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agriculture

October 2, 2019 - 12:24am
posted by Howard B. Owens in hemp, agriculture, news, Basom, video.
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Hemp could be big business in Western New York, the way Sen. Chuck Schumer sees it, but right now bank regulators are standing in the way.

As part of the most recent Farm Bill, Schumer teamed up with Sen. Mitch McConnell to take hemp off the list of Schedule I drugs and make growing it for cultivation legal. Farmers can even qualify for crop insurance when they grow it.

But banks have been unwilling to extend credit to farmers who want to start or expand hemp operations.

Today, Schumer was at Mills Family Farm on Ham Road in Basom to announce a new push by his office to get bank regulators to hurry up and write guidelines for banks seeking to do business with hemp growers.

"Hemp is harmless and in fact it's useful," Schumer said. "It's a very versatile and vital crop and it has much, much less THC, which is the active ingredient in marijuana, than marijuana."

He said besides producing CDB oil, it's used in cosmetics, construction materials, side doors of cars, and several other uses, he said.

"You know, everyone thought hemp was just for ropes but it is for much more," Schumer said.

Banks want to lend to hemp farmers, he said, but they're worried about getting in trouble with banking regulators, because of the association with marijuana, without specific, written guidelines.

"They know it's profitable loaning lending for them but they need this clearance from the regulators and today I am starting a major push to get the regulators to put out their guidelines about lending to hemp farms," Schumer said.

Brad Mills started growing hemp this year but he said without access to credit, it will be hard to expand hemp acreage next year, and hemp, in the current market, has attractive profit margins.

"On a small family farm, we had the equipment, we obviously had the land -- some of the best land in the state, and I would argue the nation for growing hemp at our disposal  -- but as we began to move along we saw obstacles," Mills said. "We really do need financing for things and that includes sophisticated equipment for the growing of hemp that a corn or dairy farmer just doesn't have along with that, the costs of buying clones, buying seeds, buying sprouting equipment to get those seeds going.

"None of that your average small dairy farmer or crop farmer would have. And that's very necessary equipment for moving forward in this industry. Our profits from this year's crop likely won't be enough to both establish that equipment and then move forward with a larger planting from next year. So we really need financing in place for that.

"And beyond that, you know moving forward, there's a real shortage of drying and processing facilities in the state as well. As we advance this farm ideally in the future, we would like to get into our own drying and processing. But you know these are all obstacles to overcome. We need financing."

September 20, 2019 - 11:43am

Press release:

Washington, D.C. -- U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued the following statement today (Sept. 20) highlighting actions announced by the Department of Labor (DOL) which will modernize the burdensome H2A visa process.

First, DOL published a common-sense rule that eliminates the requirement to advertise a job opening in print newspapers, instead shifting to advertising on the DOL and State Workforce Agency websites, which are further reaching and more cost effective. Also, DOL’s Office of Foreign Labor Certification announced updates to the pertinent H-2A forms and online filing process for the H-2A temporary agricultural program.

These two actions will ease regulatory burdens on our farmers and ranchers, making it easier for them to follow the law and hire farm workers through the H-2A program.

“Both of these actions by DOL are critical changes the Administration is making to improve the H-2A application process,” Secretary Perdue said. “President Trump is committed to ensuring our farmers and producers have access to a stable, legal agricultural workforce.

"By streamlining these processes, DOL is bringing the H-2A process into the 21st century allowing farmers to be able to better and cost-effectively advertise for workers they need and fill out the required forms faster and more efficiently, because no one should have to hire a lawyer to hire a farm worker. I commend President Trump for his continued support of America’s farmers, ranchers and producers.”

Background:

In addition to making it easier for Americans to find and fill open jobs, the Final Rule will reduce regulatory burdens like the requirement that all employers advertise in a print newspaper of general circulation in the area of intended employment as the method of recruitment. Department of Labor’s system updates increase ease of use for farmers and producers who apply for H-2A employees.

As any employer knows, hiring forms, applications and rules are cumbersome, time intensive, and duplicative that lack flexibility and common sense. These changes demonstrate the Trump Administration’s commitment to releasing the regulatory burden from our agricultural producers, making it easier for them to hire a stable and legal workforce. The more time a farmer spends on paperwork, the less productive they are, hurting their business and way of life.

DOL’s new labor application process modernizes two forms by making them electronic forms, removing time intensive paper applications that require delivery via mailing. The Department of Labor will continue to accept online submissions of the current Form ETA-9142A (and job orders uploaded using the current Form ETA-790, Agricultural and Food Processing Clearance Order) through the iCERT System until Oct. 16.

Beginning Oct. 1, an employer seeking to employ emergency, H-2A workers or those starting on or after Dec. 15 must submit a job order using the new form ETA-790/790A (and corresponding addendums) and an H-2A application using the new form ETA-9142A (and corresponding appendices) in the FLAG System.For more information, visit DOL’s Foreign Labor Application Gateway(FLAG) page.

DOL’s Electronic Recruitment Rule rescinds the requirements to advertise a job opening in the newspaper, expands and enhances electronic job register, and uses State Workforce Agencies to promote job openings.

September 17, 2019 - 11:26am

Press release:

The checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program has launched a new training and certification program for cattle transportation.

The program, known as Beef Quality Assurance Transportation (BQAT), provides cattle producers and haulers with comprehensive training based on their roles in the cattle industry. Two in-person trainings will be offered this Fall in partnership with Empire Livestock Marketing.

On Tuesday, Oct. 8th from 6 to 9 p.m. a training will be held at the Pavilion Empire Livestock Market located at 357 Lake Street, Pavilion. The training is free to all attendees thanks to support from Cargill.

The three-hour long training will include a classroom session, meal, and update on trailer inspections and common violations from the New York State Troopers.

“By educating cattle haulers and producers on the best practices in cattle transportation, BQA is helping make improvements in cattle care and beef quality," said Chase DeCoite, director of Beef Quality Assurance for NCBA, a contractor to the beef checkoff.

"Participating in BQA Transportation will be an indicator that the beef and dairy industries are committed to responsible animal care during transportation and makes both the BQA and dairy FARM animal care programs more complete.” 

