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November 14, 2018 - 6:51pm
posted by Billie Owens in fire, news, Oakfield.

A passerby reports smoke coming from a silo at 2810 Judge Road in Oakfield. The location is between Maltby and Hutton roads. Oakfield Fire Department is responding.

November 14, 2018 - 3:00pm


KNOW YOUR RIGHTS! You have a right to safe workplace. Federal laws state that your employer must provide a work area with no known health or safety hazards. You also have the right to: 

  • Be protected from toxic chemicals;
  • Request an OSHA inspection, and talk with the inspector;
  • Be trained in a language you understand;
  • Work on machines that meet safety regulations;
  • See copies of the workplace injury and illness log;
  • Get copies of test results done to find hazards in the workplace;
  • Be provided required safety gear, including but not limited to: Hardhat, gloves and harness;
  • Report an injury or illness, and get copies of your medical records If you or someone you know has been injured or fallen ill due to unsafe work conditions. 

Call Dolce Panepinto at 716-852-1888 immediately. We understand how life altering a work injury can be, and we are here to help.

November 14, 2018 - 2:33pm
posted by Billie Owens in Genesee County YWCA, news.

Press release:

Since the announcement last March that the YWCA might be closing its doors, the organization has been rebuilding, reorganizing and refreshing its programs to better serve Genesee County residents.

Hiring Millie Tomidy-Pepper, as the new executive director of the YWCA, was the first and most important step in achieving this goal. With Tomidy-Pepper at the helm, the YWCA has trimmed operating expenses, put the building up for sale, acquired grants, and continued services to participants without interruption.

And it is thanks to the very generous support of so many in the community, that the YW is now able to say that it is operating in the black. Even as we look at the sale of its building, the agency is moving forward with plans for the future.   

Establishing a new board of directors is a part of this plan. Newly elected YWCA Board President Eve Hens has a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Behavior and is a graduate of the United States Air Force Academy. She also has an MBA in Management from SUNY Empire State and is the purchasing director for Genesee County. 

Board Vice President is Liz Farmer has a Bachelor of Science degree from Houghton College, and a Master of Science degree from Robert’s Wesleyan College. She is a Human Resources consultant for Employer Services Corporation (ESC), and an adjunct professor at her two alma maters.

The YW’s treasurer is Linda Rost, who has a Master of Science degree in Education from SUNY Geneseo. Rost worked with both the YWCA of Rochester and Monroe County and the YWCA of Central Massachusetts, and is retired from Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse.  

Serving as secretary to the Board is Lucille DiSanto. With a master's degree in Special Education, SUNY Binghamton, and an Education Administration Degree from Canisius College, DiSanto was a schoolteacher for 28 years, teaching the last 20 years for Batavia City Schools. She is now a substitute teacher for the district, and a member of the Zonta Club of Batavia, where she began the Z-Club of Batavia High School eight years ago. 

Ruth Andes has also joined the Board as a director. Andes has a Bachelor of Science in Sociology, SUNY Buffalo;  Master of Science in Sociology, Southern Illinois University, PhD. in Sociology, University of Hawaii at Manoa. She was a professor of Sociology and Human Services for more than years at Genesee Community College, and was the assistant dean for Assessment and Special Projects for 10 years, also at GCC.

And, its newest director, Lorie Longhany, is a graduate of Le Roy High School. She taught Art at Holy Family School and St. Mary’s School, and is a self-employed art instructor working with diverse adult populations. Longhany is a member of the NYS Democratic Committee and the elected Genesee County Board of Elections commissioner.

The Board of Directors and its dedicated staff will continue to work on strategic planning and fiscal growth, so that it can continue to provide sustainable programs that foster healthy living for women and families in Genesee County communities. 

There will be various fundraisers throughout the coming year. Currently the YWCA is running a Cash Raffle with prize money totaling $10,000. Tickets are sold at the YWCA, and by staff and board members. The drawing will be on Dec. 6th, at T.F. Brown’s Restaurant.

A larger fundraiser will be the “YWCA Spring Fest” at Batavia Downs on Sunday, June 9th. This will consist of 130 artisans, crafters, artists, direct sales vendors and food vendors. There will be face painting, people making balloon animals, pony rides and games for the children. Proceeds will go toward the YW’s Domestic Violence Program. 

