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UMMC

October 22, 2021 - 1:44pm
posted by Press Release in UMMC.
Event Date and Time: 
October 28, 2021 - 10:00am to 1:00pm

What: United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia in having an on-site, open interview event for opportunities in Food Service, Housekeeping, and Janitorial Service. There are full-time, part-time, and per diem positions available.

Where: 24 Masse Place, Batavia, NY

When: Thursday, October 28 from 10 a.m. -  1 p.m.

Sign up: Eventbrite

October 15, 2021 - 5:38pm
posted by Joanne Beck in breast cancer, cancer screening, news, UMMC.

Cancer prevention and early detection are at the top of Lisa Franclemont’s work agenda each day, especially as COVID-19 has kept many people away from the doctor’s office.

“A lot of people avoided their screenings, and there were more late-stage diagnoses,” Franclemont said Thursday. “People still need to have their screenings.”

As Cancer Services Program coordinator for Genesee, Orleans, Wyoming, and Niagara counties (GOWN), Franclemont wants to spread the word that there is a financial help for those without health insurance to obtain those necessary screenings. Genesee County Legislature gave the health educator a proclamation Wednesday for her work in this field. Her message is especially fitting, given that October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month.

“There’s no reason why anyone doesn’t have a mammogram now,” she said. 

Franclemont has been a longtime staple at United Memorial Medical Center’s Healthy Living program in Batavia. When she began 15 years ago, this program was only available in Genesee County, she said. 

“Now it’s in every county in New York State,” she said. 

What & Who is Covered ...

The grant-funded GOWN program provides free breast and cervical cancer screenings for women 40 and older and colorectal cancer screenings for men and women 50+. According to Cancer Services Program literature, breast cancer is most often discovered in women 50 and older and colon cancer also targets men and women in that same age bracket. Cervical cancer has been more often found in women that had never been screened before. 

Most health insurance companies cover these screenings at no cost to patients, but the uninsured aren’t so fortunate. That’s where Franclemont comes in: to educate and encourage people without medical insurance to call her at 585-344-5494 to ask questions, determine if they are eligible, and set up an appointment. For anyone out of the area, or that may have concerns outside of regular work hours, there is also a toll-free number available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-866-442-2262. Hablamos Español. There are translation services for other languages.

Another layer of protection for those uninsured is the Medicaid Treatment Act, Franclemont said. That will not only pay for cancer screenings, but also for the required diagnostics. So, for example, if a woman has a mammogram and receives a cancer diagnosis, she will be able to also obtain an ultrasound and a biopsy, as warranted, and covered by the Medicaid act would also pay for those services. 

Breast Cancer: Symptoms & Stats ...

One in every eight women is diagnosed with breast cancer, program literature states. A mammogram has been the best way to find it, and symptoms may include a lump or pain in the breast, or changes in shape; irritation of the breast skin or nipples, such as itchiness, redness or flaking; and/or dimples in the breast skin, it states. Again, for emphasis: this program offers free breast cancer screening for eligible uninsured New York residents in every county and borough. 

Breast cancer screenings are recommended every two years for women aged 50 to 74, unless other factors prompt an earlier screening, such as having a family history of breast cancer, being overweight, not getting enough exercise, late menopause of age 55 or older, and never having given birth or doing so at age 30 or older.
Colon cancer screenings for men and women are recommended to begin at age 50. Doctors are the largest source of referrals for Franclemont’s program, she said, and it’s, therefore, crucial to maintaining contact with one’s primary care physician or other health care provider.

Don't Want to Go Out? Stay Home ...

Another option for colon cancer screening is the colon kit, she said, which is an at-home test that has been shown to have an 80 percent efficacy rate. If something shows up in the kit, uninsured people would then be able to get a free colonoscopy, she said. 

The biggest point is to just get screened. Medical facilities are following protocols and “using precautions” by ensuring staff is vaccinated and masked, which makes them safe places to visit, she said. 

“It’s important that people still get screenings during the pandemic,” Franclemont said. “If people have any problems, they should call their doctors. Don’t ignore changes.”

The Cancer Services Program provides breast, cervical, and colon cancer screening at no cost to men and women who qualify. So, as related flyers state: Get screened, no excuses! For more information, call 585-344-5494.

If you’re in need of health insurance and live in New York State, you can check out the New York State of Health at nystateofhealth.ny.gov or call 1-855-355-5777.
 

Comments
September 27, 2021 - 4:21pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in covid-19, UMMC, rochester reginal health, news, coronavirus.

Press release:

“Per the New York State  COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for Healthcare workers, Rochester Regional Health is currently nearing 99 percent compliance. This percentage includes individuals who have received at least one dose of the vaccine, or have been granted religious or medical exemptions. Rochester Regional Health is proud of all of its employees for their hard work and dedication in keeping the community safe through the pandemic and beyond. We remain committed to serving the community and taking care of all individuals who seek care. “

Comments
September 25, 2021 - 2:09pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in City Fire, UMMC, batavia, news.