The BQA program was first funded by the beef checkoff in the early 1990s and developed its first guidance on transportation in 2006. Today, the program offers training and certification programs for all sectors of the industry: cow-calf, stocker and feedyard.

This is the first time a nationally recognized certification has been offered for the transportation segment of the industry.

To learn more about the trainings visit www.nybeef.org under Farmer’s Fencepost. Preregistration is required by Oct. 4 to plan for materials and meals. Contact Katherine Brosnan, [email protected] or call the NYBC office at 315-339-6922.

To learn more about your beef checkoff investment, visit MyBeefCheckoff.com or www.nybeef.org.

September 12, 2019 - 5:14pm
posted by Billie Owens in agriculture, business, farmers, 2015 WOTUS rule.

New York farmers, Congressman Chris Collins and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue applaud today's announcement that the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers have agreed to rescind the 2015 Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule.

From the New York Farm Bureau:

Repeal of the 2015 Waters of the United States rule is a victory for clean water and clear rules, according to New York Farm Bureau.

“Farmers share the goal of protecting the nation’s water, but the 2015 Waters of the United States rule was unreasonable and unworkable,” said New York Farm Bureau President David Fisher.

“It made protecting water quality and conservation efforts more difficult and created huge liabilities for farmers, especially when what waters would be regulated under the old rule could not be clearly defined. This turned farming into a guessing game on which land use required federal permits and what did not.”

The administration’s repeal announcement follows a multi-year effort by the American Farm Bureau, New York Farm Bureau and an array of allies to raise awareness of overreaching provisions of the rule.

“No regulation is perfect, and no rule can accommodate every concern, but the 2015 rule was especially egregious,” Fisher said. “We are relieved to put it behind us. We are now working to ensure a fair and reasonable substitute that protects our water and our ability to work and care for the land.”

From Congressman Chris Collins:

Congressman Chris Collins (NY-27) praised EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler’s signing of the repeal of the Obama-Era Clean Water Rule, commonly known as the, “Waters of the United States.”

The signing of the repeal is part of a two-step process ordered by President Donald Trump in February 2017. This first step overturns the Obama-era regulation and reenacts rules established prior to 2015. The second step of process is for the EPA to propose a replacement rule, which is expected before the end of this year.

“This was nothing more than a giant power grab by the Obama Administration that had real and harmful consequences on America’s hardworking farmers and small business owners,” Congressman Collins said.

“This rule has serious implications for our local farmers, it allows bureaucrats to determine if small divots or puddles were considered ‘navigable waters’. President Trump made a promise to farmers across the nation and I applaud him for keeping it by repealing these outrageous regulations. &rdquo

In 2014, Congressman Collins attempted to block the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) from expanding federal control under the Clean Water Act by leading a letter to the EPA Administrator and the Department of Army Secretary urging them not the move forward. A majority of Congress signed on to Congressman Collins’ letter.

Congressman Collins additionally was a cosponsor of H.R. 5078, the Waters of the United States Regulatory Overreach Protection Act, which would prevent the EPA and the Army Corp of Engineers from implementing the proposed rule that would redefine “waters of the United States” under the Clean Water Act. This legislation passed in the House but was not taken up in the Senate.

The repeal is expected to be challenged in court by a number of environmental groups.

From U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue:

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today praised the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for taking another step to fulfill President Trump’s pledge to repeal and replace the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule.

“Repealing the WOTUS rule is a major win for American agriculture. The extreme overreach from the past Administration had government taking the productivity of the land people had worked for years,” Secretary Perdue said.

“Farmers and ranchers are exceptional stewards of the land, taking great care to preserve it for generations to come. President Trump is making good on his promise to reduce burdensome regulations to free our producers to do what they do best – feed, fuel, and clothe this nation and the world.” 

Background:

One of President Trump’s earliest acts in office was an Executive Order directing EPA and the Army Corps to review and potentially replace the Obama Administration’s definition of the “Waters of the United States.”

The EPA and the Army Corps have repealed the 2015 Rule that impermissibly expanded the definition of “Waters of the United States” under the Clean Water Act.

The agencies upcoming action will restore the regulatory text that existed prior to the 2015 Rule and will end the inconsistent regulatory patchwork that has created uncertainty and has hindered projects from moving forward that can benefit both the environment and the economy.

The repeal remedies the legal and procedural deficiencies of the 2015 Rule, addresses the extensive litigation surrounding it, and recodifies and restores a regulatory process that has been in place for years. The new rule will provide regulatory certainty to our nation's farmers and businesses as to the definition of “Waters of the United States.”

To learn more about EPA’s WOTUS Rule, click here.

September 12, 2019 - 4:21pm

Information from New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health:

Genesee County is one of the state's top five farming counties by sales, with more acreage dedicated to corn for grain and silage than any other local crop. And this is the time of year motorists can expect to begin sharing the road more frequently with tractors, combines and other farm equipment.

So it's an especially good time to pay attention on rural roads to reduce the likelihood of accidents.

A fatal accident involving farm equipment occurred this year in Genesee County. In any given year, there are also accidents here involving farm equipment and motorists that result in minor or serious injuries.

Though only 19 out of every 100 Americans live in rural areas, more than half of fatal roadway accidents take place in rural areas, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that agriculture, forestry, and fishing as an occupational group has the third highest rate of work-related roadway crashes.

Collisions involving tractors and other farm equipment are the deadliest rural road accidents in New York.

In fact, crashes involving agricultural vehicles were found to be five times more fatal than that of non-ag crashes, according to the Rural Road Accident Study by the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH).

The study was funded by Columbia University Center for Injury Science and Prevention and published recently in the Journal of Agromedicine. It was conducted because although agriculture-related crashes have been explored in the Midwest and South, little was known about agriculture-related crashes in the Northeast, specifically in New York.

NYCAMH released its findings this week in advance of National Farm Safety & Health Week (Sept. 15-21) and as the harvest season approaches.

For the study, electronic records from the NYS Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) Accident Reports (MV-104) for 2010-2012 were analyzed. Agricultural cases were identified using variables for the vehicle body type and vehicle registration.

During this three-year time frame, NYCAMH researchers identified 203 agriculture-related accidents involving 381 vehicles and 482 people.

Of the agriculture incidents, 91.6 property caused property damage, while 36 percent caused injury.

