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UMMC

April 2, 2021 - 12:10pm
posted by Press Release in Rochester Regional Health, UMMC, news, visitation, covid-19.

Press release:

Effective Monday, April 5, visitation at Rochester General Hospital, Unity Hospital, Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic, Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, and United Memorial Medical Center will expand to allow a maximum of two visitors per patient per day for up to four hours each at the bedside. Due to social distancing concerns because of COVID-19, only one visitor will be permitted at a time.

Visitors will be required to check in after being screened at the door.

Other changes to the policy include: 

  • Pediatrics (permits two support persons together)
    • Each patient may have two support persons 24/7;
  • Labor and Delivery (permits two support persons together)
    • Each patient may have two support persons 24/7;
  • Patients with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (permits two persons together)
    • Each patient may have one support person 24/7 and one visitor for a maximum of four hours per day during scheduled visiting hours.

Visitation hours: 

  • Rochester General Hospital: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 – 8 p.m.
  • Unity Hospital: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 – 8 p.m.
  • Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic:  12 – 8 p.m.
  • Newark-Wayne Community Hospital: Monday – Friday: 1 – 5 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • United Memorial Medical Center: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 3 – 6 p.m. 

Visitation is still prohibited for Emergency Department patients, COVID-19 positive patients, patients awaiting COVID-19 test results, cancer infusion centers, and inpatient behavioral health (chemical dependency and mental health).

For more information, please visit our website at www.rochesterregional.org.

March 24, 2021 - 2:23pm

Submitted photos and press release:

Throughout the course of the coronavirus pandemic, the community has found unique ways to thank the healthcare heroes at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC) through food deliveries, donations and letters.

An ongoing fundraiser spearheaded by the St. Jerome Guild’s Hometown Hero's Star Program honors the staff at UMMC and it also recently led to the donation of a freezer to store the COVID-19 vaccine. 

“Even during the pandemic, the Guild has worked to support our hospital and employees,” said Dan Ireland, president of UMMC. “We’re grateful they were able to pull the community together to remind our healthcare heroes that they’re appreciated.”

COVID-19 vaccines are now stored in the freezer as supplies arrive at UMMC. In addition, the fundraiser provides certificates of recognition to honor health care heroes. To date, nearly 1,000 certificates have been distributed to UMMC employees thanking them for their tireless efforts over the past year.

“We wanted the community to participate,” said Annette LaBarbera, president of the St. Jerome Guild. “Our goal was and continues to be raising enough money to support our healthcare workers and the exceptional care they deliver, as well as, our community.”

To celebrate an UMMC healthcare worker of your choosing by participating in the fundraiser, please email [email protected].

Visit the UMMC Auxiliaries website for more information.

Top photo, from left: UMMC staff members in front of the newly donated freezer -- Michael Harasimowicz, Lindsay Starkweather, Korey Brauen and Meagan Stringham.

Below left, Annette LaBarbera, president of the St. Jerome Guild, stands with Kathleen Storch holding her Certificate of Recognition from the St. Jerome Guild’s Hometown Hero’s Star Program​.

Below, a ceremonial check for $7,500 for the UMMC Foundation held by UMMC President Dan Ireland and Annette LaBarbera, president of the St. Jerome Guild.

February 25, 2021 - 7:21pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, tiger woods, golf, sports, Dr. Matthew Landfried.

Whether Tiger Woods can ever play competitive, PGA-level golf again depends on more than just his determination to recover from injuries he sustained Tuesday in a single-vehicle accident in Los Angeles, said Dr. Matthew Landfried, an orthopedic surgeon at United Memorial Medical Center.

Landfried spoke with members of the local media about the front-page news of the past couple of days involving the world's most famous golfer.

The 15-time winner of major tournaments lost control of the SUV he was driving and it crossed a median and veered through two lanes of traffic before hitting a curb, hitting a tree, and landing on its side in the brush, according to news reports.

Woods suffered multiple leg injuries. Landfried said based on what he's read of the injuries, Woods has a long, difficult recovery ahead of him.

"The amount of energy or force that causes the injuries creates additional problems with healing, excessive tissue damage, et cetera," Landfried said.