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City Fire and UMMC hosted a free child safety seat check at the Fire Hall this morning.

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Comments
August 24, 2021 - 9:14am
posted by Press Release in UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, news, covid-19, coronavirus.

Press release:

Due to the rapid transmission of the Delta variant and increased positive COVID-19 cases, Rochester Regional Health will be re-implementing a stricter visitation policy effectiveWednesday, August 25 at 9 a.m. at the following locations:

  • Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic
  • Newark-Wayne Community Hospital
  • Rochester General Hospital
  • Unity Hospital
  • United Memorial Medical Center
  • Rochester Ambulatory Surgery Center
  • Linden Oaks Ambulatory Surgery Center
  • Westfall Ambulatory Surgery Center

New York State Department of Health continues to require masks inside healthcare facilities this includes visitors and patients. Visitors must have their temperature checked and be screened for symptoms when entering any of these facilities.

No visitation allowed 

  • COVID-19 positive patients 
  • Emergency department patients
  • Cancer infusion center patients
  • Only exceptions: pediatric patients, labor and delivery patients, patients with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, and cognitive impairments including dementia and patients at the end-of-life (see below)

Hospital visitation policy

  • Each COVID negative patient can have one visitor at a time at the bedside 
  • Different visitors can visit the patient throughout the day as long as it is limited to one at a time
  • Visitors must be 12 years of age or older
  • Labor and Delivery (Obstetrics)
    • One visitor at a time
    • One support person (in addition to a visitor) is allowed at the beside at all times
  • Pediatrics
    • Two supports persons and one visitor
    • One visitor in pediatric ED
    • If the patient is COVID positive, one support person and one visitor
  • Patients undergoing ambulatory procedures or surgeries
    • One visitor only for pre-procedure (surgery) and post-procedure (surgery)
  • Patients with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, and cognitive impairments including dementia
    • One support person may be present on-site at a time in the emergency room or during hospitalization
    • An additional visitor may also be with the patient during hospital-designated visiting hours 
  •  Behavioral Health inpatients
    • There is no change to the current visitation rules for Behavioral Health Inpatients
      • Two visitors during site-specific hours
  • End of life patients (appropriate PPE will be required if the patient is COVID positive):

o   Up to two visitors at the bedside at a time 

o   One support person (in addition to visitors) is allowed at the bedside; clergy are not considered a visitor

o   Social distancing must be maintained

Hospital daily visitation hours 

  • Rochester General Hospital: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Unity Hospital: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic:  12 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Newark-Wayne Community Hospital: 12 p.m.  – 8 p.m.
  • United Memorial Medical Center: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. – 7 p.m. 
  • Behavioral Health Facilities – call specific site for hours
Comments
August 18, 2021 - 2:02pm

summit_access.jpg

A Summit Street entrance and exit to the proposed Healthy Living Campus is off the table.

That’s the word from Duane Preston, City of Batavia Planning & Development Committee chair, following Tuesday night’s monthly meeting at the City Centre Council Board Room.

Consultants and architects assigned to the joint venture of United Memorial Medical Center (Rochester Regional Health) and the Genesee Area Family YMCA continued their presentation of the $30 million Downtown Revitalization Initiative project, looking to address concerns from their appearance in July.

At the forefront was the idea of an access from Summit Street on a parcel owned by the hospital between two houses on the west side of the street. Developers contended that it was needed to ensure proper traffic flow; planners, however, disagreed.

“They (project representatives) were kind of hesitant but we all agreed to take the Summit Street access off the plan,” Preston said. “Nobody on the board felt that it was needed at this point and my thing is that it is something that could be put in at a later date if we had to.”

As it stands now, vehicles will be able to enter the campus via Bank Street, Washington Avenue or Wiard Street.

Preston said two residents of Summit Street spoke against the access, mentioning increased traffic on the street and annoyance of vehicle lights in the backyard or side of their house.

The PDC also had hoped developers would expand the amount of green space along the east side of the GO ART! building at the corner of Main and Bank streets, removing some parking spaces in the process.

Consultant David Ciurzynski said that has been addressed, making that area more of a park-like setting.

Preston said he expects more green space there, but emphasized that developers still believe all parking lots in the plan are necessary.

No official action on the site plan was taken, said Preston, adding that the State Environmental Quality Review will be conducted now that the public hearing is over.

“They’re going to throw us another plan next month, and we’re going to go from there,” he said. “We all agree that the building is great. We don’t want to pinch this whole thing … but we’ve spent more time on the parking lot than we have on the building. Still, we have to do what’s best for the residents of Batavia.”