For more information on its programs and services, or fundraising activities, please call the YWCA at (585) 343-5808.

November 14, 2018 - 2:20pm
posted by Billie Owens in infrastructure, batavia, Alabama, steve hawley, BRIDGE-NY, news.

Press release:

Assemblyman Steve Hawley (R,C,I-Batavia) today announced nearly $6 million in funding will be injected into six, much-needed bridge and culvert repairs in Genesee, Orleans and Monroe counties as part of the BRIDGE-NY program that was a component of last year’s state budget.

A recent study by CNBC ranked New York’s infrastructure as some of the worst in the nation, with 10.5 percent of bridges ranked as deficient and 60 percent of roads classified as in poor or mediocre condition.

“I am very pleased to see our hard-fought victory for more upstate infrastructure funding is finally yielding tangible results,” Hawley said. “At a time when too many lawmakers set their sights on funneling more and more of our resources to fix downstate calamities like the MTA and LaGuardia Airport, it is more important than ever to focus on addressing upstate’s needs and that starts with our deficient roads, bridges and highways.

"Rest assured, maintaining the longevity of programs like BRIDGE-NY, PAVE-NY and increasing CHIPs funding will be among my top priorities come next year’s session.”

A list of BRIDGE-NY projects in the 139th Assembly District is as follows: 

  • $1.081 million to Genesee County for Sharrick Road over Murder Creek;
  • $907,000 to Genesee County for Tower Hill Road over Spring Creek;
  • $787,000 to the Town of Alabama (Genesee County) for Meadville Road over Canal Creek;
  • $1.082 million to the Town of Batavia (Genesee County) for Upton Road over Bowen Creek;
  • $686,000 to Monroe County for Lake Road W Fork over Sandy Creek;
  • $1.111 million to Orleans County for Transit Road over W Branch Sandy Creek.
November 14, 2018 - 10:59am
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, Batavia City Council.

166 South Main St., Batavia, NY, 5.73 acres, LOT/LAND, $300,000. Development site 5.73 acres in the City of Batavia. Beautiful scenic views of the Tonawanda Creek. Residential, development, place of worship, many options. Existing building can be rehabbed to 8 housing units. Existing foundation (64' x 97') can accommodate a minimum of units and a maximum of 24.

The real estate ad above more than caught the eye of Jim Carney, a 26-year resident of 162 S. Main St., who also owns property at 164 S. Main St. It also spurred him into action.

Carney made his way to Tuesday night’s City Council meeting to make the governing body aware that the ad wasn’t completely accurate and that he – and his neighbors – was prepared to oppose any plan to erect a multiple-unit housing development on that site.

The property in question once housed the City’s sewer treatment plant and later was sold by the city to a private owner.

“The ad reads the building can be rehabbed to eight housing units, with a minimum of units and a maximum of 24, but it is zoned R1A, which means that you can only have single family or duplexes there,” Carney said. “(Anything else) cannot be done without a variance.”

Carney said that there already is a high volume of apartment complexes “within a stone’s throw” of his home, namely Birchwood Village, 172 1/2 S. Main St. (Meadows) and 193 S. Main St. Apartments.

“Our concern is that more high-density housing could change the nature of the neighborhood,” Carney said. “Any attempt to change that by use of a variance will be fought by the neighbors.”

After Carney spoke, Council Member Kathleen Briggs asked if ultimately this issue would come before City Council. City Attorney George Van Nest answered in the affirmative, noting that any rezoning petition would have to be voted upon by the board.

City Council President Eugene Jankowski also responded, stating that a real estate ad doesn’t translate into a binding document and that “it’s not going to happen under our noses.”

“There are plenty of large housing units there already … it’s a bad idea.”

November 13, 2018 - 8:38pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, Batavia City Council, City Church.

A proposal to rezone several parcels on the City’s Southside moved a bit closer to reality tonight by virtue of a public hearing during City Council’s Business Meeting at the City Hall Council Board Room.

City resident John Roach was the lone speaker during the public hearing and he offered a wholehearted endorsement of the plan to change the zoning from R-3 Residential to C-3 Commercial.

City Church leaders have asked the City to amend the zoning as they hope to develop commercial activities such as a dance school, art school and community education classes at the site, which incorporates six parcels on Liberty Street and Central Avenue.