What concerns Landfried the most, when it comes to playing on the PGA tour, is the broken bones in the golfer's feet. Such injuries may make it impossible for Woods to walk -- as required by the PGA -- over 18 holes of golf on four consecutive days.

Then there are the compound fractures in his legs, which of themselves Woods may be able to overcome, but there are potentially two complications: whether the bones were broken at the ankle and knee joints (unknown) -- making rehabilitation more difficult -- and a procedure apprarently required in this case called a fasciotomy.

Landfried explains:

There are four (compartments) in the lower leg. Around those compartments is a sheath that's called fascia and it's actually very hard. I don't want to call it stiff, but it's unforgiving. It doesn't expand. So inside each compartment, most of them, there's a nerve and muscles and blood supply or blood vessels. When the muscles get injured that much, they bleed, they swell and they expand or want to expand beyond the ability of fascia to expand.

What starts to happen is you start cutting off blood supply, muscle starts to die and the nerves can be injured or killed. So you have to split that fascia. You have to take a knife and open that up from the top to the bottom. And when you do that, a muscle kind of comes oozing out and pours out, but it's taking the pressure off.

He added:

Because it is so swollen, you never close the fascia, but you can, most times close the skin, even in the leg. ... They probably did a two incision, for four compartments. So you got two large wounds from, you know, top of your leg to the bottom of the leg, wide open now. So those have to be treated with dressing or vacuum dressings, and infections are the biggest risk.

Finally:

The ability to heal because at that level of trauma is a second problem because what happens when the bone breaks that badly, it comes through the skin, the periosteum, which is a lining around the bone. I tell people it's like the sausage, the skin on a sausage, but it's around the bone that's been torn and stripped the blood supply to those areas that are broken, have been stripped and are gone. So, you know, as long as they reestablish, then you heal. If they don't reestablish, then you get what's called a delayed union or nonunion and sometimes it never heals.

So, all of those varabiles factor in Tiger's ability to not only fully recover but recover enough to hit the links again.

Woods hadn't been playing because he recently went through his fifth back surgery and was in recovery. Landfried said he hasn't seen any reports to indicate whether Woods reinjured his back in the accident but that could be another factor in his ability to play on the tour again.

At 45, Woods is just at the start of the age where most people find it more difficult, and it takes longer to recover from injuries. What may be in his favor is his athletically maintained body and his own willingness, well demonstrated over his career, to work hard. He will also have the advantage of physical therapists working with him every day.

"He's an incredible athlete," Landfried said. "He's working hard and he's going to have the best of the best. So as long as he can walk the 18 holes, he'll be back. But I just think it'll be some loss of power."

February 18, 2021 - 2:50pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in dan ireland, UMMC, livestream, video, covid-19, coronavirus.
Video Sponsor

Dan Ireland, President of United Memorial Medical Center

February 12, 2021 - 4:30pm
posted by Press Release in news, UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, visitation, covid-19, batavia.

Press release:

Rochester Regional Health and the University of Rochester Medical Center announced plans to resume restricted hospital visitation. Rochester Regional Health will begin visitation on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at its five hospitals while URMC will start visitation the day before. 

Visiting Hours

  • Rochester General Hospital:  Daily from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 4 to 7 p.m.
  • Unity Hospital: Daily from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., and 4 to 7 p.m.
  • Clifton Springs Hospital: Daily from 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Newark-Wayne Community Hospital: Monday – Friday from 1 to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • United Memorial Medical Center: Daily 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 3 to 6 p.m.