In other action, planners approved downtown design reviews for a new façade, lighting and signage on one side of the Batavia Tailors & Cleaners building at 33-39 Ellicott St., along with a new rooftop heating and air conditioning unit, and for renovations at Fieldstone Private Wealth, 219 East Main St.

Photo: The City of Batavia Planning & Development Committee has decided against allowing a Summit Street access point to the proposed Healthy Living Campus.  Photo above was taken from Wiard Street, looking east to Summit. Photo by Mike Pettinella.

Comments
August 4, 2021 - 4:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Red Cross, UMMC, batavia, news.

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To help draw attention to the critical need for eligible blood donors to come forward and help replenish the supply of blood, UMMC hosted a blood drive on Friday.

UMMC’s Lead Blood Bank Technologist, Jacyln DeGolia was among the donors.

"There's a small percentage of people who are eligible to donate and it's important for our country to keep our blood supply up and for anyone who is eligible to donate to do so on a regular basis," she said.  "(It's important) especially for people like myself who are O-negative, which is the universal donor. I know how important that can be in an emergency situation where we may not have a chance to know a patient's blood type when they need a product, so that's why I personally donate.

Comments
July 21, 2021 - 8:58am
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, music, news, batavia, Dr. Harry McCrea.
Video Sponsor

For most of the day, Dr. Harry McCrea is a cardiologist, but on some days, during his breaks, he's UMMC's troubadour, singing and playing his guitar outside the hospital's main entrance.

Last year, during COVID-19, for a little stress release, he started bringing his guitar to work with the intention of sitting outside when weather permitted just so he could relax and practice.

Soon, he started drawing an audience. Other members of the UMMC staff found his music enhanced their own breaks.

Comments
July 13, 2021 - 2:23pm

Submitted photo and press release:

Rochester Regional Health is expanding its partnership with Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM), the nation’s largest medical school.  Rochester Regional Health will become the medical school’s largest clinical campus.

This partnership will enable Rochester Regional to dramatically increase clinical rotations and feature locations in addition to United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia where its program began.

Now, as part of this 10-year agreement between Rochester Regional Health and LECOM, approximately 100 third- and fourth-year students will be on clinical rotation across the health system each month.

“This partnership will offer remarkable opportunities for LECOM students to gain exceptional, hands-on training in a variety of settings with a nationally recognized leader in integrated health care,” said John Ferretti, D.O., LECOM president and CEO.

“Further, with such a large number of our students entering Rochester Regional Health’s clinical rotation program at facilities across western New York, LECOM will be furthering its goal of improving healthcare for residents and communities in underserved areas.”

“LECOM is a great partner and we are honored to expand our partnership,” said Eric Bieber, M.D., president and CEO of Rochester Regional Health. “As an integrated health care delivery system, these students will gain invaluable experience from Rochester Regional Health’s clinical teams, as they move through different areas of medicine.

"This collaboration will strengthen our network of care and help Rochester Regional solidify its position as a leader in healthcare locally, regionally, and nationally.”

Medical school graduates often continue their post-graduate training and establish residency in the geographic area they trained. Rochester Regional Health currently offers 23 residency and fellowship programs for medical students post-graduation.

The health system is continuing to expand on those programs with multiple new residencies and fellowships under development.  

“There is a shortage of primary care physicians throughout the country and LECOM produces more primary care physicians than any other medical school in the country,” said Richard Alweis, M.D., associate chief medical officer of Education for Rochester Regional Health. “By expanding this partnership, we are investing in our community and its healthcare needs.”

“We are thrilled to partner with Rochester Regional Health to offer critical clinical education for our medical students,” said Richard Terry, D.O., associate dean of Academic Affairs, LECOM at Elmira.

“This collaborative agreement offers a unique opportunity for students from the Rochester area, the Southern Tier and Western New York to pursue their collegiate premedical training with local colleges and universities affiliated with LECOM, and then complete their clinical training with the Rochester Regional Health system.

"This agreement will also secure a steady, locally trained supply of future physicians for the greater Rochester region, as well as all of Upstate New York.”

For more on Rochester Regional Health’s residency programs visit Residency.RochesterRegional.org.

Top photo: The woman lying down is Tammy LeSane; on the right is Robert Russo, DPM, Podiatry specialist; and resident in the middle is Kristopher Zainer, DPM.

Comments
June 21, 2021 - 6:22pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, UMMC Foundation, batavia, video.
Video Sponsor

Press release:

United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) has been gifted the largest donation in its history of more than 100 years. Marian Ransom, who lived in LeRoy, left her entire estate of more than $1.2 million to the hospital upon passing away last year. In honor of Marian Ransom and her generous contribution, the second-floor medical wing at UMMC has been renamed the “Marian Ransom Medical Unit.”