In addition, church officials are in negotiations with the City to move the Batavia Youth Bureau from its current MacArthur Drive location to the St. Anthony’s campus for an afterschool venture to be called Teen City.

Roach urged council members to approve the proposal.

“Before (the former) St. Anthony’s (Catholic Church) was sold, the school was empty and they tried to let a few businesses in. But they were shut down due to zoning,” Roach said. “Now, City Church (is involved). The neighborhood could use a shot in the arm, and without the zoning, it will sit and sit just like before.”

Council President Eugene Jankowski noted that no one has spoken against the plan.

“So we had the public hearing today and there was only a positive comment – there were no negative comments,” he said. “City Council will weigh that towards the actual resolution to make the amendment to the zoning, and that will take place within probably the next business meeting, depending on other pieces of the puzzle that come together.

“All being said, if everything goes well I would expect that at the next business meeting, we would come to a vote on that zoning change.”

Council's next session is a Conference Meeting on Nov. 26, but there is a possibility that a Special Business Meeting could be called to vote on the rezoning issue.

In other action tonight, Council:

-- Scheduled a public hearing for 7 p.m. Nov. 26 to amend the City Code to make Thorpe Street a one-way street to alleviate traffic congestion and safety concerns. The proposed amendment calls for southbound traffic only on Thorpe between Watson and Maple streets.

In conjunction with the one-way idea, it has been recommended to allow parking on the west side of Thorpe Street between Watson and Maple and to leave the portion of Thorpe Street north of Watson as a two-way street with a stop sign and a parking ban on both sides.

-- Amended the police department budget to reflect the receipt of a pair of grants – the first being a $13,000 award from Sen. Michael Ranzenhofer’s office to offset the cost of body cameras for police officers and the second being an $11,374 award from the state Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee for extra patrols to enforce seat belt usage and address speeding issues, specifically in the downtown corridor.

-- Heard a report from City Manager Martin Moore concerning the status of roof repairs at the City Centre Mall. Moore said that the number of buckets collecting water has been slashed from 65 to only five, and that he intends to “get the contractor to come back until he finds them all.”

City Council authorized funds for a temporary fix of the roof this winter, with plans to fully repair the roof in the spring.

Jankowski mentioned that a doctor tenant in the mall was under the impression -- based on an inaccurate report in the local print newspaper -- that Council was not going to fix the roof and, consequently, has started a petition campaign.

“(Starting a petition) is a waste of time,” Jankowski said, assuring all those present that the City intends to make permanent repairs to the leaky roof.

-- Passed a resolution to serve as the lead agency to conduct an environmental review of a project to construct water and storm drainage improvements on Brooklyn Avenue and within Williams Park.

-- Approved requests to hold Christmas in the City and Parade from 2 to 7 p.m. Dec. 1, with the parade from Jefferson Avenue to Summit Street scheduled for 6 p.m., and for a Women’s March and Rally from Jackson Square to the City Centre concourse at 10 a.m. Jan. 19.

-- Appointed Kathryn Fitzpatrick to the Youth Board for a term extending to Aug. 31.

November 13, 2018 - 1:43pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, notify, crime, batavia, bergen, elba, Alabama.

Angela Marie Torcello, 35, of West Main Street Road, Batavia, is charged with: falsifying business records in the first degree; grand larceny, 4th -- using a credit card; and petit larceny. Following an investigation of an incident that occurred on May 8, Torcello was arrested on these charges. It is alleged that she used a credit card that she stole to purchase products from a traveling vendor. She was issued an appearance ticket and is due in Town of Batavia Court on Nov. 26. The case was investigated by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Jeremy McClellan.

Rick Austin Drury, 21, of Judge Road, Alabama, is charged with DWI, DWI with a BAC of .08 percent or higher, and moving from lane unsafely. He was arrested following the investigation of a vehicle off the roadway on Ford Road in Elba at 3:55 a.m. on Nov. 10. He was issued an appearance ticket and is due in Elba Town Court on Dec. 19. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Mathew Clor, assisted by Deputy Andrew Mullen.