Visitation Guidelines

Patients may designate two visitors throughout the patient’s stay;

  • Only ONE visitor is allowed at a time at the bedside for no more than four hours daily.
  • Visitors must be 19 years of age or older. 
  • *No visitors will be permitted for:
    • Emergency Department patients
    • COVID-19 positive patients
    • Patients awaiting COVID-19 test results
    • Cancer patient infusion centers  
    • Inpatient behavioral health (chemical dependency and mental health)
  • In addition to a designated visitor, the following groups may designate a support person who is not restricted by visitation hours.  
    • Pediatric patientsOne support person may be present on-site at a time in the emergency room or during hospitalization. For pediatric patients, especially with prolonged hospitalizations, the patient or family/caregiver may designate two support people; but only one support person may be present at a time. 
    • Labor & Delivery: May have one support person and a doula to be present at the bedside upon admission, throughout labor, delivery, and the postpartum period including recovery until discharge to home. 
    • Once delivery has occurred, an additional visitor may be designated by the patient and must comply with the visitor policy outlined above.
    • Patients with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD), and cognitive impairments including dementia: One support person may be present on-site at a time in the emergency room or during hospitalization. The patient or family/caregiver may designate two support people, but only one support person may be present at a time.
    • End-of-Life Situations: The patient and/or family/caregiver may designate two visitors at a time at the bedside as long as social distancing is maintained. Minor age visitors must be accompanied by an adult. Clergy members visiting at end of life are counted as one of the two visitors at the bedside. End-of-life determinations are made in coordination with the patient, family/legal guardian, and treatment team. Visitation for end-of-life situations is not restricted by COVID-19 status or hours. All infection control guidelines and instructions must be followed.
January 14, 2021 - 2:36pm
posted by Press Release in covid-19, coronavirus, news, video, UMMC.

Press release:

This week, Rochester Regional Health began providing the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to its primary care patients who are age 75 and older. The system is directly calling patients in this group to schedule appointments at COVID-19 vaccine clinics located throughout Greater Rochester. One of Rochester Regional’s clinics is located outside United Memorial Medical Center’s Jerome Center and it began vaccinating patients in this group today.

The clinics are by appointment only. The health system has been selecting, at random, patients age 75 and older who are enrolled in primary care practices owned by or affiliated with Rochester Regional Health. When a patient is selected, a Rochester Regional Health representative calls the patient and schedules their vaccine appointment.

“By randomly selecting patients from the eligible age group, we are ensuring fair and equal access,” said Stephanie Dodd, RN, director of Nursing for Rochester Regional Health. “It also makes it easier for patients. If you go to a primary care practice owned by or affiliated with Rochester Regional Health and you are in the eligible age group, someone from our central office will call you when the vaccine is available to you and help make your appointment.”

This week, Rochester Regional is on track to administer 1,200 vaccinations for patients age 75 and older.

Per the latest guidance from New York State, Rochester Regional Health will expand this process to include patients age 65 years and older beginning next week.

Patients in this age group are part of Phase 1B in the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) prioritization guidelines. Community members who are not enrolled with a Rochester Regional Health owned or affiliated primary care practice, and/or are younger than 65, but are still eligible under Phase 1B for other reasons (including educators, first responders, public safety workers and public transit workers), are encouraged to call the New York State vaccination hotline at 1-833-NYS-4VAX (1-833-697-4829) or use the New York State “Am I Eilgible?” app.

Key reminders:

  • Rochester Regional Health COVID-19 vaccine clinics are by appointment only. If you are 65 or older and enrolled with a Rochester Regional Health primary care provider, you will receive a call to schedule your vaccine appointment. 
  • Rochester Regional is selecting patients at random from the list of those who are eligible under state guidelines. This is to ensure fair and equal access to the vaccine.
  • If you are not a Rochester Regional Health primary care patient 65 or older, but think you may be eligible, call the New York State vaccination hotline at 1-833-NYS-4VAX (1-833-697-4829) or use the New York State “Am I Eilgible?”app.
  • Please do not call a hospital directly about making a vaccine appointment.
  • If you have medical questions about the vaccine, call your primary care doctor.
  • Rochester Regional Health patients can sign up for the MyCare app as another way to stay updated.

As more community members become eligible, Rochester Regional Health will share additional information about expanded vaccination efforts.

January 13, 2021 - 2:20pm
posted by Press Release in UMMC, news, covid-19, Subaru Legacy, charity.

Submitted image and press release:

There wasn’t a dry eye in the parking lot of the hospital on Tuesday, Jan. 12, as one hardworking United Memorial Medical Center employee received a life-changing gift.

