Local Matters

Recent comments

Community Sponsors

Alzheimer's Association

August 10, 2022 - 2:15pm
posted by Press Release in news, Alzheimer's Association, Caregivers.

Press Release

BUFFALO, N.Y. (August 10, 2022) — The Western New York Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association will hold two free events at the Genesee County Office for the Aging in Batavia for people caring for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia.

On Tuesday, August 23, there will be a free educational program, “Managing Money: A Caregiver’s Guide to Finances,” held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Genesee County Office for the Aging at 2 Bank Street in Batavia. The program will feature tips for managing someone else’s finances, how to prepare for future care costs and the benefits of early planning. Participants are asked to register at tinyurl.com/BataviaMM.

On Thursday, August 25, there will be a Caregiver Resource Fair, also at the Office of the Aging, from 2 to 4 p.m. The Caregiver Resource Fair will offer information about the free community resources available to people living with dementia and their caregivers, such as support groups, educational programs and care consultations. Residents may attend anytime between 2 and 4 p.m.; free on-site respite for loved ones will be available. Registration is not required but recommended at bit.ly/CAREGIVERFAIR.

These free programs are supported in part by grants from the U.S. Administration for Community Living - Department of Health and Human Services and the New York State Department of Health, respectively.  

To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, call the 24/7 Alzheimer’s Association Helpline at 800.272.3900 or visit alz.org.

 

September 23, 2021 - 12:25pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Batavia Downs, Alzheimer's Association, batavia, news.

alzheimer_presentation-01.jpg

Press release:

Western Region Off-Track Betting (WROTB) President and CEO Henry Wojtaszek was joined by Batavia Downs employees to present the Alzheimer’s Association with a $2,000 check to support Western New York patients and their families.

“We could not be prouder of the team at Batavia Downs. As we’ve made our way through the pandemic, we understand now more than ever the need to support our neighbors any way we can,” Wojtaszek said. “We look forward to working with the Alzheimer’s Association and supporting their amazing work for years to come.”

Funds were collected earlier this summer at Batavia Downs' “Rockin the Downs” concert series. Local food vendors donated a portion of their sales on Batavia Downs grounds back to support the regional charitable causes.

Lynn Westcott, Director of Corporate Relations for the Alzheimer’s Association said, “We are very grateful for this partnership and donation. Batavia Downs recognizes the challenges so many people face because of this disease, and they have stepped up to ensure that free, crucial care and support services are available to residents of Genesee County who are living with Alzheimer's disease and other dementia, and their care partners. Through consultations, education classes, a 24/7 Helpline (1-800-272-3900), early-stage programs, and support groups, the Alzheimer's Association WNY Chapter strives to make a difficult time a little easier to manage.”

State Assemblyman Jeff Gallahan, who is on the State’s Committee on Aging, added; “Alzheimer’s disease is a terrible disease that effects nearly two-thirds of all dementia cases and countless families. The Alzheimer’s Association is the leader in global Alzheimer’s support and research.  I share in their vision to have a world without Alzheimer’s and dementia, but without proper funding, that vision cannot come to fruition. Thank you to Western Region OTB for their generous donation to the Alzheimer’s Association for their continued research.”

Batavia Downs and Western Region Off-Track Betting (WROTB) runs a year-round fundraising program to support local charities. In 2021 alone, WROTB has distributed more than $50,000 in various forms, including stay and play certificates, cash sponsorships, merchandise, and tickets.

Batavia Downs also partnered with Genesee County to host a vaccination drive earlier this year where they raffled off a signed Thurman Thomas Bills Jersey, passes to the concerts, and coupons to any of the restaurants at Batavia Downs.

“We’ve always looked for creative approaches to partnerships with charities and worthy causes,” Wojtaszek said. “We encourage anyone who thinks we might be able to play a positive role in helping achieve their mission to reach out to our team to see how we can help.”

Submitted photo: From left, Lynn Westcott – Director of Corporate Relations for Alzheimer’s Association of WNY, WROTB President and CEO Henry Wojtaszek, Connie Czworka, Batavia Downs receptionist and organizer of community outreach efforts.