Incidents involving farm vehicles or equipment tended to be more severe than non-ag crashes in terms of the number of vehicles involved, the extent of the injuries, and the number of resulting deaths.

Of the agriculture-related incidents, the most common event was a collision with another vehicle (80.8 percent). The second most common was a collision with a fixed object such as a ditch or embankment (10.3 percent), followed by an overturn/non-collision event (3.4 percent).

Poor weather conditions were rarely a factor in these events.

The study found straightaways tend to be most common crash site and crashes on straight roads with a grade were twice as common in ag-related crashes than in non-ag crashes.

NYCAMH deputy director Erika Scott speculates that this is due to non-agriculture vehicles attempting to pass slower-moving agriculture machinery on straightaways.

Although one likes being caught behind a tractor or other slow-moving farm vehicle, waiting a minute or two before you pass could make a lifetime’s difference.

NYCAMH has worked with the New York State Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee on issues surrounding slow-moving vehicle use. These initiatives have brought together the farming community, safety professionals and emergency services to raise awareness of slow-moving vehicles on the roadway.

If you’d like more information on this research, please contact the NYCAMH information specialist at [email protected] The abstract for this article can be found here.

Know the Signs

A bright orange triangle-shaped Slow Moving Vehicle (SMV) emblem, by law, must be mounted on any machinery that travels less than 25 mph on public roads.

NEW: A Speed Identification Symbol (SIS) is newly required by NYS law for equipment that moves between 25 and 40 mph.

Examples of slow-moving vehicles that these regulations apply to include tractors, self-propelled agricultural equipment, implements of husbandry, road construction and maintenance machinery, and animal-powered vehicles.

Seconds Count -- Tips for Sharing the Road with Farm Equipment during the Growing Season:

Motorists:

  • Slow down. The faster you drive, the longer the stopping distance. When speed doubles from 30 mph to 60 mph, the stopping distance more than triples.
  • Never pass with limited visibility or in a no-passing zone.
  • Be alert for farm equipment that may be turning left. Tractors not only turn onto roads or into driveways but can also turn into fields.
  • Slow down and increase following distance if you come upon equipment with an SMV emblem.

Farmers:

  • Machinery must display a slow moving vehicle emblem when traveling under 25 mph. In addition to the SMV emblem, tractors and machinery must also display a speed-appropriate speed identification symbol (SIS) when travelling between 25 and 40 mph. Never exceed the top-rated speed of any trailed implements.
  • Use proper lighting on farm equipment, including flashing amber lights in the front and rear. Use lights and flashers at all times of the day for increased visibility. Use of lights on tractors is required after dark and during times when visibility is reduced under 1000 feet.
  • Stay in the lane, do not drive equipment half on the shoulder and half on the road. A tractor can easily lose control on a soft shoulder. Ditches that parallel most rural NY roadsides can cause potentially fatal rollovers for tractors.

Both:

  • Look down the road as far as possible to be aware of what is coming and increase your warning time. At 60 mph, a vehicle is covering 88 feet per second.
  • Distractions can double your reaction time. Pay attention and keep your phone shut off while driving. Hands-free phones are legal to use but can still be a distraction.

Top photo -- file photo from accident scene on April 13, 2017 on Route 20, Bethany. The wrecked tractor-trailer passed another tractor-trailer on a hill only to come upon a farm tractor towing a manure spreader. The farm tractor had just made a left-hand turn into a driveway, but the manure spreader was still in the roadway and the passing tractor-trailer clipped the rear of it and tore off the spreader's rear axel. Loaded with 80,000 pounds of cargo, the big rig continued off roadway into a guard rail and down a deep culvert into a creek filled with water. The trucker suffered a big bump on his forehead. Citations were issued. They had a lot of manure to clean up on Route 20 as a result of the accident.

Inset photo of SMV/SIS sign and bottom photo on rural road courtesy of New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health.

NYCAMH, a program of Bassett Healthcare Network, is enhancing agricultural and rural health by preventing and treating occupational injury and illness.

September 4, 2019 - 2:50pm
posted by Billie Owens in elba, agriculture, education, stem, Grow Rural Education, news.

Press release:

ELBA -- Elba Central School has been awarded a $10,000 grant to enhance its curriculum for STEM -- Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

By working with farmers, America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education Program, sponsored by the Bayer Fund, awarded $2.3 million in grants nationwide this year to strengthen STEM education in rural schools.

The schools that received grants were nominated and selected by farmers in their communities and Elba's farmers answered the call to strengthen STEM education.

Elba's grant will allow it to produce and broadcast video announcements.

There will be a check presentation at the Monday, Sept. 9 Board of Education meeting at 7 p.m. at the Elba Central School Library Media Center. (The school is located at 57 S. Main St. in Elba.)

​Grow Rural Education has distributed more than $18 million in grants to more than 1,000 rural public school districts since 2011. 

For each grant-winning school, teachers, students and, oftentimes, community members develop plans to create more engaging and innovative STEM programs.

Grow Rural Education grants have helped schools purchase an array of STEM-related materials, such as augmented-reality sandboxes, weather-forecasting and robotics equipment.

To qualify for a Grow Rural Education grant, farmers nominated a school or school district to compete for a merit-based grant of either $10,000 or $25,000. School districts that were nominated then submitted a grant application describing their STEM-focused project.

Grow Rural Education’s Farmer Advisory Council, consisting of approximately 30 farmer leaders from across the country, reviewed the finalist applications and selected the winning school districts, including Elba Central School.

About America’s Farmers

The America’s Farmers campaign highlights the importance of modern U.S. Agriculture through communications and community outreach programs that partner with farmers to impact rural America. To learn more, visit America’s Farmers at www.AmericasFarmers.com.

About the Bayer Fund

The Bayer Fund is a nonprofit organization dedicated to strengthening the overall health and wellbeing in communities where farmers and Bayer employees live and work. Visit the Bayer Fund at www.monsantofund.org.

September 3, 2019 - 5:46pm

barn_copy.jpg

GO ART! is hosting a Farm to Table Dinner on Sept.14th.

This fits with its mission of expanding the culinary arts and cultural richness of farms in Genesee and Orleans counties.

Farm to Table events have become extremely popular in the last few years. GO ART’s! event is expected to be just as popular as the many other similar events held around the country in rich and diverse farming communities like ours.