Craig Hobart Sleeman, 38, of Victor, is charged with: DWI; aggravated DWI with a BAC of .18 percent or more and no priors; unsafe turn/failure to signal; failure to keep right; and moving from lane unsafely. He was arrested at 1:48 a.m. on Nov. 11 following a traffic stop on Main Street Road in Batavia. He is due in Town of Batavia Court on Jan. 28. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Austin Heberlein.

Susan Michelle Rea, 45, of Sheridan Road, Bergen, is charged with DWI, refusal to take a breath test, and stopping/parking on a highway. Rea was arrested at 3:52 p.m. on Nov. 10 on Wortendyke Road near Route 33 in Batavia after she was allegedly found asleep behind the steering wheel of her vehicle. She was arraigned in Town of Batavia Court and released on her own recognizance. She is due in Batavia Town Court on Dec. 17. The case was handled by Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy Austin Heberlein.

November 12, 2018 - 8:40pm

Downtown Batavia's future is not the mall; it's the open areas south of Main Street, suggests Tim Tielman, a preservationist and urban planner with a track record of success in Buffalo.

Jackson Street, Jackson Square, the south side of Main Street, are where we can find what's left of Batavia's vitality, Tielman said, in a recent interview with The Batavian. The mall, he said, is the last place Batavia should invest tax dollars.

"It's a continuing drag on Batavians, their creativity, their dynamism, their energy," Tielman said. "It's this energy sucking death star in the middle of the city, and you shouldn't spend any money making it a better death star."

We interviewed Tielman in advance of his talk this Wednesday night at 7 o'clock at GO ART! for The Landmark Society of Genesee County's annual meeting.

The topic: How Batavia gets its mojo back. 

Tielman's basic thesis is that Batavia was at its apex just after the end of the 19th century when the village, soon to become a city, had a robust, densely populated urban center with hundreds of businesses.

If that downtown, which was destroyed by urban renewal, still existed Tielman said, people from Rochester and Buffalo as well as the rest of the GLOW region would flock to Batavia every week for the small city experience.

Niagara on the Lake still has it. Batavia lost it. But, with effort, Batavia can get it back, but it will literally be a ground-up process, not a top-down, consultant-driven, developer-driven effort. Batavians have to do it for themselves. But Batavians are already pointing the way if city leaders will listen.

"There's obviously an innate human need for want of a better term, congenial spaces, in towns, cities, and villages, and even in times where they've been destroyed in war or urban renewal, people find them or build them," Tielman said. "What we see in Batavia is people have happened upon Jackson Square because it's a leftover thing that no one thought about and wasn't destroyed.

"The qualities of the thing as a physical space make it a very interesting case. You enter through a narrow passageway, and suddenly, totally unexpectedly, you come to a larger space, and even though it obviously wasn't designed with gathering in mind it has everything people want as a place to gather."

Jackson Square, Jackson Street, combined with the local businesses that still populate the business district on the south side of Main Street are strengths to build on, Tielman said. Batavia can leverage the density already found there and add to it.

But Tielman isn't an advocate of trying to lure developers with tax dollars to build big projects. He believes, primarily, in a more grassroots approach. 

The "death star," he said, and continuing efforts to deal with it, are part of the "urban renewal industrial complex," as he put it, and that failed approach should be avoided.

"The solutions (of urban renewal) are all the same," Tielman said. "It's like, 'let's put out an RFP, let's get some state money instead of saying', 'well, what do the Batavians need? What are they thirsty for? What are they dying for?' What you'll find is that Batavians are like every other group of homo sapiens on the face of the Earth. If they had their druthers, they'd want something within walking distance.

"They'd want to meet friends. They'd want to do stuff close at hand and in a way that they're not killed by vehicles careening down streets at 30 or 40 miles an hour. They want their kids to be safe. They don't want to worry about them being struck by a tractor-trailer when they're riding their bikes to the candy store."

That means, of course, narrowing Ellicott Street through Downtown, perhaps adding diagonal parking to Main Street, moving auto parking from out of the center of the city, particularly in the triangle between Jackson, Main and Ellicott, which Tielman sees as the most promising area of downtown to increase density first.

Batavians will need to decide for themselves what to do, but what he suggests is that the city makes it possible for the parking lot between Jackson and Court become one big mini-city, filled with tents and temporary structures and no parking.

"The rents for a temporary store or a tent or a stand or a hotdog cart should be low enough to allow a huge segment of the population (of Batavia) to experiment," Tielman said.