September 1, 2021 - 12:45pm

catherine_johnston_alz_walk_photo.png

Press release:

The Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is excitedly planning to stage the annual Genesee-Wyoming counties Walk to End Alzheimer’s® in a new location—Dwyer Stadium at 252B State Street in Batavia. All in-person events will implement safety protocols including physical distancing, contactless registration, hand sanitizing stations and more. Masks are welcome and will be available on-site. We will continue to closely monitor Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local guidelines to ensure Walk events adhere to recommendations and are safe for attendees. For those who prefer to participate by walking from home, around their neighbors or on a favorite trail, they can still engage in many Walk-day experiences through the Walk website and mobile app. Information about the app is available in the Walk Participation Center when participants register at alz.org/WNYwalk.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s® is critical to the Chapter’s efforts to provide care and support for all impacted by dementia across Genesee and Wyoming counties, as well as Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara and Orleans counties. Money raised by Walk participants ensures the Chapter can continue to provide free education programs, support groups, respite training services, a 24/7 Helpline, research and more.

Among those who will be participating in the Dwyer Stadium walk on Saturday, September 25, 2021 is Catherine Johnston. The Stafford resident leads the Sweet Memories walk team. “I began walking for Alzheimer's the second or third year that the walk was held in Batavia. It was right around the time my step-father was having symptoms of dementia, “said Catherine. “I needed help and I found other people who had loved one's they were trying to take care of while holding down a job, a home and their parent’s home, too. I knew I was in the right place.” Catherine found the free education programs offered by the WNY Chapter very helpful when she was providing care for her loved ones and today, she walks in memory of her stepfather Valentine and her Uncle Donald, both of whom lost their battle with dementia. So far, Catherine has raised $2,250 toward her goal of $3,000.

A key feature of the Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the Promise Garden ceremony, a mission-focused experience that symbolizes the fight against the disease with colorful pinwheel flowers. The flowers come in four colors, which represent a connection to the disease: blue is for those living with dementia, yellow signifies a care partner, purple honors those lost to the disease and orange illustrates support for our fight to end Alzheimer’s. 

There are no fees to attend, but as this event is the major means of support for the non-profit Alzheimer’s Association, fundraising is strongly encouraged and incentives are offered for meeting specific goals, including the 2021 Walk to End Alzheimer’s purple t-shirt. Free registration is quick and easy at alz.org/WNY. Once registered, participants have access to the online participant center from which they can share their efforts and progress on social media, create personal fundraising emails, share photos or videos of the reasons they are walking and more.

For additional information and to inquire about corporate sponsorship, please call Lynn Westcott during traditional business hours at 716.440.4251 or send an email to [email protected].

June 1, 2021 - 8:00am
posted by Press Release in news, COVID-19, Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's.

Press release:

With COVID-19 vaccines becoming more prevalent and a return to public activities, many Americans are looking forward to resuming their lives and returning to normal. This June, during Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is encouraging residents to make brain health an important part of their return to normal. 

“The past year has been extremely challenging for most Americans,” said WNY Chapter Executive Director Jill Horner. “Chronic stress, like that experienced during the pandemic, can impact memory, mood and anxiety. As local residents begin to return to normal, we encourage them to make brain health a priority.”

The WNY Chapter offers these five suggestions to promote brain health and to help residents restore their mental well-being: 

1.     Recommit to Brain-healthy Basics 

Evidence suggests that healthy behaviors took a back seat for many Americans during the pandemic. Gym memberships were put on hiatus, social engagement became more challenging and many Americans swapped out healthful eating for their favorite comfort foods, take-out meals and frequent snacking while working remotely. One study published recently found participants gained nearly 1.5 pounds per month over the past year, on average.

The Alzheimer’s Association — through its U.S. POINTER Study— is examining the role lifestyle interventions, including diet, may play in protecting cognitive function. Right now, many experts agree that people can improve their brain health and reduce the risk of cognitive decline by adopting healthy lifestyle habits, preferably in combination, including: 

  • Exercise regularly— Regular cardiovascular exercise helps increase blood flow to the body and brain, and there is strong evidence that regular physical activity is linked to better memory and thinking. 
  • Maintain a heart-healthy diet— Stick to a meal schedule full of fruits and vegetables to ensure a well-balanced diet. Some evidence suggests a healthful diet is linked to cognitive performance. The Mediterranean and DASH* diets are linked to better cognitive functioning, and help reduce risk of heart disease as well.
  • Get proper sleep— Maintaining a regular, uninterrupted sleep pattern benefits physical and psychological health, and helps clear waste from the brain. Adults should get at least seven hours of sleep each night and try to keep a routine bedtime. 
  • Stay socially and mentally active— Meaningful social engagement may support cognitive health, so stay connected with friends and family. Engage your mind by doing activities that stump you, like completing a jigsaw puzzle or playing strategy games. Or challenge yourself further by learning a new language or musical instrument.