The splendid diversity of the local food and expert preparation by the Genesee Valley Education Partnership Culinary Program, led by Executive Chef Tracy Burgio, are not to be missed.

Guests will enjoy live music and food that could not possibly be any fresher in the magical restaurant without walls at GO ART! at Bank and Main streets in Downtown Batavia. It is sure to please all who attend.

The four-course feast costs $105 per person and will feature local produce, beef, chicken and a vegetarian option. Click here to see the menu.

Because this is the debut farm to table dinner in Batavia hosted by GO ART!, as a special thank you for those attending, diners who book this year will be able to pre-purchase tickets for next year's event before tickets are available to the public.

For information on purchasing tickets, please click here.

A portion of the proceeds will go to the Culinary Arts Club at GVEP.

Photos courtesy of DixieLand Images | Marcy Morgan.

veggies_copy.jpg

September 3, 2019 - 4:05pm

Press release:

SYRACUSE -- The 51st Annual Butter Sculpture at the New York State Fair was taken down, but it didn't go to waste.

American Dairy Association North East, in conjunction with Cornell Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners and Noblehurst Farms, dismantled the 800-pound sculpture today at the New York State Fairgrounds.

Ultimately, the inedible butter will make its way to Noblehurst Farms in Pavilion (and Linwood), a "Dairy of Distinction," where it will be recycled in the farm’s methane digester and converted into renewable energy to power the dairy farm and produce liquid fertilizer for crops.

Noblehurst Farms has been recognized for achievements in sustainability and community partnerships to divert food waste from local landfills. (For previous coverage of an example of these efforts, click here.)

This year’s sculpture, “Milk. Love What’s Real,” featured a grandfather and child dunking cookies into milk and a young couple sharing a milkshake, illustrating how our love for real dairy connects many cherished moments in our lives.

Here's a link to a time-lapse video of the sculpture's deconstruction, which actually took 90 minutes to do.

About American Dairy Association North East

The American Dairy Association North East (ADANE) is the local affiliate of the National Dairy Council® and the regional consolidation of three promotion organizations including the American Dairy Association and Dairy Council Inc., Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association and Pennsylvania Dairy Promotion Program.  Committed to nutrition education and research-based communications, ADANE provides science-based nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier nation, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia, industry, consumers and media.

Funded by dairy checkoff dollars from more than 12,000 dairy farm families in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and Northern Virginia, ADANE works closely with Dairy Management Inc.™ to bring a fully integrated promotion program to the North East region. For more information, visit AmericanDairy.com

August 27, 2019 - 2:06pm

From the Genesee County Chamber of Commerce:

The Genesee County Chamber of Commerce will host the 30th annual Decision-makers Ag Tour on Wednesday, Sept. 18.

It is open to the public.

The initial tour begins at 8 a.m. at the Kennedy Building at the Genesee County Fairgrounds, 5056 E. Main Street Road, Batavia.

After registration / check-in, breakfast and a quick welcome and discussion with Bill Schreiber, of O-AT-KA Milk Products Co-Operative Inc., attendees will board the bus and be transported to the next location.

The bus will return to the fairgrounds once the tour ends at 12:30 p.m.

The tour will include:

  • Autumn Moon Farm Winery, 7585 W. Bergen Road, Bergen
  • Black Creek Cidery, 6885 Warboys Road, Byron
  • Sweet Life Country Store, 100 S. Main St., Elba

Register

Via email at:   [email protected]

Online by visiting the chamber website's events page here, then click on the button for the ag tour.

Or call the chamber office 585-343-7440.

August 23, 2019 - 4:43pm

Submitted photo and press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) toured several farms in Genesee, Orleans and Monroe counties yesterday, speaking with farm owners and employees on their concerns and trepidations with the recently passed the Farm Labor Bill.

Hawley is the former owner and operator of his family’s farm in Batavia, a longtime member of the Assembly Agriculture Committee and past President of the Genesee County Farm Bureau.

“I want to thank all the farm owners and their families for having me on a tour of their facilities,” Hawley said.

“I understand how detrimental these new labor regulations can be to our agriculture sector and I will be pushing very hard to have a seat at the table for the Commissioner of Agriculture and Farm Bureau members on the new wage board.”

  “As a former farm operator, it was great to meet so many dedicated families that are driving New York’s agricultural sector here in Western New York,” Hawley said.

“A consistent theme at all of the farms we visited was the new labor regulations pushed by Downstate politicians and their detrimental effect on family farms throughout the state. Many owners are concerned about labor shortage during an already short growing season and the possibility of migrant workers leaving to earn more money in other states.”

Photo: Assemblyman Hawley on his first stop of the farm tour at CY Farms in Elba, a second- and third-generation family farm where sod, spinach, corn and onions are grown.

August 23, 2019 - 12:41pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, Genesee County 4-H, Dairy Club, agriculture.

Top photo: Genesee Dairy Challenge Team – Genesee County 4-H Dairy Challenge Contest participants, from left: Bing Zuber, Wyatt Uberty, Chase Zuber, Otto Uberty, Renee Uberty.

Submitted photos and press release:

SYRACUSE -- Members of the Genesee County 4-H Dairy Club took their skills to the New York State Fair in Syracuse earlier this week.

4-H Dairy Challenge and Dairy Judging Contests were held to test the youth’s knowledge on judging skills, animal nutrition, agronomy, feed identification, farm safety, and business management.

Below are results from the contests that included more than 150 participants.

New York State Fair 4-H Dairy Challenge Contest:

Genesee Novice Team – Second-place Team. Team members were: Otto Uberty, Wyatt Uberty, Bing Zuber and Chase Zuber.

Individual Results – Bing Zuber -- third High Novice Individual; Renee Uberty -- 19th Junior Individual.

New York State Fair 4-H Dairy Judging Contest:

Genesee Novice Team AFourth Place. Team members and individual rankings were: Chloe Lamb -- 14th, Bing Zuber -- 16th, and Chase Zuber -- 18th.

Genesee Novice Team B – Third Place. Team members and individual rankings were: Evan Winspear -- third, Wyatt Uberty -- 17th, Otto Uberty -- 20th.