“Its contributions like Marian’s that make such a profound impact on the community,” said Dan Ireland, president of United Memorial Medical Center. “We are beyond grateful for Marian’s contributions and what it will mean for the hospital, our patients, and the community. With the support of her donation, we’ll be renovating the intensive care unit (ICU), which will also have a significant impact on the newly named Marian Ransom Medical Unit.”

The ICU project is still in the early stages of development, but when complete will improve patient, visitor access, and flow to both the ICU and the Marian Ransom Medical Unit. The ICU will get a new waiting area and greeting area and also, clinical support spaces for both units. 

“Marian desired to make a difference at the end of her life and so bequeathed her entire estate of more than $1.2 million to United Memorial Medical Center," said Michael T. Welsh, Marian’s attorney. “This humble and philosophical woman has left a legacy which will benefit so many of our citizens for years to come.”

Comments
May 13, 2021 - 1:51pm
posted by Press Release in UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, news, batavia.

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Press release:

Phase one of a two-part modernization project to expand United Memorial Medical Center’s Radiology department is underway.

The nearly $8 million project will add 5,000 square feet to the department, nearly doubling its size, and feature new technology and equipment. The result will be enhanced imaging capabilities that improve the experience for patients, their families and staff.

“One of Rochester Regional Health’s main priorities has been to expand access to care in the Batavia community,” said Eric Bieber, MD, Rochester Regional Health CEO. “That started with the Lipson Cancer Institute and it doesn’t end with the new imaging center.”

When both phases of construction are complete, patients who need imaging services will benefit from:

  • New MRI Suite
  • New 10-bed Intensive Care Unit (ICU)
  • New blood draw station
  • New dressing rooms
  • New, welcoming area and scheduling office
  • New cooling infrastructure supporting UMMC and its growth of services on the main campus

“The department is heading into the future with state-of-the-art technology created with patient comfort in mind and the ability to minimize scan times and improve image quality,” said Barry Rosenberg, MD, United Memorial Medical Center chief of Radiology. 

Philanthropy will be a major source of funding for this project that’s rooted in patient-first care.

“This expansion is a testament to both Rochester Regional and the community’s investment in local healthcare,” said Dan Ireland, president of United Memorial Medical Center. “This project is for you, the community, built by you, with your generous donations and support over the years.”

The first phase of the expansion is scheduled for competition halfway through 2022 and the entire project will be complete by 2024.

Among those taking part in the groundbreaking ceremony, top photo, not in order, were Dan Ireland, Dr. Eric Bieber, Joe Hanss, Dave Hetrick, Amanda Monaco, Amy Craib and Stephanie Guchone.

Photos by Howard Owens.

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Dr. Eric Bieber, CEO of Rochester Regional Health

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Dr. Barry Rosenberg, United Memorial Medical Center Chief of Radiology.

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Comments
May 11, 2021 - 12:41pm
posted by Press Release in news, UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, food service, job fair.

Press release:

On Wednesday, May 26, Rochester Regional Health’s food and nutrition service team will conduct on-site interviews from 1 to 3 p.m. for a wide range of food service positions at United Memorial Medical Center.

Open positions include:

  • Cooks
  • Food Service Associates
  • Food Service Team Leaders
  • Hospitality Office Associates

The organization is hiring individuals with full-time, part-time, and per diem availability.

“People who come to this recruiting event will be able to interview right on-site so we can get to know you and see what position best matches your interests and skills,” said Julie Hamil, senior director of Food & Nutrition Services. “Rochester Regional Health facilities are great places to work and I’m excited to see our team grow!”

The recruiting event will be conducted in compliance with COVID-19 safety guidelines. Interviews will be socially distanced and masks are required. 

Rochester Regional Health Job Fair Recruiting Event

Date:  Wednesday, May 26

Time:  1– 3 p.m.

Location:  United Memorial Medical Center / 127 North St., Batavia / Room -- A110

RSVP: Walk-ins are welcome but candidates are encouraged to RSVP using this link.    

Check-in:  Participants will arrive at the hospital’s main lobby and be directed to the interviews.

Questions:  Contact Patrick Vickery at [email protected]

About Rochester Regional Health

It is an integrated health services organization serving the people of Western New York, the Finger Lakes, St. Lawrence County, and beyond. The system includes nine hospitals; primary and specialty practices, rehabilitation centers, ambulatory campuses and immediate care facilities; innovative senior services, facilities and independent housing; a wide range of behavioral health services; and Rochester Regional Health Laboratories and ACM Global Laboratories, a global leader in patient and clinical trials. Rochester Regional Health is the region’s second-largest employer. Learn more at RochesterRegional.org.

Comments
May 9, 2021 - 8:00am
posted by Virginia Kropf in UMMC, National Nurses Week, news, batavia, Stafford.