2.     Return to Normal at Your Own Pace

Many Americans are eager for a return to normal life following the pandemic, but others are anxious. In fact, one recent survey found that nearly half of adults (49 percent) report feeling uncomfortable about returning to in-person interactions when the pandemic ends.

For those feeling anxious, the Alzheimer’s Association suggests taking small steps. It may also be important to set boundaries and communicate your preferences to others in your social circles. 

3.     Help Others 

There is evidence to suggest that helping others during the pandemic may not only make you feel better, but it may be good for you as well. Research shows that helping others in a crisis can be an effective way to alleviate stress and anxiety.

One study published during the pandemic found that adults over age 50 who volunteer for about two hours per week have a substantially reduced risk of dying, higher levels of physical activity and an improved sense of well-being.

To help others and yourself during June and throughout the year, volunteer in your community, run errands or deliver meals to a home-bound senior or donate to a favorite cause, such as supporting participants in the Alzheimer’s Association’s The Longest Day event on June 20. 

4.     Unplug and Disconnect

Technology has dominated our daily lives during the pandemic like never before. While technology has kept us connected through COVID-19, it has also created fatigue for many Americans.

Experts warn that excessive stimulation coming from our phones, computers, social media sources and news reports can add to our already heightened anxiety levels. To avoid technology overload, experts advise setting limits on your screen time, avoid carrying your phone everywhere, and disconnecting from digital devices at bedtime. 

5.     Control Your Stress Before it Controls You

In small doses, stress teaches the brain how to respond in healthy ways to the unexpected, inconvenient or unpleasant realities of daily life. Prolonged or repeated stress, however, can wear down and damage the brain, leading to serious health problems including depression, anxiety disorders, memory loss and increased risk for dementia.

Reports indicate that Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers are especially vulnerable to physical and emotional stress. The Alzheimer’s Association offers tips to help manage caregiver stress.

Meditation, exercise, listening to music or returning to a favorite activity you have missed during the pandemic are just some ways to manage stress. Do what works best for you.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has been an overwhelming time for all of us,” Horner said. “It’s important for people to know there are steps we can take to lessen the stress and anxiety we might be feeling. It can be easy to take brain health for granted, but now more than ever, it’s a good idea to make it a priority.”

Currently, the Alzheimer’s Association and representatives from more than 40 countries are working together to study the short- and long-term consequences of COVID-19 on the brain and nervous system in people at different ages, and from different genetic backgrounds.

About Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month

Created by the Alzheimer’s Association in 2014, Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month is dedicated to encouraging a global conversation about the brain and Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia. To learn more about the Alzheimer’s Association, available resources and how you can get involved to support the cause, visit alz.org.

About the Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is a worldwide voluntary health organization dedicated to Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to lead the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia®. Visitalz.orgor call 1-800-272-3900.

*DASH -- acronym for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension -- an eating plan to lower or control high blood pressure. It emphasizes foods that are lower in sodium as well as foods that are rich in potassium, magnesium and calcium — nutrients that help lower blood pressure.

October 13, 2020 - 3:00pm
posted by Press Release in Alzheimer's Association, dementia, news.

From the Alzheimer's Association WNY Chapter:

Judging by the calls received at the Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter office from dementia caregivers, COVID-19 continues to be a major challenge.

It compounds the struggle for care partners already challenged by the demands of providing day-to-day care for someone they love who has Alzheimer's disease or other dementia.

While the association's physical office remains closed to ensure the health and safety of our staff and the public, it continues to provide free resources such as virtual support groups.

The Chapter oversees several monthly caregiver support group meetings in the Genesee County region, which allows dementia caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them from care partners in local area.

These programs generally run an hour in length and are free to attend via telephone or the Zoom video chat application. Additionally, there are no residency or minimum attendance requirements. 

Caregivers looking for guidance, compassion and time away are welcome to join the discussion by phone on the third Thursday of every month at 1 p.m., including these Nov. 19 and Dec. 17. There is also a meeting accessible by phone or Zoom on the third Wednesday at 7 p.m. on these upcoming dates: Oct. 21, Nov. 18 and Dec. 16.

While there are no fees, preregistration is a requirement, by calling 1-800-272-3900 at any time. Online registration is also an option at alz.org/CRF. If you are unfamiliar with the Zoom app, call the Chapter office for a quick and easy practice session at (716) 626-0600, ext. 313.

Genesee County residents also have access to caregiving resources and programs through the Chapter’s partnership with the Genesee County Office for the Aging. To learn more about local caregiver resources, call the county office at (585) 343-1611.

March 31, 2020 - 1:48pm
posted by Billie Owens in COVID-19, news, Alzheimer's Association, dementia, Caregivers.