Catherine Weatherbee has worked as a secretary at the hospital for 20 years. She thought she was going out to lunch for her 60th birthday, until she was greeted by six cameras in the hospital parking lot. Next thing she knew a 2016 Subaru Legacy with a big red bow on top was pulling up beside her.

Dr. Nicholas Loffredo, Orthopedic surgeon at United Memorial, got out and yelled “Surprise!” as he walked toward her to hand her the car keys. Weatherbee’s astonished response, “No, you didn’t?!”

Ever since her car broke down two years ago, Weatherbee has been receiving rides to work by a friend or taking a cab. Her caring nature prompted Dr. Loffredo to start a GoFundMe for the United Memorial staff to donate money toward this gift. That goal was reached in mere days. 

Excitement grew as the big day approached, but there was a setback. A week before her birthday, Weatherbee got COVID-19.

“We were going to give this to her as soon as she got back and we’re just happy she’s back with us," Dr. Loffredo said. "She’s such a selfless soul and gives to everyone around her, you can’t help but love her."

Weatherbee said “I’m numb. I have no words to describe this. This is my family. I don’t have a family out in the public, but I have a family here."

She may have arrived to work in a taxicab Tuesday morning, but she went home in style.

December 18, 2020 - 2:20pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, covid-19, coronavirus, news, batavia.

Yesterday, the first members of UMMC's staff received the COVID-19 vaccine.

The video was shot by Rochester Regional Health staff and edited by Howard Owens.

December 4, 2020 - 1:10pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, news, covid-19, coronavirus, notify.

drtesserummc.jpg

The number of patients visiting UMMC's urgent care clinic at the Jerome Center has more than doubled over the past month due to a greater prevalence of COVID-19 in the community, according to Dr. Andrew Tisser, urgent care medical director.

"We've seen a very large increase in both symptomatic and asymptomatic covid testing and need for medical care in Batavia specifically speaking to the urgent care center," Tisser said this morning during a conference call with local media. "Our volume in the last three or so weeks has increased by about 110 percent."

The number of patients visiting urgent care has done from about 25 per day to 50 or 60 per day, and about 80 percent of the visitors are coming to the client for COVID-related reasons.

There is currently a surge of COVID in the community and there is no way to know if we're at the peak or if the caseload will only get bigger in the coming weeks or months. Either way, Tisser expressed confidence that UMMC and Rochester Reginal Health is ready to adapt to changing circumstances. He believes the urgent care center can handle the coming caseload even if there is an increase in community spread.

That said, the community can help, Tisser said. He encouraged local residents to wear a mask, keep socially distant and follow other CDC guidelines to help control the spread of COVID.

In the spring, healthcare workers were hailed as superheroes and feted with free meals and parades. That attention has faded and people are seemingly paying less attention to guidelines about social gatherings. Tisser acknowledged that there may be a degree of COVID fatigue that may have set it but healthcare workers aren't looking for any special attention.

"We don't want to be seen as heroes," Tisser said. "We want everyone to be socially responsible and know that we're doing our best. So if everyone would please do their best, that would be really helpful. But we are here to help you. We're here to take care of you."

Tesser explained to help people and to keep everybody safe, there are now two ways to access the urgent care clinic. The main lobby for standard urgent care but for people seeking COVID-related service, a doorway with a phone where clients can speak to a nurse who can triage their needs. If it's a test for symptomatic or asymptomatic clients, they are asked to wait in their car where the test can be administered.

People who show up at the clinic are usually there because they're symptomatic and were referred by a primary care physician or they are a known close contact with a COVID-positive person and need to be tested as a result.

Tesser said people who are symptomatic should contact their primary care physician to get guidance on testing and evaluation.

The urgent care clinic only handles mild COVID-19 cases, people with a low-grade fever, a mild cough, other mild symptoms. More serious cases are generally referred to the emergency room.

"We're here to help you, but please try to help us," Tisser said. "The virus is not going away any time soon. We are hopeful with the vaccine coming, but it will take time to get everyone on the vaccine. So everyone needs to keep doing what they're doing to the best of their ability and just be smart and stay safe."