Genesee Junior Team – Fourth Place. Team members and individual rankings were: Maggie Winspear -- fifth, Jillian Brewer -- eighth, and Renee Uberty -- 36th.

Genesee Senior Team – 13th-place. Team members and individual rankings were: Carolyn Sybertz -- 23rd and Amelia Brewer -- 29th.

Congratulations to all of the 4-H’ers competing at the New York State Fair this week!  For more information on the Genesee County 4-H Program, please contact the 4-H Office at [email protected] or (585) 343-3040, ext. 131.

Bottom photo: Genesee County 4-H Dairy Judging Contest participants, from left, back row: Amelia Brewer, Carolyn Sybertz, Jillian Brewer, Renee Uberty, Maggie Winspear. From left, front row: Wyatt Uberty, Evan Winspear, Chloe Lamb, Bing Zuber, Otto Uberty, and Chase Zuber.

August 23, 2019 - 11:44am
posted by Billie Owens in GC 4-H, agriculture, Announcements.

Press release:

Now is a great time to start a 4-H Club in the Genesee County 4-H Program. The new 4-H Club Year begins Oct. 1 and runs through Sept. 30, 2020.

The 4-H Program teaches youth life skills through hands on activities in a variety of project areas. Youth ages 5 to 18 years are always welcome to join.  Adult volunteers and new 4-H Clubs are always welcome as well. 

Starting a 4-H Club is fun and easy. You can start a 4-H Club in five easy steps!

How to Start a 4-H Club in 5 Easy Steps:

1.  Complete the New 4-H Volunteer Enrollment Form.

2.  Attend an orientation meeting with 4-H Staff.

3.  Enroll 5 youth in your club (age 5 – 18).

4.  Have members choose a club name.

5.  Plan monthly club meetings and projects with parents and youth.

For more information on starting a 4-H Club or joining the 4-H Program, please contact the 4-H Office at [email protected] or (585) 343-3040, ext. 131.

August 19, 2019 - 1:07pm

Submitted photo and press release:

Shoppers may have noticed the bearded gentleman with the ear-to-ear smile at the Batavia Public Market. Mike Vickner and his wife, Jan Goodenbery, of “Rooted in Joy” sell the best of the season harvested from their farm located in Oakfield.

They have fruits, vegetables (especially garlic!), flowers and delicious baked goods. They also provide “pet-the-bunny therapy,” he says with a grin.

Dedicated to providing food grown in an environmentally sustainable manner (no chemicals, only natural fertilizers, and “chickens that live a chicken’s life”) Vickner believes in preserving the Earth and her bounty with his own Hippocratic oath of “do no harm.“

In addition to his passion for farming, Vickner is committed to his role as a caregiver at Crossroads House here in Batavia and its Board of Directors has graciously proclaimed Rooted in Joy as their official market farm.

As members of the Crossroads family, Mike and Jan will provide information at their stand about upcoming community events and fundraisers to support the Crossroads mission of providing the very best in comfort care for residents in Genesee, Wyoming, and surrounding counties.

“We’ll see you at the Market!”

August 7, 2019 - 3:36pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in agriculture, farm labor bill, kathy hochul, video.
Video Sponsor

In an interview with The Batavian following an event at the Genesee County Fair Grounds, where Lt. Kathy Hochul participated in the announcement of a new workforce development program (more later), Hochul defended passage of the farm labor bill.

She said it was needed, even though it was opposed by farmers and farmworkers, because it will improve working conditions for farmworkers and help farmers attract more qualified job candidates.

Hochul said what's missing in complaints about the farm labor bill is that farmers participated in crafting compromise legislation.

August 7, 2019 - 2:21pm
posted by Billie Owens in agriculture, honeybees, pollination, business, genesee county.

Press release:

Standing amidst a swarm of advocates, at the Rochester Beekeepers Association’s beehives at Tinker Nature Park, U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer today revealed how a recent under-the-radar decision on bees could sting Upstate, the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region, its local agriculture efforts, and even a budding jobs niche that supplies summer farmers’ markets and local restaurants.

Schumer detailed a recent fed decision by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to stop collecting data on honeybees that puts the species and Upstate New York’s economy, at risk. Schumer said that the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region is a hive of productivity, but that this recent decision by the feds could derail much of what keeps Upstate competitive and robust as an agricultural hub.

Calls on USDA to 'reverse course immediately'

The senator called on the USDA to reverse course immediately, and instead, step up their work on bee populations. He revealed numbers that proved his point and hit home the critical importance of honeybees to Upstate New York and the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region’s agriculture sector.

“It sure helps, but you don’t need to be a beekeeper to understand the benefit pollinating bees have on the Upstate economy and the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region,” Schumer said. “Look around and you will see that they boost an agricultural hive of economic productivity.

"From farmers’ markets, to farm-to-table restaurants, to the farms and apple and cherry orchards that solidify the Rochester-Finger Lakes area as an agricultural hub, we have a lot to tout —and it is because of bees like these. So to find out that, in an under-the-radar move from Washington, the USDA has clipped the wings of a critical data-collection program on honeybee colonies, impacting jobs and productivity in places like Rochester, really stings.”

Schumer explained that earlier this July, USDA said it would stop collecting data for its "Honey Bee Colonies" report. The "Honey Bee Colonies" report, conducted by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, is released on an annual basis and contains critical data, tracking active honeybee colonies, new colonies and lost colonies.

The senator called the decision to suspend data collection for the report especially concerning, considering the devastating honeybee colony losses experienced in the United States over the past few decades.

Plummeting honeybee colonies

According to a report from USDA, the number of active honeybee colonies plummeted from six million in the 1940s to roughly 2.5 million in 2017. More recently, during the winter of 2018, beekeepers suffered their worst losses on record.

Data from the University of Maryland’s Bee Informed Partnership shows that beekeepers lost 37.7 percent of their colonies during this season, 8.9 percent higher than the average for winter. Schumer argued that this historic population decline shows that USDA should ratchet up its honeybee data collection, not shut it down.

Schumer said that New York State and the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region have not been immune to the devastation of honeybee colonies.

According to the most recent "Honey Bee Colonies" report released by USDA, between January and December of 2017, New York State beekeepers lost a total of 17,700 colonies of honeybees. Meanwhile, in the first six months of 2018, New York State beekeepers lost 7,000 colonies.