Low rents remove one of the biggest impediments to people starting a business and open up the experimental possibilities so that Batavians decide for themselves what they want downtown. 

"This gives Batavia the best chance to see, whether for a very low investment on a provisional basis, (if) this will work," Tielman said. "It's not sitting back for 10 years trying to concoct a real estate investment scheme based on some RFP to lure developers and give them handouts at tremendous public risk. The idea is lower the risk and do things the way successful places have done it for millennia."

That's how it worked for Canalside, one of the projects, besides Larkin Square, Tielman has helped get started in Buffalo. With Canalside, development started with tents and temporary vendors. Now the area is revitalized, and permanent structures are being erected. It's a Buffalo success story.

The idea of starting new business and community centers with tents and temporary structures is something Tielman suggested for Batavia's future when he spoke to the Landmark Society in 2013. He suggested then the major obstacle standing in the way of Batavia's economic vitality wasn't the mall, it is massive amounts of asphalt for parking -- economically unproductive and mostly unused.

While he likes the Ellicott Street project, primarily because of the 55 apartments being added to Downtown's housing stock but also because of the involvement of Sam Savarino who has been part of successful restoration projects in Buffalo, Tielman thinks the project needs to have "connective tissue" with everything on the north side of Ellicott Street.

That means narrowing Ellicott, adding wider, more pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, and slowing down truck traffic flowing through Downtown.

Any such plan would involve the state Department of Transportation but that, he said, is just a matter of the city being willing to stand up to the DOT and paying for its own maintenance of that stretch of Route 63.

"If the Batavia's really serious about fixing (Route 63), it should do it on its own dime," Tielman said.

As part of Tielman's suggestion to concentrate growth strategies on the south side of Main Street, Tielman agrees that the farmer's market, currently at Alva and Bank, should be moved to Jackson Street.

The current location is too far from the existing local businesses, so the tendency is for people to drive to Alva, park, shop and leave. The traffic being drawn downtown isn't staying downtown.

Tielman talked about contiguity, the quality of commercial spaces adjoining each other, being necessary for convenience of users and survival of businesses.

"Connective tissue," a phrase used several times by Tielman, is critical to city centers.

"Contiguity is the lifeblood of settlements of towns and of cities," Tielman said. "If left to their own devices, places will develop like this -- and you'll see this up to World War II -- whether they were European cities, Asian cities or American cities.

"Look at a (1918) map of Batavia, contiguity was everything," Tielman added. "In a town of 18,000 people you had four-story buildings. It's crazy, you would think, but (it was built up that way)  because (of) the distance from the train station to Main Street to the courthouse. That's where you wanted to be. Everyone's walking around."

People are social animals -- Tielman made this point several times -- and Batavians, if given a chance, will support a city center with more density, Tielman said because that's human nature. What exactly that looks like, that's up to Batavians, but creating that environment will give residents a stronger sense of community, more personal connections, and shared life experience. That will foster the community's creativity and vitality, which is better than just accepting decline.

"I mean, if you look at the great John Gardner," his formative years are "when Batavia was still a place where a young John Gardner could walk up the street, buy comic books, get into trouble over there by the railroad tracks, buy something for his mother on the way home, blah, blah, blah. He could have quite a day in town and encounter characters of different stripes that can actually (be worked) into pretty rich novels of American life. You wonder whether Batavia could produce a John Gardner today."

Tim Tielman has a lot more to say about Batavia getting its mojo back (this is condensed from an hour-long conversation). Go to GO ART! at 7 p.m. Wednesday to hear more about it, ask questions, even challenge his ideas.

 

Top: Use the slider on the map to compare Batavia of 1938 with Batavia of 2016.

November 12, 2018 - 4:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in outdoors, news, Alabama.

A hunter has apparently called into emergency dispatch and reported that he's lost in the swamp near Sour Springs Road, Alabama.

There's no report of the hunter being in distress.

Deputies are responding to assist. 

November 12, 2018 - 2:55pm
posted by Billie Owens in Genesee Country Farmers' Market, batavia, news, business.

Press release from Mike Bakos, manager, Genesee Country Farmers' Market:

On behalf of the members of the Genesee Country Farmers' Market, I would like to thank everyone that supported this year's Market -- the City of Batavia, the Downtown Batavia Business Improvement District (BID), our 2018 market sponsors, our market vendors, and of course, our loyal customers.