Photo above, Libby Schultz, a nurse at United Memorial Medical Center, spends her free time as a flight instructor at Akron Airport. 

National Nurses Week is celebrated every May 6-12 throughout the country, and at United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia, three nurses with unique hobbies are being highlighted.

Shanda Williams, of Stafford, Libby Schultz, of Akron, and Jennifer Leffler, of Varysburg, all combine their hobbies with their love of nursing.

Williams, an ER nurse who is in her 21st year at UMMC, makes shadow boxes; Schultz is a pilot and flight instructor at Akron Airport; and Leffler makes maple syrup.

Williams has always liked to do creative things. She initially went to school for fashion merchandising, but realized she couldn’t make a living in Genesee County doing that, so she decided to study nursing. When COVID-19 shut everything down, she was looking for something to do.

“I’ve always loved the old vintage things you don’t see anymore,” Williams said. “And I like to go to estate sales.”

She describes her creations as mixed media. Interesting graphics, old book pages, rhinestones, old flowers, junk beads and vintage frames all end up as one of her works of art.

“If something is not the right color, I paint it, maybe gold or silver,” she said. “If it’s missing chunks, that’s even better. It adds to the aesthetics.”

All her subject matters have angel wings incorporated, she said. She makes her own.

Much of her work she gives away, but she’d like to find a shop where she could display her creations for sale.

Schultz at 38 has only been a nurse for two years, but she has had an illustrious career as a pilot. 

“I get to do my two loves – flying and caring for people,” Schultz said. 

After high school, Schultz attended Delta State University in Mississippi, where she got her bachelor’s degree in Commercial Aviation. She has always loved airplanes and got her private pilot’s license in 2001 at the age of 20.

Flying was in her blood and in her family. Her father was in the Air Force, but not as a pilot. He served in security and the family lived on Air Force bases, including Japan. It was there that a friend of a neighbor, whose dad was a pilot, took her for a plane ride, and she loved it instantly.

“I loved fighter planes, and I still go to every airshow I can,” she said.

Schultz was accepted into the Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs with hopes of becoming a fighter pilot, but issues with her eyesight put an end to that. When she graduated from Delta, she had her flight instructor’s instrument rating and multi-engine and commercial ratings. Then she moved to Memphis, Tenn.,where she began instructing.

“After a while, I needed to do something else, and wanted to fly big planes,” she said. “I got a job flying Lear jets for a construction company from Canada, based in Buffalo. I came to Western New York for that job and flew for them for six years.”

Schultz also has her airline transport certification and flew in that capacity until the company shut down. Then she went to the airlines but soon realized being gone all the time and traveling was not for her now that she had gotten married.

She said she had registered for nursing school after leaving the Air Force Academy, but switched to aviation after seeing the pilots and planes.

She got her bachelor of science in Nursing in 2019 from the University of Buffalo School of Nursing. She said she graduated just as the coronavirus pandemic was picking up.

“Right now, I prioritize nursing, ” she said.

But she works the night shift at United Memorial so she can fly during the day. Her goal still is to own her own airplane and have a grass strip.

Leffler can stake claim to the sweetest hobby. She and her husband, Zebulun, have their own sugar shack and make maple syrup.

Leffler has worked in the ER at United Memorial for 12 years. She grew up helping her dad collect sap on their farm.

They boiled it down on an old wood-fired evaporator. Most of it was for their family, but some they sold at a stand in their yard.

“That was my first job,” Leffler said. “That was how I earned my allowance growing up.”

She said when she married Zebulun, he had an engineering mind and used his knowledge to install a high-vacuum pump on their lines in the woods.

The woods operation uses wet-dry lines for both main and secondary lines with a modern dry running vacuum pump operating at up to 27-inch mercury.

“Our woods are on a hill and the sap runs by the vacuum pump, which pulls the sap from the trees,” Leffler said. “That gives you a higher production.”

The Lefflers have 4,400 taps.

Their sugarhouse also has a reverse-osmosis machine to take water out. This ultra-high-efficiency evaporator cuts down on the time needed to boil down the sap, she said.

They use UV lights for treating the incoming sap. It is pumped underground 2,400 feet to the sugarhouse from the collection shed at the bottom of the woods.

During Maple Weekends in March, they serve waffles with maple syrup as well as giving tours of the sugarhouse. 

Leffler said their Varysburg farm is a good area for maple syrup. She said weather and soil all affect the taste and syrup from one area can taste different from another.

“When I’m not at the hospital, I’m helping my husband,” she said. “In the fall, we check the lines for damage done by deer or squirrels, and in January we start tapping the trees and preparing to collect the sap until March. Then I run the evaporator.”

In addition to pure maple syrup, they make granulated maple sugar, including maple sugar shapes, and maple cream in a commercial kitchen at their Over the Hill Maple farm at 2089 Maxon Road.