Press release:

The Alzheimer's Association Western New York Chapter is now offering free, live, virtual programs and services to ensure dementia caregivers, those living with the disease and family and friends have access to vital information.

Across New York, it is estimated there are more than 400,000 individuals living with some type of dementia, with another 1 million+ people providing some kind of care for them.

Their needs for access to help, support and education is ongoing, and to address those needs, the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is offering a number of virtual programs accessible from any location via computer or mobile device.

Below are education programs scheduled for April, plus information on how to access the programs. Confidential care-planning meetings are also ongoing via virtual tools, as are caregiver support group meetings.

Chapter dementia care consultants are planning a number of free online classes for participants to attend from the safety and comfort of their own homes. In the month of April, these education programs will be offered virtually:

Overview of Virtual Programs and Services

  • Friday, April 3 -- 2 p.m.
  • Friday, April 17 - 2 p.m.

Understanding Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

  • Tuesday, April 7 -- noon
  • Tuesday, April 14 -- noon
  • Tuesday, April 21 -- noon
  • Tuesday, April 28 – noon
  • Wednesday, April 29 -- 8 a.m.

Know the 10 Warning Signs

  • Friday, April 10 -- 2 p.m.
  • Friday, April 24 -- 2 p.m.

Effective Communication Strategies

  • Thursday, April 2 -- 6 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 22 -- 8 a.m.
  • Thursday, April 30 -- 6 p.m.

Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behaviors

  • Thursday, April 9 -- 6 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 15 -- 8 a.m.

Legal and Financial Planning for Dementia

  • Wednesday, April 8 -- 8 a.m.
  • Thursday, April 16 – 6 p.m.

Dementia Conversations

  • Thursday, April 23 -- 6 p.m.

Meaningful Activities for Family Caregivers

  • Monday, April 20 -- 1:30 p.m.

To register for any/all of these classes and learn how to access them, visit: bit.ly/WNYeducation or call 1.800.272.3900.

Caregiver support group meeting sare also being offered in a number of ways, including telephone conference calls and webinars. To learn more about taking part in a virtual support group meeting, visit: bit.ly/WNYsupport.

The Association’s around-the-clock Helpline is also available to answer questions about programs and how to access them, address concerns, and discuss other resources. That number is 1-800-272-3900.

Confidential care consultations to discuss care planning, finances, and more will continue to be available via telephone to the Helpline: 1-800-272-3900. Video chats are also possible for these free virtual meetings.

And finally, the Association has a dedicated website to help caregivers whose loved one is at home and those whose loved one is residing in an assisted living facility. That website is: alz.org/COVID19.

March 24, 2020 - 5:19pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's Association, dementia patients, news.

Press release:

While the COVID-19 pandemic threatens the health of millions in this country and around the world, the novel coronavirus presents unique challenges for more than 400,000 New York State residents living with dementia and their care partners.

Most notably, public health strategies aimed at limiting contact with others is nearly impossible for people living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, who rely on family caregivers and others to live their daily lives.

This reality affects these individuals across all settings, including home, adult day services, residential and assisted living facilities and nursing homes. 

To help family caregivers navigate the quickly changing environment, the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is offering additional guidance to families:

  • Free dementia education programs and support groups via the internet. Learn more at communityresourcefinder.org or call 1.800.272.3900.
  • You also have access to prerecorded educational courses available at any time at training.alz.org.
  • Early Stage Social Engagement programs will be available virtually including: Virtual Tour of the Albright Knox; Virtual Art Gallery tours ; Virtual De-stress and Restore Chair Yoga; Virtual Music Jam Session. To register, please call 716-626-0600, ext. 8997, or email  Maggie at [email protected].
  • Care Consultations will be available in several ways: • 24/7 by Phone: 1-800-272-3900 • Live Chat via our website  www.alz.org/help-support/caregiving • Video Call during business hours at (716) 626-0600, ext. 313, to schedule a time that works for you.

Our website offers some tips and tools for home-based caregivers and for those whose loved one is in a facility. That info can be found at alz.org/COVID19.

December 19, 2019 - 11:44am
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's Association, news, batavia, Le Roy, dementia.

Press release:

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter offers a number of free education programs about dementia and support services for those living with dementia and caregivers all across the region and has a program scheduled in Genesee County in January.

Chapter experts will present "Know the 10 Warning Signs" in Batavia on Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 4:30 p.m. The free class, at The Manor House (427 E. Main St.), outlines common changes that may indicate some type of cognitive impairment and lead to early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia.