November 25, 2020 - 10:51am
posted by Howard B. Owens in live stream, UMMC, covid-19, coronavirus, news, batavia.
Video Sponsor

Interview with Dan Ireland, CEO of UMMC. Scheduled to start at 11 a.m.

November 11, 2020 - 5:00pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Veterans Day, veterans, news, batavia, UMMC.

veteransday2020-6.jpg

The men and women who have served the United States in military service were honored by local veterans today, Veterans Day, in services at the County Park, the VA Hospital, the State Veterans Home, and the Upton Monument.  

These photos are from the ceremony at the St. Jerome's War Memorial.

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Below: A video submitted by UMMC of Dan Ireland, the hospital's CEO, delivering a Veterans Day message.

Video Sponsor
October 1, 2020 - 5:21pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in workforce development, kathy hochul, UMMC, video, batavia, news.
Video Sponsor

Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul visited UMMC on Wednesday to announce the hospital will receive a $200,000 state workforce development grant to help people enter the nursing career. The grant is part of an $18 million statewide project announced yesterday by the governor's office as part of Workforce Development Awareness Week.  

Press release from the governor's office:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that, during Workforce Development Awareness Week, New York State has been awarded an $18 million federal grant to fund educational opportunities that train New Yorkers for in-demand jobs, support entrepreneurs, and help small businesses recover from the coronavirus pandemic.

New York was one of just eight states to receive the funding -- made available through the CARES Act -- and received the most of any state that was awarded a grant. 

"The coronavirus pandemic is far from over, and as we continue to fight against this deadly virus, we must also respond to the economic devastation it has caused," Governor Andrew Cuomo said. "With millions of Americans out of work, we must use every resource available to train New Yorkers to compete -- and succeed - in this difficult economic situation.

"Our workforce is the bedrock of our economy, and I know that this funding will help bridge the gap between education and industry, allowing us to build back better by uplifting both individuals looking for jobs and small businesses across the state."  

"We are making success accessible ensuring New Yorkers have the training and skills they need to seek new jobs and opportunities as we continue to battle this pandemic," said Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul. "Our ongoing workforce development initiative is supporting efforts to improve the economic security of women, youth and other groups that face significant barriers by making job placement more inclusive and leaving no New Yorker behind.

"We are sending a clear message to New Yorkers that they will have the training and skills they need to succeed as we build back better, smarter and stronger for the future."

The New York State Department of Labor will partner with the Office of Workforce Development, Empire State Development, New York's ten Regional Economic Development Councils, the State University of New York, and the City University of New York to allocate the federal grant funding on programs that support New York's continued economic recovery. 

Educational programs will focus on developing the skills needed to succeed in emerging growth industries like tech, logistics, and advanced manufacturing, and supporting entrepreneurs. New York's multipronged approach will include four elements:

1) Education for Hard-Hit NYC: In New York City, which was among the worst-hit COVID-19 communities, the CUNY system will assist in training residents with the digital skills needed for in-demand sectors such as data analytics, cybersecurity, advanced logistics/supply chain, digital marketing and communications, and software development. 

2) "Stay Near, Go Far" at SUNY: At 30 community colleges across the State, SUNY will leverage its existing "Stay Near, Go Far" initiative to train New Yorkers in high growth industries, including technology, healthcare, and advanced manufacturing, and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills needed to open their own businesses.

3) Entrepreneurship Boot Camps: Building on its existing resources, Empire State Development will host a series of intensive workshops and boot camps to train entrepreneurs and small business owners on how to run their own business during - and after - the pandemic. 

4) Industry Focus, Regional Results: The Department of Labor will issue a competitive Request for Proposals and work with New York State's 10 Regional Economic Development Councils to identify industry-driven programs that either train job seekers to meet current local employment needs or are designed to address future economic and workforce development needs.

August 14, 2020 - 2:09pm

Press release:

United Memorial Medical Center Department of Cardiology in Batavia has been granted an additional three-year term of accreditation by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) in echocardiography in the area(s) of adult transthoracic, adult stress.

This latest accreditation awarded to United Memorial Medical Center Department of Cardiology demonstrates the facility’s ongoing commitment to providing quality patient care in echocardiography. 