“I don’t ever plan to give up nursing or making maple syrup,” Leffler said. “They are a good balance.”

Williams added that the hospital has planned activities for the nurses every day during Nurses’ Week.

“Rochester Regional Health celebrates their nurses in a big way,” she said.

On Friday, the administration cooked breakfast for the nurses. One day they received a bag of cookies from Deb's Bakery inside Harrington’s Produce and Market Cafe on Clinton Street Road in Batavia. And on other days a basket raffle is planned and a food truck will be on site at UMMC.

Wednesday, May 12 is International Nurses Day.

Submitted photos top and bottom; inset photos of farm sign and maple syrup bottle courtesy of Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism.

Below, Shanda Williams, of Stafford, with a couple of her shadow box creations, and more of her art work.

Comments
April 2, 2021 - 12:10pm
posted by Press Release in Rochester Regional Health, UMMC, news, visitation, covid-19.

Press release:

Effective Monday, April 5, visitation at Rochester General Hospital, Unity Hospital, Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic, Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, and United Memorial Medical Center will expand to allow a maximum of two visitors per patient per day for up to four hours each at the bedside. Due to social distancing concerns because of COVID-19, only one visitor will be permitted at a time.

Visitors will be required to check in after being screened at the door.

Other changes to the policy include: 

  • Pediatrics (permits two support persons together)
    • Each patient may have two support persons 24/7;
  • Labor and Delivery (permits two support persons together)
    • Each patient may have two support persons 24/7;
  • Patients with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (permits two persons together)
    • Each patient may have one support person 24/7 and one visitor for a maximum of four hours per day during scheduled visiting hours.

Visitation hours: 

  • Rochester General Hospital: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 – 8 p.m.
  • Unity Hospital: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 – 8 p.m.
  • Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic:  12 – 8 p.m.
  • Newark-Wayne Community Hospital: Monday – Friday: 1 – 5 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • United Memorial Medical Center: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 3 – 6 p.m. 

Visitation is still prohibited for Emergency Department patients, COVID-19 positive patients, patients awaiting COVID-19 test results, cancer infusion centers, and inpatient behavioral health (chemical dependency and mental health).

For more information, please visit our website at www.rochesterregional.org.

Comments
March 24, 2021 - 2:23pm

Submitted photos and press release:

Throughout the course of the coronavirus pandemic, the community has found unique ways to thank the healthcare heroes at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) through food deliveries, donations and letters.

An ongoing fundraiser spearheaded by the St. Jerome Guild’s Hometown Hero's Star Program honors the staff at UMMC and it also recently led to the donation of a freezer to store the COVID-19 vaccine. 

“Even during the pandemic, the Guild has worked to support our hospital and employees,” said Dan Ireland, president of UMMC. “We’re grateful they were able to pull the community together to remind our healthcare heroes that they’re appreciated.”

COVID-19 vaccines are now stored in the freezer as supplies arrive at UMMC. In addition, the fundraiser provides certificates of recognition to honor health care heroes. To date, nearly 1,000 certificates have been distributed to UMMC employees thanking them for their tireless efforts over the past year.

“We wanted the community to participate,” said Annette LaBarbera, president of the St. Jerome Guild. “Our goal was and continues to be raising enough money to support our healthcare workers and the exceptional care they deliver, as well as, our community.”

To celebrate an UMMC healthcare worker of your choosing by participating in the fundraiser, please email [email protected].

Visit the UMMC Auxiliaries website for more information.

Top photo, from left: UMMC staff members in front of the newly donated freezer -- Michael Harasimowicz, Lindsay Starkweather, Korey Brauen and Meagan Stringham.

Below left, Annette LaBarbera, president of the St. Jerome Guild, stands with Kathleen Storch holding her Certificate of Recognition from the St. Jerome Guild’s Hometown Hero’s Star Program​.

Below, a ceremonial check for $7,500 for the UMMC Foundation held by UMMC President Dan Ireland and Annette LaBarbera, president of the St. Jerome Guild.

Comments
February 25, 2021 - 7:21pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, tiger woods, golf, sports, Dr. Matthew Landfried.

Whether Tiger Woods can ever play competitive, PGA-level golf again depends on more than just his determination to recover from injuries he sustained Tuesday in a single-vehicle accident in Los Angeles, said Dr. Matthew Landfried, an orthopedic surgeon at United Memorial Medical Center.

Landfried spoke with members of the local media about the front-page news of the past couple of days involving the world's most famous golfer.

The 15-time winner of major tournaments lost control of the SUV he was driving and it crossed a median and veered through two lanes of traffic before hitting a curb, hitting a tree, and landing on its side in the brush, according to news reports.