“This is a great tool for starting a conversation with your doctor about changes you notice,” says WNY Chapter Program Director Rachel Rotach. “We also have resources across Genesee County to help those living with the disease and their care partners to ensure they are living a full life while making plans for the future”.

Preregistration is strongly encouraged by calling the Chapter during traditional business hours at (716) 626-0600, ext. 313, or 24-hours a day, 7-days a week at 800-272-3900

Additionally, the Chapter oversees several monthly caregiver support group meetings across the county, which allow caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them:

  • 3rd Wednesday (Jan. 15) at 7 p.m. – Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St. in Batavia
  • 3rd Thursday (Jan. 16) at 1 p.m. – Genesee County Office for the Aging, 12 Bank St. in Batavia
  • 2nd Monday (Jan. 13) at 2 p.m. – The Greens of Le Roy, 1 West Ave. in Le Roy

Community social programs, or respites, are also available every month in Batavia and Corfu. This program provides relief to those who care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and offers them some time to refresh and recharge, while their loved one is engaged in social activities in a safe environment.

St. James Episcopal Church at 405 E. Main St. in Batavia offers a four-hour program, starting at 10:30 a.m. on the second Monday of every month (Jan. 13). Those interested in this respite should call Barbara King at (585) 343-6802.

First Presbyterian Church of Batavia also offers this free service on the fourth Monday (Jan. 27) from 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. For additional information, please call Mickey Rodak at (585) 455-5940.

And Indian Falls United Methodist Church in Corfu at 7908 Alleghany Road offers a respite program on the third Wednesday (Jan. 15 ) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call Celinda McQuiston at (585) 762-9105.

To learn more about other Alzheimer’s Association programs and services, contact the WNY Chapter office at 800-272-3900. You can also access dementia care programs and resources by calling the Genesee County Office for the Aging at (585) 343-1611.

About the Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

December 6, 2019 - 11:31am
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's Association, news.

Press release:

Visiting with relatives over the holidays may raise questions about the physical and cognitive health of family members.

Although some change in cognitive ability can occur with age, serious memory problems are not a part of normal aging. Recognizing the difference between normal aging and cognitive impairment can help identify when it may be time to see a doctor.  

The Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter expects to see a rise in calls to its 24-hour helpline (800-272-3900) during and after the holiday season when people visit with friends and family whom they may not see as frequently during the year.

“The 10 Warning Signs are a good place to start when trying to decide if you should talk to your doctor about the changes you are noticing in yourself or a loved one,” says Chapter Program Director Rachel Rotach.

There can be other explanations for cognitive impairments, so it is always best to see a physician if any of these 10 warning signs is apparent:

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life: forgetting recently learned information; forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; or relying on memory aids;
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems: changes in the ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers, or trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills;
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks: driving to a familiar location, managing a budget at work or remembering the rules of a favorite game;
  • Confusion with time or place: people with Alzheimer's can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time or forget where they are or how they got there.
  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships: difficulty reading, judging distance and determining color or contrast.
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing: trouble following or joining a conversation or stopping in the middle of a conversation and not being able to continue; repetitive comments; struggles with vocabulary;
  • Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps: putting things in unusual places, such as ice cream in the medicine cabinet or being unable to trace steps to find a misplaced object and accusing someone of taking it;
  • Decreased or poor judgment: changes in judgment or decision-making, especially when dealing with money; inattention to personal care and grooming;
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities: refraining from favorite hobbies, social activities, work projects or sports;
  • Changes in mood and personality: confusion, suspicion, depression, fear, anxiety or irritability may occur without apparent cause. 

The WNY Chapter offers a free "Know the 10 Warning Signs" education program several times every month across the region.

In Genesee County, you can attend this class on Tuesday, Jan. 21 at The Manor House, located at 427 E. Main St. in the City of Batavia. The class begins at 4:30 p.m. but just prior at 4:15 p.m. a free, light meal of soup is available for attendees.

To attend, please register by calling the Alzheimer's Association Western New York Chapter, toll free at 1-800-272-3900 or (716) 626-0600.

*****************

Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias is an important step in getting appropriate treatment, care and support services.

The Alzheimer’s Association website lists resources for those with dementia, their families, and their caregivers (alz.org/WNY) and help is always available via the toll-free Helpline phone number: 800-272-3900. That number is available 24/7 to answer questions and provide information about local resources for those living with dementia and their care partners.

About the Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

About the Western New York Chapter
The local Chapter provides programs, services and other resources for those living with dementia, their care partners, healthcare professionals and others across eight counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming. You can learn more by calling (716) 626-0600 during traditional business hours, or 24/7 at 800-272-3900 or alz.org/WNY.