Schumer said these losses, combined with the fact that according to a June 2018 New York State Department of Agriculture report, crops dependent on honeybee pollination are worth $1.2 billion annually to the state, present a critical need to understand what exactly is causing them and how they can be reversed. This data is critical to protecting the honeybee-reliant Upstate New York agricultural industry.

Upstate ag is 'honeybee-reliant'

“We need this data to keep New York as an agricultural juggernaut,” added Schumer. “What’s the real stinger here is that the bees are part of the economy. They keep local businesses and jobs buzzing. To enact a new policy that discounts bees and their impact on New York is bad environmental, economic and agricultural policy. We are here today to say: reverse the decision, and instead step things up as this insect’s population spirals.”

The dwindling bee population is of particular concern for the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region’s agricultural industry, which is a hive of economic activity.

According to USDA, $234,935,000 worth of agricultural products were sold out of Genesee County in 2017; $221,295,000 worth of agricultural products were sold out of Wayne County in 2017; $205,160,000 worth of agricultural products were sold out of Ontario County in 2017; $155,282,000 worth of agricultural products were sold out of Orleans County in 2017; and $76,643,000 worth of agricultural products were sold out of Monroe County.

Furthermore, in 2017, Wayne County was home to 25,939 acres of non-citrus fruit and nut farms with 185 total farms; Ontario County was home to 1,384 acres of non-citrus fruit and nut farms and 53 total farms; Orleans County was home to 57 total farms; Genesee County was home to 21,927 acres of vegetable production; and Monroe County was home to 1,100 acres of non-citrus fruit and nut farms and 44 total farms.

New York ranks second in the nation in apple production, and Wayne and Orleans counties are the two top apple-producing counties in the state, meaning the bee population is imperative to the sustainability of this critical agricultural sector in the Rochester-Finger Lakes Region.

Wayne County produces more apples than any other county in New York State, and nationally ranks as the fourth-highest apple-producing county in the country. More than 25,000 acres of farm land in Wayne County is devoted to apples, which accounts for over half of the total apple acreage in all of New York State.

Prospect of extinction

The prospect of the extinction of honeybees also presents a significant to challenge to New York State’s burgeoning honey industry. In 2017 alone, 3,046,315 pounds of honey were collected from New York State farms and sales totaled $8,660,000. Schumer said that should honeybee colony numbers continue plummeting, not only would these sales be jeopardized, but Rochester-Finger Lakes restaurants and farmers’ markets would be forced to pay more for or completely stripped of the freshest, locally sourced honey.

Schumer explained that these dire numbers show the absolute necessity of USDA’s "Honey Bee Colonies" report. Therefore, Schumer urged the USDA to reverse course and maintain the collection of data for the "Honey Bee Colonies" report, to accurately track honeybees in the United States and protect Rochester-Finger Lakes agriculture from getting stung.

Advocates rally: beekeepers, farm-to-table restaurateurs, growers and educators

Schumer was joined by Pat Bono (beekeeper/owner of Seaway Trail Honey, director for NY Bee Wellness, an educational 501c3, and organizer of Rochester Beekeepers), Tim Pratt (beekeeper & director of programs at Tinker Nature Center); Dan Winter (president, Empire State Honey Producers Assoc. & owner of Winter Apiaries in Wolcott, Wayne County), farm-to-table restaurateurs: Stephen Rees (owner, Relish restaurant in Rochester’s Southwedge) Dan Martello (owner, Good Luck restaurant in Downtown Rochester), Lizzie Clapp (owner, Le Petit Poutine food truck), and Evan Schutt (owner, Schutts Apple Mill in Penfield).

“The USDA 'Honey Bee Colonies' report has provided critical data for decades that beekeepers rely on to protect the health of our colonies and that farmers depend on to safeguard the viability of their next pollinator dependent crop," Bono said. "I appreciate Senator Schumer’s efforts to resume this reporting because ceasing this data collection leaves us in the dark, unable to see or anticipate trends that are vital to preserve our local honeybee hives.”

“New York Farm Bureau values the role that pollinators play in the agriculture industry and New York Farm Bureau membership represents the diversity of New York agriculture including farmers that rely on honey bees to perform pollinator services as well as the beekeepers that provide these valuable services," said Rene St. Jacques, assistant director of Public Policy for the New York Farm Bureau.

Sweet cash: pollination-dependent crops pour $1.2 billion into NYS ag economy

"Pollinators are incredibly important to the agricultural economy in New York State, which is a leading producer of specialty crops that require or benefit from pollination, including apples, pears, cherries, strawberries, pumpkins, and beans, just to name a few. These pollination dependent crops contribute $1.2 billion annually to the state’s agricultural economy.

"The honeybee provides 50 percent of crop pollination services in New York State, yet there continue to be losses of honeybee colonies year after year. These losses not only impact honeybee producers and their livelihoods but the overall agricultural economy and well as the sustainability of the New York State food system.

"For the benefit of the entire New York agriculture industry, it is imperative that honeybee colonies continue to thrive and in turn must be accurately monitored to ensure longevity of both bees and farmers."

July 26, 2019 - 2:37pm

Press release:

Congratulations to the Genesee County 4-H members who participated in the 4-H Livestock Shows at the 2019 Genesee County Fair.