Echocardiography is used to assess different areas of the heart and can detect heart disease or signs of serious conditions. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, followed closely by stroke as the fourth highest cause of death.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), more than 2,150 Americans die each day from cardiovascular disease, which amounts to about one every 40 seconds. 

There are many factors that contribute to an accurate diagnosis based on echocardiography. The training and experience of the sonographer performing the procedure, the type of equipment used and the quality assessment metrics each facility is required to measure, all contribute to a positive patient outcome.

IAC accreditation is a “seal of approval” that patients can rely on as an indicator of consistent quality care and a dedication to continuous improvement. 

Accreditation by IAC indicates that United Memorial Medical Center Department of Cardiology has undergone an intensive application and review process and is found to be in compliance with the published Standards.

Comprised of a detailed self-evaluation followed by a thorough review by a panel of medical experts, the IAC accreditation process enables both the critical operational and technical components of the applicant facility to be assessed, including representative case studies and their corresponding final reports.

August 11, 2020 - 12:21pm
posted by Press Release in UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, Healthgrades, news.

Press release:

Rochester Regional Health is proud to announce five-star ratings for vaginal delivery at Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, United Memorial Medical Center and Unity Hospital a five-star rating for C-sections at Newark-Wayne Community Hospital and United Memorial Medical Center as recognized by Healthgrades, the leading resource that connects consumers, physicians and health systems.

UMMC has received a five-star rating for vaginal delivery for the last six years and Newark-Wayne and Unity have received it for two consecutive years.

The five-star rating indicates the hospitals’ clinical outcomes for vaginal delivery and C-sections are statistically significantly better than expected.

“The five-star ratings reflect our teams’ commitment to providing the highest quality of care to all patients during some of the most profound moments in their lives,” said Meghan Aldrich, VP of Operations for Women’s Health. “We appreciate the trust our community puts in us to take care of their families, and we are proud to relentlessly pursue ever more extraordinary care for our patients.”

“Hospital quality should be top of mind for consumers when they evaluate and compare hospital performance,” said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Healthgrades. “Women who select a hospital with a five-star rating can feel confident in their choice knowing that these organizations are committed to providing exceptional women’s care to their patients.”

Healthgrades analyzed all-payer state data for 16 states for years 2016 through 2018. Healthgrades found that there is a significant variation in hospital quality between those that have received five-stars and those that have not. For example, from 2016 through 2018, women having a vaginal delivery in hospitals rated five-stars have, on average, a 43.6-percent lower risk of experiencing a complication while in the hospital than if they were treated by hospitals rated one-star.

View Healthgrades hospital quality awards and methodologies.

Learn more about how hospitals partner with Healthgrades.

August 4, 2020 - 3:16pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in UMMC, Rochester Regional Health, honey bees, video, batavia.
Video Sponsor

Last year, Unity Hospital in Rochester became the first hospital in Upstate New York to launch a rooftop honeybee program. This summer that program expanded with honeybee hives now on the roofs of Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic, Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, Rochester General Hospital and Batavia's United Memorial Medical Center, as well.

This program supports Rochester Regional Health’s sustainability mission to strengthen and support our local environment. The bees produce honey and is bottled and available to employees, patients, and visitors for purchase. There are about two million bees total between all video hospital roofs.

Video supplied by Rochester Regional Health; edited by The Batavian.

July 28, 2020 - 1:27pm

Press release:

Genesee Orthopaedics surgeons are now performing robotically assisted knee replacement surgery at Rochester Regional Health United Memorial Medical Center with the help of Zimmer Biomet’s ROSA® Knee System.

United Memorial Medical Center is one of four Rochester Regional Health system hospitals to invest in this new orthopedic and joint replacement technology, making them the first healthcare system in the Rochester region to perform a robotically assisted total knee replacement. 

The assistance of ROSA, which stands for Robotic Surgical Assistant, provides a greater degree of accuracy for the orthopedic surgeon and a quicker return to daily activities for the patient.

On Friday, Matthew Landfried, MD, Chief of Orthopedic Surgery at United Memorial Medical Center, was the first to perform the procedure in the Greater Rochester Area and did so in Batavia.