September 21, 2019 - 11:27am
posted by James Burns in batavia, news, Alzheimer's Association, Premier Genesee.

untitled_shoot-3963.jpg

Under ideal weather conditions, as part of a national campaign, there was a walk this morning in Batavia to end Alzheimer’s.

The event started and ended at Premier Genesee Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, which hosted the event. 

Individuals and families came together to rally around friends and relatives effected by the disease. They wore colorful shirts and carried flowers that signified how Alzheimer’s affected them or their loved ones. Purple, the predominate color, signified they had lost a loved one to the disease. 

Proceeds from the walk go to the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter so they can continue to provide supportive services and education at no cost, while raising awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and Association services all across the Genesee Valley.

untitled_shoot-3956.jpg

untitled_shoot-3945.jpg

untitled_shoot-3917.jpg

untitled_shoot-3908.jpg

untitled_shoot-3931.jpg

untitled_shoot-3983.jpg

untitled_shoot-8094.jpg

August 14, 2019 - 2:32pm

From the Alzheimer's Association of WNY:

The Batavia Walk to End Alzheimer’s will take place on Saturday, Sept. 21.

It is part of the global Walk to End Alzheimer’s -- the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research.

On Saturday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to noon, approximately 750 individuals from the greater Genesee County area — family members, caregivers, employers, friends and persons living with dementia — will honor all those impacted by the disease and fight for a world without Alzheimer’s.

Premier Genesee Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation at 278 Bank St. in Batavia is hosting the event, which begins and ends there.

Proceeds from the walk ensure the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter can continue to provide supportive services and education at no cost, while raising awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and Association services all across the Genesee Valley.

While there is no fee to register or participate, we strongly encourage participants to fundraise to contribute to the cause and the Chapter offers a number of tools and materials to help with fundraising.

The Center’s outdoor park offers space to enjoy snacks and refreshments, visit with local vendors, and buy basket and 50/50 raffle tickets, while the roughly two-mile walk route offers a pleasant stroll through a lovely neighborhood.

Register today at alz.org/Walk and start fundraising to earn terrific incentives, including the 2019 purple Walk T-shirt.

Please call (716) 626-0600 or 800-272-3900 with any questions.

April 30, 2019 - 2:39pm
posted by Billie Owens in Alzheimer's Association, aging, dementia, news, Announcements.

Press release:

Memory loss is not a normal part of aging, and it could be an indication of something more serious such as disease that is causing dementia symptoms. The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter offers a free education program that discusses the basics about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, which will be offered in Genesee County in May.

"Know the 10 Warning Signs" will be presented at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, May 7. Genesee County Aging Services at 2 Bank St. is hosting the presentation. 

On Monday, May 13, Chapter dementia experts will be in Batavia to present "Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behaviors." This program is aimed at helping caregivers decode behavioral messages, identify common behavior triggers and strategize to overcome these challenges. The free class is set for 1 p.m. in the NYS Veterans Home at 220 Richmond Ave. 

Registration is required for both programs by calling the Chapter office during traditional business hours at (716) 626-0600, ext. 313, or 24-hours a day, 7 days a week at 800-272-3900.

A special joint enrichment social program is set for Thursday, May 30 at the Jello-O Gallery Museum in Le Roy. This free activity is for people living with dementia and their care partner and highlights living well with a dementia diagnosis by offering the opportunity to socialize, learn and have fun with others facing similar circumstances. Registration is required by calling Lauren Ashburn or Shelby Edgerly at (716) 626-0600.

Additionally, the Chapter oversees several monthly caregiver support group meetings across the county, which allow caregivers to connect with others facing similar challenges and hear advice for overcoming them:

  • 3rd Wednesday (May 15) at 7 p.m. – Richmond Memorial Library, 19 Ross St. in Batavia
  • 3rd Thursday (May 16) at 1 p.m. – Genesee County Office for the Aging, 12 Bank St. in Batavia
  • 2nd Monday (May 13) at 2 p.m. – The Greens of Le Roy, 1 West Ave. in Le Roy

Community social programs, or respites, are also available every month in Batavia and Corfu. This program provides relief to those who care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and offers them some time to refresh and recharge, while their loved one is engaged in social activities in a safe environment.

First Presbyterian Church of Batavia offers this free service on the fourth Monday (May 27) from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For additional information, please call Mickey Rodak at (585) 455-5940.

Indian Falls United Methodist Church at 7908 Alleghany Road, Corfu, offers a respite program on the third Wednesday (May 15) from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call Celinda McQuiston at (585) 762-9105. 

