:59pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, Announcements, Alzheimer's, dementia.

Press release:

Providing care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease can be stressful and isolating, but support groups can provide coping tools and a welcoming embrace from others in the same position.

The Alzheimer's Association Western New York chapter oversees close to three dozen monthly caregiver support groups across the region, including three in the GLOW (Genesee, Livingston, Orleans, Wyoming counties) region.

The groups meet monthly, and are designed to provide emotional and social support for caregivers and help participants develop methods and skills to solve problems.

These are the GLOW region meetings:

  • Albion
    2nd Tuesday, 6 p.m., Hoag Library, 134 S. Main St.
  • Batavia
    3rd Wednesday, 7 p.m., Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St.
  • Warsaw
    1st Monday, 10 a.m., Wyoming County Office of the Aging, 5 Perry Ave.

Information about all the other support group meetings that take place across WNY is available by visiting the chapter’s website at alz.org/WNY or by calling 1.800.272.3900.

September 11, 2017 - 4:01pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, Seniors, health, news, Announcements.

Submitted photos and press release:

Holly Eschberger, of Le Roy, has not only been participating by fundraising and walking in the Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s®, she has been an active member of the Batavia Walk planning committee for several years.

This year's event is Saturday, Sept. 23 and close to 850 people are expected to participate and their goal is to raise $76,000, which supports the free programs and services of the local Chapter, as well as vital research.

“I don't think people understand that you actually die from Alzheimer’s," Eschberger said. "It is not just part of aging. You lose your loved one emotionally/mentally long before you lose them physically and it is absolutely devastating.

"I got involved with the Walk as a way to honor my grandma who I lost to Alzheimer’s. I'm inspired by the coming together of friends and families that have this common thread of watching a loved one decline with Alzheimer’s. It is heart wrenching, but it's also comforting to be surrounded by so many people who understand.”

Eschberger named her walk team “Erma’s Army” after her beloved grandmother (inset photo, above right). Holly’s team and hundreds of others provide a vital source of financial support for the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter, which offers free programs and resources for all those facing the challenge of dementia in the eight-county WNY region.

Participating in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s is free, but fundraising is encouraged, with incentives awarded when various goals are met, such as an official purple walk T-shirt earned when individual fundraising reaches $100. A percentage of all funds raised are earmarked for research, to ensure that one day, there will be a first survivor of Alzheimer’s disease. A higher percentage of funds stays in WNY, to ensure continuing access to free education, consultations, support and social programs for all impacted by dementia.

The Batavia Walk takes place on the grounds of the Premier Genesee Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation at 278 Bank St. The site opens at 9 a.m. with snacks and refreshments, photo area, entertainment and access to basket and 50/50 raffles. A brief ceremony launches the walk at 10 a.m. and participants will head out on the approximately two-mile route at about 10:15 a.m. Additional entertainment, such as well-known cartoon characters and a "bubble brigade" will pop up along the way, with more food when walkers return to the main site.

Individuals and teams can register, join a team or donate on-line at alz.org/WNY/walk, by calling 1.800.272.3900 or in person the morning of the walk.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s is made possible locally through the support of several WNY companies, including Batavia Health Care Center, The Manor House and United Healthcare.

Below are members of "Erma's Army."

August 31, 2017 - 5:26pm
posted by Billie Owens in Le Roy, Alzheimer's, news, Announcements.

Press release:

Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It is a progressive and fatal brain disease that is the most common form of dementia.

“The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease” is a free class presented by the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter for anyone who would like to know more about the disease and related dementias.

The program will be offered in Le Roy at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 14 at Woodward Memorial Library at 7 Wolcott St.

Attendees will learn:  

  • Symptoms and effects of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia
  • How Alzheimer’s affects the brain
  • Causes and risk factors
  • How to find out if it’s Alzheimer’s disease
  • The benefits of early detection
  • Treatment
  • Resources in your community, including the Alzheimer’s Association WNY Chapter  

There is no cost to attend this public presentation, but reservations are encouraged by calling 1.800.272.3900.

May 17, 2017 - 4:30pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, Announcements.

Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It is a progressive and fatal brain disease that is the most common form of dementia.

“The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease” is a free class, presented by the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter, for anyone who would like to know more about the disease and related dementias.