4-H Beef Show

  • Senior Showmanship – Caleb Carlson
  • Junior Showmanship – Audrey Dorman
  • Novice Showmanship – Thomas Keele
  • Master Showman – Caleb Carlson
  • Supreme Female – Makayla Sugg
  • Reserve Supreme Female – Shianne Foss 
  • Champion Beef Steer – Autumn Mathisen
  • Reserve Champion Beef Steer – Shianne Foss
  • Champion Dairy Steer – Maggie Winspear
  • Reserve Champion Dairy Steer – Justin Deleo 

4-H Dairy Cattle Show

  • Novice Showmanship – Colton Walczak
  • Junior Showmanship – Jacob Beideck
  • Intermediate Showmanship – Maggie Winspear
  • Senior Showmanship – Amelia Brewer
  • Master Showman – Amelia Brewer
  • Champion Ayrshire – Amelia Brewer
  • Champion Grade – Annalise Sybertz
  • Champion Holstein – Bing Zuber
  • Champion Brown Swiss – Bing Zuber
  • Champion Jersey – Maggie Winspear
  • Supreme Champion – Bing Zuber
  • Reserve Supreme Champion – Bing Zuber
  • Best Bred and Owned – Jillian Brewer

4-H Dairy & Meat Goat Show

  • Novice Dairy Goat Showmanship – Levi Miller
  • Junior Dairy Goat Showmanship – Jade Winn
  • Senior Dairy Goat Showmanship – Gabe Winn
  • Master Dairy Goat Showman—Jade Winn
  • Best Udder—Gabe Winn
  • Best in Show Dairy Doe—Shane Coast
  • Novice Meat Goat Showmanship – Levi Miller
  • Junior Meat Goat Showmanship – Campbell Riley
  • Senior Meat Goat Showmanship – John Riley
  • Master Meat Goat Showman—John Riley
  • Champion Meat Goat Doe—Lily Haacke
  • Champion Boer Doe—John Riley

4-H Sheep Show

  • Senior Showmanship – Becky Kron
  • Junior Showmanship – Hunter McCabe
  • Novice Showmanship – Makayla Sugg
  • Master Showman—Becky Kron
  • Supreme Champion Ram – Becky Kron
  • Supreme Champion Ewe – Brendan Pimm
  • Champion Market Lamb – Makayla Sugg
  • Reserve Champion Market Lamb – Ben Kron

4-H Hog Show

  • Senior Showmanship – Dillon Weber
  • Junior Showmanship – Brendan Pimm
  • Novice Showmanship – Thomas Keele
  • Master Showman – Dillon Weber
  • Champion Market Hog – Makayla Sugg
  • Reserve Champion Market Hog – Thomas Keele
  • Supreme Champion Gilt – Thomas Keele
  • Reserve Supreme Gilt – Jillian Weaver

4-H Market Animal Auction Poultry Show 

  • Champion Pen of Chickens – Evan Winspear 
  • Reserve Pen of Chickens – Jillian Brewer
  • Master Showman – Teagan Mathes
  • Champion Project Pen of Chickens – Teagan Mathes
  • Reserve Project Pen of Chickens – Teagan Mathes

4-H Market Animal Auction Goat Show

  • Champion Market Goat – John Riley
  • Reserve Champion Market Goat – Riley Smith
  • Master Showman – John Riley
  • Champion Project Market Goat – Tyler Jirovec
  • Reserve Project Market Goat – Clare Mathes

4-H Market Animal Auction Lamb Show

  • Champion Market Lamb – Makayla Sugg
  • Reserve Champion Market Lamb – Madelynn Pimm
  • Master Showman – Brendan Pimm
  • Champion Project Market Lamb – Makayla Sugg
  • Reserve Project Market Lamb – Brendan Pimm

4-H Market Animal Auction Beef Show

  • Champion Beef Steer – Cole Carlson
  • Reserve Beef Steer – Caleb Carlson
  • Master Showman – Cole Carlson
  • Champion Project Beef Steer – Cole Carlson
  • Reserve Project Beef Steer – Shianne Foss

4-H Market Animal Auction Dairy Steer Show

  • Champion Dairy Steer – Bing Zuber
  • Reserve Dairy Steer – Chase Zuber
  • Master Showman – Carolyn Sybertz
  • Champion Project Dairy Steer – Bing Zuber
  • Reserve Project Dairy Steer – Chase Zuber

4-H Market Animal Auction Hog Show

  • Champion Market Hog – Becky Kron
  • Reserve Market Hog – Cody Carlson
  • Master Showman – Becky Kron
  • Champion Project Market Hog – Cody Carlson
  • Reserve Project Market Hog – Thomas Keele

For more information about the Genesee County 4-H Program, contact the 4-H Office at [email protected] or 585-343-3040, ext. 131. 

July 19, 2019 - 5:40pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Genesee County Fair, agriculture, video. 4-H.
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July 18, 2019 - 1:07pm
posted by Billie Owens in business, farm labor bill, agriculture.

A Statement from Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) on Gov. Cuomo signing the Farm Labor Bill into law July 17:

“The largest farm in New York City is a seasonal pumpkin patch but that didn’t stop radical politicians from dictating how our farms should operate. This disastrous legislation, ironically signed in a place with no farms, has the potential to single-handedly destroy family farming in New York as we know it.

“To make matters worse, the newly-created Wage Board, stacked with more big-labor, big-union interests than actual farmers, can unilaterally alter the labor laws how they see fit moving forward.

“Altering the maximum number of hours allowed per week or reversing the ‘no strike clause’ at any moment, goes completely against the farming industry’s standard practices where crop yields, weather patterns and labor needs are consistently fluid. If a farm can’t operate because of unavoidable weather conditions or  because workers are mandated time off – the repercussions will be devastating.

“What these big-city politicians don’t understand is that our family farms are always under the gun since our growing season is virtually half of California and Florida – making reliable labor, many times seven days of week, a necessity.

“As the former owner and operator of our family farm in Batavia, I know first hand how devastating this could be to our industry. As a former president of the Genesee County Farm Bureau and 14-year member of the Assembly Agriculture Committee, I’ve spoken with many farmers and producers about this bill and its devastating effects unlike the New York City politicians who crafted this disaster. Their concerns were voiced yet ignored.

“Our family farms are not corporations, they are not run by money-hungry business people, they are ordinary families like yours and mine who have learned this art from prior generations and intend to pass it on to their children. It’s what they love, and I will always stand behind them to fight these new regulations in any way I can.”

July 17, 2019 - 4:47pm

Today, July 17, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed into law the Farmworker Fair Labor Practices Act (S6578/A8419). It was voted on and passed by the New York State Assembly and Senate last month.

Proponents claim the new law will extend basic labor protections to New York State’s farmworkers by allowing them the right to collectively bargain and get overtime pay.

It was sponsored by Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan and Senator Jessica Ramos, both of Queens.

Western New York farmers and lawmakers were among those who lobbied against the legislation, citing the devastating impact it could have on family farms and agriculture, the primary economic driver of the region.