To learn more about other Alzheimer’s Association programs and services, contact the WNY Chapter office at 800-272-3900.

You can also access dementia care programs and resources by calling the Genesee County Office for the Aging at (585) 343-1611.

November 21, 2018 - 12:55pm

Press release:

Holiday visits to older loved ones may raise questions about a person’s physical and cognitive health, especially if it’s been a while since the last visit. Although some change in cognitive ability can occur with age, memory problems that impact daily living are not a part of typical aging.

Recognizing the difference between typical aging and potentially more serious problems can help identify when it may be time to see a doctor.

The Alzheimer’s Association® Western New York Chapter is an excellent resource for those with questions about typical age-related memory lapses and indications of more serious cognitive impairment.

The Chapter offers free educational programs that include a discussion of the 10 Warning Signs:

  • memory loss that disrupts daily life -- forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events;
  • challenges in planning or solving problems, such as trouble following a familiar recipe; 
  • difficulty completing familiar tasks, such as a budget or playing a favorite game;
  • confusion with time or place, including losing track of the seasons;
  • trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships, including trouble reading or recognizing the face in the mirror;
  • new problems with words in speaking or writing, including repetitive conversations;
  • misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps, or accusing others of stealing items they can’t find;
  • decreased or poor judgment, such as giving large amounts of money to telemarketers;
  • withdrawal from work or social activities, or lack of interest in sports;
  • changes in mood and personality that can include confusion, suspicion, depression, fear or anxiety.

Every year around the 2017 Thanksgiving holiday, the Alzheimer’s Association sees increases in calls to its 24-hour Helpline (800.272.3900), as people visit with friends and family they may not see as frequently during the year. That phone line is always staffed by trained experts, who provide confidential consultations around-the-clock, andthis holiday season will be no different.

Those with questions or concerns about memory lapses or behavioral changes in their loved ones will find compassionate people who can answer questions or listen to concerns at any time of the day or night through the long holiday weekend. Information can also be found online at www.alz.org/wny.

Experts from the WNY Chapter are also available to arrange private, in-person consultations via that same toll-free number: 800.272.3900.

About the Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer's Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

About the Western New York Chapter
The local Chapter provides programs, services and other resources for those living with dementia, their care partners, healthcare professionals and the public across eight counties: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming. You can learn more by calling (716) 626.0600 during traditional business hours or 24/7 at 1.800.272.3900 or visiting online at alz.org/WNY

September 22, 2018 - 6:48pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Alzheimer's Association, batavia, Walk to End Alzheimer's, news.

alzheimerswalk2018.jpg

The Alzheimer’s Association, WNY Chapter, sponsored today's Walk to End Alzheimers in Batavia. The route started and ended at Premier Genesee Rehabilitation and Nursing Center on Bank Street. Hundreds of people turned out, though this morning organizers did not have an exact count of participants.

alzheimerswalk2018-2.jpg

alzheimerswalk2018-3.jpg

alzheimerswalk2018-4.jpg

alzheimerswalk2018-5.jpg

September 18, 2018 - 1:47pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, Announcements, batavia, Le Roy, Alzheimer's Association.

Press release:

People who really listen to others are gifted with compassion and empathy, and the Alzheimer’s Association Western New York is looking for volunteers willing to share those gifts!

Every month, the Association’s Western New York Chapter oversees close to three dozen support groups for caregivers of individuals with dementia, including four such meetings across Genesee County.

These groups are led by Chapter-trained facilitators who provide a vital service by encouraging caregivers to share their concerns, find support among their peers and hear advice about providing the best care they can from others in a similar situation.

The Chapter is looking to provide free training for volunteers to lead monthly support group meetings in Batavia and Le Roy. If you are interested in sharing your time in a meaningful, rewarding and vital way, please call Marie Baun at the WNY Chapter between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday Through Friday at (716) 626-0600, ext. 8994. She can also be reached via email at [email protected].

About the Alzheimer’s Association WNY

 The Alzheimer’s Association is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization for care, support and research of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The elimination of the disease through advancements in research, providing and enhancing care and support for all impacted, and reducing the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health define  the organization’s mission.

The WNY Chapter is located at 2805 Wehrle Drive, Suite 6, in Williamsville and offers a 24/7 Helpline for services and support at 1.800.272.3900. The Association also offers online resources, including secure sites for caregivers, training for professional care partners and information about local support services at alz.org/WNY.