The program will be offered at 5 p.m. on Thursday, June 1, in the Pavilion Fire Department Recreation Hall at 11302 S. Lake St. in Pavilion

Attendees will learn:

  • Symptoms and effects of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia;
  • How Alzheimer’s affects the brain;
  • Causes and risk factors;
  • How to find out if it’s Alzheimer’s disease;
  • The benefits of early detection;
  • Treatment;
  • Resources in your community, including the Alzheimer’ Association WNY Chapter.

There is no cost to attend this public presentation, but registration is requested by calling 1.800.272.3900.

October 15, 2016 - 3:51pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, dementia, batavia, healthcare, aging, news, Announcements.

A Dementia Care Conference for families and loved ones will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27, at Terry Hills Restaurant & Banquet Facility in Batavia.

It is free and open to the public but registration is required. Call 1-800-272-3900 to register.

Terry Hills is located at 5122 Clinton Street Road.

The event is offered by the WNY Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association and it is sponsored, in part, by a grant from the New York State Department of Health.

Vendor tables and sponsorship opportunities are available.

There are three areas of focus:

  1. The Basics of Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia
  2. Legal & Financial Planning for Dementia
  3. Caregiver Resources
July 28, 2016 - 3:06pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, news, batavia.

(Submitted photo of Jake Oberg.)

Press release:

The Alzheimer's Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s, the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research, will be heading to Warsaw this October. 

The Batavia walk will take place at the Genesee County Nursing Home, located at 278 Bank St., Batavia, on Satruday, Sept. 24. On-line registration is available now at alz.org/WNY. On-site registration and check-in, basket and 50/50 raffles, and refreshments will be available from 9 to 10 a.m. with a brief opening ceremony to launch the Walk at 10.

The walks are organized by the local Alzheimer’s Association and are a vital source of funding for local services and resources. The walks also provide funding for research into a disease that “kills more people than breast and prostate cancers combined,” and touches almost 250,000 people across the greater Buffalo Niagara region.

“My grandpa died of Alzheimer’s...and I walk with my mom because I don’t think anyone else should lose their grandpa to this disease,” said Jake Oberg. 

The 11-year-old has been taking part in the event since before he could walk. Additionally, he has raised more than $7,000 with a lemonade stand and baked goods sale to support his Walk team, which has also earned him some special incentives.

In addition to fundraising participants, the Walks rely on hundreds of volunteers and the support of corporate sponsors like Elderwood. Eighty-five percent of residents in skilled care facilities exhibit at least some form of dementia including Alzheimer’s.

“Understanding firsthand the personal and health care ramifications of dementia, Elderwood has a long-standing history of supporting the Alzheimer’s Association through its Walk to end this disease,” said Elderwood Director of Business Development Anna Bojarczuk-Foy. “Finding a cure is one of the single most important goals in extending and improving the lives of the elderly in our communities.”

“Northtown Automotive is very proud to continue to support the mission set forth by the Alzheimer’s Association WNY Chapter. We understand the importance of supporting our community and have done so for over 45 years,” said Northtown Auto Group Chief Marketing Officer Mike Ahern. “Doing our part to support the Walk is a way for our organization to make a difference to thousands and thousands of WNY families who know the impact of this disease. We are confident these efforts will one day find a cure."

Additional corporate sponsors include the law firm of Cellino and Barnes, WDCX Radio and Tim Hortons. 

For more information or to register call 1-800-272-3900 or visit alz.org/WNY.

May 13, 2016 - 1:56pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's, dementia, news, Announcements.

Press release:

Providing care for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease can be stressful and isolating, but support groups can provide coping tools and a welcome embrace from others in the same position.

The Alzheimer's Association Western New York chapter sponsors a number of caregiver support groups across the eight-county region it serves.

In Batavia, the chapter organizes a caregiver support group meeting starting at 7 p.m. on the third Wednesday of every month at Richmond Memorial Library, located at 19 Ross St. in the City of Batavia.

This group and others like it are designed to help participants deveklop methods and skills to solve problems. The groups encourage caregivers to maintain their own personal, physical and emotional health, as well as optimally care for the person with dementia.

Visit WHY chapter's Web site at  alz.org/WNY or call 1-800-272-3900.

Also, on summer solstice, the longest day of the year, Alzheimer's Association supporters and groups take part in a day-long fundraising effort called The Longest Day. It's June 20.

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