Upon its passage in the Senate in June, Sen. Michael Ranzenhofer said: "This is just another example of Downstate legislators who do not understand the Upstate economy. This will impose hundreds of millions of dollars in mandates onto farms who are already struggling. Simply put, it is going to eliminate jobs and put farms out of business."

For the complete post with reactions after the Senate passage of the bill, click here.

Below is a press release sent this afternoon from Grow NY Farms on the Governor's signature today creating the new law.

For months, hundreds of farmers and farmworkers spent countless hours seeking to find a balance with elected officials on measures that will change working conditions on farms across New York State. However, the measure that ultimately passed the Legislature and was signed by the Governor on July 17 did not address the challenges and needs of farmers and farmworkers.

This measure does not create a path that will assure an economically viable New York agriculture industry, and the four fixable flaws within this bill will likely drive more family-owned farms out of the state or out of business. Worst of all, farmworkers will feel the impacts the most because their work hours will be restricted and their income reduced.

Grow NY Farms has been seeking to correct four fundamental flaws contained in the new legislation (Assembly Bill No. 8419 and Senate Bill No. 6578). Modifications include:

  • Applying a standard wage rate for farmworkers who decide to work on the prescribed day of rest.
  • Expanding the family farm definition to include close relatives such as aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.
  • Modifying the composition and timeline of the wage board.
  • Preserving secret balloting for both farmworkers and farmers.

“New York's farmers have been at the table from the beginning asking for a workable solution, a bill that would provide the balance agriculture would need to sustain itself as an important job creator and food provider in this state. Common ground should have considered what farms can afford and the opportunities our employees will lose as a result of this law. In the end, our reasonable requests were cast aside, even though there was support for a moderated bill from legislators on both sides of the aisle. What was also dismissed by many of New York's leaders is the dignity and respect our farm families have long provided to the men and women we need and work alongside every day. While the final legislation signed by the Governor is certainly better than the original version of the bill, it will still lead to significant financial challenges for farmers and the continued erosion of our rural communities,” said David Fisher, New York Farm Bureau president and dairy farmer in Madrid.

"It is upsetting that state lawmakers have placed rural New York at a serious disadvantage in our ability to compete in the market place and provide economic opportunities for our employees. This new law failed to take common sense into account, and in turn, will place Upstate further behind in its ability to grow our farms and economy. Our farms and farmworkers deserved better for all that they provide this state,” said Brian Reeves, of Reeves Farms in Baldwinsville and president of the New York State Vegetable Growers Association.

“Long Island has a proud tradition of being a source that New Yorkers turn to for fresh food, wine, flowers, landscape plants and more. Our farms have also provided good, quality opportunities for our employees to get job experience and support their families at home and abroad and have the potential to advance their careers. Sadly, those days are numbered as the farm labor bill will force dramatic changes on agriculture as we know it. It won’t just be our farm families and employees who will suffer, but our customers who value what it means to buy “Grown on Long Island.” Unfortunately, by the time that the legislators who voted for this misguided bill realize the damage they have done to the agricultural industry on Long Island and the rest of the State of New York, it will be too late. This is a sad day for all of us,” said Karl Novak, president of the Long Island Farm Bureau.

“Dairy represents New York’s largest agricultural industry. Our farms must operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year in order to care for our cows and produce fresh, nutritious milk. We certainly appreciate that legislators who listened to the many voices expressed by stakeholders in trying to negotiate a bill fair to everyone, but we were disappointed in language added in the final hours that has the potential to both negatively impact the long-term viability of our farms and the earning potential and livelihood of our workers,” said Jon Greenwood, president of Northeast Dairy Producers Association and dairy farmer in Canton.

“My family has a long history of supplying fresh fruit to our Hudson Valley community every year, and we have seen our business diversify into building a cidery, but we are worried that the tradition we have built is now in jeopardy with the signing of this legislation. We are proud of our workforce and the benefits we provide them, but the massive increase in labor costs coming down the pike because of this new law will make it difficult to sustain the business that has lasted for generations and one that I hoped to continue. I’m afraid this could be the breaking point for our orchard and many like ours across the state,” said Sarah Dressel, of Dressel Farms in New Paltz and Chairperson of the New York Apple Association’s Board of Directors.

“Today’s job market is competitive, and many farmers provide their workers with optional days of rest, sick and holiday pay, and other benefits. I appreciate New York’s effort to ensure all farms are doing this, however, by limiting worker hours, we are taking away opportunity that many are seeking. Employees do not want to work simply to live – they enjoy farming and want to save for their families and their future. This bill does not include fixes that are needed to help our farms and farmworkers thrive. The reality is clear, our workers will pack their bags and seek opportunity in another state,” said Jose Iniguez, vice president of Lamont Fruit Farms in Waterport and former farmworker.

“This spring, New York’s family farms faced some of the toughest planting conditions we’ve seen in years, and continue struggling to compete against regional and national competitors. Our challenges have been compounded due to recent actions by state officials who have endorsed policies that are fundamentally changing our businesses and threatening the viability of New York’s farm community.  We are urging the Governor to fix several flaws in the Farm Labor bill in order to support the future of New York’s growers, harvesters and dairy producers,” said David Zittel, president of Amos, Zittel and Sons in Eden.

“The Farm Labor will bring about unintended, yet devastating changes to our state’s agriculture sector. The farmworkers who work side-by-side with farm owners and their families want to see this industry continue to grow and diversify, and they understand they are big part of each of our farms’ success. However, this legislation will force many growers and dairy producers to lay off workers or cut hours in order to remain competitive. Far worse is that some will make the difficult decision to cease farming – and New York’s consumers will see prices increase and their source of fresh fruits, vegetables and dairy products diminish. We want to grow our farms, employ more staff, and continue providing the best workplace possible for our workers. The Governor must fix several flaws in this legislation in order to support the more than 30,000 farms across Upstate and on Long Island – and without action, he will be sacrificing those who were counting on him the most,” said Dale-Illa Riggs of The Berry Patch in Stephentown and President of the NYS Berries Association.

For a full list of Grow NY Farms campaign supporters, visit: GrowNYFarms.com

July 13, 2019 - 2:47am
posted by Howard B. Owens in video, Genesee County Fair, agriculture.
Video Sponsor

The Genesee County Fair for 2019 is open.

Friday was preview night, a kind of soft open. 

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