The Market, located at the Downtown Batavia Public Market, on the corner of Bank Street and Alva Place, was, once again, able to sustain a three-day/week market schedule being open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., from mid-June through the end of October.

This year marked the third year of collaboration with the BID. The popular Friday "BIG" Market continues to grow and receive inquiries from new vendors interested in joining the Market.

It is estimated that between 1,500 and 2,000 people visited the Market each week, bringing 30,000 to 40,000 market customers into the Downtown Batavia Business District over the 20-week market season.

During the off-season, the Market will be pursuing new/prospective vendors with a goal of growing/enhancing the upcoming 2019 Market.

Please know that the Market is committed to our Mission of "providing a family-friendly environment where the residents of the Greater-Batavia area and Genesee County can shop for fresh, locally grown, produce and specialty artisanal items" -- and our Vision of "making the Genesee Country Farmers' Market @ The Downtown Batavia Public Market a WNY Destination."

Comments/inquiries regarding the Market are welcomed by emailing [email protected].

We wish you a wonderful and safe holiday season. Hoping to see you next June.

November 12, 2018 - 2:42pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Nate McMurray, NY-27, news.

Press release:

Today we observe Veterans Day, a day when we honor the sacrifices of the men and women of our armed services who have given so much to defend our democracy, keep our nation free and make our world a safer place for everyone.

It is a day worthy of discussing our elections and the importance of counting every vote, especially those of our service members who voted absentee.

As of now, several counties have begun the official canvass of the voting machines, but the vast majority remain uncounted. Tuesday is the deadline for absentee ballots to arrive, and most of the absentee ballots will be counted on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week.

Beyond the official canvass and counting of absentee ballots, there are a number of affidavit ballots that may or may not be valid. All of these will be duly considered in the coming days until the Boards of Elections are ready to provide final official results.

All of the Boards remain enjoined by Court Order from finalizing the results until all ballots are counted. This is a slow process, but a necessary one. 

There are multiple races across the state facing similar delays in determining the outcome, some with Democrats leading in the unofficial results, some with Republicans leading. I believe that in all of these, every vote must be counted. In those races, as in ours, the election isn’t over until all the ballots are counted.  

NOTE: McMurray also shared this on Twitter this afternoon: "TOMORROW: As the count goes on, I’m headed to DC! It’s new member orientation and some friendly members of Congress invited me down."

November 12, 2018 - 1:52pm
posted by Mike Pettinella in news, sports.

A ball change after the first game turned out to be the right move for Ron Lawrence of Stafford on Thursday night in the Toyota of Batavia 5-Man League at Mancuso Bowling Center.

The 61-year-old right-hander said he switched to a Storm Marvel Pearl after an opening 162 game, and proceeded to roll 205 and his first USBC-certified 300 to finish with a respectable 667 series.

"I couldn't figure it out in the first game, so I changed balls, and they started to fall," said Lawrence, who has been bowling on-and-off for the past 50 years -- regularly since 2014.

A longtime maintenance employee at Stafford Country Club, he averages in the 190s. Last season, he registered a 290 game.

Elsewhere around the Genesee Region last week:

-- Curtis Foss of Medina added to his long list of perfect games with a 300--752 effort in the Sneezy's Monday Night League at Oak Orchard Bowl in Albion.

-- Sixteen-year-old Dennis Van Duser of Perry spun a 706 series to lead all competitors in the Genesee Region Youth Travel League on Nov. 4 at Legion Lanes in Le Roy. His big series helped his Perry team to a 19-1 win over Mount Morris Lanes and into third-place in the seven-team league behind Rose Garden Bowl II and Oak Orchard Bowl I.

For a list of high scores, click on the Pin Points tab at the top of this page. Mike Pettinella's next Pin Points column is scheduled to run this Thursday.

November 12, 2018 - 10:41am
posted by Billie Owens in fire, news, batavia.

A fire is reported at the Walden Estates Apartments at 337 Bank St., Batavia; uncertain which apartment #480. Smoke is coming from the door and windows of both floors. City fire is responding.

UPDATE 10:42 a.m.: City fire on scene confirms smoke showing; investigating.