Woods suffered multiple leg injuries. Landfried said based on what he's read of the injuries, Woods has a long, difficult recovery ahead of him.

"The amount of energy or force that causes the injuries creates additional problems with healing, excessive tissue damage, et cetera," Landfried said.

What concerns Landfried the most, when it comes to playing on the PGA tour, is the broken bones in the golfer's feet. Such injuries may make it impossible for Woods to walk -- as required by the PGA -- over 18 holes of golf on four consecutive days.

Then there are the compound fractures in his legs, which of themselves Woods may be able to overcome, but there are potentially two complications: whether the bones were broken at the ankle and knee joints (unknown) -- making rehabilitation more difficult -- and a procedure apprarently required in this case called a fasciotomy.

Landfried explains:

There are four (compartments) in the lower leg. Around those compartments is a sheath that's called fascia and it's actually very hard. I don't want to call it stiff, but it's unforgiving. It doesn't expand. So inside each compartment, most of them, there's a nerve and muscles and blood supply or blood vessels. When the muscles get injured that much, they bleed, they swell and they expand or want to expand beyond the ability of fascia to expand.

What starts to happen is you start cutting off blood supply, muscle starts to die and the nerves can be injured or killed. So you have to split that fascia. You have to take a knife and open that up from the top to the bottom. And when you do that, a muscle kind of comes oozing out and pours out, but it's taking the pressure off.

He added:

Because it is so swollen, you never close the fascia, but you can, most times close the skin, even in the leg. ... They probably did a two incision, for four compartments. So you got two large wounds from, you know, top of your leg to the bottom of the leg, wide open now. So those have to be treated with dressing or vacuum dressings, and infections are the biggest risk.

Finally:

The ability to heal because at that level of trauma is a second problem because what happens when the bone breaks that badly, it comes through the skin, the periosteum, which is a lining around the bone. I tell people it's like the sausage, the skin on a sausage, but it's around the bone that's been torn and stripped the blood supply to those areas that are broken, have been stripped and are gone. So, you know, as long as they reestablish, then you heal. If they don't reestablish, then you get what's called a delayed union or nonunion and sometimes it never heals.

So, all of those varabiles factor in Tiger's ability to not only fully recover but recover enough to hit the links again.

Woods hadn't been playing because he recently went through his fifth back surgery and was in recovery. Landfried said he hasn't seen any reports to indicate whether Woods reinjured his back in the accident but that could be another factor in his ability to play on the tour again.

At 45, Woods is just at the start of the age where most people find it more difficult, and it takes longer to recover from injuries. What may be in his favor is his athletically maintained body and his own willingness, well demonstrated over his career, to work hard. He will also have the advantage of physical therapists working with him every day.

"He's an incredible athlete," Landfried said. "He's working hard and he's going to have the best of the best. So as long as he can walk the 18 holes, he'll be back. But I just think it'll be some loss of power."

Comments
February 18, 2021 - 2:50pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in dan ireland, UMMC, livestream, video, covid-19, coronavirus.
Video Sponsor

Dan Ireland, President of United Memorial Medical Center

Comments
February 12, 2021 - 4:30pm
posted by Press Release in news, UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, visitation, covid-19, batavia.

Press release:

Rochester Regional Health and the University of Rochester Medical Center announced plans to resume restricted hospital visitation. Rochester Regional Health will begin visitation on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at its five hospitals while URMC will start visitation the day before. 

Visiting Hours

  • Rochester General Hospital:  Daily from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 4 to 7 p.m.
  • Unity Hospital: Daily from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., and 4 to 7 p.m.
  • Clifton Springs Hospital: Daily from 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Newark-Wayne Community Hospital: Monday – Friday from 1 to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • United Memorial Medical Center: Daily 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 3 to 6 p.m.

Visitation Guidelines

Patients may designate two visitors throughout the patient’s stay;

  • Only ONE visitor is allowed at a time at the bedside for no more than four hours daily.
  • Visitors must be 19 years of age or older. 
  • *No visitors will be permitted for:
    • Emergency Department patients
    • COVID-19 positive patients
    • Patients awaiting COVID-19 test results
    • Cancer patient infusion centers  
    • Inpatient behavioral health (chemical dependency and mental health)
  • In addition to a designated visitor, the following groups may designate a support person who is not restricted by visitation hours.  
    • Pediatric patientsOne support person may be present on-site at a time in the emergency room or during hospitalization. For pediatric patients, especially with prolonged hospitalizations, the patient or family/caregiver may designate two support people; but only one support person may be present at a time. 
    • Labor & Delivery: May have one support person and a doula to be present at the bedside upon admission, throughout labor, delivery, and the postpartum period including recovery until discharge to home. 
    • Once delivery has occurred, an additional visitor may be designated by the patient and must comply with the visitor policy outlined above.
    • Patients with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD), and cognitive impairments including dementia: One support person may be present on-site at a time in the emergency room or during hospitalization. The patient or family/caregiver may designate two support people, but only one support person may be present at a time.
    • End-of-Life Situations: The patient and/or family/caregiver may designate two visitors at a time at the bedside as long as social distancing is maintained. Minor age visitors must be accompanied by an adult. Clergy members visiting at end of life are counted as one of the two visitors at the bedside. End-of-life determinations are made in coordination with the patient, family/legal guardian, and treatment team. Visitation for end-of-life situations is not restricted by COVID-19 status or hours. All infection control guidelines and instructions must be followed.
Comments
January 14, 2021 - 2:36pm
posted by Press Release in covid-19, coronavirus, news, video, UMMC.