“We are thrilled to bring this emerging technology to our rural hospital and provide local access to this level of care,” said Dan Ireland, president of United Memorial Medical Center. “Having teams that embrace this advanced technology is an extreme benefit to our patients, providing them with the best possible outcomes and the care they need, close to home.”

Total Knee Replacement is one of the most commonly performed elective surgical procedures in the United States with approximately 700,000 conducted in a year. It is also the most common surgery performed within the health system with more than 2,000 knee replacements conducted each year. Almost all patients who are candidates for total knee replacement qualify for the procedure using robotic assistance. 

Prior to surgery, the ROSA Knee System’s 3D model virtually tracks how the patient’s knee moves in real time. If a patient’s knee moves even a fraction of an inch, the robot will know and adjust accordingly. This data provided enables surgeons to use computer and software technology to move surgical instruments executing the procedure with an extremely high degree of accuracy.

“No two patients are the same,” UMMC's Dr. Landfried said. “The robot doesn’t operate on its own but is instead used to assist us in making an accurate incision. The Rosa System personalizes surgical procedures to each individual patient’s anatomy, allowing for greater precision and accuracy during the procedure.”

This minimally invasive procedure offers the following benefits:

  • Less pain;
  • Quicker return to daily activities;
  • Shorter hospital stay;
  • Increased longevity of the implant;
  • Reduced blood loss;
  • Reduced injury.

Rochester Regional Health’s Surgery program ranks in the top 1 percent in the Northeast year after year for robotic assisted procedures. The acquisition of the Rosa Knee System is an extension of the health system’s continued investment in robotics and technology. The system has been at the forefront of robotically assisted surgery for more than 15 years with more than 10,000 robotic surgeries to date.

In the coming weeks, procedures will begin at Rochester General Hospital, Unity Hospital and Newark-Wayne Community Hospital.

July 10, 2020 - 1:08pm
posted by Billie Owens in covid-19, UMMC, The Jerome Center, batavia, news.

Press release:

Rochester Regional Health transitioned care back to Emergency Departments and Immediate Cares from evaluation tents at Unity Hospital, United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia, and Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic this week.

The drive-thru evaluation tent at Wilson Immediate Care on the Rochester General campus will remain operational for employee testing and respiratory evaluations only.

The pre-operative testing done in these tents will now transition to Patient Service Centers and the Linden Oaks Surgery Center. The locations and hours of these sites are listed below.

Since the pandemic began, nearly 25,000 patients and 21,000 COVID-19 tests were performed in the tents. This is in addition to the more than 800 discharges of patients from the hospital systemwide (more than 750 in Monroe County). 

All Pre-Op Testing

Patient Service Center

Address

Hours

Batavia PSC

106 Main St., Suite 47B 

Batavia, NY  14020

 

Monday - Friday:  8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday:  8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 

Clifton Hospital PSC

 

2 Coulter Road

Clifton Springs, NY 14432

 

Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

Saturday: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Linden Oaks PSC

 

10 Hagen Drive Suite 120 

Rochester NY 14625

 

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Saturday: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

 

Linden Oaks ASC 
(Drive-thru in the parking lot)

 

10 Hagen Drive 

Rochester NY 14625

 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday: 7 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

Newark Union PSC

 

165 Union St.

Newark NY 14513

 

Monday- Saturday: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 

Park Ridge/Unity POB PSC

 

1561 Long Pond Road, Suite 111 

Greece NY 14626

 

Monday- Friday: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Saturday: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 

Titus PSC 

 

485 Titus Ave.

Rochester NY 14617

 

Monday- Friday: 8 a.m. -- 4 p.m.

Saturday: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 

COVID-19 Evaluations  -- These are NOT walk-in testing sites, patients will be evaluated and tested only if they meet the criteria (we do not test everyone. The MCC state-run tent does.)  

Immediate Care

Address

Hours

Immediate Care – Chili

 

3170 Chili Ave. 

Suite T1A

Rochester, NY 14624

 

Monday -- Friday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. -  8 p.m.

Immediate Care Webster

1065 Ridge Road

Webster, NY 14580

 

Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. -- 9 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. --  8 p.m.