UPDATE 10:43 a.m.: Ventilating apartment now.

UPDATE 11:03 a.m.: Food on the stove was the cause of the smoke. The city assignment is back in service.

November 12, 2018 - 9:19am
posted by Howard B. Owens in accident, news, byron.

A two-vehicle accident is reported in the area of 5312 Cole Road, Byron.

One person reportedly has minor injuries.

Both vehicles are off the road.

Byron and South Byron dispatched.

November 11, 2018 - 3:31pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Armistice Day, veterans, Veterans Day, news, Le Roy, notify.

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George Botts, Cecelia Cochran, Errol Crittenden, Leo Fiorito, Thomas Illes, Edward Kaine, Percy Luttrell, Patrick Molyneaux, Edgar Murrell, George Ripton, Alvin Smith and John Wilder.

Twelve Le Royans who went to war in the Great War, the War to End All Wars, and who didn't return home.

Today they were honored on the 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day. The day when a treaty calling for the end of hostilities in Europe on the 11th day of the 11th month at the 11th hour 1918 went into effect.

A new memorial to Le Roy's 12 who died as a result of the war was dedicated at Trigon Park with prayers, poems, a song, a reading the names of the 12 names, a 21-gun salute, and the playing of taps.

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November 11, 2018 - 2:41pm

Photos and some of the information provided by Julie Beach:
 
Girl Scouts of West Genesee Service Unit held a Candlelight Vigil late yesterday afternoon to honor their sister Girls Scouts of Troop 3055 in Minnesota who were killed Nov. 3.
 
Three fourth-graders and one of their mothers died after being struck by a truck as they picked up roadside trash for a service project near the community of Lake Hallie. A fourth girl, 10, was injured.
 
The girls of Troop 42025 braved cold windy weather with light snowfall on the ground to honor them at Alexander Fire Department's Recreational Hall.
 
The truck driver, 21-year-old Colten Treu, of Chippewa Falls, Minn., is in custody in the case. Treu and a male passsenger allegedly had been "huffing" (intentionally inhaling chemical fumes) a computer keyboard cleaner he bought at Walmart at the time of the fatal wreck.

November 11, 2018 - 2:35pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in va center, veterans, Veterans Day, batavia, news.

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Among the Veterans Day ceremonies in Genesee County today there was one at the VA Center in Batavia attended by residents of the VA Hospital.

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November 11, 2018 - 9:21am
posted by Howard B. Owens in football, sports, news, oakfield-alabama, elba.

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Article by Mike Cintorino, OAE head coach.

The Oakfield-Alabama/Elba Football Team completed a perfect season on Saturday, finishing 8-0 and defeating the Weedsport Warriors 48-6 in the first-ever New York Upstate Championship in Eight-man Football. 

Once again it was the defense, as it has been the last three games for OAE, that truly set the tone for the day. 

After an opening offensive drive stalled for OAE, the defense got the ball right back after a 3 and out. 

Colton Dillon, Section V Offensive Player of the Year, scored the first three touchdowns for OAE. Dillon finished with 128 rushing yards on 13 carries with scores of 2, 6 and 61 yards. 

Gage Dieterle (Section V Defensive Player of the Year) added to his resume, earning MVP honors for the game. Dieterle only carried the ball six times but ran for 119 yards and for two big scores with runs of 50 and 35. 

Ty Mott continued his strong season with 21 carries for 158 yards and a 44-yard touchdown. 

On the defensive side of the ball, Peyton Yasses led the team with 13 tackles while Dieterle had five tackles with two sacks, one forced fumble, and two fumble recoveries. Mott and Ty Kornow both came away with interceptions. 

For the third-straight game, the OAE defense held the opposing offense out of the end zone. Weedsports lone score came on a 60-yard kickoff return by Hunter Morgan for a touchdown to open the second half. Jake Maloof led the Warriors with 87 yards on 13 carries.  

This has been an unbelievably successful season for the OAE team. The team overcame adversity with the switch to eight-man, learning to apply everything they have done in 11-man and apply it to this new opportunity. The team is 8-0 on the season, League Champions, Section V Champions, and NY Upstate Champions. 

Photos by Cindy Cassada .

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Colton Dillion, #2

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Gage Dieterle

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Ty Mott

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MVP Gage Dieterle

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