Press release:

This week, Rochester Regional Health began providing the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to its primary care patients who are age 75 and older. The system is directly calling patients in this group to schedule appointments at COVID-19 vaccine clinics located throughout Greater Rochester. One of Rochester Regional’s clinics is located outside United Memorial Medical Center’s Jerome Center and it began vaccinating patients in this group today.

The clinics are by appointment only. The health system has been selecting, at random, patients age 75 and older who are enrolled in primary care practices owned by or affiliated with Rochester Regional Health. When a patient is selected, a Rochester Regional Health representative calls the patient and schedules their vaccine appointment.

“By randomly selecting patients from the eligible age group, we are ensuring fair and equal access,” said Stephanie Dodd, RN, director of Nursing for Rochester Regional Health. “It also makes it easier for patients. If you go to a primary care practice owned by or affiliated with Rochester Regional Health and you are in the eligible age group, someone from our central office will call you when the vaccine is available to you and help make your appointment.”

This week, Rochester Regional is on track to administer 1,200 vaccinations for patients age 75 and older.

Per the latest guidance from New York State, Rochester Regional Health will expand this process to include patients age 65 years and older beginning next week.

Patients in this age group are part of Phase 1B in the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) prioritization guidelines. Community members who are not enrolled with a Rochester Regional Health owned or affiliated primary care practice, and/or are younger than 65, but are still eligible under Phase 1B for other reasons (including educators, first responders, public safety workers and public transit workers), are encouraged to call the New York State vaccination hotline at 1-833-NYS-4VAX (1-833-697-4829) or use the New York State “Am I Eilgible?” app.

Key reminders:

  • Rochester Regional Health COVID-19 vaccine clinics are by appointment only. If you are 65 or older and enrolled with a Rochester Regional Health primary care provider, you will receive a call to schedule your vaccine appointment. 
  • Rochester Regional is selecting patients at random from the list of those who are eligible under state guidelines. This is to ensure fair and equal access to the vaccine.
  • If you are not a Rochester Regional Health primary care patient 65 or older, but think you may be eligible, call the New York State vaccination hotline at 1-833-NYS-4VAX (1-833-697-4829) or use the New York State “Am I Eilgible?”app.
  • Please do not call a hospital directly about making a vaccine appointment.
  • If you have medical questions about the vaccine, call your primary care doctor.
  • Rochester Regional Health patients can sign up for the MyCare app as another way to stay updated.

As more community members become eligible, Rochester Regional Health will share additional information about expanded vaccination efforts.

Comments
January 13, 2021 - 2:20pm
posted by Press Release in UMMC, news, covid-19, Subaru Legacy, charity.

Submitted image and press release:

There wasn’t a dry eye in the parking lot of the hospital on Tuesday, Jan. 12, as one hardworking United Memorial Medical Center employee received a life-changing gift.

Catherine Weatherbee has worked as a secretary at the hospital for 20 years. She thought she was going out to lunch for her 60th birthday, until she was greeted by six cameras in the hospital parking lot. Next thing she knew a 2016 Subaru Legacy with a big red bow on top was pulling up beside her.

Dr. Nicholas Loffredo, Orthopedic surgeon at United Memorial, got out and yelled “Surprise!” as he walked toward her to hand her the car keys. Weatherbee’s astonished response, “No, you didn’t?!”

Ever since her car broke down two years ago, Weatherbee has been receiving rides to work by a friend or taking a cab. Her caring nature prompted Dr. Loffredo to start a GoFundMe for the United Memorial staff to donate money toward this gift. That goal was reached in mere days. 

Excitement grew as the big day approached, but there was a setback. A week before her birthday, Weatherbee got COVID-19.

“We were going to give this to her as soon as she got back and we’re just happy she’s back with us," Dr. Loffredo said. "She’s such a selfless soul and gives to everyone around her, you can’t help but love her."

Weatherbee said “I’m numb. I have no words to describe this. This is my family. I don’t have a family out in the public, but I have a family here."

She may have arrived to work in a taxicab Tuesday morning, but she went home in style.

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