Immediate Care – Penfield

 

2226 Penfield Road

Penfield, NY 14526

 

Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Immediate Care – Irondequoit

 

2701 Culver Road

Rochester, NY 14622

 

Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. -  8 p.m.

Immediate Care – Wilson

 

1425 Portland Ave., Wilson Building 

Rochester, NY 14621

 

Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. -  8 p.m.

Immediate Care – Greece

 

2745 W. Ridge Road

Rochester, NY 14626

 

Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. -  8 p.m.

Immediate Care – Henrietta

 

2685 E. Henrietta Road

Henrietta, NY 14467

 

Monday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. -  8 p.m.

Immediate Care – Batavia (The Jerome Center)

 

16 Bank St. 

Batavia, NY  14020

 

Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

June 25, 2020 - 1:56pm
posted by Billie Owens in covid-19, news, UMMC, visitation, Rochester Regional Health.

Press release:

As you all know, visitation began at our Rochester Regional Health hospitals today at noon, including United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia.

Today visitors were welcome from 12 to 1 p.m. and they will again be welcome today from 4 to 7 p.m.

After today, the visiting hours are 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. seven days a week.

There has already been some confusion at some of our facilities about what the visitation rules are. We would like to reiterate the following points:

  • Each patient is allowed to designate two visitors for the length of their hospital stay.
  • Each patient can have ONE VISITOR at a time for a MAXIMUM of FOUR hours a day.
  • Two visitors will NOT be permitted at the facility at the same time (we are having people show up in pairs). If they show up in pairs, one will have to leave the facility and come back when the other has finished visiting and left the building.
  • Visitors will have to register at the entrance to the facility and provide an ID.
  • Visitors MUST wear a mask and wear it PROPERLY. If they do not have a mask, we will provide one. The proper way to wear a mask or face covering is to COMPLETELY COVER YOUR NOSE AND MOUTH. If visitors fail to comply, they will not be allowed to visit the patient and be asked to leave.

Please know that we are doing our best to follow the NYS guidelines for visitation. We know people want to see their loved ones and we want to allow them to do that, but we have to continue to make safety the priority and do all we can to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

This is a tough time for everyone and we appreciate your patience and understanding.

For yesterday's press release regarding visitation and the strict policy in place for it, click here.

June 5, 2020 - 2:15pm

101528756_2586884428244473_4481484166453526528_n_copy.jpg

Photo by Jim Burns.

Batavia employees of Rochester Regional Health / United Memorial Medical Center take a knee at the War Memorial at Jerome Center at 8:46 this morning.

The time of 8:46 signifies the length of time a white police officer in Minneapolis, Derek Chauvin, knelt on the neck of George Floyd May 25, killing him. The police were called after a store clerk suspected Floyd of using a counterfeit $20 bill at the store. Three other officers at the scene are also charged in the case: J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao.

A message from Rochester Regional Health President and CEO Eric Bieber, M.D.:

"Today, we as healers at Rochester Regional Health stand with you for healing. The events we have witnessed in our nation and community these past few days are almost unbearable to describe. Already frayed by fighting COVID-19, we witnessed the brutal death of George Floyd — a horrific repeat of too many deaths gone before. Then in our own Rochester community, a peaceful protest devolved into violence.

"Each member of our Rochester Regional Health team is touched by these tragedies—more than 17,000 souls, along with our friends, loved ones, neighbors, and families. And of course, you, our patients. Many of you were born and raised in Rochester. Others hail from every continent on earth. We are diverse in every possible way — race, ethnicity, job description, cultural background, and religion.

"While diversity is our strength, there is more work to be done to bridge the divide. Today we are united in our grief and our resolve. All throughout the coronavirus pandemic, we have been telling you that we will get through this together. Those words mean more now than ever. Together is the way we will get through this to mend our hearts and community.

"Thank you, each of you, for your precious differences and united spirit."

May 21, 2020 - 1:18pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in masks, covid-19, coronavirus, news, UMMC, video, live stream.
Video Sponsor

Interview with UMMC infection preventionist Tricia Woodward about wearing masks.

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