June 27, 2018 - 1:37pm
posted by Maria Pericozzi in picnic in the park, Alzheimer's Association, news, batavia.

unnamed_1.jpg

(Submitted photo.)

Carmelina Pellegrino, an 8-year-old who lives in Batavia, has dedicated her time this summer making colorful rubber band bracelets to sell at Picnic at the Park this year, with all the proceeds being donated to Alzheimer’s Research.

A booth will be set up outside of their house at 150 State St., across from Centennial Park during Picnic at the Park on July 4th, with purple balloons and tablecloths, which is the color of Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness.

“Hopefully she can get some donations,” Angelina said.

Carmelina is going into fourth grade at John Kennedy Intermediate School in Batavia. Her older sister, Mikalina, 13, started making the bracelets a few years ago for the annual walk to end Alzheimer’s, sold the bracelets to family members, and the proceeds were donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Angelina said the family participates in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s every year in memory of family members who passed away from the disease.

“Mikalina got busy with school and Carmelina started making the bracelets not too long ago,” Angelina said.

Carmelina said she likes making the bracelets and it’s a nice idea for a good cause.

“She suggested that the day of Picnic in the Park, to set up a booth and sell the bracelets,” Angelina said.

As of Tuesday, Carmelina has made 108 bracelets, and hopes to make even more by next Wednesday.

“She is still going,” Angelina said.

Carmelina has made many types of bracelets, including bangle bracelets, and threaded bracelets with charms.

Angelina has been helping Carmelina with the bracelets.

“It’s something fun we can do together,” Angelina said. “We pop on some music or put on the TV and listen as were making them.”

Angelina is hoping people will learn about the bracelets and donate to the cause.

“It’s just an awful disease and we’re hoping one day that there will be a cure,” Angelina said. “That’s why we try to raise awareness. When you talk about cancer and heart disease, Alzheimer’s gets put on the back burner.”

September 23, 2017 - 3:39pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Alzheimer's Association, batavia, news.

alzheimerswalk2017.jpg

The Alzheimer's Association held its annual Walk to End Alzheimer's through Batavia today.

alzheimerswalk2017-2.jpg

alzheimerswalk2017-3.jpg

alzheimerswalk2017-4.jpg

alzheimerswalk2017-5.jpg

May 10, 2017 - 3:24pm
posted by Billie Owens in Announcements, Alzheimer's Association.

The Alzheimer’s Association is proud to announce the appointment of its new executive director for the Western New York Chapter, Jill Horner. A proven executive and compelling communicator, Horner brings her infectious energy and innovative thought leadership to execute a vision of “a world without Alzheimer’s.”

Horner will direct the organization’s strategy implementation across the chapter’s eight-county service region, by working with the national Alzheimer’s Association, community and state leaders, local corporations, families, and foundations to fight the disease. Programs and services are offered in various locations in Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming counties.

“The association is delighted to welcome Jill. We look forward to benefiting from her perspective and strategic leadership,” said Christopher Smith, Alzheimer’s Association NYS regional director. “In Jill, we found a leader who we are confident will not only continue to advance the forward progress of the organization on behalf of Western New York families through education, research and fundraising initiatives, but also effectively champion our advocacy efforts with state and community leaders.”

Prior to her appointment, Horner delivered outstanding results as chief operating officer for 17 years at Joe Slade White & Co., where she oversaw the day to day operations for the national political advertising agency. These political races included high profile politicians, policy and ballot initiatives, corporations, and non-profits across the country. Her team at JSW was one of the most respected groups of people in the nation, acclaimed for their work with advertising strategies and winning several annual awards.

Horner is also a highly experienced executive leader with a successful track record of directing nonprofits in community outreach, fundraising, marketing, budget operations, and productivity improvement. Before joining JSW, Horner held director of development positions at Daemen College and People Inc., where she creatively turned around community awareness and significantly increased annual and capital funding for both nonprofit organizations.

“I am honored to lead such an important and vital cause alongside my passionate colleagues, teams, families and volunteers,” Horner said. “Together we can and will continue to make a difference towards a world without Alzheimer’s.”

Horner earned a master's degree in Higher Education, Advancement/Development from Ohio University, and a Bachelor of Science in Education, cum laude, also from Ohio University. She and her husband, Rich, are raising their two children in Clarence.

September 26, 2015 - 1:10pm
posted by Howard B. Owens in Alzheimer's Association, batavia.

alzwalksept262015.jpg

alzwalksept262015-2.jpg

alzwalksept262015-3.jpg

Subscribe to The Batavian - Local Matters

Copyright © 2008-2022 The Batavian. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
 

blue button

News Break